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In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing pla...

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Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

Billboard
In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest m

SEPTEMBER

23, 1967

SEVENTY-THIRD YEAR



75 CENTS



The

Billboard Cut

Product Broadways Vanishing Breed: Some Areas Disk Companies as Angels

in

denials.

RCA

The denials came from tained that tlie label was in no

Japanese Pub, Acuff-Rose in Sound Merger —

Acuff-Rosc Publications is working out an Agreement with Shinko Music PPiiblishing Co.. Ltd.. Tokyo, for 'creation of a "new sound" in both the United States and Japanese markets.

Bob McClusky, general manager for Acuff-Rose. and Shoichi Kusann owner nf Shinko, said ihiS new. expanded relationship would allow utilization of typi-

Japanese instrumentation in today's sound, and also bring aboiii production of current .\—icritan chart record for dis-

cal

tribution in Japan. In essence,

it

would work

like

Japanese soundtracks, fcaluring the Shamisan and koto, would be instrumented in Tokyo by Shinko, which is the agent for Acuff-Rose-Far East. Shinko this:

-

MIKE GROSS

By

By LEE ZHITO

NEW YORK—RCA

Victor's position in the mono LP price picture came into sharper focus last week against a backdrop of dealer discount offerings in some markets intermingled with heated

NASHVILLE

Newsweekly

Mono

Victor Is

International

Music-Record

Victor executives here

who main-

way contemplating any change in its mono price schedule, but was sticking to its recently established wholesale price which is on par with stereo. In the face of these denials,

NEW YORK—The

1967-1968 Broadway musi-

season marks the

end of the record com-

cal

RCA

Victor, general manager of of the seven musicals scheduled this upcoming theater year. Four five were previously committed. are Records Artists United and

which has

the

Noticeably absent so far this season are Columbia Records, which has long been a moving force in record company participation in Broadway productions, and Capitol Records, which has

markets

eral

which

amounted

20 per cent and more cut the wholesale price. Victor's distributors operate on to a

RCA

in

autonomous

an

basis,

and

offer able to are product at a price level they feel is required in their specific markets. Distributor customers in various parts of the country reported they are still able to ac-

therefore

SPECIAL FEATURES

PlayTape See Center Section

By

same In

mono

for

as

for

Supraphon Pages S-1 to S-12

stereo.

Los Angeles, customers of

RCA Victor Distributing Corp., an RCA distributor, received a

MONY Anniversary

formal announcement signed by Dave Pearce, manager of the

RCA

See Coin Section

Record Depart(Conlinued on page 10)

Victor

much more

the

past

few

selectivity in the selec-

shows even though they are getting much to select from.

He

says that his

Of

the five

shows

cially involved, three

in which Victor is finanare the offshoot of earlier

(Continued on page 10)

Teen Rock Bands Get Coddled and Clubbed

RCA

Victor mono prodquire uct at the old price. Some in other markets said that their now charged the distributor

shows during

Racusin, the record companies

company's prime interest in a Broadway musical is as producer of the original cast album rather than as an investor. However, he admits that there are still instances where the producer acfinancial support from a record tively seeks company.

only other

companies involved.

and informal discount were being made by Victor distributors in sev-

are exercising tion of

Records

formal

to

more material

five

production out of Victor's

ABC

in

investing

According

for

offerings

RCA

been years.

"mad scramble" for rights to original cast albums. The "mad scramble" description was made by Norman Racusin, vice-president and panies'

RAY BRACK

CHICAGO



A

new

By asso-

ciation of club and ballroom owners in Minneapolis-St. Paul has been charged with setting up three classes of teen bands and fixing fees S25 to S50 under what the groups had been getting.

The

formed three (Continued on page 14)

association,

LORAINE AI.TERMAN

DETROIT



The

Detroit Federation of Musicians, Local 5, is making a strong move to unionize the teen-age rock 'n' roll bands and all the teen nightclubs that use live music here. The move was spearheaded by Jim Cassily, the Federation's former business agent. Dennis Day has taken over the job. The Federation acted when it found that many teen club own(Continued on page 14)

(Continued on page 57)

BB's Forum: Brass Galore

IstMontreux

NEW YORK—

Disk Awards MONTREUX, The Montreux

year's This Billboard Tape CARtridge Forum is rapidly shaping up as a summit conference. cartridge Of the total number of registrants to date, some 25 per cent hold the position of president of their respective companies, with an additional 20 per cent in the capacity of vice-president, director or manager. The Forum will bring together these executives from phases of the industry all

Switzerland—

Festival will inMontreux Inter-

augurate the national Record Award next year. The awards, which will be selected by an international panel of specialist record critics, will be given the three outstanding classical records of the

without breakdown by year category. The festival will institute a similar jazz award in 1969.

The

first classical

be given on Sept.

awards will 1968 dur-

11,

ing intermission of a concert of rOrchestrc de la Suisse Roman-

(Conlimtcd on page 62)

from record manufacturers and who "plays pretty lor llie people" with the newest member of the Seeburg family of coinobvious Louis can tell the It's phonographs. Phono-Jet is going to be playing pretty for people all over Louis

Prima,

Phono-Jet.

operated

the world.

Broadway."

His latest

United Artists

hit

album

is

titled

"On

(Advertisement

Acta Records' hot new group from the Windy City, the American Breed, after running up a string of chart singles, now launches its first album. 'The American Breed," Acta A (3)8002. Packed with their hits plus their unique treatments of standards, it's sure to blow up a storm of sales Advertisement! activity.

tape rack

cartridge

tailers.

will

Hilton-

duplicators

to

merchandiser and reThe two day sessions

be held Oct.

the 16-17. at

New York

(Continued on page 10)

<

(AdvertlMmtntl

MIINTZ MS TODAY^S

MUSIC MJVnUSTRr UAPM»Emi\G MUlVrZ STEREO-PAK not atfihatvd with

Vm

INC.

Munta TV

7715 Upnsmoro Avenue Nnys, CaUfornia (213) 989-5000

They're playing

our soul...

everywhere UniEDION

NINASIMONE "(YOU'LL)

GOTO HELL' "LONELY TEARDROPS" #9284

#9286

RCA VICTORS)

@The most trusted

name

in

sound ^•^g<^

U.

Hold War Date V. Bootleggers

to Distribute Immediate in Mfrs. fo

CBS

2d Outside Label Deal

S. in

NEW YORK—CBS

NEW YORK—At

Records

will handle the marketing and releasing of Britain's Immediate Records in the U. S. The deal was concluded by Clive J. Davis, vice-president and gen-

CBS

eral

manager

and and

Andrew Loog Oldham Tony Calder, owners of

of

grows of record companies seekmg to take part in the drive. At presstime, those set for the meeting will be Mort Nas-

least eight

manufacturers,

record

list

picking

ball thrown by B. T. Puppy, are about to form a major offensive to stop boot-

up the

operations. This springs action

legging certed

Records,

atir,

metropolitan

New York

MGM

Records president; music attorney

Hofer,

Walter

con-

from

representing

Morton

Capitol;

Miller, counsel for Kapp Records; Paul Marshall, attorney representing Bell Records and

initiating suits against 15

Puppy

and

Island record retailers on charges they sold counterfeit re-

Immediate. This marks the second outside label that CBS has taken on this year for marketing and

Long

sued Tuesday, Sept. 5 (Billboard,

vice-president Decca Yamin, and an attorney; Ralph Seltzer,

distribution. The first outside label to come into the CBS

Sept.

assistant

fold ords.

16).

Michael

in

rise

British

Mil. to

NEW YORK—The

J. DAVIS (center), vice-president and general manager of CBS Records, concludes deal with Andrew Loog Oldham (left) and Tony Calder for handling of their Immediate label in U. S.

CLIVE

record industry is attributed to policy of emphasizing and its

encouraging forts

and

of

the

creative

artists,

its

writers.

The

ef-

producers main-

label

tains a small self-contained staff of writers and producers who provide material for the recordImmediate also focuses ing. much of its attention on artists who write, arrange and produce

Members of AFM Phono-

graph Records Special Payments Fund distributed approximately $3 million to IS.OiOO members of the American Federation o£ Musicians in 1967. This marks distribution the third annual made by the Fund. The first in 1965 was for $720,0(X), and the

Laurie

Deal Firm

in

With UK —

NEW YORK

Laurie Records has concluded its first U. S. distribution deal with a foreign label. It's with President Records of England, a division of the American Metropolitan International Holding Co. The parent firm is on the Canadian Stock Exchange. President was the first British label to turn to independent distributors (the others distribute through the majors). First

record

to

be

released

under the new arrangement is "I Can't Find a Girl to Love

Me," with the Equals. The second release, scheduled for Oct. is by a new group, Guardians 1 ,

of the RaintKJW. President has been on the British charts with the Casinos, Symbols, Alvin Cash, Felice Taylor and Otis Clay, and on the German charts with the Equals.



NEW YORK error

in

"And Me Mahon" was .

as a classical

.

.

"I'm

listed

album

to an Cameo's

Ed Mc-

incorrectly under the

Four-Star Album Reviews in week's issue. The correct category for the album is pop four stars. last

second in 1966 amounted to $2 million.

The Fund is made

payments

Columbia Records.

it

by

the

AFM

Herman President Kenin expressed the expectation that continued prosperity of the record industry coupled with vigilance by the union over collection procedures would result in increasing payments by the Fund to musicians in future years.

iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

COLLEGE, FOX PUB.

PROGRAM

CORAL GABLES,

Publishing Co. will continue to assist a University of Miami undergraduate in his final semester as an internee in the firm's New York office under a co-operative agreement, in its

second year.

The program is part of a mumerchandising course under Department of TheoryComposition and Music Education. Robert Rogel, the first internee under the program, was graduated in June and received a permanent berth at Fox from the

Frederick Fox, president of the

company.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1967, BILLBOARD

Commenting on

agree-

the

ment, Davis said, "The Immediate label has been managed with much imagination

and

number

of successful records has been very unsuual. In a short perod of time the label has been consistently on the English charts,

and

creativity.

I

rection

Tony

know

Its

that under the di-

of Andy Oldham and Calder, Immediate Rec-

ords will soon establish itself as an important souce of hit product in this country."

Ampex Adds Cortina Line To Cassettes NEW YORK —The Institute

language tapes

Cortina will

be

added lo Ampex Stereo Tape's (AST) 1968 line of cassette product in agreement between Bob Livsey, president of the Cortina

Language Studies and AST manager Don Hall. Initial product will be issued in Spanish, French, German and for

Institute

AST

currently duplicating and distributing Cortina's tapes in 8-track and open reel configurations in Spanish and French. Each of the cassettes, as do the 8-track and open reel tapes, will be packaged with a printed text insert. First Cortina cassettes will be available in January. Italian.

is

Fla.—

Sam Fox

now

own material. "Itchycoo Park," for example, was written and produced by Steve Marriand Ronnie Lane, who are members of the Small Faces.

London Brochure Plugging Series NEW YORK



An

eight-

page color brochure, "A World of Wonderful Music," is being distributed by London Records in connection with a merchandising campaign for its new International Series release. In-

an African Mass from Kenya in the Global Heritage Series. Other albums are from Czechoslovakia, Rumania, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Israel, Argentina, Germany, Hungary, Portucluded

gal

is

and Spain.

in

television for president in charge of radio and

&

Norman, Craig

Kummel. He had late

campaign adviser for the F. Kennedy.

ROSHKIND

HamUton

been a

also

President John

*

* Chris

of

Broadcasting

AlSW ^ilH

their

ott

from

derived to

record industry under 1964 colagreements with the union. Under the agreements each record manufacturer bases its contribution on its sales of records, and each Federation who made phonomusician graph records receives an individual payment in the proportion that his annual scale wages from recordings bears to the total scale wages paid by the industry to all union musicians. lective

sic

Due

transmission,

Sam

Records'

firm of Irvui L. the industrial public relations the Atnencaii Straus Associates, news director of National Broadcasting Co., news editor of the Co. and assistant to the vice-

,

,

Record Trade's Fund Gives

$3

Motown

Roshkind has been named a vice-president Motown, Inc. Roshkind had been a partner

in

Immediate's

to

Executive Turntable

the throughout market Under these arrangement Records are reImmediate leased on the Immediate label

world.

Stones.

Atlantic-Atco

and Berry Gordy, president Walter Yetnikoff, representing

Puppy, the

president of B. T.

ord

owner, Andrew Loog Oldham, who also produces the Rolling

^

,

initial

with CBS is the culmination of Immediate Records' plan to establish releasing outlets in every rec-

ing charts, making it the label's fastest-breaking single to date. Since its establishment two has Immediate years ago, emerged as the first successful independent record operation in England. Immediate's roster of producers includes Mick Jagger, Mike Hurst, Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane and the label's co-

the

is-

No date has been set for the meeting, but each day, according to Seymour Barash,

was Lou Adler's Ode Rec-

The arrangement

each country. The debut single in the U. S. for Immediate will be 'itchycoo Park," by the Small Faces. The disk has been out only a few weeks in England and is already Mo. 4 on the best-sell-

Summonses were

cordings.

group;

resigned as Dot's executive vice-president.

was R»»dy Woods She had been with the company 17 years and Wood launched Hamilton chief assistant. As a tribute to her, held the top Records as his budget line. Miss Hamilton, who Wood from Tennessee. post, had come to California with sales ijy

held Dave Pell rejoins Liberty as a&r administrator, a post the past year bick Peirce, now Dot's general manager, during was with UNI Records.

Pell

*

*

*

ABC

Records, has been at divisions, in relations for all

David Berger, vice-president

named

handle

to

all

artist

ABC

department. addition to his duties in the international promotion tor Wally Roker has been hired to do r&b national promotion and its subsidiaries. He formerly did national .

.

.

ABC

for Scepter-Wand.

*

*

*

Bob Bohanan, former general manager at Hanna-Barbera division, working Records, has joined Philco-Ford's new record Prior to under Vince Novak, new products planning manager. sales executive with his two years with H-B, Bohanan was a out of the firm s working been Liberty Records. Bohanan has new hip the for distribution Philadelphia offices in developing Rick Frio, recently national pocket single record medium. joined Philco-Ford s sales manager with Imperial Records, has region. Western the in sales handle new record division to .

*

*

.

.

*

He Paul Kresh is the new vice-president for Spoken Arts. hand been editor of American Judaism and co-ordinator series,

of

"Legacy

Broadcasting.

He

the award-winning television of Light," on Westinghouse wrote and directed the weekly

radio series, "Adventures in Judaism." Kresh has written a novel, magazine articles, short radio stories, a libretto for an opera, poetry and"

and

television

scripts.

.

.

.

KRESH

Mercury Record

home entertainment products division Oliver Tyler, has named its first national service manager. He is a veteran of 12 years in the electronics repair field.

Corp.'s

*

*

for ^e Jerry Seabolt has been named as promotion man He Mercury label in Chicago, working out of Chicago Merrcc. comes from Bell Records, where 'he was Midwest proinotion photogIn Dallas, Evans Reynolds, a former sports director rapher for The Houston Post, has been named promotion manPhilips, ager at the Merrec branch. He'll handle the Mercury, Smash, Fontana arid' Limelight labels.

* * * Bob Halley has been named to the Mercury ar staff in New He had been an arranger, songwriter, performer and Merrec, He is married to singer Cathy Carroll. New York Mercury outlet, has named Charles Morrison as promotion manager for Philips, Smash and Fontana. He succeeds Merrec with been had Morrison Joe Senkiewicz, who left recently. York.

producer.

.

.

had been

as a Brooklyn salesman. Before joining Merrec, he with Malverne and Portem Distributors.

*

Fred

Munao

has been named general manager of Real

Good

Johnny Productions. He had been a performer and a writer. Mnsso has been named national promotion manager for White Whale Records. He had been a Decca West Coast salesman, promotion director for Liberty and national promotion director Benno Bemt named for the Imperial World Pacific group. general manager of the Pacific Mercury Division of Warwick Electronics, responsible for product engineering. .

.

.

.

.

.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WEEK IN

Jack Bregman

Billboard 71

PRICING PRECEDENTS Allied Radio catalog.

an

galore

An

found

to be

Dead

Is

AUDIO RETAILING new

the

in

analysis.

Mount

died in

CLASSICAL

62

BRITTEN OPERA. London Records issues first recording of Benjamin Britten's "Midsummer Night's Dream" with the composer conducting.

COIN MACHINE NEWS MUSIC OPERATORS OF NEW YORK (MONYI old.

The

history

73 is

30 years

a

drive to

Among a

57 music industry has launched by the drink.

legalize liquor

INTERNATIONAL

64

AND WARNER

DECCA. PYE conventions

BROS.-REPRISE held

sales

London.

in

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS TALE OF TWO CITIES— Detroit

14

RADIO

32

TIGHT PLAYLISTS on record labels to

Sin

to

promotion

countries this

fit

12 14 8

34

CHARTS Bast-Sallinq

Classical

Best-Selling

Jazz

Best-Selling

R&B Records

LP's

Rscords

Broakout Albums Breakout Singles

63 ....12 34 39

ciety's

will

be launched

fall.

67 60 58

24 61 31

40

Sam Taylor, Jerry Lewin, Hy Ross and Bernie Pollack are the committee members this year. William D. Litlleford, president of Billboard Publications, Inc., will be playing as Fred Waring's guest.

Album Reviews

miimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii

.

.

91M PittmM

.Back Cover, 39. 42. 44. 61 IB Reviews

B.

Coak,

New York

Ackannan Rir Brack Aaron Starnfiald Paul

TOM

Coda 213,

PHOSttCTION HUNAOER: Bob

Music Editor: Paul Ackerman Associalc Music Editor: Mike Gross Chill Copy Editor. Robert Sobal

Virgil

Classified

Circulation Manager:

News

II.

Chicago, Midwest Editor: Ray Brack Washington Bureau Chief: Mildred Hall Hollywood, W. Coast News: Eliot Tiegel

Newt

Nashville

Milton Gorbulcw

0.

45214

I.

BRANCH OFFICII IBS W.

60601, Area Coda 3l2, CE a-«aia

CHICAGO,

Editor: BUI Williami

III.

Randolph

Supervisor, Print Services:

Bill

London W.l. Phone; 4B6-5971

St.,

Rue Fontaine, Paris 9 me, France.

Pnone: S2e.«0.l9

UNITID

KINGDOM:

Cable:

Billboard

Graeme

Andrews,

Published weekly.

7 Welbeck

St.,

London

W.l.

Phone:

466-5971

107, Toronto 10 Padova 154, Milano, Italy. Phone; 2B3.23-tO

Via

New York, N. Y., and at additional mailing Biliooard Publications, Inc. The company also publishes Record Business, High Fidelity, American Artist, Modem Ptiotograptiy, Postmaster, please send Form 3579 to Billboard 19

Second
offices. Copyright 1967 by Retailer, Vend, Amusement Inc.,

2160 Patterson

£0

time other

first all

ur

St.,

Cincinnati,

iSCMPl

Ohio 45214.

Vol.

79

He. IB

CIgremont House,

Monument

in

LOS ANGELES



Deol Monu-

ment has acquired publishing

label

inchides

John Klemmer Quartet. Introduced on the Chess label were Pig Meat Markham and Charlie Chalmers. New Checker items are by Sammy Bryant, the Dorothy Bewt Gospel Singers, Harold Smith and the Majestic Choir,

international representation for

Claremont House Music, owned by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant of Nashville. The new pact provides Monument with 10 catalogs either owned or represented by the label.

.

the Soul Stirrers, Rev. O. M. Hoover, the Meditation Singers, the Violinaires, Ernest Fraiilclin

and Choir, Rev. C. L. Franklin and Stevie Hawkins.

Up

Gen-

100 chart in four weeks, now 2, is sweeping across five other Billboard charts. This week "Billie Joe" is No. 34 in country singles. No. 14 on the easy listening chart and No. 39 on the r&b singles listing. In each instance, the song is

moving up, receiving bullets on the country and r&b charts. The

upward

sharp

signify

bullets

movement. "Billie

the

album

charts.

The

albiun

landed on the Top LP's chart at No. 60. This week it is at No. 9. On the country album chart, "Billie Joe" is No. 24 with a bullet.

In addition, three cover versions are making strong bids at the singles market. An instru-

mental of "Billie Joe" by the Kingpins on Atco jumped onto Hot 100 this week at No. and Margie Singleton's counis climbing up that singles chart. This week it is No. 50 with a bullet. "Billie Joethe 77,

try reading

given a jazz treatment in Ray Bryant's Cadet release. Bryant No. 128 on the Bubbling is

Is

Joe"

is

also scoring

on

Under

listing.

Boston as Talent Hub, Goal Of Producer-Artist Lorber BOSTON—Alan

Lorber,

dependent producer and

in-

MGM

recording artist, is attempting to develop Boston as a talent center, with help from

MGM.

Lorber,

York,

who

this

is

based

local

in

New

week concluded a

Amphion management and

deal with the

Co., a talent

development operation. Amphion will represent Lorber in

duced by Lorber and will record for MGM. According to Lorber, Boston's college student population of more than 200,000, plus the large number of clubs, make the city a good bet for talent. Also, Boston was the birthplace of the modem folk movement, is strong on jazz festivals, and has a strong clas-

Boston. An Amphion act, the Ultimate Spinach, will be pro-

sical

Fontana Track of 'Love' Goes Over

are

music

The wide tastes

50,000

NEW YORK

in



in

tradition.

variety of musical said Lorber,

Boston,

conducive to the develop-

ment of Lorber artists

talent. is

and

in Boston writers.

signing

Sales

The Fontana Records soundtrack of 'To Sir With Love" has gone past 50,000 in sales and may become the company's largest selling soundtrack, said Charles Fach, director of recorded product.

Paul said the additional five

TIchester Rd., Apt.

FRANCI: Mike Hennessey, 16 bis Rue Fontaine, Paris 9 ma, France. Phone; S26.a0.t9 JAPAN; Kanil Suiuki/Japan, Trade Service, Ltd., 2-1-40S. 3 Chomo Oltuka, Bunkya-ku, Totsyo MIIKO; Kevin Keiiaghan, Varsovia 54, Mexico City, Mexico. Phone; 125002 Sujscription rates payable In advance. One year, 120 In U. S. A. (except Alaska, Hawaii end Puerto Rico) and Canada, or S45 by airmail. Rates in oHier foreign countries on request. Subscribrrs when requesting change of address should give old as wall as new address.

Merchandising Week.

the

London

CANADA: Kit Morgan, 22 ITALT; Germano Ruscltto,

Publications,

show marked

in the 8 to 10 time based on the Nielsen rat-

ings.

DIRECTOR: Andre de Vekey, 7 Welbeck bis

day's

programs

specials would most likely be produced with Metromedia and would stretch from this fall to June 1968. The videotaped programs would be televised both in New York ad Los Angeles. Acts would again include rock, folk-rock, blues and gospel. Organic Realtity will not take on a record producing arm, he said.

Ave.,

WASNINSTON, D. C. 20005, 733 ISIh St., N.W. Woodward Bldg., Rm. 533. Area Code 202, 393-2580

Courtney

more mu-

for five

specials similar to the one he produced on Monday (4) over WNEW-TV from 8 to 10 p.m. According to Paul, Mon-

LOS ANOIIIS, Calif. 90069. 9000 Sunset Code 213, 273-1555

Billboard London

Cefale:

IVROPEAN IDITOR; Mike Hennessey, 16

concerts and p(»sibly later, films. Paul is negotiating with cials,

NASNVllU, Tenn. 37203, 110 2ltt Room 710. Area Code 615, 244-1B36

INTERNATIONAL OFFICES

imOfEAN

Organic Reality Productions aimed at providing TV spe-

slot

Blvd. Area

SPECIAt PRtJiaS DIVISION Oaneral Manager; Andrew J. Ctida Mgr. Record Market Rescarcti; Andy Tomko Director, Reviews and Charts; Don Ovaiss Manager, Charts: Laurie Schenker

is

a pop mtisic special led

Editor;

Sachs

J.

The

sic

SUiSCalPTlON FUIFILKUNT Send Form 3579 to 2160 Patterson SI., Cincinnati,

IDITORIU OFFICES

Paul,

niteries

tions.

Metromedia

Mgr.; John O'Neill

— Steve

New York

Scene and The Scene East, is forming a production company called Organic Reality Produc-

Phillips

CIRCUUTION SAUS, NEW TORK

Audio, Coin Machine Editor: Ray Brack

NEW YORK owner of

CUSSIFIED ADS, CHICAM

Ametl

CMICACO

Cincinnati, Exec.

PL 7-2)00

COIN MACNINI ADV., CNICAM Coin Machine Adv. Mgr.; Richard Wilson

Radio-TV Prooranuning; Claude R. Hall Clauical Editor: Fred KIrby SpKlal Issues Editor: Aaron Slamliald

Wm.

Ar»

Ron Carpenter Advertising Manager: Ron Carpenter Promotion Director: Geraldine Piatt Midwest Music Sales: Richard Wilson West Coast Gen. Mgr.: Peter Heine Nashville Gen. Mgr.; Robt. L. Kendall

OiPAtTMENT EDITMI. NIW

I.

Product'n Co.

Offici

10036.

Director of Sales:

mcvTivi unmi!

11.

V.

N.

CINIRAL ADVIRTlllNC OFFICES

IN CHIIF: lei Zhito

ART DIHCTOR:

ni-44M

Td.: Arti CiJa Stl.

St.,

Owner

Paul Forming

4ni4

0.

Clncliiaatl,

II.,

NEW YORK — Bobbie

try's "Ode to Billie Joe," probably the most talked about song of the year, is converting that

No.

Professional Music Men's annual golf outing at Fred Waring's Shawnee Inn, Shawnee-on-the-Delaware, Shawnee, Pa., will be held Wednesday and Thursday (20-21).

Cadet

'Billie Joe' Stirring

\NARING GOLF

— The

the

packages by Ahmed Jamal, Ray Bryant Trio, the new Ramsey Lewis Trio, Bobby Bryant Sextet, the Soulful Strings and the

6-Chart Musical Storm

SEPT. 20-21

RECORD REVIEWS .

Ntw rork, BIlieOARD NEWrO«K

Cable:

IBITOH

an

on



and airplay on the broadest scope. The song, which made it to the top on the Hot

NEW YORK

Publishxl Wnkir by lllbaar< raMlcatlMl, Ik.

nilLISHER; H»l

mil-

been

more than of the Socommittee.

treastirer

membership

Nitery

iBITOmXl OFFICI: 165 W. 46th

$4.5

for

had

director for

Singles

..61

Billboard

for

By BOB BIJRNS

NEW

ORLEANS Chess Producing Corp. President Leonard Chess told distributors here last week that by January 1968, the entire Chess, Checker and Cadet line will be available in compatible stereo. The meeting introduced 18 new albums to distributor executives who came in from as far as Charlotte, N. C. The meeting was one of four distributor gatherings staged by Chess in San Francisco, Chicago, Washington and here. The new product introduced

talk into sales

the

Hit! of the World Hot Country Albums Hot Country Singles Hot 100 New Album Releases Top 40 Easy Listening Top LP's

FEATURES

Vo« JoK

"'Vou'll

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiimi

68

A MULTIMILLION-DOLLAR

....

Lie,"

"Holiday

30 years and served as chair-

TAPE CARtridge

Jati Beat Musical Instruments Steele Marltet Quotations

a

May

last

Bregman

man and

.23

28

Films

ASCAP

'n' roll stations are forcing to advertise their product.

THE FOUR TOPS custom-tailor their repertoire to requirement of the nightclub.

in

Tell

Know,"

and "'Vou Make Me Feel So Young." The company had contracts with such composers as Harry Warren, Mack Gordon, David Rose, Steve Allen and Count Basic. Bregman, Vocco and Conn was sold to 20th Century-Fox

rock

buy time

TALENT

by PlayT^pe

more than 3,000

Strings,"

lion.

knocks down union initiation fees for teen combos; Minneapolis club owners impose a limit on young talent fees.

the

copyrights owned by the firm were "Winter Wonderland," It's

Never

COUNTRY THE NASHVILLE

Hospital

on Sunday (10) of heart disease. He was 68. He formed the ptiblishing firm with the late Rocco Vocco and Chester Conn in 1937.

fun reading.

is

68

at

MX. VERNON, N. Y.—Jack Bregman, a partner in Bregman, Vocco and Conn, Inc., Vernon

Compatible Stereo in Chess' Future for '68

Radio spots and a campaign of in-store displays and other dealer sales aids have been up to coincide with opening of the movie in neighstepped

borhood theaters. The fitai stars Sidney Poitier and features Lulu and the British group Mindbenders. Other movie-based albums slated for release by the firm include the soundtrack "The Young Girls of Rochefort" on Philips Records and a Roger Miller Smash Records LP based on the movie "Waterhole No. 3." These, coupled with the Smash Records soundtrack of "Hell's Angels on Wheels" constitute a major effort by the Mercury-Philips firm in the film field. Previous soundtrack hits have included "Umbrellas of Cherbourg" and "The Sandpiper."

PSYCHEDELIC-STYLE book cover devised by Capitol Records plugging the Beatles, Beach Boys, Lou Rawls, the Seekers and other Capitol artists, is now being shipped to dealers. One million covers, which also will be used as counter merchandisers and dealer posters, were printed. In conjunction with the big print Capitol has tied in with Honda, making recipients of the book covers eligible to- win a Honda 50 motorcycle.

SEPTEMBER

23, 1967, BILLBOAJtD

-

England's queen of song... about to become America's first swinging lady.

Anita singing the world

smash

that

won

her a British Silver Disc (English Top Ten for ten weeks) and the title of Great Britain's

No.

1

Girl

Singer—

Just

Loving

Youi (written

by Tom "Georgy

Girl"

Springfield and Produced

by Mike Margolis)

Butterfly With Coloured Wings Who

and What everyone's tuned to today. On Columbia Records!^

The

4-44236

Cue ^^^^^^^^^^^

to Salute

ASCAP Od. 15

RECORDS

BluesWayE3 ITSATIE^El ISWHEBE

NEW YORK— Fifteen posers

Cue

Kornheiser: Writer Trade's Foundation

com-

will be spotlighted in magazine's "Salute to at Philharmonic Hall

ASCAP" on Oct.

15.

Composers taking

part will be Richard Rodgers, Rudolf FrimI, Johnny Mercer, Vernon Duke, Ned Washington, Hal David and Burt Bacharach, Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake, Jerry Herman, Morton Gould, Wolfie Gilbert, J. Fred Coots, Sammy Fain and Harry Ruby. A supper-dance honoring Stan-

Adams, ASCAP president, follow the Esplanade at Philharmonic Hall. Proceeds of the evening will be donated to the New York Cultural Foundation, Inc. Tickets can be purchased through Cue, Philharmonic Hall or the committee's ley

will

impulse! RECORDS

H

headquarters at 1290 Avenue of the Americas, Suite 2836.

ABC RECORDS and

its affiliated labels are sporting new logos, above. Only label logo unchanged is BluesWay, which came into being this year and which was the first label to carry the new look.

Merc Names

iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^

David-Martin

COPYRIGHT ENTRIES BACK Premium Rep ON UP-TEMPO FOR 1967 CHICAGO —

Mercury Rec-

WASHINGTON—

The Copyright Office has announced that the unusual decline in copyrights registered during fiscal 1966 has reversed, and the 1967 fiscal report will show the registrations climbing again.

Music

1967 are 79,291. up 3.2 per cent 1966, when they numbered 76,805. (Billboard, Aug. 5.

of fiscal

registrations for fiscal

1966.)

The Copyright

Office is a little worried for fear the late issuance of the annual report for fiscal 1966, which brought out figures nearly one year old, may have misled some as to the current

which is up. advance of the annual fiscal year report, the Copyright Office has announced that figures available for fiscal 1967. which ended June 30, show registrations hitting an all-time high of 294,406. This is 2.6 per cent increase over fiscal 1966, when registrations were 286.666. and below the previous fiscal year. Some of registry trend,

In

the registration dip for that year is attributed registration fees were raised in fiscal 1966.

to

the

fact

that

ord Corp. has named the David-Martin Corp. its exclusive representative in specialty field.

premium

the

David-Martin will represent the five labels in the corporalion, its 4, 8-track and cassette tapes and home entertainment products. David-Martin will sell the entire premium user field, concentrating on sales incentive and dealer load programs in the trading stamp area. They will also develop the consumer contest prize area. "We're aware of the $4 bilannual gross in the premium field in making our first lion

exclusive

negotiations with

the

David-Martin Corp., said execuVice-President Irwin H.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW^

tive

CLUB REVIEW

Steinberg.

"We

magnitude

of

that

feel

our

the

corporate

product necessitates a sales and

Vale Unveils Rich Delivery In 22-Song Pleaser at Copa NEW YORK— Jerry

Vale's

sixth opening at the Copacabana Thursday (14) displayed his rich, vibrant and distinct delivery.

Vale,

who

records for

Columbia, opened with an uptempo "This Is My Song" and kept the pace going throughout his 22-song repertoire. He rarely

Cap. Puts Out- Call For 80 Emioyees LOS ANGELES—Capitol

is

80 employees for its forthcoming Thousand Oaks,

seeking Calif,

center.

needed

record

club

The

first

fulfilment positions

correspondents to to club membegin

are

work with mail

Training programs at the end of the month.

bers.

The company

plans to hire supervisory personnel from the initial group of employees who will be trained in Newbury Park. Once the facility is opened in the suburb of north Los Angeles, will it hire computer-associated specialists.

stopped to introduce a song or say anything to the capacity crowd until toward the close of the show.

As long as Vale continues singing the type of songs in his present repertoire, he will be a perennial favorite. His cup of tea is the uptempo and emotional easy listening tunes, movie and Broadway productions. Vale was at home as he dished out full-toned renditions of "Have You Looked Into Your Heart" and "Aldi La," both among his hits, "Love Me With All Your Heart," "Born Free," "My Cup Runneth Over" and his current single, "Time Alone Will Tell." Preceding Vale was United Artists' comedian Pal Cooper.

Cooper did

a fair job.

He

HANK FOX

Cle-0 Incorporated CLEVELAND—Clc-O Records, a partnership, has been incorporated, with John S. Scalena, president, and Frank J. Diorio, secretary-treasurer. publishing company, Jo-Re Music, Inc., has also been set up with Diorio as president and

A

Gets Master NEW YORK— Bell Records

Bell

master by the Night Shift, a Canadian group, from Tom Dc Cillis and Ed has acquired

Leipzig of

a

T & E

Associates,

independent producers.

Eliran Disk Push NEW YORK — Ron Eliran, top

Scatcna as secretary-treasurer. The corporation has recently signed the Naturals, a Cleveland area group, who have a record, "Baby You Got It."

pop

Israeli

moting

singer,

Coral Records'

his

"Sharm means of a

TV

Carson show on NBC. On Friday (8) he was on the Joe Franklin program on WORthe

Eliran recent

conference

appeared at mid-year Lancaster, Pa. His

also

NARM

at

performance scored strongly.

Merc,

in

3

Indie

Prod'tion Deals



PHILADELPHIA

Mer-

cury Records this week signed three deals with local independent producers.

Ken Gamble and Leon Huff have

been

Jerry

Butler

signed for

produce

to

the

This is the view of Phil Kornheiser, who retired five years ago after a notable caprofessional manager during the vaudeville, band and radio eras. Phil was professional manager for Leo Feist from 1 910 to 1929. "I picked the songs the writers submitted and arranged to have the tunes tested. did this by getting artists to perform the material at vaudeville houses. This was one of the more usual forms of exploitation, and our men reer as a

We

label.

A

was recorded while Butwas appearing in the Apollo

Theater, New York. released shortly.

The

Mul-Tee-Bag,

will

It

a

be

local

group, will makes it debut on Billy Jackson is the producer. He will work with arranger Joe Kenzetti. Also, local producer Sonny Cassella will record the Magic Mushrooms here for Mercury.

Smash.

the

business.

"It

glamour and romance so than today and I often took my two boys, Sidney and Bob, to catch the vaudeville shows and see the acts had



more

backstage," Kornheiser said.

Today, Sidney is general promanager of Edwin H.

fessional

Morris Music and Bob tional

is naAtlantic

of

chief

sales

Records.

"A

publisher

those days would set his entire schedule early in the season, say in June; he knew what his plug songs were, and with minor changes in



—he

would

adhere

to

this

A

schedule. song, of course, had a relatively longer life then," Kornheiser added.

Knew

the Greats

artists

During his career Kornheiser headed up the professional department of Edward B. Marks

Phil continued: "A songplugger in those days was just that many could sing and play piano, and a publisher would send teams of pluggers to beer gardens and vaudeville theaters to promote his copyrights. To do a good job required a certain amount of

with many of the great of the Golden Age. Whiteincluded Paul Rudv Vallee, Sophie Tucker. Belle Baker, Ruth Etting. Eddie Cantor and count-

were

always

soliciting

backstage."

.

.

.

the music man had to really believe in the merit of his material; and when he did, he would fight for his song until it was established. Of course, publishers and professional men had more control of their prodfaith;

uct

Had Glamour music

good

Music, following his years with

man.

too.

Doors Strikes Gold

On

Debut Album

Its

NEW YORK

— The

"The Doors" on Elektra, has been awarded the RIAA Gold Record for sales in excess of $1,000,000. The group is the only one this year to win a Gold Record with their first album. Doors' second album. "Strange Days," will be released album.

late

Shayne in ASCAP NEW YORK— In the Top 60 review of Ray Bryant's "Ode to Billie Joe" on the Cadet label, society credit for Shayne Music was inadvertently credto BMI. Shayne is affilithe

ited

ated with

ASCAP.

Brimhall in England NEW YORK — John Brimhall, sic

noted children's piano educator,

England

to

hit,

lionaire."

on

a

mu-

trip

to

do promotional work Walt Disney mu"The Happiest Mil-

for the latest sical

is

others.

less

Carroll,

Earl

noted producer of

girlie

the

shows,

was one of Kornheiser's songpluggers when he started out. Kornheiser was also a good friend of Fred Rose, the noted songwriter who wrote "Red Hot Mama" for Sophie Tucker

embraced

eventually



the

setting up country music field the firm of Acuff-Rosc with Acuff.

Roy

"Today," music

"the

come

said, Kornheiser has be-

business

computerized;

it

is

no

longer a personal business. But

who

writer,

is

es-sentially

person, will always be the foundation of the entire in-

an

artistic

We always developed and publishers today should be aware of the importance of this facet of pubdustry. writers,

lishing."

Cutlas Expanding

month.

this

close associa-

a

tion

the

Doors'

He had

Feist.

artists

These man,

and

those days."

in

A

single ler

loved

really

sin-

El Sheikh," by string of appearances. On Tuesday (12) F.liran appeared on the Johnny

TV.

AND MRS. MILDRED KORNHEISER

a song there is something universal and basic about it ... as long as the people love it, it is a great song, and you must not put it down. This is as true today as it was in the early years of Tin Pan Alley." hit,

pro-

is

gle,

dealt

mainly with ethnic jokes about Italians.

promotion force working primarily on this growing industry and its potential."

PHIL

NEW YORK—"If

becomes a

On Three NEW YORK Cutlas

felder's

expanding

Fronts

— Pete LengsProductions is product and

facilities,

Lengsfelder's artists roster. oriented firm recently closed exclusive deals with arranger Larry Lucia, Cozy Cole and two r&b groups, the Speed Limit and the Dynamites. its

r&b

Master to Murbo NEW YORK — Murbo Records,

from is

a

division

disk

Music,

has

EMI

in

acquired

of Bourne a master disk

Denmark. The

coupling of "Answer

Me

My Love" and "Lady of Spain," by Kidd and the Donkey.

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BlUBOARp^erial

A femme

First:

Aretha's 3rd Goldie

NEW YORK — Aretha

lit

Row

Franklin has

set a precedent for female sin^ng acts. The Record Industry Association of America (RIAA) has just certified her third million-sellinj? single in a

row, regarded as a

first for gal

enter-

tainers. The new gold deck is "Baby, Love You," which follows "I Never Loved A Man" and "Respect" on the road paved with gold. She has now racked up four gold I

records since she joined Atlantic early year. In addition to the three gold records for her first Atlantic LP,

this

Never Loved A Man," which has sold over $1,000,000 worth of albums. The second Aretha Franklin album on Atlantic, "Aretha Arrives," is also heading for the $1,000,000 sales mark, the label reports. This album, issued *'I

in Aug., is selling, the company adds, at a faster rate than "I Never Loved A Man," and should hit the gold record figure in the near future. Her sales success on Atlantic has led to scores of stories about her in consumer publications including Jet,

Newsweek, Crawdaddy and Sepia and

many

teen magazines.

lATLAIMTICl

NOW... The Magnificent

ARETHA FRANKLIN Abates History Again!

(you make

me feel like)

A NATURAL

WOMAN Published by Screen

Gems— Columbia

Music,

Inc.

(BMI)

This

Or

Atlantic i^2441 DG70-18R-9EP1 Personal Management:

TED WHITE, 1721

Field St,

Detroit,

Michigan

Premier Puts

Market Quotations A* of Noon Th unday, September

14,

WHk-i Wtik-i Wtlk'i

Wiik'i Vel.

NAMI

lew

Hlih

Admiral

American Broadcasting

IM'i

In

Plant on Sale

1947

Hlgk

lew

Clese

Net ChiRft

38

20^4

1444

27 '/4

23

24V4

+ 2Vi

102

72>/4

479

79>/4

74

771/4

22^4

922

391/4

37

38H

7H

3'/4

7H

3>/4

7Vi

+ IV4 +1 + % + 1%

Automatic Retailer Aitoc.

74'/4

5iy4

123

73'/i

75>/4

UH

70^4

+4V»

Avnel

y6V,

1333

44H

39H

41^1

+ 2%

2V,

1311

Amp«x

W/t 30W

Audio Devicei Automafic Rodio

Camto Parkwoy

42'/,

Canteen Corp.

28

CBS Columbia

Pic.

Coniolidaled

El«c.

Oiiney, Wolt

27 V4

4}'/.

24

24'/4

37Vi

39'/4

+ 2V,

24'/4

Unchg,

21'/e

3SS

76%

391/1

1334

42%

41

42>/4

+

V.

33Vi

204

31

49M

50

+

V,

5TA

36H

489

44H

42

44 Vi

+ 1V,

73

233

93

93 '/4

95

+ 1%

10«

24'/4

23H J/4

iV,

3Vi

492

SH

3'/i

iVt

- V4

Electric

113%

82'/2

1094

113'/i

IIOV1

111%

Western

uv. 35H

iW,

2348

34

30H

31V,

+ 1V, -1%

17'/.

397

33H

33Vi 58 '/i

34%

+

General

&

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119

384

52'/,

EMI Gulf

21H

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MCA

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Metromedia

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RCA Seeburg Tronf Amer.

120

-2V4

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21

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281/1

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+2 + H

32H

44 Vi 33 '/4

43%

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379

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12% 26%

12% 28%

Pickwick

7V.

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5%

3V,

5%

12%

14V4

3Vi

3V4

3V4

lOV,

10%

BVi

lOV,

11

Notional Mercantile

lOVa

Meanwhile, in a public announcement, Philip Landwehr, of Premier, said he knows of no specific reason for the recent rise of Premier common stock, which is traded over the counter.

Landwehr pointed out that company has financial prob-

the

lems and that

it

loss

fiscal

the

for

will report a net

which

year

ended July 31.

He

added,

however, that, litigation, Premier has the option to buy about 72,000 shares of Cameo/Parkway stock at an average price of less than $5 a share. Cameo stock is selling on the American Stock Exchange for about $41 a share.

pending

However, to

up to the court decide whether Premier will is

it

be able to exercise

this option.

Act-ion Record

New

t-o

Facility



DENVER Earl Woolf and E. Edward Hacker, owners of Action Records Distributing Co., have announced that con-

8

13V4

Tenno Corp.

+ 1V4

1947

13V4

Uor

attempt to raise working capital.

president

Gef »4,

7V4

Jubilee Ind.

MilU Muiic

%

C1«H

7

11%

V,



- Vi

48%

47

7OV4

-

+

Week'i

Ai of Noon Thuridoy, September

Ent.

V4

iJVt

Zenith

Jet

-

+ 5Ve + 1%

Wurlitier

Merco

Unchg.

1J5V4

WB

OVER THE COUNTER*

Vi

NEW YORK

Premier Albums is negotiating to sell its pressing plant, according to reliable sources. The move is an

struction of a new facility will be started as soon as engineering and design plans are completed.

The new facility will replace the firm's present headquarters 1622 Federal Boulevard. The new site is in the Montbello In-

•Oyer.the oppoied to "oiked"). nor the oiked pricei of untitled leturltiet repreunt ocluol

Neither the Irontoclioni.

Rather, they ore a guide to the range within which Iheie lecuritiet could hove been lold or bought ot the time of compilation.

the obove quololioni compiled for tlllboord by Merrill lynch. Pierce, Fenner & Inc., member of the New York Stock Exchange ond oil principol iloc> •xchanget. Smith,

dustrial Park, east of Stapleton International Airport, a 510acre development by Bennett & Kahnweiler.

second-class airmail cate-

cial

fourth-class

cents the

first

6

each

cents

rates

of

16

two pounds and additional,

for

books, records, films and educational materials.

Present rate

10 cents for the

first

is

pound,

5 cents each additional. Final vote of approval by the full

on

conmiittee

these

and

other rates voted during recent

weeks of executive mark-up of a subcommittee bill was expected

sumed

soon, as hearings reafter the Labor Day re-

cess.

The

full

proved

its

committee also apsubcommittee's idea

gory for business and other papers, on a space available basis but added a proviso that the postmaster general can authorize the new service only when it docs not impede regular airmail category for second-class class mail. Rate for the new airmail category for second-class publications would be an additional 50 per cent of normal



charges. If current committee thinking prevails, first-class letter rate

go to 6 cents, post cards to 5 cents. Airmail letters will be 10 cents, airmail cards 8 Air Parcel Post rates will be computed at one-half pound will

cents.

intervals

on parcels up

to five pounds, at Postmaster's request,

replacing current one-pound interval.

Boja Set ATLANTA

Up

in

Go.



Baja Records, label, has been formed by Barrow, operator of Records Heavens 1, 2, and 3 here, and Jan Cox, writer-producer. The new label is part of Baja Recording Co., which also includes Twin Jay Miisic Publishers and Southern Sound Re-

r&b Bill

cording Studios. Baja's first release by Chuck Wilder, "If Love Is

Not

Answer" b/w "Where Go From Here," was

the

Expansion NEW YORK

Do We

released last month.

NEW YORK—

The key to a commercially successful jazz record today is rhythm "that a listener can relate to, even dance to," believes Esmond Edwards, newly appointed jazz a&r manager for Records. Edwards may not have invented this thought, but he certainly capitalized on it at Cadet Records where he produced such jazz-pop hits as "The In Crowd" and "Hang On Sloopy," by the Ramsey Lewis Trio. Dyed-in-the-wool jazz rec-

MGM

ords

he

are felt.

not lagging "They're

in

sales,

certainly

Second-class

trade

tion is paid in whole or in part, as under current law.

committee

will

also

decide whether or not to uphold subcommittee recommendation to charge newspaper and trade papers at first, third or fourth-class rates advertising, bills





Vanguard its 23d

Street studio to include 8-track

equipment. Vanguard owns and operates its recording studios and the facility measures 40 by 100 feet and is 25 feet high. The studio can accommodate from a 50-piece orchestra to a rock combo.

MGM,

Verve Picks Chips in PhiUy PHILADELPHLA Distributing

handle duct in

-- Chips been set to and Verve pro-

has

MGM this

Chips

area.

a

is

subsidiary

of

Cameo-Parkway Records, Raymond Rosen Co., Philadelphia, the current Philadelphia distributor for and Verve.

is

MGM

The agreement between Chips and the two labels also to market Cameo product across the country distributors. Chips will be setting up a sales promotion force

calls for

MGM

MGM distributing efforts

for

its

in

Philadelphia.

A

tween Kama Sutra Records, York, and Tower Records, here, has resulted in the Roar-

New

ing Records, a

new

single label.

Kama Sutra will produce for artists on Roaring Records, and Tower will distribute the line through its regular distriall

on inserts of and receipts.

been small."

COAST ASCAP MEETING SET BEVERLY

HILLS, Calif.— West Coast Membership Meeting is slated for Wednesday (27) at

ASCAP's the ley

Beverly

semi-annual

Hills

Hotel.

Stan-

Adams, Society president, and other ASCAP officials will

give reports to the membership.

It's

always

a limited audi-

ence product, he said, but added that this type of record could not be compared to those by jazz artists who're "doing something to reach a mass audience. It's only in comparison to pop and rock product that jazz

may seem

sales

small."

Edwards, however, aims

his

jazz product, to a large extent, at the pop field "to appeal to a larger audience than just the jazz fan." Johnny Hodges session recently, for example, included a version of "Don'l Sleep in the Subway." Not every cut on an album has to be of this nature, he said, pointing to a suite being written by Oliver Nelson for a Jazz Interactions sessions. The suite is

A

"The Jazzhattan

Suite." Kenny Burrell and Cal Tjader sessions are also due under the direction of Edwards.

As

part

of

its

jazz

action,

MGM/Verve

Records plans campaigns to coincide bookings and record re-

publicity

with leases.

First

be "Free-

releases will

Crescendo Prunes Catalog; Has 8 Acts



LOS ANGELES Crescendo Records has pruned its catalog and now has eight active working pop acts. The Seeds are the small

label's

top drawer, with and Lyrics new

the Challengers active groups.

The company has also begun Mike Ciirb's Carole

Duke City Set Up

— Bee

President

ALBUQUERQUE, new

label,

has

been

Tommy

Duke

N.

M.—

City Records,

formed here with Bee as president, and a&r director. release Is "Mr. Sweet

Neil Murray, First Stuff," by to

Fe-Fi-Four Plus 2, be followed by the Sheltons

and other pop groups.

Distri-

butors for the Southwest will be

named shortly. The complex

includes Tommy Bee Productions, Stinger Booking Agency and a BMI publishing firm, Stinger Music Co.

distributing

Records, with the gles:

Bob

first

two

sin-

"Ode to Billy Joe" by the Summers orchestra and

"Big Little Bit of Sound" by Incense and Pepparments.

Monument Adds Aznavour Rights LOS ANGELES ment

aiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiHi

have

they

but

small,

butorship.

dom," b/w "Please Take My Life," by the PeepI; and "Love Got in the Way,'' b/w "Dusty Said Good-Bye," by Jay Traynor and the Peter Blaise Voices.

publica-

tions serving entertainment and industries of "performing arts" would no longer be exempt from revealing circulation, methods of distribution and whether the circula-

full

New Label Via KS, Tower Pact production-distribution contract be-

in

More

show business

The

MCM's Edwards Has Key —Jazz That Communicates

HOLLYWOOD

Vanguard Studios Records has expanded

0. Committe Gives Go Ahead on Rote Increases WASHINGTON — The of a P.

House Post Office Committee has tentatively decided on spe-

lead guitarist of the Lovin' Spoonful, signs a longterm exclusive contract with Buddah Records. Looking on are, from left, Bob Cavallo, YanovsKy's personal manager; Charles Koppelman and Don Rubin of Koppelman-Rubln Associates; Neil Bogart, general manager of Kama Sutra and Buddah Records, and Art Kass, controller of Kama Sutra Productions.

at

bid

House

ZAL YANOVSKY, former

Invincible Contest

NEW YORK



Invincible

Records is ruiming a Miss Invincible contest, with the winner receiving a recording contract with the company and a chance to model. Applicants will be judged on beauty and talent. All applications must be postmarked by midnight, Nov. 23. They should be sent to the company, c/o Jeannie Wheaton, at the Morningside Hotel in New York,

has

distribution

secured rights



to

Monu-

additional to Charles

Aznavour product. Previously, Aznavour product from Pathe-Marconi was only distrlb^

the

uted domestically.

Monument will also handle the vocalist in Australia, Japan, South Africa, Philippines. Thailand, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia and the Dominican Republic. All product is newly recorded versions of tunes previously recorded by the singer.

Two Aznavour

LP's are forth-

coming.

SEPTEMBER

23, 1967, BtUIOAliD.

serial..

THEY'RE

CHANGING PARTNERS.

BUT

NOT THEIR TUNE LOVERS WORLD'

'OF THE

UNITE K-13813

a/?/GHTB2J

^" Record (forn.etW^°

THE

VOGUES ON

YOUR CHARTS

NOW

ON MOM!

MGM RECORDS MGM

Records

is

o divisions of Metro-Goldwvn-Mov«r Inc.

Broadways Vanishing Breed: Disk Companies as Angels • Continued from page

music by Jule Styne and

1

The

3 Merrick Shows Merrick productions

The three are "How Now, Dow Jone!!," "The Happy Time" and "Facade." The Theatre Guild production is "Darling of the Day," and the Alexander Cohen production is "Hellzapoppin'." This is the second year of Victor's deal with Merrick in which the record company invests in Merrick musicals in exchange for the original cast album rights. The financial terms of the Victor-Merrick tie were not revealed but it's understood that the deal runs through this season. Victor is angeling the Theatre Guild production to the tune of $150,000, and it is understood to have another $150,000 in the Cohen

'Jewish Mother* to Be a Jewish Mother," the comedy Molly Picon and Godfrey Cambridge, classified as a play with music rather than as a musical, will have songs by Michael Leonard (music) and Herbert Martin (lyrics). Edwin H. Morris Music (ASCAP) is the publisher and Epic Records will do the album. The show is scheduled to open Dec. 26. Also on tap for this season but not yet lined up with a record company are "Golden Rainbow" and "The Education of H*Y*M*A*N K«A*P*L*A*N." "Golden Rainbow," which will star Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme, has words and music by Walter Marks. The score

"How

starring

which

The first original cast album of the new seawill be "Henry, Sweet Henry." The Bob musical, which stars Don Ameche and Carol Bruce, is set to open on Broadway Oct. 17. ABC Records' ASCAP subsidiary, Ampco Music, is publishing the score. son

Next up is "How Now, Dow Jones," due on Broadway Nov. 25. Edwin H. Morris Music (ASCAP) is publishing the score by Elmer Bern(lyrics).

for "H*Y*M«A*N K'A'P'L'A'N" has a score by Paul Nassau and Oscar Brand. Tom Bosley has been set for the lead.

In the

Roberts, Marlyn Mason and Brenda Vaccaro. Following is "The Happy Time," scheduled for Dec. 26. The music and lyrics by Fred Ebb and John Kander, writers of the current Broadway click "Cabaret," are being published by Tommy Valando's Sunbeam Music (BMI). Star-

Off-B'way Step-Up Victor

Broadway tie will be with "Hair," a rock 'n' musical by James Rado, Gerome Ragni and Gall McDcrmott. It is scheduled to open Oct. 17. The TV cast sets will be on "Androcles and the Lion" and "Cricket on the Hearth." "Androcles," which has a score by Richard Rodgers, features Norman Wisdom, Noel Coward, Ed Ames, Inga Swenson, John Collum and Kurt

bum, and David Wayne. There has been some at Victor of recording the album during the show's tryout stay in Los Angeles in Novem-

Kaznar. "Cricket on the Hearth," which has a score by Maury Laws (music) and Jules Bass

not definite.

Danny Thomas, Mario Thomas, Ed Ames, Roddy McDowell and Abbe Lane. Both musicals will be presented on NBC-TV. features

(lyrics),

'Darling of Day' "Darling of the Day" follows on Jan.

The

3.

also stepping into the off-Broadway album fields this season. Its off-

cast

roll

talk

it's

is

TV

and

ring in the cast are Robert Goulet, who is said to be getting special dispensation from Columbia Records for his appearance in Victor's cast al-

ber but

is

American

The Music Capitals of the World

countries.

.

.

Michel

.

has signed a contract for session at a Moscow in January. Lilo Fransen (RCA), the Argentinian singer currently in Spain, has made the first Spanish version of the (Belter)

Frcxn

a

15-day

theater

.

.

.

McKcmdc "San Francisco." Fransen is planning to stay in Spain for several months. Jorge (Fonogram) recorded a new Scott

MILAN Durium

will release the record-

ings of Austria's

Udo

from Jan. Pbonovox is to

ttart

Italy

1,

Jnrgcns in

1968. . . imincdiate .

distribution of the Ariston catalog

in Australia.

.

.

.

DET

a&r man-

ager Ezio Lconi left Sept. 4 for 13-day visit to the USA and

a

Canada taking

in

New

York, Los

CGD

Angeles and Montreal. executives Giuseppe Giannioi and lohiray Porta flew to London to attend the international WarnerReprise convention Sept. 7. .

.

.

.

.

.

A&r man Bio Gariboldt, who superivised Italian recordings by Pitney and Dionne Warwick, has left to become a free-lance producer. Gariboldi will handle the recordings of Maurtzio Gene

CGD

Rkhard & Manuel (Rifi), Armaodo Savini (Phonogram) and

(Saar).

KS Will Distribute Family Dog Posters NEW YORK



Kama Sutra has gained distribution rights for Family Dog's psychedelic poster catalog for record servicers and retailers. The brightly colored posters feature rock groups. The posters will be handled by the Special Projects Division of Capitol Records. The posters will retail for a suggested list of $1 each.

.10

Fcny

I Profed,

i^^anco

Rene Dan-

ny e Gaby, I Rolb '33, Thomas MiUan, Thane Rosecl and Gli Al-

.

.

single in the Philips Studios, Paris,

for release later this month. The record, produced by Jean Fallcc,

.

.

.

from the film

featuring the music

"Vivre Pour Vivre." published here by Orchestral Music, a company jointly owned by Curci and U. A. Music. Cemed Carosello will also release a vocal version by Memo Remigi which will be performed at the Festival of Roses, Oct. 3-5. A three-song disk from the film "Pronto C'E' Una Giulia Per Tc" by L«s Coilegicns de Is Chanson is to be issued by Italdisc. "Cord.

ialmenle,"

.

.

byOmella Vanoni

(Aris-

has been selected as the theme for a 52-wcek TV serial. Song is published by RCA-Italiana. The Maschera d'Argcnto, the most

ton).

.

.

.

Italian show business award, will be presented to Equipe '84 (Ricordi) at the Tcatro Sislina.

im|X>rtant

Rome on

Oct. 4.

.

.

.

The sound-

music from "Hurry Sundown" and "Thoroughly Modern Millie" has been recorded by Fox by the Ben Tbompson Orchestra. The recordings have been allocated to Murbo Records, New York, for release in the U. S. track

CERMANO Ruscnro

MADRID Hispavox

Los "Out and About' which is already on the market in Mexico and several South releasing the Angeles' Spanish version of is

The Sept.

who

supervises the

.

.

.

batch of Abnak recordings including "Western Union" by the Five Americans and "Do It Again a Little Bit Slower" by Jon and Robin. Lenita Genttl (Belter), winner of the l.ist Hispano-Portuguese Song Festival, appeared in a special Spanish National Television show. "El Dia del Turista" (Tour.

a

dated

follows:

TO;

All Record Dealers Subject: Monaural Price Change

Effective this date and until further notice, our warehouse stock of monaural albums will be sold at the prices as indicated on the attached price schedule. Exceptions: All new releases since July 1. 1967, For-

Mexican, Education-

eign,

Christmas,

Vintage,

al,

and

albums

not able on stereo will be sold at the price announced in our price bulletin of Aug. all

avail-

1, 1967. Credits will be issued at

these

prices.

This prior schedule supercedes all

previous price schedules.

Yours

RCA

second sheet, headed RCA Victor Record Dealer Bulletin,

A

was

also issued. (See chart.)

Nim

.

ists' Day) on Sept. 5. American singer Dean Reed (Belter) recently completed the Western mov"Buckaroo" in Italy, co-starring with German actress Monica Bruger, and will begin another film shortly with Van HefUn. .

.

same

price

for

mono

as

they

charge for stereo. In last week's issue. Billboard carried a press-time report attributed to "reliable" sources Victor mono price that an cut was scheduled to go into effect Monday (11). The report said the new price would be competitive with the 20 per cent being offered by reduction Distributing Records Capitol

RCA

Corp.

RCA

Victor termed this report as "completely erroneous" in a wire it sent to dealers and distributors, signed by Billboard's editor. By interestiing denial wire coincidence, the reached the customers simultaneously with the arrival of the new mono price schedule from

Los Angeles-based RCA the Records Distributing Corp. These prices were regarded by retailers as b«ing Victor

truly,

D. G. Pearce, Manager Victor Record Department

competitive to the new CRDC mono price schedule. The Los Angeles Victor Distributing wing covers Southern California and Arizona.

RCA

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuaiiiiiHm^^

MONAURAL PRICE SCHEDULE CHANGE September

8,

1967

POPULAR SUGGESTED LIST* DEALER NET CATEGORY $ 2.13 $ 4.79 LPM/FPM/COM IM 5.79 COMO/FOC/FPMD/LPM/LOC/LOP 3M 6.79 LOCD 9.95 4J1 LPM SM nss Loc 6Ji UM LPM An addUional 4% rebate will be earned if Popular albums cxchangn do not exceed

10%

of dealer parchases.

RED SEAL $ 5.79

$ 2J9

6.79 11,59

1.89 4.83

LM LD/LS LM LD LM LD LM LD LM LD LM

SM IM 7.74 9M

1139 17J9 18J9 23.19 24.19 28.99 29.99 34.79

'Suggested

retail price guides

1«J<

IMS 12JB 14J*

opUonal with dealer.

All prices subject to change without prior notice. All orders are subject to prices at time of delivery.

Exceptions: All new releases since July 1, 1967, Foreign, Mexican, Educational, Vintage, Christmas, and all albums not available on stereo will be sold at the price announced in our price bulletin of August 1, 1967. niiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiniHiiiwiiMiimimiiMiim

BB's Forum: Brass Galore • Continued from page

questions and topics will be given to each at the table and a

I

recordings of

French pop star Claude Francois, features "Viejo Cafe" ("Old Cafe"! and "Un Dia" ("Some Day"). Los Manola Diaz entitled "Ojo por Ojo" ("An Eye for an Eye"). Hispavox has released its first

.

of

price cut.

announcement, 8,

The sheet was accompanied a "Suggested Retail Price Guide." which recommended to dealers that they maintain the by

them

informing

mono LP

Product

Some Areas

.

Cemed

Carosello released a single and an album on the United Artists label

ligalori (CBS-Italiana).

in

• Continued from page I

ment,

is

is now due sometime in the spring. The score by Marian Grudcff and Raymond Jessel will be published by Tommy Valando's Sunbeam Music (BMI). Soupy Sales stars.

Merrill

Carolyn I-eigh

by E. Y. (Yip)

is

cast

Cut

Is

pin' "

show. United Artists has the full stake in the financing of "East of Eden," which could bring its financial involvement up to $500,000. ABC Records has put up a little more than $200,000 as its share in the backing of "Henry, Sweet Henry." 'Henry' Cast LP

stein (music) and cast are Anthony

lyrics

being published by Chappell (ASCAP). headed by Vincent Price and Patricia Rutledge. Next up is "Facade," slated to open Jan. 13. The score by Martin Chamin (lyrics) and Edward Thomas (music) is being published by E. H. Morris Music (ASCAP). Set in the cast are Marissa Mell and Pemell Roberts. The United Artists-Mitch Miller production of "East of Eden," is scheduled for a Jan. 31 opening. UA's subsidiary. United Artists Music (ASCAP), will publish the score by Robert Waldman (music) and Alfred Uhry (lyrics). Lined up for the cast so far is Paul Rogers. Alexander Cohen's production of "Hellzapop-

Harburg

deals made with producer David Merrick, one is the result of a deal made two years ago with the Theatre Guild, and the other is an Alexander Cohen production.

Mono

Victor

.

ie

RAFAEL REVERT MARTINEZ

Mrs. Miller Disk LOS ANGELES— Mrs. Miller has left Capitol and her next single will be released as an independent master. Jimmy Haskell has been signed to produce the disk, "Green Thumb." Also, she has formed Vibrato Publishing.

Whereas last year's Billboard Tape Cartridge Forum served to alert manufacturers,

merchandisers

rack

tributors tial

and

of the growth

of the relatively

tridge

industry,

this

dealers, dis-

poten-

new

car-

year's ses-

sions will be devoted to analyzing the market with the stress on proper merchandising and marketing techniques. Primary among the list of the Forum's goals is for personnel on all

industry levels to interchange ideas and discuss pitfalls, problems and successful marketing tools they have encountered in their operations.

Most of the seminars will be keyed to smaller meetings with emphasis on participation. Tuesday's afternoon meeting will be the form of round-table discussions. Each registrant will be assigned to a table, limit 10 to a table. And each table will be comprised of a mixture of rein

tailers,

rack merchandisers, disrecord manufacturers An outline of

tributors,

and duplicators.

chairman

will

be chosen to head

the group. This round-table seminar is geared to run at the close of the Forum to further give all attendees an opportunity to discuss any questions that they feel need additional amplification.

This year's Forum will be conducted under the combined auspices of Billboard and its

Merchanpublication. sister dising Week. Registration fee is $100. All registrations should be directed

The Tape Cartridge Forum,

to

Room 1408, 500 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10036.

SSS, Minaret Tie

NEW YORK

— Shelby

Sin-

SSS International will be exclusive distributor of the Fin-

gleton's

ley

Duncan's r&b Minaret

bel.

Among

Minaret's

la-

artists are

Big John Hamilton, the Tifand two new fany System, groups the Sacred Mushrooms, and Jefferson St. James and the Band of Gold.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1967, BILLBOARD

lllkurt SPECIAL SUtVET Far

Unk

t/tS/U

Eirfillf

Jazz Beat

BEST SELLING

JAZZ Thit

Jazz guitarist Bole Sctc has scored his

LP's WMks

Lait

We«k

Week

1

Z

2

1

Number

TITLE, Artist, Label &

on



Chert

CALIFORNIA DREAMINS

29

Wei Mcmtgomery, Verve V B672

V6-8673

(M);

station.

(S)

DYNAMIC DUO

The sophisticated equipment is being designed for use on both coasts of the U. S., and the Brazilian government is interested in acquiring the device. Consequently, Max Weiss, the co-owner of FanRecords, publishing partner with Sete and his manager, was contacted by Convair to inquire whether Setc, as an outstanding Brazilian musician gaining popularity in the United States, would be interested in creating 40 minutes of original music for a demonstration film explaining Convair's new seabound defense system. Weiss spoke to Sete, who has scored movies in Brazil and

19

Vtm

Jimmy Smith i Wes Mantgomtry. Vb-8678

V 8678

"secret" military

first

motion picture. The Brazilian composer and his manager Max Weiss were both in Los Angeles last week for the recording sessions. Scte's client was the Convair division of General Dynamics, which has buill a monster buoy both a floating lightship and sound detection

(M),-

(S)

tasy

SWING FACE

3

BIO

5

SWEET RAIN

3

12

S

7

6

8

10

9

9

LEND A

7

4

27M

116 (M); SP 4116

LP

'W

14

T

(SI

29 SI 2459

2459 (M);

(SI

I4S3

(SI

EQUINOX

20

Maudes &

Sergio

IMA

Bratll '66,

11

13

LISTED

12

14

THArs MY KICK

LP 122 (M); SP 4122

15

13

MEUOW (Mell

14

IS

MGU

(5)

5 E 4463 (M); SE 4463 (S)

YELLOW

Brown

A PAINTED

&

3

the Organ.iien, Cxlft LP

7>8

15

12

BlU EVANS

16



BRAVO BRUBECX

RY!

AT

TOWN

VOL

11

19

mer.

(S)

6

I

me how

it. And I was supposed to know what they were talkiiig about. Convair guys came up to our office in San Francisco and started asking me questions about the music business. They wanted to know about copyrights and one guy even asked: 'Who's BMI?' gave them the Billboard book, 'This Business Of Music' It was I my only copy and they still haven't returned it." Placing Sete in the role of film composer for a highly secret defense film is part of Fantasy's plan to broaden its artists' activities. "We are phasing ourselves out of the jazz field, unfortunatdj^ Weiss said. "But look where the new artists are coming from; rhythm and blues and rock 'n' roll." Sete, Weiss boasts, is the label's top-selling jazz artist, now outselling Brubeck and Cal Tjader, two influential performers who gained their record fooling with Fantasy and then moved onto major labels. Vince Cuaraldi is the label's sec-

about

1

Two

(S)

MERCY, MERCY, MERCY

29

Cannonball Adderley Ouintel, Ca«ilol T 2663 (M); 5T

2663

(S)

MIXED BAG

2

Richie Havens. Verve forecast FT

19



20

18

T

WANTED IT'S

3

A 9144

Impulse

tU):

AS 9144

(S)

29

3566 (M); ST 2566

(SI

ond top

From The AT

SYDNEY

ORGANIST

for

.

.

the

Manager

AND DRUMMER

dropped I '

BANG RECORDS

.

their price to a

istic level.

-

RAY PASSMAN

his American TV There's a lot more work Loved Ones pop group. Peter MacKenncI has more real-

work on

act to

show.

FENDER BASS

The trend is toward New Zealand. Australian artists heading over there within the next month or

so

include

Rim

D

Paul,

.

Your

the

LaDt-Das and Gita Rivera. Roimie Bums is over there already and the radio stations have declared Ronnie Bums Week. The La-De-Da's came over to Australia from New Zealand a few months ago and now have three records in the New Zealand top 20 but only a few near misses in Australia. Philips will release 20 of the bestselling LP's this month. Philips took over the label last June. Marie Dallas has come back F.iecutives. the To-illelits, the

.

.

MGM

.

,

.

10 Australia to

work

after touring

New

Heart Fund

Zealand with Little Millie and David Whitfield. Miss DaUas a contract in New Zealand

won

year to record in Nashville for RCA. Now she hopes to work in the United Slates, Australia and New Zealand using Sydney as her headquarters. last

Fights

Singer-writer Jay Justin is off to England next month to study writing and record production. He hopes for club work while he stud.

HEART ATTACK

STROKE HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE INBORN HEART DEFECTS

a

week

Rowe

Hong Kong and .

other

.

Man,

soundtrack.

.

.

.

Meanwhile, Rowe and bis manager, Ivan Dayman, arc denying published report that they have split and that Dayman's Danceland Promotions organization is on the rocks. Rmy Charles' Tnanagcr Adams has taken biogs and tapes of the Giw>p, the Twilights and the Vibiants back to the United States with him. .

.

.

Joe

Young Sydney songwriter

Peter years writing their records, all without much success. Now Peter is making it on his own with "Colonel Burke Has Pink Suspenders On," a number he wrote, sang

Best

devoted

managing the and producing

very freakie."

all

it's

later. Singer Nomiie has bought his parents a in Doncaster, Victoria.

new house

about

three

Po^

and

and produced.

Brief Solos Manne Hole has snared 21-piece Don Ellis band for regular Monday night presenta-

Shelly's

the its

Timekeeper

tion.

Mondays

wailing

Ellis has been at Bonesvillc for a-half years. He

the past one and is also reported signing with lumbia after two independent releases on World Pacific.

Count Basic and crew fifth

is

running

"Ivor

the

Co-

LP

their

appearance at the Sands. Las

Vegas.

.

.

.

first single

Lou Rawls getting the recording on two songs

the Jay Livingston-Ray Evans score for "West of East." Title tunc plus "Almost in Love" sched-

from

Barney uled for his next LP. Kessel. who recently opened a Music World instrument store in Holly.

Singer Ray Brown trouble with his

into

in

Europe

.

.

October

Engine Driver" record. Several Aus-

wood,

tralian radio stations won't play

for personal appearances with Miles Davis. Lionel Hampton and Sarah

it

because they feel a mock news broadcast about a train smash is too gruesome. Festival Records is rushing out special doctored versions of the disk. Rod Midr, former disk jockey at 2SM, Sydney, is back at the station as program .

.

.

Jay co-authored "Reminiscin' which was big hit for Hank WilUams a few years ago. A. W. T. (BiU) Smith, managing-director of the Australian Record Co., holder of CBS's Australtan franchise, has been appointed vice-president Australian Operations and will run CBS in New

manager. Rod left 2SM about two years ago to work in the United States, and came back several months' ago for a job in Tasmania. Former program manager John Brennan has been made music manager and will be given more air time, which he requested.

Zealand, the Philippines, Malaysia,

JACK VEITCH

ies.

is

coverage,

Far East areas. Top disk jockey from 2tIW Sydney, Tony McLaren, is missing, after leaving Melbourne on Aug. 25 with_ three others in a trimaran. The trimaran was found abandoned and floating upside down south of Melbourne .

ELECTRIC GUITAR

WITH GOOD FOOT CONTACT IMMEDIATEIY

Singapore,

Ray Cbarles on recent tour here asked Kenn Broilzlak, head of Aztec Services, for an Australian

under such an arrangement) and has begun total career capped by management iJeals. The company has been working with American Airlines which on varioijs cities is using Fantasy artists to score 20 20-minute films two for showing en route. Tjader and Sete have worked on the first spotlighting San Francisco and its southern rival, Los Angeles. During a chat with Weiss at Shelly's Manne Hole between sets was by Sete, Weiss was wide-eyed over Sete's Convair project. Bole paid a fee plus he owns the copyright and synchronization rights. "You should .sec the government purchasing order I got for the Tjader

of the World

FOR EXTENSIVE WORLD TOUR WITH BRILLIANT TOP 10 ARTIST NEED

jazz act. Guaraldi, too, is involved in film scoring, notably specials and now full-length motion Charlie Brown Fantasy sets up publishing partnerships with artists (Cal

TV

the

for

pictures.

Music Capitals

MUSICIANS

12

(S)

LOU RAWLS SOUUN' Capitol

4 WHERE

3006 (M); FTS 3006

KENNEDY DREAM Oliver Nelson Otch.,

will be shown to the Defense Department and then to "friendly nations" Weiss said. "They kept telling secret the project was and then would tell me things

The film be shown

will

(S)

Dave Brubcck, Columbia CI 2695 (M); CS 9495

17

|S)

11

HALl,

Verve V B683 (M); V6-B683

18

7B1

(M); LPS

THE MOVIE ALBUM Ramsey Lenis, Cadet LP 782 (M); LPS 782

BIRD

were

(SI

4

lUy Charln. ABC AIC 595 (M); ASCS 595

CAN'T

the film. I said: 'What? How could he do that?' So we were shown shots of how the monster buoy was constructed, how it floated in the water and how it withstood hurricane Betsy. Then when there secret technical segments, the screen went white." Sete and Weiss were given the screening of the hour movie in a Hollywood hotel room, with the recording set and then postponed until after Labor Day. Sete's score was performed by his trio, which is now without the services of percussionist Paulinho, who left two months ago to form his own group. Sete was waiting for Chico Mendes to arrive from Brazil as Paulinho's replacement when the recording ses-sion was called, so he planned to use a substitute drum-

7

Hefbie Mann, Atlantic 1483 (M); SD

»

[SI

BEAT GOES ON

Erroll Gariier,

WHY

ST 2756

(M];

LOU RAWLS LIVE Capitol

entered the American TV commercial composers' guild. He is interested in the unusual project. As part of Sele's pact with Convair, Fantasy has the soundtrack rights and Weiss says that this original music will comprise Sete's next album in about six weeks. "It was all rather secret and mysterious," Weiss said last week in Los Angeles. "We had to be checked for security clearance and one official kept emphasizing how top secret the equipment was. He actually asked me if Bole could compose the music without seeing

(M); V6-6«ra (S|

SERGIO MENDES I BRASIL

A&M

10

(S)

THArS LOU Lou Rawls, Capitol T

7

14S1 |M)i SD 1461

V S693

Stan Geti, Verve

TO THE FiLLEN ANGELSl

(S)

7

Chirlei Llovd, Atlantic

HAND

ST 20117

I0II7

Budily Rich, Pacific liii PI

LOVE-IN

4

5

flies

Vaughan.

to

in

Hugh

Masekela's recent signing with UNI Records was given a push by the label's proclaiming August as Masekela month, the first monthly conccntration for any artist on the label. Trumpeter appeared on the "Kraft Music Hall" TV'er airing Thursday (14). .

.

.

ON THE FESTIVAL

BEAT:

The second annual Pacific Jazz Festival bows Oct. 6-8 at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Cosa Mesa, Calif.; Jimmy Lyons producing Duke Ellington and Miles Davis first two signed. The first annual Washington/Baltimore .

.

.

the Laurel Race at Course over the Labor Day weekend spotlighted Miles Davis. Dizzy Gillespie. Gary Barlz, Woody Herman, Jimmie Smith, Art Blakey.*. Dave Brubeck, Mel Lewis-Thad Jones Band. Horace Silver, Hcrbie Mann. Gloria Lynn, Nina Simonc, MJQ, Clark Terry's band and Thclonious Monk. Omette Coleman makes his first appearance at

Jazz bash

.

Monterey

after

.

.

six

on the

years

Sunday. Oct. 17, afternoon concert. His afternoon co-stars includc^M Don Ellis band conducted by Yugoslavian composer Miljenko Probaska, Gabor Szabor and Gil Melle Electronic quartet.

LeRoy Vinnegar has been workTime in downtown LA. The

ing with Sari Baptiste at the

Lounge

.

New York

State Council

.

.

on the

Arts has given Jazz Interactions a SI 1,250 grant to sponsor 50 concerts

in

New York

schools.

.

.

.

The Washington, D. C, Jazz Society, a new group, is holding concerts at Barnett's Crystal Room, around local players. KOED, San Francisco's educational TV station, taped one of the Oakland Recreation Department's jazz workshop concerts featurinB Mimi Farina and the Steve MiH^' Blues Band. Oakland group has a four-week orientation for teens in the Basics of jazz and the blues. built

SEPTEMBER

.

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

.

.

SMALL TALK B/w MAN

IN

A RAINCOAT

A&M 877 It

It

you're isn't

in

business as a srnger.

enough to be

beautiful;

And if

you're beautiful,

It

isn't

enough to be

a singer

(you're expected to be charming

\

as well). If

you're a tharniing singer

«

and beautiful too, then

you're too much. So

can you win? if you have humility and a couple of lovely kids in addition

Yes...

Then everyone

be glad you

will

had a hit(

"fancy a great looking

like that,

charmer

so humble"

having time to have a couple of kids. ..and a

making

hit:'

they'll say).

Such

arbitrary logic

is

justified

only by

Claudine Longel

who

everything

she seems to be

maybe more.

is

•i-

And

Musical Instruments Not So

Detroit Teen Bands Get Break; Union Local Cuts Initiation Fee for Teen-Age Groups • Continued from page ers

were

bands.

not

paying

I

teen-age

The bands were asked while the club was band would play free and not get booked

to audition

open. The night back. The Federation also wants to stop their union bands from playing free for disk jockeys. Many club owners pay a disk jockey who bring in bands, but the deejay doesn't pay the bands. Kids Exploited all

According

to

Merele Alvey.

president of the Detroit local. "These kids arc exploited and prostituted." Alvey admitted that until now the Federation has virtually ignored these teen-age bands. About a month ago some 25 bands and some parents of members met with the Federation board to explain their problem. From these suggestions evolved a program. First, the Federation has created an apprentice membership. Teen bands will not have to pay the regular $89.50 initiation fee and $42 a year dues together. Instead, the first year the apprentices' dues will average to $10 a month. The second year they are full members and pay the regular $10.50 dues every three months. Second, the Federation will

Sho-Bud Builds For Baldwin

every teen club to become a union club and to hire only union bands. This means

NASHVILLE

try to get

at

least

minimum

scale wages union contract.

and a standard Union bands will not be permitted to play at a non-union club and they cannot play for a disk jockey unless given mini-

mum

scale.

(Continued on pane 16}

custom

ing

a

new

ture

CHICAGO Corp. of

its

has



extent

Instrument Co. during the

first

nine months of fiscal 1966 and 1967.

These losses amounted to $969,785 for the nine months ended July 31, 1967 and $189,for the nine

1966.

months of

Valco Guitars has since quired the

Seeburg

Kay

fis-

ac-

firm.

also

reported

ex-

guitars

castom secretary, its

work. said

gross

income during each of the past

and disposition of Kay Musical

cal

to

itself

David Jackson,

from the operation

488

steel

Sho-Bud headed by noted Dobro player Shot Jackson,

three years. the

will

factory here to

electric

of

open manufac-

guitars,

the firm had doubled

The Seeburg

reported

losses

manufacturers

steel

clusively for Baldwin.

limits

Seeburg Reports Losses on Kay

— Sho-Bud

Guitar, one of the nation's leadelectric

that

months ended July 31 were $68,967,734 com-

out a

The

full line

firm also turns

of amplifiers and

public address systems.

The new cated

in

factory will be lo-

near

Galletin

the

Starday Records firm. Called Music City Manufacturers, the firm will have in production in

October two — Twin-Ten lines

^the

Single-Ten.

Both

for Baldwin and the feature six

foot pedals and will be universal (the player can change the instrument to suit his music needs).

David Jackson

is

presi-

dent of the new firm. He said production of electric steel gui-

before.

Baldwin will start at the rate of five a day and "we plan to build from there." The deal was negotiated with Russ

1966.

and Dick Harrison of Baldwin.

sales for the nine

pared to $68,606,508 the year

Income was $2,113,388 compared to $2,991,093 in

tars

for

Kurth,

vice-president

of

Twin

in

Cities

Minneapolis Clubs Charged With Fixing Low Band Fees

sales,

Continued



front pase I

weeks ago, is made up for the most part of club owners who cater strictly to the teen crowd and feature young bands, of which there are 250 that work regularly in the Twin Cities. There arc 1 2 members in the association, including the owner of such hot teen spots as Bimbo's. Magoos, the 'Town House. Danceland, the Prom Center, the Barn, the Castaways, Ryan's and others. Classiried "These owners have classified bands," said Dick Shapiro, president of Central Booking in Minneapolis. "They've put the top 10 bands in an A class and all

admission prices and, of course, talent fees. They felt there has been a talent price spiral and

B

the class particular,

much.

and were

So

they

C bands, in asking too discussed the

drawing power of all groups and placed them in the

relative

three categories. The fee schedule just sort of fell naturally into position a little lower than it had been. They say they will have monthly meetings for re-

classification

of

bands.

Meeting concede

Bookers

that

some

clubs have had lagging business this year but deny that the

second and third class bands have been asking for larger fees.

they get $150 to $200. The B class bands, of which there are

Top Twin-Cities bookers met with the ballroom and club own-

about 45. get from $135 to $140. And the 200 remaining bands were put in a C class

association last Wednesday (13) to discuss the problem. "The only result was an airing of laundry," said Shapiro. "But the owners did indicate that perhaps they can raise their fees for top bands."

which gets scale plus booker's commission.'' (Scale for a five-

youth group would amount to about $90. Bookers get anywhere from 10 to 20 per cent. "For the top bands," Shapiro said, "this is $25 to $50 under the former fee. For the top bands in the area, this is an injustice. They've worked long and hard to get where they are, and they draw good crowds." Shapiro said the classification also

and

is

C

unfair

the

to

bands as

class

B

Polish



HUNTINGTON,

Pa. McMillan Music Co., manufacturers of "Guitar Glo," arc releasing a new high gloss polish to be used

on

all

string

ments. The product "Guitar Glo."

is

Commonly

recognized as the in the Twin Cities the Underbcats, T. C. At-

top groups are

Hot Half Dozen, Casta-

lantic.

ways, High Spirits, Stillroven. Michael's Mystics and Da-ve

Brady and the

Stars.

Chicago

word

well, for

of the rankings had leaked out to the young fans, "and there is a stigma placed on these bands." Club owners, who decline to be quoted by name, insist that they formed their association only to discuss common problems such as parking, policing.

New

ers'

instru-

called

In

wake of a

the

about

article

(AFM)

Musician

the

stifled

young

of

May

6,

instituted

Billboard

complaints that Federation of

American

high

initiation

fees

recording activities groups (Billboard,

1967), Local 10 here a policy of install-

ment payments.

"We don't favor any one group of musicians over another," said AFM's Leo Nye. "Often, when a musician or group can't work out the initiation fee the treasurer will investigate the situation and an installment plan is worked out." Regarding the $144.50 fee for initiation here, Nye said, "Our fee is the same for all musicians." At America Federation of Radio Television Artists (AFTRA) here, the inilintion fee is $200. has a $20 down payment arrangement and 20 per cent installments thereafter, if required. Some groups have heretofore sought to circumvent the Chicago fees by joining suburban locals, where initiation fees are lower ($1(X) in Hammond, Ind., for example). But most suburban locals require the musician live, work and record in the

&

AFTRA

area.

Local

lO's

attitude

toward

young recording groups in Chicago was expressed in highly complimentary terms by Nye. "We're very proud of our kids here. Many have been on national television shows and many have had hot records,"

Nye said. "Some people may

think these kids look a little odd but so did I when I was a youngster. The thing is these kids are good musicians and they're pulling down some very good

important

OVATION INSTRUMENTS has

) 1967

14

Shufo

In-

troduced a new line of Electric Storm guitars. Called the Williwaw, this six-stringer is one of five different electric models available.

money on dates. "When you have

prices for groups in the $1,200 and $I,5(X) range, the union initiation fee is incidental," he said.

Brott>«rs, Inc.

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

THEY WALKED AWAY WITHRENEE

THEY GO

ALL THE WAY WITH DESIREE THEY WERE S-2119

SWINGING WITH PRETTY BALLERINA

PRODUCED BY MIKE BROWN PUBLISHED BY MINUET MUSIC
WEST S5TH

NEW YORK.

,

ST^

N.Y. 10019

filSMASH

.

Musical Instruments lllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

Union Local Cuts Initiation Fee for Teen-Age Groups • Continued from

pa^e 14

Third, a band will only be allowed to audition for a club owner when his club is closed. Seminars Set In addition, the Federation promises other benefits for teenage rock bands. It will hold seminars about topics of interest to the band; plans to build its own recording studio so groups can make inexpensive demonstration tapes; sets up practice studios; start a club for band members, and have older musicians give lessons.

WRAPPING UP

XMAS PROMOS

been derelict in recognizing the rock movement as such. The only reason we signed was with the understanding that the union would enforce this."

The union promises

They are also relyon each band to help pro-

tect

the policy.

make

buck off

will

ment.

to

Gibb stated, "Why should 1 make money off kids who spend thousands of dollars on equipment and not give them any. thing in return? The union has

agers will have a wider choice of entertainment in the city." So far the Federation is pleased with the response from teen-age bands here. They aim to sign about 250 bands. Fifty have been signed since the campaign began a month ago.

at Nashville

LOS ANGELES



A

m

a fast

ager anyway. get better

pay

the' teen-

The better clubs when they have

bands,

and

the

YOU WANT TO BUILD

traffic? Put up a bulletin board. This is one at Trestman Music Center In suburbain Minneapolis. Owner Ray Trestman is tacking up another notice.

Now

"The boom instruments is over.

Frank Sites, buyer for Ludwig Music House, a 1967 Brand Name Reit's

a business," said

"A

winner.

tailer

of stores

lot

that went into musical instruments treated them like a 10cent can of beans. It's not like

Dick Clark Productions of Los Angeles, special consultants

that

entertainment trade for



anymore now you're $400 guitars."

talk-

ing about

Vox, will make the presentation. Page's Ampliphonic OrBill chestra will be featured in the display.

Ludwig, with stores in suburban South County, River Roads, Belleville, 111., Southand Mount Vernon, 111., has been in the music business 91 years. Some of the stores side

Similar demonstrations are be ing prepared for presentation in Memphis, Detroit and Los An-

MEDIUM-PRICED bass

geles.

BUDDY RICH has signed a fiveyear endorsement of-product conThomas Organ

Co.

under which the drummer use Vox instruments In all

tele-

with

amplifier

recently introduced by Sunn Musical Equipment Co. is called the Sonaro. Designed to match the firm's new Solarus guitar amp, the unit has a list price of $435. Amp measures 38 inches high, 24 Inches wide and ll>/2 inches deep.

and

sales

demon-

people

We

strate instruments.

also

have

combos perform," he said. Ludwig rotates its "GroupIn" promotions. At the downtown store it will often schedule them mid-week in the evenings from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. On local

one of the personalities on the series

feature records; five feature lessons with over 3,000 students and 125 teachers. The best promotions. Sites reports, are "Group-Ins." "This is where we clear the main sales floor and invite hundreds of youngsters and have our instructors

will

vision, motion picture and concert appearances. He is currently

summer TV

111.

60601.

"Away We Go

Show."

Saturdays,

especially

Louis

ranging in price from Japanese

$125

at



LOUIS

combo

in

pres-

tract

Chicago,

Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllll

in St.

EARL PAIGE

By ST.

of the new Vox ambe made Country Music Associaconvention, Oct. 20-23, in

Vox

should write to Ray Brack, Billboard, 188 West Randolph Street,

'Group-Ins' Stimulate Sales

At Ludwig's

the

the

merchandise.

teen-

Nashville.

to

New

Manufacturers who want their merchandising programs and new merchandise reported

entation at

Manufacturer promotions.



• Dealer promotion plans.

plified instruments will

tion



• Hot merchandise prospects (according to dealers).

Cassily said, "Clubs that arc run on liquid finances and have fairly poor management will probably fold when they have to pay even a minimum. But these clubs were just out to

Billboard four-part report

a

ing season:

to police

ing

October.

publish

on the industry's merchandising plans for the big Christmas sell-

sending members

its policy by to teen clubs.

So far only one club owner, Russ Gibb of the Grande Ballroom, has signed a union agree-

Vox

During will

American makes

to

Trends? "I don't think trends any one particular part of the country. have seen the solid bodies drop off here around the first of 1967 and a strong surge of hollow bodies start in

We

because a couple of groups in Los Angeles were featuring hol-

low bodies. But this doesn't mean all trends start in Los Angeles. I think the Farfisa trend started in the Midwest," he said.

"A

of

lot

trends

in Nashville," Sites

have

one of

the

"You

that

coun-

biggest

still

is

influences

in the combo instrument field. The only difference between much of the combo music our

youngsters play and what you have always had in country and western music is the beat. It's strictly

the beat."

dream

to the

^thereal splendor of

subur-

in

^plucked

outlets,

day

strings,

^caught up



Better

star!

still

added.

remember

to

and western music

try

it may have an devoted to Open House. Sundays, too, are utilized at branch stores usually between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m.

ban

entire

at

$400. "We sell a lot of onepickups, too," he said, noting that tremolo is no longer as important a feature on guitars.

L better

Equipment

Sites was among those dealers who agree that better equip-

moving now. "A lot of youngsters want the best inment

is

strument right off the bat," he said.

Noting

LEND A

HAND

BENARON,

VoxThomas

presents trophy to Barry Smith, guitarist with The Orphan Egg. winner of the napresident,

TO THE FALLEN

other

changes

since

"boom" ended. Sites said, "One big change is the move away from so many guitars in the

JOE

Vox Stardom."

tional

"Band

Battle

for

CHET ATKINS, RCA cording behind

and

Victor

re-

a&r

genius the firm's "Nashville Sound," as he appeared during the recent National Association of Music Merchants in Chicago. artist

A few years back the basic combo was guitars, drums and an organ. Some groups used combos.

to use

four or five guitars. you'll sec two guitars, combo organ, drums

"Now

ANGELS

a bass, a

and usually two horns. Mostly you'll see a sax and trumpet

WHY

or variations of this. Two years ago combos rarely used a horn," he noted. How much will a group of youngsters invest in instruments? Sites cited the basic price ranges

CAN'T

A PAINTED BIRD

most

often

involved:

"Combo

organs and amplifiers run from S900 to $1,500, guitars go from

$300 to $1,000, drum sets from $300 to $600, a saxophone will run around $300 to $700 and trumpets from $150 to $400.



Best Movers

ONE OF THE MODELS in a new combo line introduced by WMI Corp., this deluxe 61 key instrument folds into the compact package shown at right. The five-model line starts at $345 and Is marketed under the

tars.

Teischord trade name.

hollow bodies with two pickups

Ludwig's best movers

in gui-

RBCORDINCa TAPE A ORCENTREC Division of

2135 Canyon

ELCCTRONICS

Dr..

Costs (Mess.

Cslif.

9262G

jfm^ ADVERTISING IN BtJSINESSPAPERS ullllJ

yUl^ MEANS BUSI NESS

Sites said, are the electric

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967,

BlUBOARD

PITNEY .

A GREAT NEW SINGLE PICKED BY AND RECORD WORLD

BILLBOARD, CASH BOX

"SOMETHING'S GOTTEN HOLD OF MY HEART" MUSICOR 1252

AND BREAKING OUT WITH PICKS

IN

THE FOLLOWING

MARKETS: HARTFORD, PHILLY, CLEVELAND AND MIAMI

AND A GREAT NiW ALBUM FOLLOWING HIS RECENT BEST SELLER "GENE PITNEYS

GREATEST HITS!" GROOVY KIND OF UIVE CRYIN' CARA MIA STOP IN THE NAME OF UnrC - TIME MNMrr LET ME UIVIM' FEELIM* • MISSION BELL • COUNT ME IN BUS STOP BABY 1 NEED YOUR LOVIN' ^^^^ITio^ GREEN GREEN GRASS OF HOME •

[\

PIMY

im

GREATS

SELECTIONS INCLUDE: A GROOVY KIND OF LOVE TIME WON'T LET ME

STOP

IN

THE NAME OF LOVE

LOVIN- FEELIN'

BUS STOP GREEN GREEN GRASS OF HOME BABY

I

NEED YOUR

LOVIN'

CARA MIA CRYIN'

COUNT ME

IN

AND MISSION BELL

RECORDS*

Also AVAIUBLE

IN

4 AND 8

I'KACK

STEREO TAPE CARTRIDGES THROUGH

INTERNATIONAL TAPE CARTRIDGE CORPORATION

_„._, ,

mono

Number

of Singles Reviewed This Week, Ill-Last Week, 186

•Thii

ncord

SpotligMs



•T"^\ft 20 of the Hot 100 Chart

Predicted to reach the top

ARETHA FRANKLIN—A NATURAL WOMAN

BEE GEES—HOLIDAY

PEACHES & HERB—LOVE

&

David Kapralik Baker)

IS STRANGE (Prod. Williams) (Writers: Smith-

Ken

BMI)—The

(Jonware,

classic of the *SO's

made

is

&

Mickey

Sylvia

GOOD

EVEN THE BAD TIMES ARE Mike Smith)

a

MGM

TOP 60

Dean Taylor)

(Writers:



Spotlights

(Prod.

Ron

(Writers: Hicks-Clarke-Nash) (Maribus, off-beat and fascinating material done an easy-beat arrangement that serves as a fast follow-up to "Carrie Ann." Another winner for the hot group. Flip: "Water on the Brain" (MariEpic 10234 bus, BMI).

Richards)

BMI) up

— More

Taylor)

(Writer:

60

of the

HOT 100



Jack Nitzsche)

(Prod.

(Writers:

— Former

BMI)

Prod.,

•MARGARET WHITING — I ALMOST CALLED YOUR NAME (Prod. Jack Gold) (Writers: Lewis-



Smith) (Singleton, BMI) All the flavor and sales appeal of another "Tennessee Waltz" are in this exceptional country oriented ballad song to perfection by the stylist. Lush string arrangement by Arnold Goland in strong support. Much jukebox appeal. Flip: "Let's Pretend" (Piedmont, ASCAP). London 115

BETTY HARRIS—CANT LAST

&

MUCH LONGER

(Prod. A. R. Toussaint M. E. Sehorn) (Writer: Toussaint) (Marsaint, BMI) Having hit initially with "Never Leave Me," the bluesy stylist has a

winner performed

sure-fire

lad



Thiele)

(Writers:



Flip: sic,



Something on

BLUES

My



10982

MY

GLAD

Mind" (Twin-Tone, BMI). Smash 2119 (Prod. Bob

MGM

BMI).

13805



CHART BMI).

AaA

CHAILES

BMI)

Spotlights



Predicted to reach

ttie

S07 SINGEdS-Tlien

Street,

New

the

^UADT ^n/\l\

Spotlights— Predicted to reach the HOT COUNTRY SINGLES Chart

CAL SMITH-Yev'r* Not

Drowning

I

I'll

Ua My

Can

Tell

Me Caadbye

(AcuflHote,

COMMAND 4103

I

Sm

Tsur

(Wont

HitrtKbl

KATP

Mil* AlHie (loU. BMI).

BMI)-

Verde,

U1

ED BHUCE-II I CnM Jint Se Hime (Combine, BUI). IIM VICTOt CDOIC ««
ms

R&B SPOTLIGHTS TOP 10

Spotlights



Predicted

reach

to

TOP SELLING RHYTHM SINGLES Chart

the

& BLUES

FREDDIE SCOTT—HE AINT GIVE YOU NONE Bert

(Prod.

BMI)

Berns) (Writer: Morrison) (Web IV, JOE (Prod. Bert Berns) (Writers:

— RUN



Jordon-Willoughby-Merrick) (Cherio, BMI) A blockbuster entry with equal potential for either side. First is a driving blues ballad penned by Van Morrison, while the flip is a revival of the old Louis Jordon hit given a pulsating workout loaded with wailing blues excitement. Arrangement moves Shout 220 and grooves from start to finish.

MARVA WHITNEY—IF YOU LOVE ME

(Prod.

James Brown) (Writer: Campbell) (Golo, BMI)— A James Brown discovery, the blues stylist wails throughout strong ballad material that could fast establish her as a top seller. Exceptional vocal work-

King 6124

out.



CHART JONNNT

Spotlights

Predicted

R&B SINGLES

MOOBE-Hinn't

Sen Gm4

I

It

to

reach the

Chart

TM

(Slartrek.Flomgr,

BMI).

WAND HAS

BMBT BrnD-Fintr BIS

Yoik, N. Y. 10036.

JDHN

MINAMT

Seal

HAMIITON-I

m

Ne.

Ha>e

BMI). KINC AlU Doe (Cape Ann/Chii

IColo,

I



Flowen, SOFT 1014

(Shifting

SMI).

BMI).

Fin,

BMI).

DOT 17D43

Chart TOMMT FUHDEBS-Briday

BOB StMUKEIS-Ode ta Billy ioa (Shayne, ASCAP). CASOIE 1001 JODT MILIEB-Oaly Wkan Taa'ta Lonely (Trousdale, BMI). CAPITOL lOOS FIFTH

0(DEB-A Tbaasand Dovlb

(Arc

Ckasln'

Me)

(Counterpart,

BMI).

LAUBIE 3404 Tea

CLAtK-Fraai

18

(Prod. Kelso Herston) (Cedarwood, BMI)— Hilari"Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town" hit has all the earmarks of a novelty smash. Clever lyric and performance should rapidly soar the country chart. Flip; "TenderCapitol 2002 Hearted Me" (Border Town, BMI).

on

raiL FIOWEBS-One Mara Hart

HOT 100

Haad ta Tao (Jobete, BMI). MOTOWN 1114 ABIES-I'n Nel Asblni fee tke VTerld (Wingale, ASCAP) Dvnbill 4101 JOE BIOOKS-Strawtetry MarainB IBiooks, BMI). EPIC lOnO SWEET TYMES-I Think Know Ner (Kortltern, ASCAP). EPIC 10117 GBACE MAHCAT-Fer Thoie In Leee (Feist, ASCAP). CAPITOL MALCOLM DODDS-I Don't Went to Cry (Small Acre, BMI). PIOJECT 3 1319 nNNESSEE CINIE FOID-Tke Soad (Caravelle, ASCAP). CAPITOL S*9i

CHIIS

165 W. 46th

Take

(Please

Town)

to

Tillis-Miles)

parody

ous

JAMIS MOOtE-Fett ILeBIII, END CHAIT SPOniGHTl

JIMMT lOSElli-AII HM Tlaie (Cedarwood, BMI) UNniD AITISTS S0I17 PATTT DilKE-Mr Own Little Place (Bornwin, BMI), UNITED AITISTS SOIIS AT CONNIFF-One Paddle, Two Paddle ISunbeam, BMI). COIUMIIA 44291 PEPPEMIINT ntOLlET COMPANT-Ske's tka Kind ef Girl (Breinahen,

AT

All records submitted for review should be addressed to Record Review Department, Billboard,

Love

(Writers:

perfect Armfor program-

ABC

MAGOOS—THERE SHE GOES &

Wyld Art Polhemus) (Writers: Gilbert-EspositoThielhelm) (Ananga-Ranga, BMI) Hard driving rocker loaded with discotheque and teen buying appeal should fast prove a big chart winner for the group. Flip: "Life Is Just a Cher O'Bowlies" (Ananga-Ranga, BMI). Mercury 72729

Your

ming. Flip: "Cabaret" (Sunbeam, BMI).

YOU'RE So) BABY (Prod. Mickey Stevenson) (Writers: BrownNixon) (Milkim, BMI)—Nash is in top vocal form on this easy rock item, with top production work by Mickey Stevenson. Should prove a top seller in both pop and r&b areas. Flip: "Stormy" (Milkim,



GEEZINSLAW BROTHERS—CHUBBY



ballad, string arrangement and interpretation are a natural

Gone)" (Pamper, BMI).

Monument 1025

Satchmo's debut on ABC las) (Valando, ASCAP) could prove to be the sleeper of the year. Beautiful



IT (Prod. Bob Montgomery) (Writer: Macrae) (Ly-Rann, BMI) Lewis follows up the successful "Love Me and Make It All Better," with a beautiful ballad performed in his top fashion. Chalk up another chart winner for him. Flip: "Laughing Girl She Not Happy" (ForUnited Artists 50208 rest Hills, BMI).

ARMSTRONG—WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD (Prod. Bob Thiele) (Writers; Weiss-Doug-

strong

Chet

(Prod.

BOBBY LEWIS—I DOUBT

•LOUIS

JOHNNY NASH—
BMI).

(Southwind.

ter) (Writers: Bryant-Bryant) (House of Bryant, film star made a sales impact with "Little Old W'ne Drinker, Me" in country markets. This follow up has equal potential for pop markets and is loaded with jukebox appeal. Double-barreled material, one side penned by John D. Loudermilk and flip by Boudleaux Bryant.



DeAngelis-Sawyer)

DESIREE (Prod. Mike Brown) (Writers: Brown-Feher) (Minuet, ASCAP) This fascinating easy beat material should rapidly put the creative quartet right back in the "Pretty Ballerina" selling bag. Groovy entry. Flip; "I've Got

YOU

MI BUTTO (Prod. Doug. Fowlkes) (Writers; Amurri-Canfora-Fowlkes) (Brighton-WUson, ASCAP) Currently a smash on the Italian charts, this hard driving rocker, with an English lyric added, should prove to be equally successful here. The American boys give it a groovy workout. Flip: "Just Because of You" (Brighton- Wilson, ASCAP). U. A. Intematfonal 2804

"Somewhere There's Someone" (Music, MuMusic, ASCAP). ABC 10983

LEFT BANKE

DANA—A

COUNTRY Don Law &

BMI>—The

ROCKY ROBERTS & THE AIRDALES—STASERA

•FRANKIE LAINE—YOU, NO ONE BUT YOU Bob

(Prod. Carone

and

and compelling baltop soulful fashion. Powerful

(Damian/Sawyer, ASCAP) Back in his successful "I'll Take Care of Your Cares" and "Making Memories" bag, l.aine has still more commercial appeal with this smooth vocal treatment of a compelling new ballad. Another top jukebox winner.

LISTEN

Adams-Woods) (We Three/

Wind Changes"

NELSON—SAN ANTONIO

((She's

—Miss Drew has a

LIFETIME LOVIN" (Prod. Artie Ripp) (Writers; Andreoli-Poncia. Jr.) (Kama Sutra, BMI)—With the feel of "Elusive Butterfly" "It's Not Unusual," this top-notch rhythm ballad should prove to be the one to bring Dana back to the hit selling class. The Artie Ripp production is exceptional. Flip: "Guess Who, You" Liberty 55998 (Kama Sutra, BMI).

•VIC

Allen Toussaint lyric material. Flip: "I'm Gonna Git Ya" (Marsaint, BMI). Sansu 471 (Prod.

(Writers;

the

reach

to

HOT

(Prod.

RCA Victor 9324 ROBERT MITCHUM — YOU DESERVE EACH OTHER (Prod. Fred Foster) (Writer: Loudermilk) (Windward, BMI)—TTIAT MAN (Prod. Fred Fos-

sure-fire topper for her initial chart entry, "Tell Him," in her powerful vocal workout of this exceptional rock ballad that has equal sales potential for both pop and r&b markets. Flip: "My Lover's Prayer" (East/ Capitol 5969 Time/Redwal, BMI).

in this single

in

Inc.)

Predicted

Hot on Atkins) (Writer: Blanton) (Alamo, BMI) the heels of "Black Jack County Chain," Nelson takes a change of pace in material with this sensitive ballad reading, headed right for the top of the charts. Flip: "To Make a Long Story Short

Rock, BMI)

Little



Columbia 44288

Verve 10551

DREW—STOP AND

PATTI

mem-

Spotlights

10 of the SINGLES Chart

top

'The

Flip;

WILLIE

son) (Writer: Stevenson) (Mikim, BMI) ^This blockbuster ballad material with the Righteous Brothers in top wailing form is just the one to put the duo right back at the top of the Hot 100. Should prove a fast smash. Flip; "Been So Nice" (Mikim, BMI).

ber of the Lovin' Spoonful, Zaily has all the ingredients in the grooves for a top chart item in this rocking mover. Backed by a tremendous promotional campaign, he should fast be established as a big solo seller. Duddah 12

Chart.

Frank Jones) (Writer: Tyson) (Witmark, ASCAP)— Folkster Ian Tyson's plaintive ballad serves as potent material for Cash as he perfoms it in his compelling and winning style. Another big Cash hit.

Chart

ZALMAN YANOVSKY (ZALLY>—AS LONG AS Bonner-Gordon) (Chardon,

BMI)

RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS — STRANDED IN THE MIDDLE OF NO PLACE (Prod Mickey Steven-

in

YOU'RE HERE

(Prod. R.

(Jobete,

Powerhouse rocker moves all the way through by the strong group of five. Good vocal blend, solid dance beat and top-notch material make this a natural. Flip: "California Soul" (Jobete, BMI). Sold 35037

Predicted to reach the top

HOLLIES— KING MIDAS IN REVERSE

— WINDOW SHOPPING

g\ lU

\Jr

JOHNNY CASH—RED VELVET

MGM

MESSENGERS:

Murray-ColBMI)—Following up their lander) (Ponderosa, "Silence Is Golden" smash, the Tremeloes offer an excitement-filled treatment of a groovy easy rock number. Loaded with teen appeal. Flip: "Jenny's Epic 10233 All Right" (Mainstay, BMI). (Prod.



tremendous promotional campaign, the Cowsills family mark their debut with an infectious easy rocker that should quickly establish them as 13810 chart toppers the first time.

to order for the duo,

Dale 1574



(Prod.

COWSILLS—THE RAIN, THE PARK & OTHER THINGS (Prod. Artie Kornfeld) (Writers: Kornfeld-DubofO (Akbestal-Luvlln, BMI)— Backed by

and should follow their previous hits right to the top of the charts. Flip: "It's True, I Love You."

TREMELOES

I

Robert Stigwood) An in(Writers: Gibb-Gibb) (Nemperor, BMI) triguing ballad change of pace from their "To Love Somebsdy" hit. this outstanding Robert Stigwood Production should quickly prove to be a hot sales item for the group. Flip: "Every Christian Lion Hearted Man Will Show You" (Nemperor, BMI). Atco 6521

(Prod. Jerry Wexler) (Writers: Goffin-King-Wexler) (Screen Gems-Columbia, BIVII)—Chalk up four goldies in a row for the exciting Miss Franklin. Another top-notch ballad produced by Jerry Wexler will hit the top fast, with impact. Flip: "Baby, Baby, Baby" (14th Hour/ Pronto, BMI). Atlantic 2441

TOP 40 [ASY lISnNINO

t)<«

COUNTRY SPOTLIGHTS

POP SPOTLIGHTS TOP 20

rmch

pradietad Id

is

NAKED TIUTH-The

ASCAP). RCA VICTOH 9317 IGUEI-I'll Slip Away (Gomba. BMI) IMPAa 1031 JESSE HOOGES-Hiy Little One (Tamerlane, SMI). ASSOCIATED ABTISn 91A7 HAL BLAIHE-Tbe Invaders (Wingate, ASCAP). DUNHILL 4102 CLAUDE CIABI-Tower iridge [Bourne, ASCAP), MU^BO 1018 MICKEY BUCKINS A THE NEW BREED-Beflectlani of Ckorica Brown

00

(Conder,

BMI).

Stripper

(Rose,

SOUTH CAMP 7007

G«OUN0 FLOOII PEOPLE-Treat Ho MEBCUIT 71719

Settee

(Impoccable/Firu

Dale,

BMI).

Hlokl City (Flantom, BMI). VEBVE FOBECAST S0A4 EDDIE RABKIN-Dreem Bafcy (Haw lMi« Matt Dream) (Combine, BMI). COLUMBIA 4419S LTHN TEIBT-Till (Chappell. ASCAP). LASALIE 0070 CEKTAIN AMOUNT-No epty (Maclen, BMI). PtES-TO-HIT t]07l PUNCH A JUDT-Catth a Balnkaw (Andros/Act Ttiree, BMI). SMASH 111B CBNE HBNSIEE-Saul of a Man (Billie Fran, BMII. BILLIE FBAN 014 raULY SMITH-I Want to Go Saak Tkere Afaln (Jobete, SMI). PA«BOT 40017 A LinLE BIT OF SOUND-lncemo and PaaaanHlnti (Claridge, ASCAP), CAROLE 1002 GOOD TIME SIHCERS-Hlfll Flyia' Bird ((jt/artet.Bexhill, ASCAP), IN AITS I

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILIBOARD

Talent

Room

at the Top, Four Tops Find Customizing Songs for Clubs

In

By ELIOT TIEGEL

LOS

ANGELES—The

Four

Tops, who closed their first booking at the Cocoanut Grove with a live LP recording, have learned

custom-tailor their repertoire to suit the level of the room. Four years ago the Detroit quartet was still hustling

to

around

the

"chitlin"

cir-

cuit."

MAYOR DENNIS SH£A

of Newport, Mass., bids adieu to the Cowsills, Records' new group, on the start of their nationwide tour.

MGM

Winding, Johnson Reunite —For Recording Purpose NEW YORK—Kai Winding and J. J. Johnson are teaming up again after a separation of more than 10 years. They're reuniting for recording only. Both artists are agents.

purposes

now

free

Winding and Johnson, who were billed as Jay and Kai, did most of their recording under the Columbia Records banner and had such solid sellers a.s "Jay and Kai at Newport." The trombone duo recorded for Bethlehem before moving to Columbia. Johnson is now a staff ar-

Everything about Darin's act is contemporary. Even when he does a standard like "I've Got Skin" it has a big beat band arrangement. He isn't bogged down by nostalgia but knows exactly what's happening today.

You Under My

He

put his heart into "Drown in My Own Tears," and his version of "The Work Song" had tremendous emotional impact, too.

act is paced beautiand he wrapped it up on

Darin's fully

the piano, singing and playing a swinging version of "Whal'd I

Say."

LORRAINE ALTERMAN





bookings.

"We try to keep the composer's beauty in the material." explains Renaldo Benson, who along with Levi Stubbs Jr..

his

own

has

production firm which

creates music for

Johnson's

TV

recording deal

last

was with RCA Victor and Winding has been tied to

MGM/ Verve torney, their

for

Beldock,

six

years.

New York

at-

representing them in

is

new

than the "chitlin" clubs.

The Tops now

and writers are

artists,

to

truly

The Tops' troupe numbers nine (including rhythm section) which involves a healthy weekly nut, but they are earning submore than their "chit-

as its film or-

the

for

of

circuit" salaries SI. 000-$ 1,500. lin'

from

Two months ago the artists worked the Whisky A Go Go on the Sunset Strip, where their repertoire was more tuned to their

Motown

hooking

bit

customizing

the

stimulate

stantially

this

During their Grove engagement the quartet included an

to

time.

13 years ago.

Academy Award medley

work

audience." Benson says they never "jive an audience" because they've been through the scuffling bit and appreciate the opportunity to work in the big

Lawrence Payton and Abdul (Duke) Fakir, formed the group

single hits. Their

downtown

the

into

room so soon after exposure was a surprising

The perennially popular Ferlin Husky has added another potential

to

hit

.

.

.

duced by Chips

Roman

in

.

.

Mem-

phis.

5 Acts to DeNave NEW YORK — Connie DeNave, public relations office specializing in recording talent, this week signed the Five Amerthe Hassles, the Illusion, the Dave Heenan St. and Eric Errol. The company also represents Spanky and Our Gang, the Tokens and Harpers Bizarre. icans,

Mor-

wide range of talents displayed before an appreciative audience at the Royal

gan's

were

Box here Monday

(II).

The

re-

ABC

Records artcently signed ist, a polished and poised veteran, displayed a brand of associated dynamism usually with some of the younger rock artists, and a block-busting voice usually associated with the old pros.

Her entrance, in a flaming red cape-gown, was a slow and measured "Where or When." seguing into an upbeat "Faster Than Sound." Miss Morgan's "Ten Cents a Dance" (with a bit of "Big Spender" interspersed) was a soul-searing

effort.

Her

Piaff

medley began with a moody and emotional "La Vie en

Me Too

Pushed 5938)

of scheduling.

When they play colleges, students ask for the single hits. fall the quartet is planning a new act for the Ivy circuit.

This

Rose." and closed with an exuberant "M'Lord." Of course. Miss Morgan performed her big one of a few years back. "Fascination." and she performed "Born Free" in

emotional

charged

a highly fashion.

Her closing, "Soul City," was medley of Ray Charles and Al Jolson numbers, with "Geor-

Husky's

Liberty's

at

sharing the

bill

the

Troubador,

with Imperial's

Sunshine Company,

The

Nitty

Gritty,

composed

of six young men, is in every sense a washtub band, and their performance includes the use of a honky tonk piano, saxophone, clarinet, banjo, washboard, a funnel equipped with a 2S-cent kazoo and a washtub bass fiddle made from a washtub. broomstick and a piece of cord. The repertoire g r o u p's strongly resembles a vaudeville act of the 30's, as does their dress. Most of their numbers are from the late 20's, such as

"Hard Hearted Hanna" and

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967,

"You

his vitality



a

My

on

Mind" woven in at Comic re-

the appropriate spot.

was provided by a serenade Marty Allen (Allen & Rossi) who was at a stageside table. Lloyd Mayers, organist, was lief

to

and

style

inimitable

matches

Ferlin

guitar that

and expres-

Gibson Guitar. (Advertisement)

6L0SSY PHOTOS E^J*^ 8^^1000 LOTS8x10

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outstanding as her accompanist on the medley.

"Jane Morgan at the Royal Box" wouldn't be a bad idea for Miss Morgan's first album outing on ABC.

AARON STERNFIELD

botoc^rapherr tOMaionof JAMES J. KRIE6SMANN 165l».46thSL,N.Y.36 PL 7-02331

TOP QUALITY

"Collegienne."

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band opened (5)

of

list

(Capitol

with

He chooses a

verve.

a

gia

Far"

rendered

is

Nitty Gritty Makes Splash How Sweet It Is—Candymen's Sunshine a Bright Group Vocal & Instrumental Style LOS ANGELES — Tuesday

long

his

country tunes.

successful

prestige

siveness

NEW YORK — Jane

.

a

is

artists.

group sought a wider musical scope. "For the last four years we've been playing rock conwhere sound is not really that important. Here, we had

Jane Morgan Displays Old Flash, Wide-Ranging Talent Sly and the Family Stone signed to Epic Records. The group's debut album, "A Whole New Thing." will be released in October. Lester Lanin to Audio Fidelity Records. An album will be released soon. Roy Head to Mercury Records. His first album is being pro-

plan to begin

producing records, which

characteristic of the Motown operation where executives are

venture.



DETROIT Bobby Darin opened at the Roostcrlail Thursday (7) with an act that had the audience shouting for more with a standing ovation.

Grove and New York's Copa. Washington. D. C.'s Shoreham. Cherry Hill. N. J.'s Latin Casino and Hollywood, Miami's Diplomat all forthcoming

commercials. His company has worked for Ohio Bell Telephone Co., Johnson & Johnson Products, and Eastern Airlines.

a,ssoci-

arranged for Sarah Vaughan's recordings and Sammy Davis' NBC-TV show. Winding has been active with

Howard

Darin Darling of Detroit Patrons In Nitery Bow

Today, the male vocalists are a top Motown act and a new find for such rooms as the

and radio

and

atcs,

Benson, the "philosopher" in the group, feels that as a result of the Grove appearance, the

which pays considerably better

certs

On recordings, the quartet sings the love songs pop of Eddie Holland-Brian Holland and Lamont Dozier. On stage, they dip into the Broadway and film repertoire for adult-oriented tunes which fil their pleasant harmonies.

Mark Brown

ranger for

iented audience. Wade Marcus, the group's musical director, and Payton produced the live LP. for which Motown's chief engineer was flown here.

The band was performed

at

its

best

when

only hit single. "Buy for Me the Rain." It was the highlight of the show and the only number not overdone with humor. The Sunshine Company gave (he impression of being quite new as stage performers and talking to the audience was limited to an occasional joke. However, the rock group came over well on its numbers and had no trouble keeping the audience's attention. They offered a good rearrangement of an old Beatle tune, "1 Need it

You,"

and

blues tune, Life."

BlUBOARD

its

on the jumping "Get Out of My

NEW YORK—The

Candy-

ABC

Records

men, newly signed

Scene Sept.

The Candymen. who were the back-up men for Roy Orbison. consist electric

of

a

be

will

nearly

ABC

lead

guitars,

an

singer,

organ

two and

They delivered convincing interpretations of "Eleanor Rigby." "Gimme Some

drums.

l.ovin'." "Long Tall Sally." "The 1941 New York Mine Disaster," and a standout work-

of Tom Jones' "What's Pussycat" and "Thunderball." Rodney Justo is the lead

tops as an imper-

out all

will

ABC LP

first

this

month

original

promote

the

for the Candymen to open the West Coast branch of Arthur's in

Los Angeles

in

October.

In

ABC

addition. has brought in Valerie Reardon to handle pub-

ABC's young

over

licity for

New

the Candymen will be her project.

acts,

PICTURES IITHOSMPKED ON HEAVY KROMEKOTE

with

material. the album

slogan "Candypower" and has prepared a special mailing and a special press kit to distribute with the album and the group's singles. Also in the works are plans with

7.

is

The group's

group,

displayed a highly polished turn and an excellent vocal and instrumental delivery at their opening at Steve Paul's

He

singer.

sonator.

and first

3V>< to 2< each

!

depending on quanf Hy SEND FOR SAMPLE 8x10 plus prices and order hlnnkip

on theae and other size prints

^

PICTURES

^.g^F Jj in

N.

ROBBERSON

SPRINGFIELD. MO. 6H06

23 Copyrighted material

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THE LETTER

15

Record Industry Atsiiciatron of America seal

of

I

Ending September 23, 1967

lOO

STAR

4

Week

Od

R*T •'!«"•. C»4«l SS7S AMt, Ami a BiilT. R*pr>if 0419 .

I«PBI«

47S4

OlIKfc «fO«4.

B'Mil 4*. AAM S71 LiaiijH U'linai, Dat 17034

M«a4n A

Vkki An^Klta. P.

J,

FrabT.

Llbtrly

1*109 SSffI*

TtMRHl. Saitik 1094

''happiness

is

. .

"Your recent ad was discussed by of the writers at luncti the

some

being publislied

by MILLS

|

day. Among them were: Jimmy McHugh, Ned Washington,

other

^

L.

Wolfe Gilbert. They

how

nice

it

is

all

remarked

|

that you are get-

ting such nice action on the songs

IVIUSiC

|

of the Mills Music Co. This itind of attention given the

AND HERE'S THE WAY THE WRITERS OF "HAPPINESS SAY IT...

songs-the

-

must have a very healthy effect— and serve to bring back the kind of music business we all knew. Thanks a lot. Hope good ones

to see you on

IS'

New

York."

my

next visit to

I

| I

I

I

HARRY RUBY

AND WE'RE GLAD YOU, TDD. HAVE NOTICED "WHAT'S HAPPENING" AT MILLS. PAUL...

MILLS MUSIC, INC.

van6

Mr. Richard Rosenthal President Mills AAusic, Inc.

1619 Broadway,

NEW YORK,

N.Y.

Paul Evans, Esq. 1100 Madison Avenue New York, New York 10028

1619 Broadway New York, N. Y. 10019

Dear Paul: Dear Mr. Rosenthal

As time goes

As to our recent conversations with Nv. Litwin and Mr. Silverman and other of your people, Paul Pomes and want you to know that we were greatly impressed by their awareness of "what's happening" in our music business, and their interest in our talents, capabilities and copyrights as well as your achievements on our behalf.

and creatively-appreciative people added to the Mills organization people who are also qualified business men, to the benefit of our composers and authors, as well as our company.





During our meeting with you several months told us you were adding the "right men" to the vacancies in the Mills office. We are very happy with your choice of these two gentlemen.

We, of course, appreciate your affirmative expression. And all of us will, I think, be pleased with the mutual benefits arising from Mills' continued publication of the compositions showing the outstanding talents and capabilities of Paul Evans and Paul Parnes.

ago you fill

Thanking you on behalf of Paul Parnes and remain

myself,

on, you will continue to find

additional capable, properly -motivated

I

I

jrely

Cordially yours,

Richard L. Rosenthal President

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLS —and

talks the language of today's

aware composers and authors. ..young and

talks crea(/ve music in

aspects

old, established or

unproven

achieves for them!

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLS THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLS

talks

and

its

their

producers-of

IVIills'

staff

and

all its

sound business ...

to the

.

.

.

pop, standard, serious, instructional.

mutual benefit of

its

composers and authors-of performing

artists

owners.

AND...

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLS

talks opportunity to outstandingly able people in all aspects of the music industry. For those who are and achievement-oriented, association with Mills provides a rewarding environment and outstanding opportunities -whether it be in professional editing, arranging, selling, promotion ... or any of the many other functions in the ever-changing world of music publishing.

creative, business-like

^ MILLS MUSIC, NEW YORK

10019

Subsidiaries or affiliates in Amsterdam, Berlin, Buenos Aires, Copenhagen, London, Madrid, Mexico City, Milan, Paris, Sao Paulo, Stockliolm, Sydney, Tokyo and Toronto.

IIMC.

(212)00 5-6347

From The

Music Capitals Carnegie Hall Oct. 7 and at the Philip's Philharmonic Oct. 8. the Four Seasons will be appearing at Indiana University. BloomingJake ton, Ind., Saturday (30). at

.

Tom Moore, district promotion manager for Capitol Records, has

.

.

.

been named a Kentucky Colonel. The honorary tide was bestowed

by

Bill Crisp,

WAKY, Swan

F.

Holmes has a date

.

.

.

.

&

Jimmy Dean,

.

Ed

for Oct.

.

.

.

are

who

.

Sparton

here Sun-

.

also to acquire

new

lines for

office

AWAY FROM YOU"

WHO

.

.

his

554 of

.

A&M

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Hendra and IJIIett to appear with John Davidson's college tour beginning in Miami on act

28.

Johnny

Tillotson,

MGM

artist,

begins a seven-day engagement at the Eden Roc Hotel, Miami Beach. Erberto Landi will Oct. 6. present two concerts, starring Mil* va and singer-author Pino Dona^gi with his Giovani-Giovani group. .

.

.

SEPTEMBER

23,

A>i..

UUF)

lASA,

(Pitr

1.1-1,

OLD WINE DRINKER, 5 HOI

Mirtia, RipriM

(hlMt^W*.

Ml)

TURN THE WORLD AROUND. IMI) ANYTHING GOES

20 20

6

Kitftn ii»rrt, Wiraff RrM. 7041 (lUnMi, A5CAR)

10

YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE

10

HMcy

0595 [U.iH. BMI)

RiRfiii

lhi*tr*.

14

A BANDA 6

@ ® ® 1

1

5

3

THE BACK

6 IN

THE CAT

29 35

13

17

WINDOW

Jlnay RMdll, UnitH

17 23 33

Artlits

»M

17

18

ASUP)

.

.

1

5

(Martt, IMI)

MORE THAN A MIRACLE

a-ling-a-Ioo" to coincide with their date at The Club Embassy in Toronto Sept. 11-23. ... The York-

® ^

2

Sugar Sboppe is into engagement at The Friars in Toronto Sept. 18 just in time for added promotion for

Siflipipm,

new "Attitudes" single. The new Barclay Records

Ltd.

Canada, which takes over the

Barclay label for Canada when its contract with Columbia expires the end of the year, has appointed John Williams lo a key executive position. Williams, now in Paris for meetings with Barclay there,

was recently named Columbia's director of merchandising, and was formerly ager.

its

Ml)

6

AAM

841

(Mflric,

Ml)

11111 LOOKED BACK

Winner of

7

@

HORN DUEY

25 34

FOR ONCE IN

12

12

..

MY

promising

4

.....

..

..

LIFE

FEMALE

3

Tea, ItBHrH, C.lwnbia 44158 (SItIn 4 Via Stack, ASCAP)

MAKES NO DIFFERENCE.

14 IT

vlt Saflwnc,

RCA Vktar

9U0

.

7

.

(ROMtvcIt, BMI)

Al Mirtiaa,

30 30



I'M STILL

AW ARD,

Cipilol

SEE

2

3

@28 1^

LAURA (Whaft He

IN

I'LL

Got That

(33) (34) (35)

31



First

5

HIGHLAND RECORDS RELEASE

Praakia Laiaa, ABC 10947 (fiallka, BMI]

CAN'T HELP REMEMBERING

I

YOU 6

3

"There's Nothing

32 32 35

THE CHAPEL MOONLIGHT IN

-

IIIH

38 38

I



(39) ^0

"Don't Mess With Sue" liijihiand Rerord :1181 .

(Jac/BlaaJ|4Mj

Just released 0418 (Vagaa, BMI)

HAVE LOVED ME A MAN

.

HANK

.

JACOBS'

Maroaaa Kiao, Rcpritc 0404 [CalBami, ASCAP)

"Pushin' The Button of Soul"

DON'T TALK TO ME Jehnay Matkri, Ca4amkU 44144 naeaavaH-AMRA

Sania Maadat 4

37

(38)

I

It"

b/w

TOGETHER Trial lafat, Rcprlaa

39 40

THE

WINDOWS OF THE WORLD. Olaaaa Warwick, Scaptar

36

IN

far

@

Album

Can Do About 16

GCMA, Ml)

Call

THE FROG (37)

BETTYE

2 I

Ain't Got)

31

1967

be

SWANN'S

LOVE

Tarn Janai, Parrat 4018 IKallH, BMI]

23 26 29

to

released

5909 (Sitardir, BMII

NOT THROUGH

MISSING YOU

NEVER FALL AGAIN

W ® ®

VOCALIST Soon

MORE THAN THE EYE CAN

AaBy Raiidl, Capital 5971 (Craaabar, A5CAP}

/9S

this

years most 24 25 38

label's

their

1967, BILLBOARD

BON SOIRE DAME

20 22 31

an open-end

in

2

Raitr WillUmi. Ka.p 843 (RtkU.t, ASCAR)

Jet

Have

.

villc

12

(MmIm. tMI)

U1M

Cslumbii

Filth,

M

Kttr

YELLOW DAYS rmy

-

4 [ShiyBi,

WAY

S0I79 {UvnI. ASCAP]

OUR SONC Jich JenM,

13

3

JOE

THERE MUST BE A

J

11

AIMP]

[Filil,

Warnir liDi. 7073 {Qttrim. IMI)

ODE TO BILUE

Bebkic Gintry, Ufitri

15

HEART.

44IU

THE

IN

Pitttit Clark,

18 37 40

MY

IN

V*U, CBlHinbi*

J«frr

®35

Records with "Every to Cry Some," which gains national exposure with lead singer Lee Roy Preston's apf>earance on the CTV network's "It's Happening" Sept. 2 1 doing the number. new a Capitol has released Jimmy Shand Jr. album, "A Dram of Scotch" on Waverley, to coincide with The White Heather Concert tour of North America, starwith Logan Jimmy and ring Shand Waverley artist Bill McCue, which opened in Montreal Sept. 6 and winds up there again Nov. 10. covering Central and Western Canada and several U. S. centers. Columbia has rushed out The Platters new Musicor single. "On the Top of My Mind" and "Shing-

on

6

Ara«M, RCA Vlci.r 9145 (Fl.|trlik«,

EMr

/k\ 27 27 30 MOONLIGHT BRINGS MEMORIES

NukilU

The Inn Crowd, a leading Montr&b group, makes its disk de-

but

Day

bols on Laurie Records. Kassner will work out of his office at 25 Denmark Street. London, for the Herb Bernstein next month. will arrange upcoming Herbie Records. Mann LP for Irvinf; Spice has arranged the Victorians* new single for Bang RecThe Vagrants wilt appear ords. at the George Washington Hotel's new discotheque. Martha Slept Here, opening Friday (22). Eddie Hazcll taped his fifth Merv Griffin Show Tuesday (19). Bob Banner Associates has signed .

Itlk

real

sessions of his groups, the Equals on President Records and the Sym-

.

22

Dt4«i

® W

PubNshEd by TREE MUSIC

N>

Pic

at

16 LITTLE

18

ME

(23)

THE GUESS

.

president

441H

- STRANGE SONG

"THERE'S NO GEniMG

Ave. KassDcr,

15

\JJ

8

Ml)

7 S5*U

Vlkkl C«rr. LlbtMy

®10 ®11

{Isnttwn,

LOVER'S ROULETTE

Ca-

CASH BOX BEST BET

.

relations

44M1

Hirry lilalMit*. RCA Vlcl>r 914] (Bl4Ck«..4,

American Metropolitan Enterprises and Kassner Associated Publishers, is in Europe to produce recording

Sept.

to

.

Edward

8 12

HIM

BE

Ml)

prod-

Randy Bachman's

.

MUST

19 IT

nadian distribution.

Music, Rytvoc and Llee Corp. signed with the

comedy

mono

ques Canelti and Editions Chapin Paris, CBS and MajorMinor Records in London, and

The Box Tops have

.

its

8

LOVE

MORE AND MORE AiidT Williini, (•I.Mkii

9

pell

sional manager for writers. He also signed Ruthanne Friedman, composer of the Association's "Windy," to a writer contract. The Dave Heenaa Set currently at the Stan Catron will reCheetah. present the music firms in the Lee Eastman Group. These include

.

7

selling

is

off

is

&

Fifth

7

Paris and London for two weeks to meet with affiliate companies, CBS France. Jacing,

Jacqueline Bienstocit, formerly with the rights department of Hill Range Music, and daughter of Atlantic records executive Joiinny Bienstockt was married Sept. 4 to Michael Katz, attorney in Tcancck. Chuck Kaye, general N. J. manager of Irving and Alamo Music, has signed Joe Sill as a profes-

public

MIKE GROSS

.

.

NEW YORK

.

2

14

Sparton

.

BILL SACHS

.

4 TIMELESS

5

has a new sales representative in Eastern Ontario, Bob Mclnlyre, replacing Keith Archer, who has left the record field. Jack Robertson, Columbia's general manager, sales and market.

WKRC

.

3

are

uct at pre-price-equalization prices month of September. the for

personality Bob serving as emcee. Baker, has appeared here and abroad, has cut some 50 organ albums, his most recent being "Curtain Time With Don Baker" and "Rise n' Shine With Don Baker." The American Association of Theater Organ Enthusiasts is a nonprofit organization devoted to furthering the knowledge of the theater organ, its literature and technique.

Arnold Agency in Atlanta. Larry Lowenstein has opened

2

the past couple of years, now picking up action from coast to coast.

who

Warock Music, Chcrio Music,

STOUT-HEARTED MEN

7

Ed Amti. RCA Vkt.r 9155
TORONTO

Jones

.

®

Every

Decca Rcords in the U. S. is rush-releasing "Cornflakes and Ice Cream," debut disk by Toronto's Lords of London, on Apex here. first Canadian single to It's the make the No. 1 .spot on the influential CHUM chart in Toronto in

7

(llBm*tll, IMI)

B.rkri llrfliiad, C.l.flibi. 44213 IHirait. ASCAP}

4

.

MIO

FriBk Sin«lr«, Kifriit

4

3

M«l Tonn*. Ctlunkia

Albce Theater day night, Oct. 8. Featured will be prominent organist Don Baker,

.

il

WE KNEW

THE WORLD

1

1

by

.

.

MGM

group, a Metro film their manager Peter Leeds.

Germany. The Ohio Valley Chapter of the American Association of Theater Organ Enthusiasts presents its third annual program of nostalgic and memorable organ music at

.

1

2

and Rene St Clair. Mother's son, being set for

stationed in

.

s

i

.

.

ductions will a&r three acts for Jubilee Records this month. The recorded are the artists to be Blades of Grass, Marie Appleby

week from the MGM-Vcrve

.

1-^

appear at Sing Out! magazine annual Hootenanny at Carnegie Bill and Hall Friday (22). Steve Jerome of Real Good Pro-

conclave in the Ozarks, made the rounds of area deejays and music shops attired in her Bavarian and all, costume, Ledcrhosen which she brought back from her recent visit with her brother, a captain in the Army Air Force,

.

Len

Seegar,

will

.

RKO

1

CBS-TV show

Pete

Tim Buckley

and

gal in this sector for Mainline of Cleveland, upon her return

with

from rh*»» ore b«»r »lling middl.-of. the- rood lihglei eompil.d wUi ond rodio ilotion oir play lilted in tank o»d*r.

notional reioil

14.

Victor, set

the featured performers

tion

the

.

date at the

RCA

Sullivan's

8.

Chandler

among

premium division, with firm's headquarters in Chicago, wa.s a reHis stop-over cent visitor here. included a jackpot session with Haro' Carlson, head of Fraternity Julie Godsey, promoRecords.

last

.

Vanderbilt 2 through

Bobby Darin, At-

.

set for a

artist,

Copacabana beginning March

.

president of Claudette RePublishing Co., with cording offices in Dayton, Ky., plans the opening of a Nashville branch soon. Newest single on the Claudette label finds Leon Grissom, of Kenosha, Wis., doing a pair of Doubi" b.w. his originals, "No "I'll Climb the Highest Mountain." Max Callison, veteran Capitol staffer, newly named head of the

Fish,

.

.

.

lantic

at

from Oct.

University Oct. 7.

program director of Judge L«e Jim

Louisville, and of that city.

.

TOP 40

Billboard

of the World CINCINNATI

AM 871 (Radra, BMI] THE STREETS

Me Record =5388

Bratil '44,

DANCING

IN

,

.

2

Haaiiay Inrii, Cadrt 5571 (Jakcta, BMI)

BLAME

IT

Jarry Vala.

LAST

ON ME Cahiaikla

EaoaAart

1

44174 (Myra, ASCAP)

WALTZ

1

Huaipardlack, Parrat 40019 (Oaaaa, ASCAP)

MISTY ROSES Jakany kUlkti, Calaaikia 44144 (Pallktal Virtua, BMI)

2

MAIYNN enterprises, inc. 2580 West Pico Boulevard Los AnReles. California (213) 385-9161

Montreal branch man-

KIT

MORGAN 31 -Uei lal

Radio -TV programming iiiinitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiin^^^^^

Majors Buck Tight Lists WABC-FM — On LP's Vfitli Paid Plugs EDITORIAL

NEW YORK

on a dream sitting.

is

By

NEW YORK— Tight on most

lists

forcing

arc

tions

— especially

panies labels



buy

to

play-

roll

'n'

sta-

the

commajor

to

adver-

record

time

Many major

wares.

their

tise

rocl<

record executives are bitter over the fact that it's virtually impossible to get a record by a newcomer played on the air. there's But nothing they can do about it except reach for the pockclbook. Generally, only albums are being pushed through purchased time. Charles Fach, director of recorded product for

Mercury Records and

its

affili-

ated labels, said that radio commercials on an album even when the album has hit single tune to lead the way can triple sales. He named a recent Frankie Valli album on

— —

Philips.

MGM

Records, realizing the importance of radio commercials, is producing an album of spot commercials and giving it to their distributors to use in their areas. Harvey Cowen, who also produces Records' syndicated stereo radio show

MGM

"The Music Factory"



is prothe album, under the supervision of advertising director Jack Maher. In fact, an Atlantic Records spokesman credited Maher with inspiring him, and Atlantic has already come vp with four commercials boosting album product by Aretha Franklin, the Young Rascals, the Bee Gees, and the Vanilla

ducing

CLAUDE HALL

copy by Bob Rolontz, publicity chief for the Records,

tributed

be loo.

a

is

a

by Atlantic, may soon

handle the work there.

sale

E.

at

J.

25 of Billboard's Top LP's chart and none of the singles released from the LP (there

were several) did more than hit the bottom of the singles chart. Columbia has been heavily advertising on radio albums by such

artists as

Paul Revere, the

Moby

Grape, the Byrds, and the Buckinghams, among others. Frank Maruca, program di-

WKNR

rector of in Detroit, said that the station did a "good

business" with Columbia and Capitol Records, and these two labels had been active for some while, though Columbia seemed to be becoming more active. Columbia publicizes these radio

ventures

with

tributors

and

mailings

New

York,

week.

this

Joen

Dorn,

a former deejay with in Philadelphia and jazz a&r and promotion executive with Atlantic, did the

WHAT now

them

exactly

commercials

The

mailings

to

dealers,

when

BUY. We're buying

four-to-

WOR-FM,

New

Korvetle, a

York discount chain, for S2.39. Heavy promotion by Columbia Records pushed the first album by the Moby Grape into the top

spot

next

dis-

telling

the radio appear.

will

state:

"TIME

concenone-minule a

trated schedule of radio spots that will help

YOU

more albums!" The

mail-

sell

shows the cover of the album and pleas. "Don't be

ing

KUMU

Getting Big Reception on Listing HONOLULU,

local

music

Hawaii

survey,



A

published

and distributed twice a month by KUMU here, is getting excellent

results,

according

to

R, Gil Bahr, operations and pro-

gram

director.

The

unusual

thing about the survey is that is a conservative music station, using clustered commercial breaks and uninterrupted music. The list is distributed free by local record dealers and lists the top 10 selling albums and the top seven selling Hawaiian albums. In addition, lists its own personal five favorites, the top 10 tunes on the station's playlist, and the recom-

KUMU

KUMU

mended

new

The Aug. where My tune and soundtrack

album releases. had "Some-

issue

1

Love"

the top this included the version as well as as

"Up Up and Away" by the Johnny Mann Singers on Liberty was the best-selling album, according to the station, other cuts.

in

Honolulu.

The

top-selling

Hawaiian album the station was "Al Lopaka, live at Hale Ho" on Hana-Ho Records.

listed

32

in

depth today."

"No Ka Oi" by Leinaala Haili on Makaha Records was second and third was "Music of Hawaii, 2" by Jack dc Mcllo on Ala Moana Records. Don Ho. Reprise Records artist, had two LP's on the seven-record chart. KUMU, featuring 24 hours of music similar to the programming of WPAT, Patcrson. N. J., and KPOL. Los Angeles, has been able to maintain the overall No. 3 position on weekends Vol.

audience ratings loaded with 17 in

AM

in

a city stations,

and three FM stations, falling behind KPOI (which features a Hot 100 format) and KGMB (Easy Listening personality

sta-

TRACE

tion). showed the station doing quite well during the week. too. In a 7-9 p.m. period, for example. Monday through Friday, the station was

fourth

among listeners in cars, among listeners at

and fifth home.

The

station

takes

requests

6 p.m. weekdays and after noon on weekends, making it a after

very unusual conservative operation. sic

Steed Records feels that radio commercials are important enough to use them for singles and has bought lime on New York radio for singles by the Rich Kids and the Wild Weeds.

sitting.

.

and

.

sitting.

WABC-FM.

is

Alex Smallens, station director, programming the first new format to

in





called "stage and screen." The since talk and news station leans heavily on original cast and movie soundtrack albums. The potential of such a format? I remind you that "My Fair Lady" is one of the best-selling albums in history. You can list play after play and movie after movie with exciting appeal on record.

come along





is there and, considering the audience a very large one York) it's the price of theater tickets (even movie tickets in obvious that the audience of a stageshow format station is a finanmiddle class and upper class one. Logically, a stage and screen format has everything working has everything going for it but a for it. In this case,

Thus

New

cially

Boost R 'n' R Columbia Records and Capitol Records have long promoted product through spot commercials, but lately have boosted this particular method of exposure for rock 'n' roll artists. Capitol Records a week ago was plugging a "Music of the Flower Children" album on

Fudge. These will start to be used nationwide in major marthe

dis-

involved in commercials, Stax vice-president Al Bell former deejay and will

kets within eight weeks

and on

label

and

innovation

an

guides

caught out of Stock! Order

label.

Boost

The American Broadcasting system is sitting come true. The problem is: The network

that could

.

The dream

work, based on

Stax

.

mu-

Gross $500-$l,000 WOR-FM grosses anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a week from record company commercials, said Bert Lambert, who heads the New York FM stereo Hot 100 format operation. This includes all companies, he said,

RCA

except All of for

Records.

Victor

the commercials were album product, except Steed

Records.

To two

large extent, there are factors contributing to the a

radio.

album product on For one thing, many al-

bums

sell

WABC-FM

promotional budget. It's a great station, but no one knows about the network is spending little or doing little telling people and an exciting one stereo operation even has a flagship

it;



FM

it

at

that.

Without publicity and promotion, the station continues to climb in ratings; people arc discovering it by twisitng the dial (a slow method of discovery in a crowded radio market). But Madison nor the public Avenue isn't being told very loudly of the station at large. WABC-FM and Smallens, a fireball of a manager and one of the top leaders in the FM field today, deserves better .

.

.

CLAUDE HALL

treatment. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii

iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^

advertising of

like

today.

singles

Too. there's a current wave of

— — program

primarily rock 'n'

stations

FM

stations

roll

albums

their sale. Fach at said his company had

and aiding

Mercury bought year

all

time during the over the nation

past .

.

said.

The firm is laying out a "considerable amount of money on top 40 radio in advertising" to support a just-released album featuring Jay and the Techniques who have a hit single on Smash Records "Apples. Peaches. Pumpkin Pie." But a



special project coming up will center around albums by the Mauds, the H. P. Lovecraft. and the Thorinshield. All three albums are scheduled in the September release and Fach said that none of the groups had yet had hit singles, "but we feel they're important enough to

FM

For

AM

stations

will

come

and many

radio stations who'rc now experimenting with album cuts after 7 p.m.. Mercury will provide special promotion packets, including records, information on the recording session of the artist, biographies on the ariisi and producer, pictures, and other information. "We're going to help these stations in every way we can because the deejays are interested in what they're playing on the air and in many cases will pass this in-

formation on to their listeners." He said that by the end of the year Mercury would produce and release half a dozen more albums by groups "not necessarily represented on the hit singles chart." Thus, the special

promotional packets continuing project. Bert

will

be



LOS ANGELES

McClen-

.

Kenerally to promote an album by an artist with a hit single. "But it's one thing to advertise an album that is already partially presold and another to try 10 create a sales impetus behind an unknown artist." Fach

produce." Hit singles later, he felt.

McLendon Seeking FM's 'Letter' Change

a

Lambert at WOR-FM week that Boh Crewe, of DvnoVoice Records,

don Broadcasting has

FCC

with the

pers

filed pa-

to

change

FMletters to KOST-FM er's call from KADS-FM. The KADS"new" lush background

its

FM

letters

call

the

identified

company's one-year experiment with classified advertising radio which recently ended with the switch back to music.

The KOST-FM which have stations tion to

being

region

the

FCC, by

FM

Houston

call

letters,

be accepted by

to

the

in

used

is

in addicurrently

McClendon's

outlet. When to the Coast, station will flip

HOST-FM comes Houston

the

KZAP-FM.

over to

ming which haven't been done yet." One at the new

will

be tested

KOST-FM;

the other not to dis-

all.

After a year of losing money with classified ads, McClendon decided to return to music because he felt that small operators could get hurt if they followed his example and tried classified ads. It could work for

FM

a big, financially solvent tion over the long run, says.

sta-

Mc-

Clendon

The Dallas executive, who waiting for FCC clearance on the sale of his KLIF, Dallas, is

HILT,

and

confirms he

N.

J.,

Houston is

stations,

eying two other

WCAM

outlets,

According to President Gordon McClendon, "there are two types of good music program-

format

McClendon chooses cuss at

in

Camden,

located outside Philadel-

phia, and a unidentified.

Midwest

location,

'Music City, USA' Makes Its TV Premiere in Nashville NASHVILLE



The

tele-

cast of "Music City, USA," a pop and modern-country syndicated show originating here, premiered Friday (8) on WSIX-TV.

The

show,

originally

"Nashville in the Round,"

titled is

set

premiere in the New York market Sept. 23 on WPIX, Channel 11. Jane Dowden, president of Show Biz Inc., which produces the program, said it would open in many other major markets to

after the football season. It currently is in 10. Regulars in the

weekly hour-long variety-music

show are singers Ray Stevens. Bob Luman, and Debbie Lori Kaye, emcee Jerry Naylor and band leader Bill Pursell.

Among the early guests on the program are Boots Randolph, Frankie Randall, Gail Wynters, Deana Martin, Bobby Vce, Diana Trask, Johnny Tillotson. Mary Taylor, Roy Clark, Mitchell, Jackie DeShannon, Freddie Cannon, Patricia Morrison, Roger Miller, the Jor-

Guy

danaires,

and Zsa Zsa Gabor.

Naylor, a Tower recording artist, has moved here and will host two other local shows.

Mitch Miller Seeking Review

On UHF Channel Turndown

said last

head had credited WOR-FM with breaking Milch Ryder's "What Love" single and aiding sales of 102.000 copies in New

Now My York single

week

within hit

at

three days. Billboard's chart

No. 82 with

The

a star.

last

WASHINGTON— Mitch Miller,

voted

tion

UHF

down on

his applica-

Washington, D. C. channel by a Federal

for a

Communications Commission

re-

view board in July, has asked the full FCC to' review the board's decision.

An FCC Basil

hearing exeminer. Cooper, had warmly rec-

ommended

the former Columbia Records a&r man's proposals for running and programming his All-Amcrican "TV Features, Inc., on the capital city's Chan-

SEPTEMBER

iConliriiictt

23,

on

pai'e 34)

1967, BILLBOARD

ANNOUNCING The Annual Baja Marimba Band

MnilRTHPHF PniUTP.RT Open

to

all

distributors, rack jobbers,

1ST PRIZE— All

— All expenses paid for Color

1

week

TV/ 4TH PRIZE— On

as a band

boy/

one stops,

retailers,

expenses paid fori week vacation

JUDGES

for

and radio stations

vacation for 2 to Mexico City/

the road with the Baja for contest will

be

/ 2ND PRIZE 3RD PRIZE

2 to Spain

Marimba Band

for

one week

CLAUDINE LONGET; ANGIE

967 DICKINSON; LIZA MINNELLI / DEADLINE FOR ENTERING— OCT. /CLOSES-DEC. 1, 1967/ FINAL ENTRY PHOTO has to be mailed in by DEC. 5, 1967 /TO ENTER— submit a photo of yourself with name, address, 1

and phone number to

90028/ ATTENTION:

A&M

RECORDS, 1416

MOUSTACHE

,

1

N. La Brea, Hollywood, California

AFFILIATION

m

RECORDS

In WMk EnOii

•lllkMN SPECIAL SUtVET

TOJ»

SfEMiEtlBTG STAR Perfifnir-SMci

It

r«9lt1triRf frtatcit praparti»natt

Week! oa

This

Week

Week

1

label, Ka.

Artlil,

Title,

Pgk.

10

Chart

BABY

LOVE YOU

I

3

Seas,

MY EVEWTHINfi

YOU'RE

3

7

28

28

&

Diana Ross

6

29

27

Motown 111]

the Supremes,

CJobete, BMI)

5

5

6

6

FUNKY BROADWAY Wilson

7

30

2430 [Routine/

Atlantic

Pickett,

(Your Lsm Keeps UWng Me) HKHER AND HIGHER Jackie Wilson, Brunswick

Ruifin,

LOVE

IS

7

5

55336

10

W ^ W

&

Knight

the

& Cee A

Charlie Foxx, Eye, BMI)

11

&

11

CASONOVA (Youi Plajing Diys Are 0»er). Ruby Andrews, Zodiac 1004 (RicWil/CoKam, BMI)

S

10

fiROOVIN-

S

t

T.

29

FORGET

20

GET ON UP

IN

134 (Unbelievable,

Calla

BMI)

(Hi-Mi,

13

12

COME ON SOCK

14

14

SWEETEST THING THIS SIDE OF HEAVEN 10

9 8

16

19

13

SOUL MAN

the Miracles, Tamla 54152

20

18 19

^

22

26

Kent,

Tic

Ric

23 25

2 1

LONaY

BABY, I'M

47

2

Gamble 209 (Raiorsharp, BMI)

Intruders,

3

YOU KEEP RUNNING AWAY Motown 1113

Four Tops,

Wenna) TESTIFY

13

I'M

Parliaments, Revilot 207 (GraovtivlMi, BMI)

25

(Zira/Flotaca, BMI)

Gene Chandler, Brunswick 55339 IJalynne/BRC, BMI)

7

127 (Myto, BMI)

APPLES, PEACHES, PUMPKIN PIE Jay & the Techniques, Smash 2086 (I

1

(Jobete,

BMI)

A FOOL FOR YOU

James

LITTU OLE MAN (Uptight—Eniythine't

Carr,

1

Goldwax 328 (Rise/Aim, BMI)

DIFFERENT STROKES 3

Alright) Bill Cosby, Warner Bros. 7072 (Jobete, BMI)

Wittcrficid,

Louisville.

7

1

Johnson, Twilight Edgewaier, BMI)

103 (Zachron/

Syl

SELLING S

R&B

reglsterini greatest proportlanate

Waaks on Label. No.

Artist.

Title,

Chart

1

ARCTHA ARRIVES

5

This

Last

Week

Week

0'

SOUL

3

I

I

7

Motown

M

660

(M),-

660

S

Aretha

Franklin,

10

S

416

S

717

8145 (M); T.

t,

SD 8145

15

(M);

(M|;

11

25

26

FOR YOUR LOVE & Herb, Date TEM 3005

26

Gordy 919 (M);

S

919

LUSH LIFE

20

COLD SWEAT, PARTS 1 t 2 James Brown & His Famous Flames, (SI

.

KBMS-FM

KRLA

has joined to

Jim Wood Los Angeles

in

9-midnight

the

fill

slot.

Policy

LOVE SRM 555

Cosby, Warner Bros.

1634

(S)

29 (M)t

6 1634 (M):

ABCS 606

11

(S)

8149

(M);

SD BI49

1 (S)

SUPREMES SING RODGERS I HART (M);

SLP 659

15

(S)

BILL COSBY IS A VERY FUNNY FELLOW,

W

9 1618 (M)/ (No Stereo)

devel-

WVOL

with in Nashville while attending Tennessee State University. He had been with about two and a half years before moving to WJLB. He considers himself a "derivative of Ed Wright," who'd been program director of prior to joining Liberty Reccords as head of its Minit label. Allen wrote lyrics and produced the Jones jingles. Future plans call for psychedelic jingles. Station has brought in new equipment and is building up its news department. In Martha Jean Steinberg and Ernie Durham. Allen felt he had two of the top air personalities of any station in the nation. "Now, with the new equipment, we have everything to work with."

WABQ

RaOIO-TV

maRT

make

a station; he could make record. It can't be like that today." Things are changing so fast in radio, especially in

r&b

many

radio,

older dec-

jays

RATES REGULAR CLASSIFIED: Minimum:

DISPLAY

S5.

25tf

Eoch odditional inch Box rule around od.

in

a

word.

set olt cops.

line

First

CLASSIFIED:

$20. od, $15.

inch,

1

some

FREQUENCY DISCOUNTS: 3 consecutive insertions, 5%: 6 consecutive inser-

0%

tions, 1 insertions,

;

1

3

more consecutive

or

IS'JE).

BOX NUMBER:

50< service charge per insertion. Also allow 10 words (ot 25C eochl for numt>er ond oddress.

Miller

A/litch

CLOSING DATE:

Continued from page 32

days

December. But the review board awarded the Theodore Granik, New York attorney and radio-TV pronel

50, last

gram Wants

originator

of

Miller to contend with is O. Roy Chalk, who runs D. C. Transit and has other transportation interests, but is reapplying for the spot.

UHF

American

for

Tuesday,

p.m.

5

dote of

Send order 1

8B

or>d

11

issue.

payment

to;

RADIO-TV MART, Billboard W. Rendolph St., Chicago, III. 60601

"Youth

to Know," and others. third rival for singalong Mitch

Attorneys

prior to

PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY ALL ORDERS.

FCC

license to

A

UP AND AWAY

situation

this

WABQ

in Detroit. "Certain top tunes must be played consistently and deejays must be consisin their shows. One deejay can't make a station; it has to be a total operation and this is a new concept in r&b radio. In the old days, one guy could



W

that

CKLW

(M);

THE FABULOUS IMPRESSIONS

RIGHT

same

necessary to teach radio to these

(S)

Warner Bros.

the

15

(S)

Bill

Motown MLP 659

30

philosophy

26

37

IS

COWBOYS AND COLORED PEOPLE 29

2

his

were finding it difficult to grasp what was happening. "To some extent." Allen said "it was

1691 (M);

WONDERFULKESS

Flip Wilson, Atlantic

fell

Drake, consultant to General stations, and Paul program director of

Bill

16

11

(U);

fault

oped. It's just that times are changing and a radio station has to move with the times." Allen began his radio career

sound." Playlist will be 40 records, to which he will add as necessity demands. "You can never tell how many good tunes will come out in a good week, but I think the average will be about five new records a week." he said. The aim will be to establish

He

anybody's

wasn't

It

just

WABQ

programming was

people.

r&b

(S)

WS UP,

CLAUDE HALL

WJLB, Booth

Miller's

SCHOOLS A SUPPLIES HE! FIRST-CLASS RADIO

TELEPHONE

License in 5 weeks guaranteed. 9295.

Rooms and

Apts.,

week. Job placement free.

Tuition SlO-115 per achooli:

Two

Pla.. and Kansa* City, Mo. Kor Information contact R.E.I.. 1336 Main SI.. Sarasota, F)a.

Sarasota.

All-

TV

Features challenge the Granik plans on the grounds that he is now 60 years and his outside interests practice of law and ownership in a system. old,

include

CATV

34

.

Deejay

.

New Program

in



that Allen felt

S 921 (S)

CALIFORNIA DREAMING Was Montgomery, Verve V 8672

ABC ABC 606

2

Nancy Wilson. Capitol T 2757 (M); ST 2757 (S)

King 1020 (M); S 1020

3

(S)

5rh Dimension, Soul Clly SCM 91000 [Ml; SCS 92000 (S)

30 41

(S)

22

24

3 {Ml;

(S) .

.

WDVR-FM

.

.

a 3

USTEN

V6-8672

2

THE TEMPTATIONS GREATEST HITS

788

(5)

Ray Charles. ABC ABC 595 (M); ABCS 595

23

14 717

Peaches

TES 4005

13

28 24

(S)

SRM 563

the M-G.'s, Slax

Dionne Warwick, Scepter SPS 563 (S)

(M),-

Dionne Warwick. Scepter SPS 555 IS)

(S)

(S)

WINDOWS OF THE WORLD

W

Cosby, Warner Bros. 1691 IS)

HERE WHERE THERE

(S)

HIP-HUG HER Booker

2775

(M); ST

King 1018 (M); S 1018

7

1709

JAMES BROWN LIVE AT THE GARDEN

22

7

T 2775

Gordy 921

S 8148 (M): SO 8148

Rascals, Atlantic

SOUND OF WILSON PICKETT Atlantic

6

14

(S)

OTIS REDDING LIVE IN EUROPE 416 (M);

8

WS

1709 (M)i

TEMPTATIONS UVE

21

6 SD 501

GROOVIN'

Volt

7

WS 20

5

(M).-

w

REVENGE Bill

25

(S)

SUPER HITS

Young

8

16

SD

(S)

Various Artists, Atlantic SOI

it

Capitol

THArs LOU Lou Rawls, Capitol T 2756 (M)i ST 2756

9

Chart

MAGNIFICENT MEN "LIVE"

18

(S)

19

8139 (M);

Atlantic

Weeks on

* fob.

Tnle, Artist, Ubel. No.

Warner Bros,

IS)

NEVER LOVED A MAN THE WAY LOVE YOU

8139

5

922

S

1

rector.

tent

week

BILL COSBY SINGS/SILVER THROAT

7

922 (M);

REACH OUT Four Tops,

4

M

this

Odell Brown & the Organ-izers, Cadet LP (M), LPS 788 (S)

(S)

WITH A LOT

Temptations, Gordy

«/U/«7

LI

upward progress

MELLOW YELLOW

16

Aretha Franklin. Atlantic 8150 (M);

SD BI50

2

Dave Shaycr, 0th year. formerly of in Philain delphia, has joined Pasadena. Calif., as program di-

with a 30.4

consistency in programming, Al-

•inboard SPECIAL SURVET Far Week Endlitf

Week

a

time to time.

a

Broadcasting's ,000-watt operation here, has

RKO

This

WICLO

Caen of

host

"Music

in

launched a new programming policy centering around tighter production, faster pacing, and a new set of custom jingles by Quincy Jones. Wash Allen, who just reprogram cently took over director duties after being transferred from Booth's in Cleveland, said the Detroit station would be "running with a blast, exciting young full

Drew,

Alleek

is

noon and

By

as

STAR Perfarmer-LP's

to

DETROIT

len said.

it

Ky..

a.m.

leader

Herb

as

Joe Black, host of WGAR's After Dark" show for Cleveland listeners, marks his

.

Bon Gunn and

Hooper

WJLB

in



.

.

week

hour evening conversation series on KGO-TV. San Francisco. Music personalities will be interviewed on the show from

at

WJLB

King Curtis, Atco 6511 (Pronlo/Kllynn, BMI)

(Akbeslal/Act Three, BMI)

24

3

20

THERE GOES THE LOVER

YOU'VE GOT TO PAY THE PRICE Al

ME BABY

MEMPHIS SOUL STEW

45 7

116 (Big Shot,

ASCAP)

22

3

Lome 2070

Linda Jones,

11

SUN

503

HYPNOTIZED

44

NEARER TO YOU LITTLE

.

.

columinst

last

Saturday

which

1

1

Dionn

Jesse James, 2Cth Century-Fox 66B4 Je-Ma/Chavit, BMI)

12

Betty Harris, Ssnsu 466 (Marsaint, BMI)

GIMME

Brenton Wood, Double Shot

C

S.

2

2

BELIEVE IN

43

BMI)

YOUR UNCHANGING LOVE Marvin Gaye, Tamla 54153 (Jobete, BMI)

21

4

Box Tops, Mala 565 (Barton. BMI)

14

&

MELLOW

MAN

THE LETTER

42

MORE LOVE (Jobete,

681 (Don, BMI)

Brenda & the Tabulations, (Bee Cool, BMI)

2

Sotokey Robinson

director

but only 7.4 in the San Francisco

.

Chronicle

4

lUST ONCE IN A LIFHIME

BMI)

(Don,

Harry

M

Laura Lee, Chess 2013 (Chevis, BMI)

10 421

Sam Norman.

2

ODE TO BILLIE JOE DIRTY

Tamla 54151 (Jobete, BMI)

IT Bland, Duke

3

Bobbie Genttr, Capitol 5950 (Shayne, ASCAP)

Sam t Dave, Stax 231 (Easl/Prailo, BMI)

18

Irs GOT TO BE

afternoon.

bowed

WWOK,

July-August

TURN ON YOUR LOVELIGHT Jr., Bell

the morning,

a

Leon Haywood, Dacca 32164 (Jim-Edd, BMI)

14

THAT DID Bobby

46

11

Vando 101 (Blackwood, BMI)

Bartley,

WAS MADE TO LOVE HER

Stevie Wonder,

IG

TO ME

IT

Johnson, Twilight 100 (Carforn, BMI)

Syl

Chris

gram

Gemini ID04 (Hangra/Slockbridge, BMI)

Oscar Toney

Sumter.

in

features a

THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT

LOVE BUG, LEAVE MY HEART ALONE

37

WOL.

morning and

afternoon.

Hot KM) format. New deejay line-up at Charlotte, N. C. includes prodirector Phil Rainy, Ross Brooks, Mile Cloer, Jim Beaty,

3

Martha Reeves & the Vandellas, Cordy 7042 (Jobele, BMI)

37

afternoon. the

of

director

new program

4

Ray Charles, ABC 10970 (United Artists, ASCAP)

BMI)

4

Bunky 7750

the

BMI)

(Slascar,

15

I

Exits,

Washington.

is

UMP

UNDER THE STREET

34

operations

in

10 6 p.m. the morning

in

a

Sondcrling station, leads the market with an r&b format. Atkins began work al his new job last week. In case I haven't mentioned it before. Larry James

(Cat-a-log/

BMI)

(Double

8

IT Sandpebbles,

Esquires,

St« 224

the M.G.'s,

appointed

WOL

WDXY

Soul Survivors, Crimson 1010 Diaittond/Downstairs,

4

Slax 22S (East, BMI)

Caria,

Booker

4 Dynamo 109

EXPRESSWAY TO YOUR HEART

33

KNOCK ON WOOD

and

years

...

35034

Soul

Pips,

(Jobete, BMI)

Otis

S

6 BMI)

(Tree,

YOU ARE THE MAN

32

EVERYBODY NEEDS LOVE Gladys

17

6

A DOGGONE GOOD THING

Joe Tex, Dial 4061

Inez

7

BIT,

A WOMAN'S HANDS

31

(Jalynre/BRC, BMI)

V ^

seven

WAKY had 17.2 and a 22 in the WAVE had a 13.4 in a 12.2 in the WHAS had a 12.3 in

noon

Atkins, in Denver radio the

former program director of Hoi 100 powerhouse KIMN thererhas been

(Jobele, BMI)

35035

Soul

Eddie Floyd, Stax 323 (East, BMI)

BUI)

Drive-In,

Radio-TV Editor

Ted

148 (East, BMI)

Volt

DON'T YOU MISS ME A LITTU BABY Jimmy

CLAUDE HALL

By

7

KNUCKLEHEAD

pasi

REfllCTfOHS

4

4

12196 (Jac/Blue

Scepter

ASCAP)

Bar-Kays,

Temptations, Gordy 7063 (Jobcti, BMI)

4

217 (Boogaloo/love lone, BMI)

WINDOWS OF THE WORLD Dionne Warwick,

9

Aretha Franklin. Allanlic 2427 (Pronto, BUI]

2

KARATE-eOO-GA-LOO Jerry 0., Shout

32

2

profriti tkii wttk.

Week!

48

James Brown & the Famous Flames, King 6110 (Dynatone, SMI)

2

pwarj

This

Week

Ckatt

COLD SWEAT

1

Radio-TV programming

«/]]/«7

XtAB SINGLES

NitSCillAmOUS •365

DAYS OF LAUGHS"— A DAILY

radio utt cervlce: may be available In your market. Try a month. S2. Box Merchandise Mart Stn, Chlcafo

3736. 60654.

SEPTEMBER

t/n

23,

1967,

BlUBOARD

Album Reviews

Continued From Bock Covor

OUR GOLDEN FAVORITES

NATIONAL BREAKOUTS

6556

Derom DE 16008

(412-16008-3;

(S)

Hermon

< 12- 1 8008-3)

Keith.

SR 61129

Leon Bibb. Philips PHM 200 249 (M); PHS 600 249 (S)

21129 {M);

The^e in

"Suzanne" was by Leon Bibb

new

albumi, reporleo

Oeen maicr markers

ridve

(S)

K«ith hai another winner here. His reptrtoire is top-grade and his delivery gives tune an unusual zippy quality. Producer Jerry Rosi has seen to it that each side has the air-play quality that stations programming alubms want which it an tmportdnr factor in getting sales.

wh

done belter then good programming ma-

LP's

not yet on Billboard's Top getl.ng itrong iaies action

LP's tiy

Chart, dealers

.

.

CASH & JUNE CARTER

I

Columbia CI 2728 (M); CS 9528

bal-

.

(SI

.

Hermits,

(330-02728-3;

WAYNE NEWTON

THE BEST OF

Buck

Owens &

2760

(S)

MGM

4478 (M); SE 4478

E

(S)

.

.

.

AGAIN

Ernest

Tubb and

74872

(S)

.

.

.

.

(S)

DL 4872 (M); DL

Lynn, Decca

Loretta

.

STER 5001

(M);

(400 04872-3; 400-74872-3)

.

.

.

Marly Robbins, Columbio CI 2725 (M): SO 9525

300-02797-5)

.

.

.

TONIGHT CARMEN

Copilol T 2797 (M); ST 2797 (S) (300-02797-3;

.

2760 (M); ST

His Buckoroos, Copilol T

(300-02760-3; 30O-O276O-5)

SINGIN'

.

350-09528-5)

lads.

UAS

.

HAPPIEST MILLIONAIRE

ON WITH JOHNNY

CARRYIN'

of

"Here There and Everywhere" To soft

s

.

Soundtrack, Buena Vista DV 5001 (903 05001-3; 905-03001-5)

never .

for easy listening stations, at is much the material on this excellent album. also does "If Were a Carpenter," "Little Boxes," and "To Be a Man," varying the pace from a recitation version of terial

He

.

(660-04478-3; 660-04478-5)

NEW ACTION

NEW COMPOSERS

THE

MG

Mtrcury

.

YOUR TENDER LOVING CARE

POP SPOTIIGHT

OUT OF CRANK

(S)

BLAZE

DES 18008

(M);

.

Teicher, United Artists, UAL 3556 (M); (875-03556-3; 875-06556-5)

&

Ferronte

PROCOL HARUM

(S)

(350 02725-3; 350-09525-5)

GOLDEN HITS-THE LAWRENCE WELK

BEST

Dot DIP 3812 (M); DIP 23812 430-25812-5)

(S)

.

TWO FOR

.

ROAD

THE

OF

THE MAGIC PEOPLE

.

.

Paupers, Verve ForecosI FT 3026 (M); FTS 3026 (895-03026-3; 895-03026-5)

.

(430-03812-3;

BLOWIN' YOUR MIND .

.

.

.

Henry Moncmi, RCA Victor IPM 3802 (M); ISP 3802

(S)

.

.

(S)

.

Van Morrison, Bang BLP 218 (M); BLPS 218 (204-00218-3; 204-00218-5)

(S)

(775 03802-3; 775-03802-5)

BLUES THEME

.

A

Anthony & th* lmp«riali. V««p VP 13516 (M); VPS 13516 (S)

GIRL FOR AIL SEASONS

CAPT. BEEFHEART & HIS BAND (SAFE AS MILK)

Gail Wynters. Hickory LP 138 (M}; LPS 138 (S)

.

A ntw bag-and

a great one-for Anthony and the Imptrialt. Here the quartet delivers

easy listening versions of "You Only live Twice," "Georgy Girl," and "Born free," •mong others. Every tune is good, highly entertaining listening. Teddy Randazio does txcflfcni producing [ob on this.

Buddoli BDM 1001 (M); BDS 3001 239-05001-5)

going all out on thit attractive is young artist and this, her debut album, should pay off with handsome dividends. Including her first single "You Don't Have to Be In Love," this pressing offers different tempos of soul, but meaningful interpretations. Among the gems are such favorites at "My Man," "Bom to Lose" and Hickory

Me

"You Made

L«vfl

.

.

.

.

Dovie Allon & the Arrowi, Tower T 3078 (M); DT 5078 (873-05078-3; 873-05078-5)

MOVIE GRABBERS

.

THESE YEARS .

(S)

Mott Monro, Capitol T 2801 (M); BLPS 2801 (S)

.

(S)

(300-02801-3; 300-02801-5)

THE YIDDISH ARE COMING! THE YIDDISH ARE COMINGI

MAGIC

.

.

.

.

Lou Jacobi with Vorious Artists, Verve V 15058 (M); (S) (893-13058-3; 895-13058-5)

(239-01001-3;

V6-15058

You."

Vk

Dqpione Srtgs.

I Tin i>

.\iit,fli*.Siii;{n\

VIC

OAMONE SINGS

Harmon

MORE FOR YOUR MONEY Various

Arliiti. Bell B«ll

(M); B«ll

6009S

POP SPOTLIGHT

6009

ALL

11231

ABOUT LOVE

HL

7431

(M);

SAINT-5AENS: NO. I

HS

tias all the ingredients for one of the low-priced records of the season. Dasings the oldies with style and sentimentaiity. There's such winners as "Out of Nowhere," "I Cried For You" and "Deep Purple." It's nostaglia without gush. Ttiis

up a big winner's circle of this package combining hits by Lee Ooney, such "Working in the Coal Mine" and James and Bobby Purify with "I'm Your Puppet." James Carr and Gladys Knight and the

DeAngelii Singers / Peter Angelii Ork. ABC ABC 609 (M),

Challc

ABCS 609

(S)

at

Pips are also here, along with the Emand othen. Something lo please perors

everybody.

^

LM

Here's a highly commercial LP that should sell very well nationwide. DeAngelii, a top arranger and producer for recording stars, conducts an orchestra and 15 singers which closely resembles the Milch Miller style. "Too Late," "True Love," and "Oh, How I Miss You Tonight" are tome of those that hit the entertainment mark.

here

From

"Caprice Viennois" to Gershwin's

You

My Woman,"

Suk displays perfect control, and gives the tS selections his personal trademark. Alfred Holecek's magnificent. is

Heifeti's brilliant interpretation of the Saint-

"Sess,

Saens "Sonata No. I" will be widely acclaimed With performances such as the one on the album, it's little wonder that he ranks among the best selling virtuosos of

accompanyment

the

(S)

There's a wide collection of pieces that should please all musical tastes. Kreisler's

mone

Is

time-

m ^

^

Josef Suk. Epic LC 3967 (M);

BC 1367 Jascha Heifelz. RCA Victor 2978 (M); LSC 2978 (S)

big

(S)

VIRTUOSO VIOLIN MUSIC

SONATA

(S)

(

MtlMT:) MMllH Annliui SjUi>'<«-ll*nMMl4s

Toots nrhielemanM \^

Toots

Thielmani

mand RS 918

Ork.

.

Andre Kostelanetz. Harmony HL 7432 (M); HS 11232 (S)

.

LOW

Thlelemans, one of the most accomplished and versatile pop musicians of the day, combines some excellent guitar work with a big band sound. Repertoire ranges in time from "The Continental" to easy listening material of today. It's all tastefully arranged and makes for extremely easy listening.

PRICE POP SPOTLIGHT

MUSIC FROM LERNER &

ComSD

(M); RS 918

LOEW'S "CAMEIOT" Andr« Prevrn. Harmony 7429 (M); HS 11229 (S)

Tools

23,

MAHHEW

ST.

PASSION .

(S)

SEPTEMBER

BACH:

JOY TO THE WORLD

POP SPOTLIGHT GUITARS AND STRINGS AND THINGS

HL

Previn and his trio give a poptreatment to the "Camelot" score comes off as smooth as silk and prosome mighty easy lislrning. The cover art, with a helmeted pianist in tails, It

vides

catches

1967, BILLBOARD

the

spirit

of

the

thing.

CARMINA

sity

UniverChoirs/ Philadelphia Orch.

Ormondy. Columbia ML 6417 (M);

MS 7017

(S)

baritone.

ALBUM REVIEWS ON BACK COVER

SEE

Maefliger

bouw

Blegen/Knesi/Temple

Kostelanetz and his orchestra have packaged the standard Yuletide favorites as well as Ride," Skater's Walti," "Sleigh "The "March of the Toys," and "The Sugar Plum Fairy Interlude." Earl Wrightson is

Andre jazi

ORFF: CATUUI

This is a highly pleasing and often moving interpretation of Orff's work based on the poems of Catillus. The exceptionally fine soloists and choirs, aided invaluably

Ormandy and the Philadelphia make a fitting and moving U. S. LP debut indeed. A tint complete translation from the Utirt is enclosed. by

this

Philips

/

Berry

/

Concertge-

Orchestra. Jochum. PHS 4-999 (S)

monumental

Matthew Passion" performed by a fine set of soloists, the Netherlands Radio Chorus, the Boys Chorus of St. Willibrod's Church of Amsterdam and the lamed Concertgebouw Orchestra under Eugen Jochum's usually fine conducting. The inclusion of reproductions of Rembrandt sketches addes to ttte packBach's is

admirably

age.

{Continued on pane 42)

C

39

For

Week

Ending September 23, 1967

Rmw4

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TOP

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152

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MANTOVANI HOLLYWOOD IHIH U Mil

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111

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-indicates Star Performer

STRAVINSKY: ORPHEUS/ SYM-

Philipi

TO

MliliiM CmI. CiIiiiIIi

167

•169

IBI»«M0I-1;

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188 189

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London

IM aMWL

— — —

187

WEST MEETS EAST

(S)

Ernst

and and

162

n.Mi

IllMMMI

[Ml

(IMMIIll;

161

POLIVETSIAN DANCES

27

w

Ml.

(IIMIIM-I.

RALLY ROUND THE fLAC Iwl.

50

ommim-ii hi w i m ii

HI

MOVEMENTS

Symphony.

PHS 900-163

THE GREAT MARY GARDEN Odyssey 32 16 0079 (M)

Davis.

(S)

is grand collector's item for the a great Miss Garden's fans. In this LP, culled from recordings of 1911 and 1912, she sings arias from "La Traviata" and "Louise," among others. Side two consists ot five Scottish and Irish songs. Tech-

This

Colin Davis adds to his luster as one of the finest young conductors aroynd with an effective Stravinsky coupling. The "Sym-

phony

in Three Movements" with its associations with World War II is precisely performed as is the more familair ballet

nical

sound reproduction

is

9^ *

adequate.

tcori

SIIOSIXkOVHIl ST\II1I<)\V\
A CADDY FOR DADDY SCHUBERT: SONATA IN

Paul

Ihis

Clora Series

KOSTELANETZ CONDUCTS GREAT ROMANTIC BALLETS Columbia Ml 6418 (M); 701 B

Nuw

MS

Classical

Repertoire ing with usual brilliance. his "Sleeping includes the popular Beauty Ballrl," "Swan Lake Ballet" and "Nutcracker Ballet" by Tchaikovsky. And there's Khachaturian't lively "Gayne Ballet."

York Philhamionic. Milro16 0123

Philips

World

(S)

Miss Haskil's playing is lop-nolch here as she shapes phrases from both works with her delicate and sensitive touch. The Schubert sonafa is simply and precisely weaved. The Moiart work shows off her stylish subtlety. Her death in 1960 left a void wf>ich has not been filled.

well-produced

record

has

a

Honk Mobley.

Su-

Blue Note 4230

Mobley

big sound.

One side is devoted lo hymns and anthems and the other side to gospel and spiritual. On the former there's the immortal "Abide With Me," while on the latter there's a moving solo performance by Phil Dunaway on "Gonna Cross Jordan River."

and his cast o' handpicked jai/ personae have come up with a disk that will be a big chart item. Four out of the five compositions are Mobley originals and this perhaps accounts for their being good ones. From the highly spirited title number, to rhe deep-groove blues of "The Morning After." the group never errs.

BsnoiLEY nmncHTiiit

poulos. Odyssey 32 (M)

(SI

should be a big one for the popmarket, with Kostelaneli conduct-

This

SHOSTAKOVICH: SYMPHONY NO. 10

Haskil.

PHC 9076

Weaver

Chorale. preme 115 (M); S 215 (S)

SONATA

B FLAT/MOZART: NO. 10 IN C

Mitropoulos conducting Ihe New York Philharmonic on this important Sfiostakovich listening experience lhat every is a classical music follower should have. The record captures the deeply emotional expressiveness of Ihe symphony in a particularly masterful way.

m

EXPIIESSION

work

sill

rn<>Mvsui:ij
I

MIMI \sl

III

II ll\IK
JAZZ ALBUM SPOTLIGHT

AIIIKI Kl

iMviiiiii

dRr)

IIVMV.OI Mll

JAZZ ALBUM SPOTLIGHT

illK IC

THE SPOILER Stonley Turrenline. Blue Note BIP 4256 (M); BLP 84256 (S)

SEMI CLASSICAL SPOTUGHT John Coltrane. Impvlie A-9120

THE OLD BELOVED

Mormon

LOW

PRICE

LOW

CUSSICAL

BIZET/TCHAIKOVSKY/

BRAHMS: THE FOUR SYMPHONIES

Naw ter.

York Philharmonic. WalOdyssey 32 36 007 (M)

This is a fine recording and Ihe performof Walter and the New York Philharmonic show they are a capable unit to render the Brahms Four Symphonies. The three record set here should be included in every classical record library.

ances

42

PONCHIELLI Columbia Symphony. Beechom. Odyssey 32 16 0117 (M) Biiet's priccio of the

to

To be made Choir. ML 6412 (M), MS

The material is Anglo-American folk which has reached classical status - "Annie Laurie," "Loch Lomond," "Jeanie With the Light Brown Hair," with the Tchaikovsky "Mone But the Lonely Heart " The per-

formance

marked

is

by

taste

and

start.

AS-9120

This LP makes up the late Coltrane's last recording session and it represents still another step forward in his drive to create a powerful form. The title selection is a near 11-minute composition complete with Coltrane's exploratory approach and the characterizes the olher three numbers. "To Be" (16 minulei), "Offering" [B minutes) and "Ogunde" {3 minutes)

same

More SEE

ALBUM REVIEWS

ON BACK COVER

(S)

This LP is the second in a four-album project by Turrentine and arranger Ouke Pearson, and if the remaining disks are as good as this one, its a team that should never split. Particularly eHedive is a number called "The Magilla," a bluesy, crisp, composition with lots of brass. Also included is the theme from the film, "Oscar"

and "You're Gonna Hear From Me."

(Continued on pane 44)

grace.

"Carmen Suite," Tchaikovsky's "Caand Ponchielli's "Dance Italien"

Hours," with an excellent performance by Sir Thomas Beecham and the Columbia Symphony might not be the classical buff's cup of tea, but there's a vast market of pop buyers begin into classical. And this an is

way

Columbia 7012 fS)

PRICE CLASSICAL

SPOTLIGHT

SONGS

(M);

the more you GIVE

will

LIVE

HEART FUND SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

only one RFPnnnQ

man can

produced by andrew loog oldham

#55993

re visit >unaiiiiay'... del

\x«^3f^

shannon

1UIHI\'SJU*(1

THE EXPLOSIVE SIDE OF J' WVai-V

Album Reviews

MARTHA

SMMME-

ALBUM

Continued from page 42

REVIEW POLICY Every olbum sent to Billboard

INTtHNATIONAl. SPOTIIGMT

Decco DL 4690 (M); DL 74990 (S)

"Vida"-as and

SWING LOW, SWEET CADILLAC Jimmy Reed. Bluesway 6009 {M}; BLS-6009 (S)

Dizzy GSIIeipie. Impul»* A-9149 (M); AS-9149 (S) This could be one oF the big [azi sellen of rhc yc«r. Oiuy's irreverant approach toward his music is tempered with a musicianship of the highest quality. The title song It much more than a parody of "Sweet Chariot" and the verbal byplay with the tidemen is not merely to hoke up the performance. It's solid jazz and it can

be dug by

BL-

well

to

j«iz in

this

Siitef" LP a

double threat position on sales. Jo« Panama as a lot going for him in this excellent LP to ttie benefit of the listening

...

public.

it

rated

Ma rtho

for Spotlight Picks or Speciol

III

Merit

(S)

Picks,

are

LP's

Schlamme explores the Jewish folk idiom and makes it fresh and alive warm and penetrating voice. her the songs are humorous ("Chaiher

category of music.

reviews

Full

Schlomme. Vangua rd

SRV.73004

(M); Milt song with

Bill-

and

Panel,

within

Everymon Series SRV-3004

Latin



Spanish—

botti

Englisli-"Soui

as

My Name"-give

"What's

heard by

potential

AND ALMONQS AND OTHER JEWISH FOU SONGS RAISINS

The pulsating rtiythim of beat and tunn vocalized

sales

!ti

Is

Review

board's

THE EXPLOSIVE SIDE OF JOE PANAAU

ALBUM SPOTLIGHT

review

for

ore

presented

and

oil

other

under

lilted

their

reipcctive cotcgoriei.

Whether

kele") or tragic ("Zog Marao'O, manner is refreshing and understanding. The title song, the well-known Jewish lullabye, is a standout.

Reed gets down to the nitty gritty with "Blue We flound Dog," wraps it up right with "I Wake Up at Daybreak" and "Don't Press Your Luck Baby," and seals it with "Dedication to Sonny," Jimmy Reed leaves no doubl he's king of the blues. The songs new, but the style is grits and from are

ttie

heart.

all.

.

MERIT

SPECIAL MERIT PICKS

Special Merit Picks are new releases of outstanding merit which dticrve exposure and which could have commercial success within rheir respective categories of music.

lOW

POP SPECIAL MERIT

VIcentico Valdes. ists

UAL 359B

United Art-

(M);

UAS 6398

(S)

This

ODETTA AT CARNEGIE

HAU FOLK SONGS FOR BABIES, SMALL CHILDREN, PARENTS

Od«Ha. Vanguard Everyman Scries

73003

SRV-3003

(M);

SRV-

AND BABY

(S)

Latin

American

performer

brings

romantic

a

off

touch

with

(S)

Mati adds his imagination and explosive arrangements to such big-band standards as "Jersey Bounce," done in Latin tempo; "Frenese" and "Bye Bye Blues." Results are swinging and scintillating. Solo work by Vtnny Bell, Bob Tricario and Paul Griffin

outstanding.

is

she dou.

Baby

The

Everyman

Sitters.

Vanguard

Series

SRV-3002

SRV-733002

(M); is

Capitol T 2831 (M); ST 2B31

(S)

The unusual combination of harpsichord and string quartet has resulted in an uncommon album that seems a natural for easy listening programming. The LP offers fine performances of such pop hits as "Up, Up and Away," "Windy" and "Don't Sleep in the Subway" with a blend of authentic best and chamber music treatment that proves a del>ght.

a

fun

Pepe

LOW

Pepe Jaro. RCA Victor MKL1736 (M); MKS-1736 (S)

The Ormon Luboff Choir. Harmony ML 7433 (M); HS 11233 (S)

packs

powerful

a

emotional

guitar

all-the

trills

kind

that

sparkles through add spice to a

Land

Your land" and "Greenland Whale

Is

Fisheries." The group's craftsmanship shines

The

Luboff

Christmas

in

Choir

strong sales in the fall. does its usual slick and most popular

job with 22 of the carols, The quality

an

represents

for

Coedmon TC 2023 An album

is

Morgle Singleton. Ashley A3003

the poet at his best.

Mariachi Vargas de Tecaiitlan,

RCA

Victor

MKSO740

Question."

PRICE CLASSICAL

SPECIAL MERIT

OPERATIC A DRAMATIC FANTASIES LISZT:

Kentner,

piorw.

Turnabout TV

MKl-1740

(M);

(S)

virtuoso performance by a presents some of Liszt's difficult piano muiic with true authority, the

(S)

COMEDY SPOTLIGHT

HOUSTON/l AIN'T GOT NO

THE WONDERFUL WACKY WORLD OF WOODY ALLEN

HOME Vangua rd

Bell

SRV-3006 A

Bell

6008 (M)

laugf)-filled package recorded live at Mr. Kelly's in Chicago that shows Woody Allen his wackiest and funniest, which also is his most salable. Aden's unique way of looking at things draws humor out of such topics as marriage, divorce, psychoanalysis, school, bullies and a host of others. The results are uproarious.

at

tion of Silvestre Vargas, uses violins with trumpets to achieve a haunting, romantic Other tunes include "Amorc del sound. Alma," "Duda" and "Tristes Jardines."

artist

"Reminiscences de Don Juan," bated on themes from Mozart's opera is a tour-deforce for Kentner, while the "Walti" from Gounod's "Faust" also affords him much fine opportunities. The other two selections, based on themes from Wagner's "Flying Dutchman" and Mendelssohn also are excellent.

LOW

PRICE CLASSICAL

SPECIAL MERIT .

^

BACH: SUITES FOR UNACCOMPANIED Maurice Gendron. Philips World Series 3-010

600SS

Bell

Bell

600S

a

this

PHC

(S)

(S)

instrumentals

guitar

featuring

a wide variety of guitars and guitar styles. Tunes include "I Walk the Line," "Third Man Theme" and "Oh Pretty Woman." A ?ood catalog item and radio stations will

ind

THE LEGENDARY CISCO

powerful

The Tennessee Guitars.

"Poeta y Campesino," an overture by Frani von Suppe, receives a mariachi treatment. The Vargas de Tecaiitlan, under the direc-

44

TV

CEUO

Far-reaching

%ust

Houston.

Turnabout

THE GUITAR STYLINGS OF THOSE NASHVILLE CATS (M); Bell

POETA Y CAMPESINO -* ^/>I_L^

woow

Everyman Series (M); SRV.73006 (S)

Sinfonietto.

LOW

Louit

y»ct.TnKrv

Cisco

Zimbler

34154S A fascinating, well-played quartet of modern pieces, including the subtle intricacy of Bartok's "Divertimento for String Orchestra." foss, an authority in this area of music as conductor and composer, conducts the fine Zimbler Sinfonictta expertly A first listing for Skalkottas' "Little Suite for Strings" is another high point. Trumpeter Roger Voisin in excels tvn "The

renowned

Margie Singleton scores high with this LP that packages several hits by other artists. Tunes include "There Goes My Everything" and "Elusive Dreams"- with several other excellent tunes written by Leon Ashley and herself. And one of these is the ringing "Your Conscience Sends Me Flowers."

P

been more than seven years since Houston died, but the folksies still remember him. Th is is a representat ive Houston album. Nearly all thi 17 cuts were written by the artist and by Woody Guthrie. It's authentic folk, »nd it's good enough lo be commercial folk.

SPECIAL MERIT

34163S

COUNTRY SPECIAL MERIT

It's

prod-

LUKAS FOSS CONDUCTS IVES/ MILHAUD/SKALKOTTAS/BARTOK

This

COUNTRY MUSIC WITH SOUL (M)

Sandburg reading his poetry and telling his stories is no novelty. Sandburg's place in American poetry is secure, and his recent death has heightened the public's appreciation of the "Poet of the of

people." This

Cisco

this

the price

excellenf buy.

COUNTRY SPECIAL MERIT

CARL SANDBURG READS HIS

full

throughout.

This should pull

proficient

\mj THE PEOPLE YES

of the original Weavers of both wonderful singing and instrumental harmony. Ttiis is no such great On," "This

appreciate

PRICE CLASSICAL

song.

SRV-SOOI

Any compilation must be

LOW

Unanswered

SONGS OF CHRISTMAS

Interpretive

ihem

THE WEAVERS' SONGBAG The Weavers. Vanguard

PRICE CHRISTMAS

SPECIAL MERIT

MIS CANCIONES PARA TM

J art

will

uct.

MARIANO AND THE UNBEIIEVABLES

(S)

delightful record that will bring for children (and adults) kepi indoors by inclement weather. Some of the tunes include participation for the small fry. Featured singers are Alan (artd Jeremy) Larkin, Doris Kaplan and Lee Hays, one of ttic original Weavers. This

wallop. He puts soul into a tune such as "Cada Muchos Anos," while other songs come across with a soft romantic touch.

first-rate

(S)

listeners

POP SPECIAL MERIT

BT)

i

exception. Included here are folk tunes as "Gotta Travel

34164S

finesse.

SITTERS

INTERNATIONAL SPOTLIGHT

Everyman Series (M); SRy-73001 (5)

Guiomor Movoes. Turnabout Vox TV Guiomar Novaes, the Braillian pianist, has an impeccable technique; and the performance has great sensitivity and nuance. Diicerning

I

much

CUSSICAL

SCHUMANN: CARNAVAL, SCENES FROM CHtlDHOOD POPILLONS

/hjX

seems

unfair to classify Odetta as a "folk singer." Her appeal is so broad as to negate the classification. She draws on a wide variety of styles and repertoire"If Had a Hammer," "Jirtin Henry," "Sometimes I l^eel Like a Motherless Child" and "No More Auction Block for Me." And she approaches perftction with everything It

well-known

makes an impressive debut on United Artists RKords with a set of lovely and lush ballads like "Un Muchacho Como You," "Cuando te Deje de Querer" and "El Mundo de Noche." His style is warm and he

PR5007 (M); PR5007 SD

Project 3

PRICE

SPECIAL MERIT

PEnR MATZ BRINGS 'EM BACK

SORPRESAS

valuable

programming

Maurice Gendron 's Edison-Award-winning performance is outstanding in this budget All six Bach suites for unaccompanied

set.

cello are cleanly played with superb bowing throughout.

tool.

LOW 'OW

fS\

P't'CE

CLASSICAL

London phony

/

Various Artists

(Moralt).

PHC 3-009

WAGNER: ORCHESTRAL SHOWPIECES /

Philips

Vienna Sym-

World

especially

in

the

Vienno New Symphony. Goberman. Odyiiey 32 16 0119 (M); 32 16 0120 (S)

Series

CS)

The presentation of Mozart's p
PRICE CLASSICAL

SPECIAL MERIT

SPECIAL MERIT

MOZART: DON GIOVANNI

reading

of the title role by George London. Rudolf Mora It's corKlucting of the Vienna Symphony is another plus.

A competent performance by Max Goberman and the Vienna New Symphony makes tMVB an outstanding buy for the budget buyer. The selKtions from "Tannhauser" and "Die Meistersinger" are powerful and melodic. It's a good introduction to Wagner.

SEPTEMBER

(Continued on pORe 61) 23,

1967, BILLBOARD

"^riai

milTED FOR

II

mum mm^m r"

"HELM' MAMA" e..

The capture of this great

new single has been demanded by Disc Jockeys. Last seen hiding out in his Imperial

Country album...

BIG RElLfARD

Hi

r

»

A

"COME BACK WHEN YOU

BOBBY VEE Vee Day

for

Bobby!

GROW OP"

His sensational

"Come Back When You Grow Up" album is heading the same way as the single! Join the Vee Day parade today! LRP-3534;lST-7S34

mm UBERIY

1

GET READY for the

BIGGEST SALES EVER on these

^XH ART- BOUND" 917U

NEW STEREO ALBUMS from RECORDS WORLD

LEADER IN RECORDED

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ALBUM #917 THE NEW SOUND OF TODAY'S BIG BAND. with Today's Here it is! The New NOW Sound of Today's UNIQUE BIG BAND Music Today's Rhythms and the one & only Doc Severinsen: Monday, Monday, One Step Above, Soul & Inspiration, Here, There and Everywhere and

DOC SEVERINSEN

.

.

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FLASH*— Watch Doc

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ALBUM #919 EXPLOSIVE BRASS IMPACT

- WARREN

KIME AND HIS 'BRASS IMPACT' ORCH. Brass Impact Was Great Trades

UnanimousI Spotlight picks in All But "Explosive Brass Impact"— Vol. 2 is Bigger & Better. Mor« explosive exciting Mor« electrifying than you can imagine!

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ALBUM =916 WALKING IN THE SUNSHINE-THE ROBERT DE CORMIER SINGERS. The BIGOPEN-SUNNY sound of Country Music ... the best-the biggest-the happiest songs— such as: Walk the Line, Almost Persuaded, Walking in the Sunshine, Act Naturally and 8 others ... A Tremendously Commercial Album is Sure to See Strong Sales. I

that

ALBUM ^18 GUITAR AND STRINGS ... AND THINGSI-TOOTS THIELEMANS AND HIS ORCH. Toots Thieleman's Magical Guitar Fascinating, Fresh, New Sound Phil Bodner's Dazzling Flute . Voices . and Wonderful Songs Strings such as: The Continental, Sunny, Wave, So What's New and 8 more.

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ALBUM -11037 GEORGE GERSHWIN-PORGY AND BESS/AN AMERICAN IN PARIS William Steinberg and The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. BrilThis is the Finest Gershwin that has ever been recorded liantly interpreted & performed ... & recorded with a revolutionary NEW noise reduction system which makes possible the purest level of recorded sound ever ACHIEVED! An overvrhelming musical ex.

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A sutHldlary ol ABC ReCOIIDS. INC. 1330 Avtnui ol the AmerlCH. New York, N.

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WORLD LEADER -

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ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SCORE BY LESLIE BRICUSSE WRITTEN ESPECIALLY FOR "DOCTOR dolittle:' contains 14

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"When Look In Your Eyes"/ "The Vegetarian" I

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In

"I

Think Like You" 1

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PAGE FULL COLOR STORY & PICTURE BOOKLET

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11

Me

>1

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Frank Sinatra Try A Little Tenderness SPC-3452

You're A Good Charlie Brown

SPC-3074

I

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SPC-3076

SPC-3070

Guy Lombardo Sweet & Heavenly SPC-3073

-

Judy Garland Over The Rainbow SPC-3078

SPC-3071

Llberace

You Made

In

Sisters

Pat Boone

Our Favorite Songs SPC-3084

True Love

The Lennon

& Teicher SPC-3077

Love

SPC-3079

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Six Fat

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Dutchmen Hits

SPC-3083

Love You

The Powerful Stan Kenton Band & The Pretty June Christy Voice SPC.3075

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Nat King Cole WhenYou're Smiling

SPC-3085

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SPC-3069

I

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Save

Sinatra

Mr. Banjo's Back

In

The Fabulous Four Freshmen SPC-3080

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George Jones You're

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JS-6048

Jean Shepard Hello Old Broken Heart JS-6049

Margaret Whiting & Jimmy Wakely I'll Never Slip Around Again JS-6053

The London Symphonia, Walter

Stott

Pete Drake The Greatest Steel Guitarist In The World J5-60S2

Gone With The Wind SPC-3087

Wynn

Stewart

Above & Beyond

Claude Gray Treasure of Love

The Coll of Love

Pickwick/33 presents the most complete catalog of the greatest recording presold by their enormous popularity with record buyers across the nation. Backed by national advertising and effective merchandising, Pickwick/ 33 works harder to help you sell more of your product and faster. And that's what happiness really is!. artists





piGkiiiiick/33 I /

Demon RECORDS

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CITY. N. Y. 11101 1212)

EM

1-8811. OFFICES:

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In the music, business

talking about

MORE ABOUT

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office has greatly increased its musical knowledge. Very helpful in preparing a speech 1 am to deliver soon.

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available."

it

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Pasco. Business Mgr. Al Jarvis Orchestras

am

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F.

Swift

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News

Dr.

In

the music, business and academic worlds, people are

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Going beyond Volume

NESS OF MUSIC,

the

I,

the widely acclaimed THIS BUSI-

new book explores 4

additional areas:

BACKGROUND MUSIC AND TRANSCRIPTIONS •PRODUaiON AND SALE OF PRINTED MUSIC and TAPE SERIOUS MUSIC •

CARTRIDGES

A

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Cci

(©lay^ape THE STANDARD SYSTEM

A wide variety of pre-recorded Playtape cartridges to choose from. They all play in all the Playtape Music Machines.

PICK.

PUSH. •iiiiiiiii.

.iiiiilililliiiilli,

RED HOT SINGLE

EXTENDED

2 Tunes

4 Tunes

6 minutes Price

99t

play

PUY

KIDDIE TAPE™ Up to 12 minutes

LONG PLAY

12 minutes play

8 Tunes 24 minutes play

Price $1.49

Price $2.98

songs & stories Price $1.49 of

PLAY. GENERAL INFORMATION SERIES

iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

'iiiiiiiiililin'

For languages, history courses, art courses,

famous person biographies, etc.

$1.00-$1.49

PLAYTAPE, INC. 1115 BROADWAY,

NEW YORK,

N.Y. 10010



Tel.

(212) 675-8050

CABLE:

PUYTAPE NEW YORK Cor'

The PlayTape Story ^ Its Birth and Growth CLAUDE HALL

By

He

listens 10 the

machine, holding

it

in

his

hands

a book, and remarks about the sound and says,

like

"Runs like a dream." Il is the second model produced by the firm, but has already undergone many internal refinements. The sound is better than its first counterpart, it runs better on less power. Frank Sinatra is singing "You Make Me Feel So Young" and he sounds great.

Frank Stanton

pulls out the cartridge

cartridge he innovated listening critically to

—and

flips in



the 2-track

another cartridge,

it.

"This idea was born

in a

U.

anti-submarine war-

S.

fare school in Florida in the early 1940's," he says. "I

was

listening to sounds recorded on pure steel wire sounds of what a submarine sounded like under water. I felt then that it would be a good idea to market music

on

.

steel

wire

if

I

idea of steel wire,

got out of the war alive. I

From

.

.

the

progressed to the idea of tape.

in Germany, we made a regular automobile my brother and I." But il wasn't January 1966 that Stanton took his idea for a 2-lrack cartridge system aimed at a mass market to

"In 1955

cartridge player

.

.

.

until

"associates."

The 2-track system was his idea all the way. Once he made the decision to go into it, he went 100 per cent, dropping all other interests. He assigned the his own at a factory idea to a group of 12 engineers in Tokyo. Within 60 days, the engineers had "something that worked." He admits that the unit, at that point, had bugs, but "it was basically a very simple concept that had to work. Our plan, then and now, is to continue



to

make



the cartridge simple, simpler, simplest."

A total of 52 engineers now work constantly on PlayTape, seeking ever to improve it. Twelve are employed by PlayTape directly and the rest by a factory PlayTape supports in Japan. That first working model, what Stanton calls a "little black box a squeaker." was brought to Sears Records. "The reaction from both was imand mediate," Stanton says. "They saw the simplicity of the new system." A

music catalogs

catalyst in the acquisition of

from the

first

was Clarence Avant, manager of

right artists

Jimmy Smith and Johnny Nash, who has also varied other music interests. Avant introduced Stanton to Mort Nasatir, president of Records, and Larr>' Newton, president of ABC Records the first two music like

MGM



catalogs acquired by PlayTape. The machine was first unveiled to the general public

MGM

Records distributor meeting in New York in mid 1966. It was almost instantly a success. Stanton has had enormous faith in the system, divorcing himself from all other business aspects and handling much of the negotiations for catalogs and the business arrangements himself in the beginning. He says he felt PlayTape was a "standard system not competitive with anybody. There's room in the market for all of the cartridge systems. We have our own niche from SI -53 retail cartridges, from mono to stereo, from Beatles and Sinatra to Shakespeare and poetry and at

an

system, iritrodticcj it tu the public for the I rank Slanloi:, innovater of the 2-lra(k PlayTape time at a summer 1966 distributor sales meetinf; of Records. Mort Nasatir. president of Records, is at right.

MGM



MGM



contraception. Contraception, that's the subject of the first talkie cartridge I'm trying to get out."

The

two PlayTape units offered were a $19.95 by Sears exclusively at first and an had tone controls and a better speaker. But Stanton will have on the market in 1967 about 15 different models. These will range from the two units first offered through Sears and Records to home table models featuring hi-fi speakers, an auto hang-on unit, a wide variety of portable units (including a kiddie unit), special stereo models, and first

unit sold

model

MGM

(retailing at $29.95) that

first

MGM

Tape should change the nature of

the record business

as we know it today because of the enormous hunger existing in the U. S. and the world for general entertainment. Beyond musical monkee beats and orchestral sounds, people want to listen, to laugh, to learn and all of this can come out of a simple cartridge retailing

for a $1.

MGM

"Music

is

getting us into the business fast

.

.

.

and as

we can. we will develop a non-musical cartridge make our company a well-balanced organization, trymuch as possible, the hysterics that go

fast as

to

ing to avoid, as

other units still in the planning stages. In addition, the 2-track system is now being manufactured as a special dictating device for one of the worldwide business equipment firms. The device should

with the merchandising of current hits." Books, he feels, will have a much longer span-of-life on cartridges than music, especially how-to books.

be on the market soon.

are in the development stage.

"We're a mini-communications business," Stanton is part of our business, but so the dissemination of education and knowledge. Play-

says of PlayTape. "Music is

Other ramifications of the PlayTape 2-track system Another project of the is a simple videotape system, which Stanton says is to market in the

firm

new concept, and which he plans summer of 1968. a

Premiums Expand PhuyTape Popularity Almost at the same time that the public discovered PlayTape system and began buying it, the manuit and began giving il away. was a big "hook" with every gift and, in some cases, the PlayTape unit is far from free.

the

facturing world discovered

Of

course, there

Pepsi-Cola, for example,

.

is

.

.

launching a national pre-

mium promotion economy

using PlayTape. offering the smaller unit for SI 2.95 (suggested letail of $19.95).

plus six cork bottlecap liners. This promotion is expected to put several hundred thousand PlayTape 1200 units in the field, building the demand for PlayTape cartridges sky high.

The unit has multiple uses for business firms, said Bernard Sussman, who heads up the premium division for PlayTape. "Westinghouse is using PlayTape units as dealer-loaders in one of its divisions. Electrolux is making use of the unit as a sales incentive. Clairol is using it as both a dealer-loader and sales incentive item

in several divisions.

The

of other firms who've hinged various profitbuilding programs around the PlayTape unit read like

PT-2

list

Wall Street report. There's Reader's Digest. Kinney Alley Cat clothing manufacturer, Mennens. Breck and Sybiiives (a division of Bristol-Myers). Esin a recent "Youth Quake" promotion, used the PlayTape unit to help show the youth market potential to clothing manufacturers and retailers at a meeting in Chicago. The PlayTape machine has become so big with big business firms that Frank Stanton is retaining 60 feel of space to show product at the National Premium a

Shoes.

quire magazine,

next April. Previously, the unit received warm reception at the June Consumer Electronics Show' in

Show

New York and Ihe 66th annual National Association Music Merchants convention and music show in Chicago in June. Sussman estimates that there are already 100.000 units in use in various premium and promotion ventures "and the figure is mushrooming.' One firm alone had ordered 30,000 initially, with a 30.000 backup order; il is already halfway through ils second 30.000 of

.

.

,

units.

The major promotion that will explode the PlayTape system nationwide upon the minds of America is the Pepsi promotion. The national headquarters of Pepsi will supply all 56 bottlers with PlayTape units and a special message cartridge explaining the program. Another cartridge contains the selling message for the customer and special in-store polc-stackcr displays using a 1200 PlayTape unit that will air the message visually and vocally. The promotion includes carloon stuffers (an estimated million of them will reach Ihe public). Iruckback signs and streamers. David Jacobson, public relations counsel for PlayTape. lined up the promotion with Pepsi. The added publicity from the Pepsi promotion should prove of extra benefit to regular PlayTape dealers. Sussman said, by helping Ihcm market the higher quality units. In both the Westinghouse and the Pepsi promolions. PlayTape is including in the package a "bounceback" brochure describing Ihe entire 2-track system and some of the cartridge selections available.

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

Introducing

the Music IMaciiinCi We took the portability from the transistor radio and the piay-what-you-want ability from the record player with a machine that plays nothing but music

And came up

for less than $301

There has never been a music machine like The Music Machine. The Play Tape 2 Track.

After you've heard

them

all

like?

which way. But transistor radios

track? Or

you don't

supposed to

pick. You're

the announcer

It

lets

like

its

what

a near miss, try to

down and see

side or upside

what happens. And you have

all

those

points. Put

them

to lug

records around.

Now, take

all

As for what you can

good

good

doesn't cost much.

you can hear

The Theme from the

how about

Dr.

Ella

what do you

Zhivago sound

You've heard us. Play

Now hear

Tape 2 Track near

all

it.

ideas from

You'll find

the

the other music

machines. The ones we got

all

our good

piay Tape 2 Track

Fitzgerald, Her-

man's Hermits, Stan Getz, The Lovin' Spoonful,

The Righteous Brothers,

themallinourlittlecar-

And they're some of the

fridges.

just

peoplewhoplayin The Music Machine.

their

together. Into one

all,

play, well

Connie Francis? We've got is

you play what you want. But

play one on

hear,

likes.

The portable phonograph too.

talk, too.

And the music you do

Talk too much.

them

over again. Without rewinding.

The transistor radio comes close. It's light and you can carry it around and play it any

little

^

machine. That

And you've got

The Music Machine. The Music Machine plays tapes that little

come

in

skinny

cartridges (they're only

$1.49).

Push a cartridge

in

and

The Music Machine makes music.

Pull the cartridge out

and you turn

it

off.

Easy?

One

little

cartridge will keep you

entertained with four selections.

TBatteries not included.

REPORTS FROM THE MytRKET PLACE

2^Trach on Track ia Mast Gene

ai the fVarid

Shipley, president of

Main Line Records, Clevebuid

"PlayTape is the most exciting new product lo hit entertainment field since color TV. It's such a one wonders, 'Why didn't I think of it myself?' Interest and sales are growing every day. The kids, especially, are flipping for it. This is definitely a product of the future. And as soon as it hits that magic number (10% of saturation) there should be no stopping it. the

'natural*

PlayTape, at this point, is moving fast into foreign markets. Shipments to England are already afloat; involved in the PlayTape operation in England is George Martin of AIR Productions, noted as producer of the Beatles records, and Discatron. In Italy. PlayTape is produced and distributed by Ezio & Nino Consorti Co. Through its four offices throughout the country Rome. Milan, Bologne, and Naples, Consorti will not only distribute cartridges featuring U. S. artists, but produce and market 2-track cartridges starring Italian artists

The new



singing ItaliaiL



Hannimax is i>ow assembling machines and they're already reaching the market in Australia. In Japan, both the Tokyo Broadcasting Service and Yamaha are



marketing PlayTape machines. Irwin Specialty dling the several

The PlayTape receives in

Rome

special attention in Piazza S. Pietro by four beautiful Italian girls.

unit

in

libraries

is

han-

Canada and

like

MGM

is already distributing Records, Records,

A&M

and Quality Records, among others. In addition, shipments have already left for South America. Moves of PlayTape into other countries are either under way or in the planning stages, including Germany.

line has everything."

Wesley Cater, buyer, Western Aulo Supply Co. (4,500 stores)

"Our

store

managers are enthusiastic. Wherever the

product has been shown, teen-agers have been very receptive. There's a lot of talk about conflicting systems but PlayTape, .

.

8-track, 4-track, cassette, etc.

.

.

.

in

.

THE

our opinion,

is teen-age music system. It's a entity, peculiar to itself. The cassette is a recording system principally, and the cost of the cartridge takes it out of the music playback field. We're talking about the teen-ager. The market is an enormous

separate

one.

Latest

indicate

statistics

population

lies in

especially,

we

that

31%

of the

total

the 15-21 age group. In that market,

predict

that

PlayTape

will

make one

whale of a dent."

Abbe Cohen, buyer, Allans

Stores (80 units)

"PlayTape is one of the hottest Christmas items we've seen in a long time. It's been extremely successful in test markets. We are now convinced that this is no longer a fad, but a continuing system for the teen-agers.

Our 1.

sales ratio of tape cartridges to

And

really

there's

lots

buying.

problem

Wayne

machines

of repeat business.

obsolescence

Stock

has

The

is

10 to

kids are

presented

no

at all."

Wallace, department manager, cameras and tape

recorders, Foley's

Department Store, Houston

"We've found it to be a good item. It gave us plus The new models look sharp and smart. We should twice as many in our fall promotion as we did in May."

sales. sell

Craig Marlon, department manager, Sanger-Harris, Dallas

"We

were the first to break PlayTape in our market, using a heavy newspaper campaign and a saturation program on TV for our graduation promotion last June. It was a new and exciting item. We feel it was the combination of the Sanger-Harris image and the PlayTape image that put it across. With the increasing availability

of tape in

heavy upswing

in

all

categories,

PlayTape business

we

look for a

this fall."

Edward Feldman, merchandising manager. Two Guys "Consumer reaction has been excellent since we put the product in last February. It's in our traffic appliance department because we have proportionately more salesmen there and we fell that as a new product

Frank Stanton, PlayTape president, examines the Hong Kong factory of the 2-track system with Irv Stimler, right, director of special projects for

MGM Records.



PlayTape would take a certain amount of selling. As far go now, it's become more self-service else. The customer picks out the selections he likes and that's it. In our opinion, this product can go only one way UP. Especially the tape cartridge end of the business. As other companies begin lo produce "copies" of the machine and there are some around the only source of playback material must already come from the PlayTape cartridge. We look forward 10 a great Christmas for the new units recently introduced."

New

as the cartridges

f7. &• FiMctary fViii Specialise

in Mted factured

and



in

a

company-owned

factory in

Hong Kong

PlayTape-supporled factory in Tokyo. The new U. S. factory will be completely automated. Frank Stanton, president of PlayTape. said that production of cartridges will start at lO.tXX) per day and build up from there. in a

Mostly, the U. S. factory will be turning out the red single cartridges (featuring two tunes as does a 45 r.p.m. record) and the black EP (featuring four songs). White LP's, which hit the market only recently, will continue to be manufactured abroad for a while,

Stanton said.

The new PT-4



the factory will be able to erase

music on

and place

different

it.

Stanton plans lo launch his new single cartridge

lake advantage of the

records.

Besides factories in the U. S.. Hong Kong and Japan, PlayTape will have factories (o assemble units in various countries around the world where there are against

importing.

South American countries.

These

include

little

too soon to talk about results with us,

in

in operation, the factory will be able produce these single cartridges within 48 hours after receiving the master tapes from the record companies.

to

a

several

first

shipment on Aug. 15

Nevertheless, we actually had a number of orders the lime the units arrived. The new line looks '-'.^ winner. We feel the product's got it couldn't have been inlcrcslcil_

Coleman

November. Once

Thus PlayTape will be able sales demand created by hit

vice-president and director of

marketing, Craig Corp., Los Angeles "It's

since we've only gotten our

I

Rink*s Dep.i^

to

restrictions

factory will also be turning out cartridges

Durward Carson,

in stereo, though the first of these will most likely not be on the market until January. One of the key features of the new factory will be the record-over capability. Any cartridge that doesn't sell,





Mat Singles

PlayTape opens a new revolutionary factory in N. J., in October its first factory in the United States. At present, players and cartridges are manuClifton,

than anything

"Rink's has hccr.j

and we have Ircmc j be prt>niohn^ medii natii

REPORTS FROM THE IHARKET PLACE

2'Track an Track ta Mast Gene

at the fVartd

Shipley, president of

Main Line Records, Cleveland

is the most exciting new product to hit entertainment field since color TV. It's such a 'natural' one wonders, 'Why didn't I think of it myself?' Interest and sales are growing every day. The kids, especially, are flipping for it. This is definitely a product of the future. And as soon as it hits that magic number (10% of saturation) there should be no slopping it. The new line has everything."

"PlayTape

the

PlayTape, at this point, is moving fast into foreign markets. Shipments to England are already afloat; involved in the PlayTape operation in England is George Martin of AIR Productions, noted as producer of the Beatles records, and Discatron. In Italy, PlayTape is

produced and distributed by Ezio & Nino Consorti Co. Through its four offices throughout the country Rome, Milan, Bologne, and Naples, Consorti will not only distribute cartridges featuring U. S. artists, but produce and market 2-track cartridges starring Italian artists



Wesley Cater, buyer. Western Auto Supply Co. (4,500 stores)

"Our product

singing Italian.



Hannimax is now assembling machines and they're already reaching the market in Australia. In Japan, both the Tokyo Broadcasting Service and Yamaha are



marketing PlayTape machines. Irwin Specialty dling the unit in Canada several libraries like

The PhyTape in

Rome

girls.

been shown, teen-agers have been very

.

.

8-track, 4-track, cassette, etc.

.

our opinion, separate

THE

is

teen-age

peculiar

entity,

to

but PlayTape, in music system. It's a .

.

.

The

itself.

cassette

a

is

recording system principally, and the cost of the cartridge lakes it out of the music playback field. We're talking about the teen-ager. The market is an enormous one. Latest statistics indicate that 31% of the total population lies in the 15-21 age group. In that market,

han-

is already distributing Records, Records,

A&M

and Quality Records, among others. In addition, shipments have already left for South America. Moves of PlayTape into other countries arc either under way or in the planning stages, including Germany.

receives special attention in Piazza S. Pietro

by four beautiful Italian

is

and

MGM

managers are enthusiastic. Wherever the

store

has

receptive. There's a lot of talk about conflicting systems

especially,

we

predict

that

PlayTape

will

make one

whale of a dent."

Abbe Cohen,

buyer, Arlans Stores (80 units)

"PlayTape is one of the hottest Christmas items we've seen in a long time. It's been extremely successful in test markets. We are now convinced that this is no longer a fad, but a continuing system for the teen-agers.

Our 1.

machines

sales ratio of tape cartridges to

And

really

there's

Wayne

lots

of repeat business.

Stock

buying.

problem

obsolescence

The

has

is

10 to

kids

are

presented

no

at all."

Wallace, department manager, cameras and tape

Department Store, Houston

recorders, Foley's

"We've found it to be a good item. It gave us plus The new models look sharp and smart. We should twice as many in our fall promotion as we did in

sales. sell

May." Cniig Marlon, department manager, Sanger- Harris, Dallas

"We

first to break PlayTape in our market, and a saturation program on TV for our graduation promotion last June. It was a new and exciting item. We feel it was the combination of the Sanger-Harris image and the PlayTape image that put it across. With the increasing

were the

using a heavy newspaper campaign

of tape

availability

heavy upswing

in

in

all

categories,

PlayTape business

we

look for a

this fall."

Two Guys

Edvrard Feldman, merchandising manager.

Frank Stanton, PlayTape

preside/it.

examines the

Stimler, right, director of special projects for

New

Hons ^ong

MGM

"Consumer reaction has been excellent since we put the product in last February. It's in our traffic appliance department because we have proportionately more salesmen there and we felt that as a new product

factory of the 2'track system with Irv



Records,

PlayTape would take a certain amount of selling. As far go now, it's become more self-service

as the cartridges

S. Factary HVill SpeciiBlize

in

f7.

Red Hat

PlayTape opens a new revolutionary factory in J., in October its first factory in the United States. At present, players and cartridges are manu-



Clifton, N.

factured in a

and

in a

company-owned

than anything else. The customer picks out the selections he likes and that's it. In our opinion, this product can go UP. Especially the tape cartridge end only one way of the business. As other companies begin to produce "copies" of the machine and there are some around the only source of playback material must already come from the PlayTape cartridge. We look forward to a great Christmas for the new units recently introduced."

factory in

Hong Kong

PlayTape-supported factory in Tokyo. S. factory will be completely auto-

The new U.



Singles

Durward Carson,

sell,

the factory will be able to erase

music on

and place

restrictions

day and build up from there. Mostly, the U. S. factory

will

start

at

10,000 per

be turning out the

red single cartridges (featuring two tunes as does a 45 r.p.m. record)

The new PT-4

factory will also be turning out cartridges

against

importing.

These

include

several

little

and director of

too soon to talk about results with

since we've only gotten our

first

the lime the units arrived.

The new

line

us,

We

Coleman

1

looks like a

winner. feel the product's got it or frankly, couldn't have been inlerestec^jrj.+^e" first place."

November. Once

South American countries.

a

shipment on Aug. 15 Nevertheless, we actually had a number of orders by

different

Stanton said.

that production of cartridges will

said

"It's

it.

and the black EP (featuring four songs). White LP's, which hit the market only recently, will continue to be manufactured abroad for a while,

Frank Stanton, president of PlayTape.

vice-president

marketing, Craig Corp., Los Angeles

in stereo, though the first of these will most likely not be on the market until January. One of the key features of the new factory will be the record-over capability. Any cartridge that doesn't

Stanton plans to launch his new single cartridge in in operation, the factory will be able to produce these single cartridges within 48 hours after receiving the master tapes from the record companies. Thus PlayTape will be able to take advantage of the sales demand created by hit records. Besides factories in the U. S., Hong Kong and Japan, PlayTape will have factories to assemble units in various countries around the world where there arc

mated.





we

(jliher, vice-president.

Rink's Depa.^ment Store, Cincinnati

"Rink's has been selling PlayTape since

last

March

and we have

tremc,i''jous confidence in the item. We'll be promoling^,tll4. new line heavily this fall in multimediV^campaigns. In this mobile world, it seems a natiiral part of the equipment for the younger element. When you've got all that and the price is right, you're

^

y

lalking 'right

now

buying' to a tremendous segment of

Ihe population."

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BIILBOARO

Introducing

the Music IMacliine. We took the portability from the transistor radio and the play-what-you-want ability from the record player. And came up with a machine that plays nothing but music for less than $301

There has never been a music machine lil
The transistor radio comes close. and you can carry

it

around and play

which way. But transistor radios Talk too much.

you don't

any

talk, too.

And the music you do hear, supposed to like what

its

is

a near miss,

what you want. But

lets you play

play one on

try to

down and see

side or upside

what happens. And you have

to lug

all

those

records around.

Now, take

all

After you've heard

them

all

them

like?

you can hear

play, well

The Theme from the

track? Or

how about

man's Hermits, Stan ful,

all,

over again. Without rewinding.

As for what you can

Dr.

Ella

Getz,

what do you

Zhivago sound

You've heard us.

Now hear it.You'll find the

Play Tape 2 Track near

all

the other music

machines. The ones we got ideas from

all

our good

RiayTape 2 Track

Fitzgerald, Her-

The Lovin' Spoon-

The Righteous Brothers,

Connie Francis? We've got

likes.

The portable phonograph It

it

light

pick. You're

the announcer

too.

It's

themallinourlittlecartridges.

just

And they're

some

of the

peoplewhoplayin The Music Machine.

their

together. Into one

good

good

doesn't cost much.

points. Put

little

them

machine. That

And you've got

The Music Machine. The Music Machine plays tapes that little

come

in

skinny

cartridges (they're only

$1.49).

Push a cartridge

in and The Music Machine makes

music. Pull the cartridge out

and you turn

it

off.

Easy?

One

little

cartridge will keep you

entertained with four selections.

tBatteries not mcluded.

Cl;

iterial

©PLAYIAPE. INC 1967

PUSH.

PLAY. Meet The Music Machine. The PlayTape" 1310. It goes where you go. It plays what you want. The Music Machine plays tapes that

come

in

skinny

little

PlayTape cartridges.

(We thought you might be

tired of lugging

records around. Or listening to what disc jockeys want to hear.) Now you just pick a tape. Push it in. And The Music Machine makes music. One little PlayTape cartridge will keep

you going with four selections. The tapes have two tracks and they're continuous. You don't rewind. What can you play? Well, what do you like? The theme from the Dr. Zhivago sound track? Or how about The Tijuana Brass, Ella Fitzgerald, Herman's Hermits, Stan Getz, The Righteous Brothers, The Animals, Connie Francis? They're just seme of the people who play in The Music Machine.

The model you see here is $19.95. Further up the line, we've got one for less than $30.00. (The cartridges, by the way, are $1.49.)

You can see and hear The Music Machin any of the

ines at PlayTape Centers

stores listed below.

Stop by. And you can have music wherever you go.

The PlayTape 1310.*19.95

Year^End Report FRANK STANTON

By

according to the company's latest figures, cartridges for every PlayTape model sold.

President, Play Tape



In less than a year PlayTape's first two playback models reached the market last October the system is now in almost 20,000 outlets including department stores, variety chains and key record shops throughout the country. Sales have been in the millions and the surface has yet to be scratched.



the intervening period, the

In

duced

company has

The red

The

2-lrack tape cartridge system, has educational and cultural fields, and largest inventory of musical entertainment

The

units,

in

(children's albums)

based on extensive research, contain the of interest to the mass market:

They are

light (only IV2 pounds): completely portable (outside dimensions of the portables were only 6" x 9");

any position); trouble free, durable, and priced within the reach of all. The two original models sold for $19.95 and $29.95. PlayTape cartridges retail for $1, $1.49, and $2.98, depending on the amount of tape involved. Each is about the size of a deck of cards, with half the thickness. One has merely to pick up a cartridge, push it into a slot and the machines play. It's simplicity, itself, to operate. Initial research and development was undertaken in Japan. Manufacturing facilities were then set up in Hong Kong and Japan. The first major move in the direction of acquiring music for the cartridges was made last fall via a joint marketing venture with Records. Seeking to tribute the

a contract lo dislabel. This

was

a

MGM's

the

first

own

interests,

PlayTape units under the major diversification move in

MGM

history-

time it had ever marketed anything but its records and films. To support the fledgling opera-

lion,

converted

record library to the PlayTape 2-track tape cartridge system. With this contract as a beginning, PlayTape moved with a speed unparalleled in the industry, signing up it

its

entire

the libraries of United Artists,

ABC, Motown, A&M.

Cameo-Parkway and

Chess,

their subsidiary labels. For months the firm added more than two new

several

labels every week.

May, Warner

Bros,



still

negotiating

with



other

labels

for

and should have them available soon. With over 3,000 different selections

their

in

its

catalogs

catalog

PlayTape's inventory represents by far the largest library of its kind. But impressive as this achievement is in the entertainment field, the firm has not lost sight of the dual purpose of the mini-playback system and is moving rapidly into the educational field at

this

Russell.

Petula

Clark,

Fitzgerald, Sarah

Ella

Lawrence, Lena

Home

point,

as well.

The over-all philosophy of PlayTape has essentially been the Gillette approach: Use Ihc razors to sell the blades. With exclusive contracts covering the manufacture of the tape cartridges, though there may be knock-offs on the machine in time, tlicre is little necti 10 worry. For the production of the cartridges will ultimately be the major part of the company's activities and its principal source of profits. The present ratio.

Wayne Newton, Martino, Andy

Two cartridge customers at Sam Goody's in New York as Arlyn Weisbrot, assistant tape manager, center, explains the advantages of the 2-lrack PlayTape system and listen its

portability.

Trini Lopez. Connie Francis, Vaughan, Eydie Gorme, Steve and thou.sands of others.

Temptations, the Stevie

To Discaunt*

Sam the Sham Revue, the Four Tops, Smokey Robinson, and

Wonder.

Jazz artists number among them headliners such as Louis Armstrong. Lou Rawls. Jimmy Smith. Stan Getz, Ramsey Lewis, Ahmad Jamal, Count Basic, to name a few.

PlayTape also has such outstanding artists as Herb Alperi and the Tijuana Brass, Sergio Mendes, the Baja Marimba Band.

Country music stars include Buck Owens, Del Reeves. Jean Shepard, Wanda Jackson, Tennessee Ernie Ford. Sonny James. Tex Rilter. and Hank Williams. With the audio-educational market just opening up. imd with cost factors so vital, especially in a worldwide marketing complex, an affordable unit and affordable tapes seem to be the only answer 10 (he problems of mass consumption. There will always be a market but

PlayTape

is

equipment

out to reach

the



in

any

field

average consumer

Hare

*Oan*i

The rock 'n' roll category includes such names as Beatles, the Animals, the Supremes, the Lovin' Spoonful, the Grateful Dead, the Mamas and Papas, the

the Righteous Brothers, the

for the Rolls-Royce type of

and Reprise entered ihc fold. In June, Capitol Records one of the top three in the industry moved into the family as well. PlayTape is In

.

Peggy Lee, Nat King Cole, Garland, Nancy Wilson, Al

Stevens,

Judy

its

$2.98

.•

.

attractive,

diversify

an LP)

cartridge

(talk and educational) $1.00-$1.50 recap of some of the personalities in the PlayTape inventory reads like a "Who's Who" in the entertainment world. Represented in the popular music category are such greats as Frank and Nancy Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Buddy Greco, Connie

versatile (can play in

MGM MGM signed

$1.00-$ 1.50

cartridge

(8 songs, like

A

the world.

ingredients

principal

$1.00 $1.49

The gray

the

and educational tape cartridges

tape

cartridge

(equivalent to the 45 r.p.m.) cartridge

(equivalent to 4 songs) blue cartridge

The white

PlayTape

the

10

1

The black

intro-

signed two dozen of the largest record companies in the business to exclusive contracts for the use of their libraries to be converted

moved into now has the

1

cation:

new models, has

six

is

PlayTape cartridges are presently being manufactured under five different color codes for easy identifi-

Sam Goody's, one of the nation's major discount record chains, doesn't discount PlayTape cartridges. In fact, said Bernard Borstein, tape buyer for the seven far-flung stores. PlayTape 2-track cartridges retail for $1.59 instead of the usual $1.49 found in many other stores.

"We

no reason

we feel we have warrant cutting the price."

discount where

to

to.

There's

Goody's, in the short eight months the unit has been generally available on the market, has moved between 300 and 400 players and some 6.000 cartridges. Most of these sales have been through New York outlets, but the Philadelphia operation has also been moving PlayTape product well, Borstein said. What helped in Philadelphia was when a local Sears outlet cut the price the smaller, cheaper PlayTape unit it was marketing

on

down

to $9.95. Unfortunately. Sears didn't

cartridges available to meet the

have enough said, and

demand, he

with average income potential.

Goody's had the only product

Both the music machines and the cartridges are being marketed via free-standing PlayTape centers. These "centers" consist of three four-foot units, which combined, contain thousands of different tape cartridge

PlayTape since it came out. The unit has its market, above and beyond the other systems. Personally, I think it's a good idea because the PlayTape sy ;ems puts cartridges where people can afford them. The usual customer buys five-to-IO cartridges in

selections (both entertainment and educational) plus a separate area for the display of the various PlayTape

"We've been

available.

in

Most of

the 2-track system at a time.

know why. Perhaps

these are adult

units.

customers.

new models were unveiled by the company at Consumer Electronics Show held in New York last Jun-. Thev included an automotive model retailing for

units for their children or their teen offspring."

Six

the

^.12 95. a children's model, a transistorized portable with radio, a horizontal model, and two plug-in home units (one with an radio which retails for $69.95). The number of "tracks" whicti is presently hedcviling

AM-FM

the industry, will be an academic question soon. With quality, tone, and all other things equal, the dollar factor will ultimately determine the issue.

I

don't

they're buying the



A great advantage of the PlayTape system it's price is brought home from time to time when a potential customer comes in for 4 and 8-Irack cartridges, said Borstein. "A man buying a car is sometimes told by the



dealer that he can get cartridges for his 4 or 8-track cartridge player, if he buys one with the car. for about $3. When the customer later comes in and runs face-toface with a price of about $6 per cartridge, boy, does

he gel mad."

Bye^ Bye 3€ema!

Office By

BERNARD SUSSMAN

The PlayTape system could office use.

memo

The

or.

al

the very

eventually replace the

least,

sharply curtail

its

2-track system features cartridges so relatively

inexpensive that several firms arc already using them to address messages lo people who have limited reading lime. For example, doctors. for major corporations

and

retailers

on

We

believe the unit

who need

is

ideal

to educate salespeople

a continuing basis.

It's very simple for an insurance company to send out monthly tapes to its salesmen highlighting specific

Technician in.serls especially-prepared tapes into cartridges to be used in promotions. Cartridges like each carrying a sales message, are already in use by several of the nation's maior firms. these,

PT-6

policies or new plans. Other firms could use cartridges in the same way to introduce new products. The 2-irack cartridge is an excellent way for the president of a firm to speak directly to men in the field. Several firms of all types are already interested in doing this.

SEPTEMBER

22,

1967, BILLBOARD

About six months ago. the first marvelous magic music machine appeared on

earth.

Nothing

Our Playtape 2-track. like it had ever been seen be-

fore.

Itwas sort of

like a

transistor radio with

the disc jockeys removed. Or a portable

phonograph with about 30 pounds removed. It

was

a light little

machine.

light little self-winding

It

played

tape cartridges of

whatever music you wanted

to hear.

It

also had a nice

everybody That's

with

it.

fell

little

for

it

price tag. Naturally, in a

big fat way.

when we became

dissatisfied

We thought there should be

more

than just one kind of marvelous magic music machine for people to choose from.

So we went to work and invented a whole invasion of them— seven different Playtape machines in all. Theycome in sizes ranging from small to pipsqueak. Their prices range from $16.95 to S69.95. Their self-winding

tapes play from eight to 24 minutes, and then start playing all over again.

Without rewinding. And they'll play anywhere. In boats, subways, planes, dogcarts, upside down, right side up, or sideways. All

the marvelous magic music

chines are

now

in

ma-

Playtape Centers

in

So pick out the one you and a bunch of Playtape cartridges to go with it. stores near you. like

Enjoy yourself. The invasion

is

here.

Playtape

Hanv to Make 3Maney in Spite

British PlayTape

A Perfect Cup of Tea GRAEME ANDREWS

By

ai 3Mistahes

The

for

battle

on

ducers

consumer acceptance between the and musicassette promarket will be decided on low price and attraction for

manufacturers

cartridge

rival

the

British

simplicity of operation, .

.

could easily be the

.

title

MGM

of the story of

home and portable use. And this will bring PlayTape

Records and PlayTape's 2-track system, because Irv

com-

Stimler. director of special projects for the record

pany, admitted that there had been a few misjudgments. None that cost money, fortunately. In fact, through careful evaluation of marketing and handling the PlayTape unit (in addition to marketing cartridges for every label except United Artists Records), the record company has been able to do quite well in the 2-track system.

Henry Hitderbrandt, New Orleans distributor, right, demonstrates the PlayTape 1200 to two teens at a New Orleans Teen Fair attended by more than 50.000 youngsters. Mel

MGM

Records looks on at

"The record company had never handled anything like this before," said Stimler. "It was our first venture into a field other than movies and music."

Price of

Mort Nasatir, president of the record company, pointed out that, as a test, the handling of the 2-track system players had proved the value of the logo. "Side by side, the machine with the logo of sold better than a machine without it. So, the test was extremely encouraging as an example of just what the logo can do."

around 100,000 units and, "This represents a million cartridges the people who buy those players will need right away," Stimler said. Automatic Radio now has a

MGM

MGM

MGM

of the early evaluations of the record company all record channels were appropriate for the player. Whereas Morrie Price, manager of the factory-owned Metro Distributors in Chicago, was able to do a fantastic job in selling both machines and car-

One

was

that not

for it, the Metro distribution branch in New York stumbled. So distribution of the machine was moved from its owned Metro to Chancellor, an electridges

tronics

distributor

that

also

handles

other

Topp

Topp

Florida.

in

left.

reportedly

is

bringing

in

And one of the pioneers of the 4-track system was reported to be entering the 2-

unit available.

cartridge

irack unit field.

"The 2-track field has just begun to open up. For instance, Rexall offered PlayTape product until buy the machines separately, or machines and cartridges in a rack, or 36 cartridges separately. But now drugstores can obtain the first two deals and three other deals, one featuring 500 assorted cartridges, another 102, recently in three different deals: Dealers could

There

systems.

is

still

a shortage of product.

The

MGM

was screaming for Chicago had just ordered 288

distributor in Seattle, said Stimler,

"We made

mistakes every turn of the road," said still sold 100,000 units and we'll be completely out by Christmas." Records initially invested more than $2 million in the players, but Nasatir claims a "very satisfactory profit structure." Stimler, "but

we

MGM

Stimler

said

the

record

50,000 cartridges on hand

company had

at the

warehouse

less .

.

.

than

"and

is a very small figure. We're actually backordered." Between and what cartridges Frank Stanton has sold through other channels. Slimier estimated that around six million 2-track cartridges have

this

of every

The

distributor ordered

was able

is

a

slow getting started because a

little

don't

know about

Some

it

lot

of people

yet," Stimler said.

of the distributors and

retail

outlets

doing

a good job with the PlayTape system, he said, included

Main Line

in

electronics

man

ords

in

Cleveland (the distributor has put on an to handle the machine); Eastern Rec-

Hartford, Conn.; Rexall, the Thrifty drug chain

and Earl Wolf

in

Denver.

MGM

But, mistakes or not, has helped pave the to voliune business in the 2-tnick cartridge. "It developing into a big business."

way is

explained Martin. "We feel that material should be available on all systems on the market to give the consumer the choice of the system he prefers. "But playback units must be aimed at both the home and portable market in the U. K. There just is no worthwhile market for music in cars here at the present.

"This

Men Behind The Machine

market, where car use

mestic

cartridge sales.

President

Frank Stanton divorced himself of all other business interests and invested several million dollars of his personal funds into it. He was born in Brooklyn, attended New York University, majored in economics. in the Navy during Lived in France five years after end of formed Craig-Stanton firm after

HAL DENNIS,

II.

brother,

war, which was very active in trading between North Africa,

Europe and the U.

S.

Firm gradually expanded

to the Far East and eventually split into various companies and activities which Stanton hesitates to discuss (an article in Fortune a few years ago brought un-

wanted notoriety). He is 46 years old, married, father of two children. He works about 12 hours a day and claims he has 200 per cent of his time available 00 per cent he devotes to PlayTape and the other 1 00 per cent to a new videotape system he plans to launch in 1968. Reading and playing tennis are two pastimes; has a passionate dislike for the Vietnam war. 1

Director of Distributioo

Responsible for distribution through normal retail and wholesale channels. Had been with Dual Automatic Turntable before joining PlayTape. He is assisted by Bert Miller, who'd been with him at Dual Automatic Turntable.

So

far,

JACK LEVY,

Program Director

In charge of the PlayTape library. Had been with Cragstan, toy firm. Selects material from the record company catalogs available to place on cartridge.

Director of Promotion and Advertising Joined the fast-growing PlayTape operation last August. Had worked for Dewald Radio, Long Island

and prior to that was sales manager for ECl Electronic Communications, Inc. Is deeply involved in the premiums facet of PlayTape.

City,

smaller and as few as a People here are not con-

their material being

system

the

will

be

MGM

Records have agreed to used by PlayTape in Britain and launched with 50 cartridges in

November. be imported from Japan as

Initially cartridges will

they are for the American market, but long-term plans are being set for the installation of plant to manufacture cartridges in the U. K. Martin has concluded a deal with a Birmingham record player manufacturer Discatron which will market the cartridges through record dealers and electrical shops. Additionally, Discatron (which has a major line in its slide-in-type record player operating on linear tracking principle) will market four



playback machines imported from Japan and Hong Kong and toward year end will manufacture another PlayTape machine under license. Initial production targets are 50,000 players by end 1968 with sales of 400,000 cartridges. The units will be competitively priced, ranging from a $25 kiddie model through a $28 teen set to a unit which will also incorporate a radio and carry a price tag of $40.

The actual cartridges are equally competitive. Initially releases will feature cartridges containing eight which will retail for $3.50, and EP cartridges containing four numbers which will retail at $1.75 titles

comparable to an releases

EP will

disk.

be drawn from the cartridges

already in production for the U. S. market, but as the operation picks up masters of British artists will be sent direct to Japan for cartridge equivalents to be manufactured. And once local manufacturing facilities are established, cartridge production will be simultaneous with disk release. later

next year will be the. release of cartridge singles, again priced similarly to equivalent single records. These will not be launched until British manufacture is under way. "It is essential, of course, with single production to

have

ART PROTAS, Key engineer of

Design Engineer

the system; in charge of mechanical

production.

topicality. Speed is vital to catch sales while a single is breaking and to have to import singles would be too time-consuming a process," explained Martin. He feels that entering the single cartridge market will give

MARTIN LEVY,

Head

of Order Department

PlayTape a decisive edge.

teen-ager can

He

buy a

"I

am

single in this format,

even be able to carry a single

sure that

he

will

—a great advantage over

Sewing Machine Corp. for 10

gram has been drawn up and Martin envisages possibilities with spoken word and educational

years.

CLARENCE AVANT,

ConsulUni

system and arranged the first meeting between PlayTape Records president president Frank Stanton and Mort Nasatir that helped the system get an initial push. Avant is personal manager of several artists, including Jimmy Smith and Johnny Nash. He also heads an independent record producing firm and has other business

MGM

interests.

it.

An

will

in his

if

a

want

pocket

Responsible for moving merchandising to customers. Previously sales administrator of Remco Industry, leading toy firm; prior to that sales manager with Necchi

Catalyst behind catalog acquisition for the PlayTape

BERNARD SUSSMAN,

EMI, Pye and

Another key move scheduled by PlayTape for

Served as a lieutenant commander

World War war. With

much

"In Britain, cars are

third are fitted with radios.

First

FRANK STANTON,

Inspired by an idea for a 2-track cartridge system,

where American manufacturers have got from their dois a major factor in

is

to take account of differing conditions

60 of every-

to ship 40.

Most of the demand has been for the EP, the car"The LP 2-track cartridge

sold.

The basic aim of a record company is the merchandising of music, Stimler said. "Thus we were all hoping that knockoff manufacturers would come into the market. And they have." Some firms importing and selling units capable of playing the 2-track cartridge, he said, include Mayfair, Artie Importers, and

One

title.

thing, the label

in

tridge featuring four tunes.

MGM

been

Morrie Price

product.

are also likely to enter the fight for sales this fall. "We are not seeking exclusive repertoire deals"

ditioned to listening to music in cars.

another 48."

cartridge

out on top, claims George Martin, head of A.I.R. London, the partnership of highly successful independent producers which is also the British licensee of PlayTape. PlayTape machines and cartridges will be launched in Britain in November at prices comparable with disks and undercutting Philips musicassette prices. The projected launching of the new cartridge line marks a significant development in the British tape market where previously the musicassette has had a monopoly. With the invasion of PlayTape the U. K. now seems set for a system war. Other American cartridge manufacturers

existing disks."

ambitious long-term repertoire development provast car-

"We feel that this system whole new range of consumers untapped by the record manufacturers," enthused

tridges in addition to music.

can bring

in a

present Martin.

at

"The applications are enormous



^just

one example

the possibility of issuing recipes on cartridge for housewives. But there are many, many more possibilities, including drama, languages and a host of other educational and leisure-time activities." is

Copyrighted

niaterial

Pepsi pours it on with the

Playtope Promotion. NEW YORK— Pepsi-Cola hitting the youth market with the hottest thing in

dous consumer response.

(The local Pepsi bottler moves at least one carton

"Consumers save substan-

of Pepsi for every Playtape

music since the transistor radio: the Playtape Music Machine. Pepsi has built an entire

tially

by buying the Play-

Machine the consumer

promotion around

they resist?"

is

item. sive

this

ready generating tremen-

tape through Pepsi,'" said

"We have

on

it

an excluin the soft drink

Alan FinPepsi-Cola's promo-

founded. Pepsi

is

is

well

putting a

promo price

very attractive

ley,

on the Playtape: $12.95 plus 6 cork liners from

is

now

source,

Pepsi caps.

adding

the

that is

al-

Pepsi in.

is

really interested

They stand

for sales.

sales

momen-

tum, Pepsi has designed a

bounceback

into the pro-

motion. There's a library of more than 1 ,000 music

Pepsi promotion pros, Alan Finley

(r.j

and

Bill

Brown

(I.),

check over. the

Playtape promotion package.

some 250 cartridges. Consum-

selections on tape

The cork liners are what

the hottest music

Playtape promotion

Bounceback

Profitable

To keep up

That optimism

industry," stated

tion director. He pointed out that the tape cartridge

buys.

Brown, associate promotion director. "How can Bill

ers

can get any selection at

a special Pepsi price, plus six cork liners. According to Mr. Finley, people who buy the tape machine will

keep on buying Pepsi to money on the tapes. Pepsi has covered all the bases. A complete promotion package is available to bottlers throughout the save

details at PEPSI-COLA display

country: carton stuffers streamers truck backs .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

and special dealer-

loader pole displays that play music and sell the pro-

Pepsi trucks

will

spread the word about the Playtape promotion via this

poster.

mm

motion right in the stores! Also newspaper, radio and television advertising materials.

apparent that Pepsi expects this promotion to sell its product right down

PCPVCOU

WITH THE MUSIC MACHINE

It's

to the floorboards.

Playtape: The machine that's rocking the youth market.

This stufferdoesa selling job in every

carton of Pepsi.

This large space newspaper ad local Pepsi bottlers.

will

be selling the Playtape promotion for

"Pepsl-Cola" and "Pepsi" are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc., N,Y. "Playtape" is

This far-out pole display has a built-in Playtape Machine that delivers the sales

message

to consumers, right at the point-of-sale.

a trademarlt of Pla/tape, Inc., N.Y.

Cop;

I

.J.

i.Uo

a.ul

...ll

MGM Music

All the little push. All your customers have to

do

and out comes the music of

is

push

in a

tape cartridge

Anytime,

their choice.

anywhere. Instantly and continuously, without rewinding. All you have to do to push your sales to an all-time high is

to give an extra

Machine. Display

little it.

sold in the

first six

MGM

push to The

Demonstrate

the instant appeal of instant music.

it.

Music

Take advantage

months on the market!

$1.59 gives your customers four complete pop

one

cartridge.

Or

of

Over 500,000 were

hits

on

they can get eight selections for

$2.98 on the Long Play cartridge.

MGM PlayTape offers the world's largest library of music exclusively on tape cartridges. Hundreds of releases

on

MGM. VERVE, CAPITOL, REPRISE, WARNER COMMAND, DUNHILL are now available-

BROS.,

performed by such top

stars as:

Connie Francis / The Animals / The Beatles / Ray Charles / Petula Clark /

Bill

Cosby / Nat "King"

Cole / Herman's Hermits / The Kinks / Trini Lopez /

& The Papas / Dean Martin / Peter, Paul & Mary / The Righteous Brothers / The Sam The Sham Revue / Frank Sinatra / Nancy Sinatra / The Supremes / The Temptations / and many, many others The Lovin' Spoonful

/

The Mamas

.

.

.

Machine needs is a (Suggested

list

price,

$19.95

SPECIAL PREPACK AVAILABLE! 12

on

Music Madiincs with \A4 cartridges ct)untcr display. For the name

LiniqiiL-

of your nearest distributt)r, please contact

by mail only:

Mel Brandt MCiM Records 5M) Avenue of the Americas New York.N.Y. 10019 1

MGMffi2

HANIMEX AUSTRALIA'S LEADER IN TAPE ENTERTAINMENT - IS PROUD TO HAVE CREATED THE 'PV SET IN AUSTRALIA WITH

playtepe —

Now, every swingin' youngster in the country wants to "get with the pf set" ... to have his (or her) kind of music, when and where they like! The

Music on Playtape cartridges (through Festival Records, Australia) comes from the libraries of:



PLAYTAPE way.

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The pf set loves the musical

freedom Playtape gives them.

HANIMEX Old Pittwater Road, Brookvale, N.S.W. Australia. Sole Agents for Australia

& New Cl

Zealand.

aerial

Now from Smith-Corona! New sales! High profits! • Mail Call is a



high quality, low-cost record-

and-playback set that uses easy-to-mail tape cartridges, for inexpensive voice letters.

It

gets a

full

ally in Life

page,

full

advertising and promotional support. Stock

color send-off nation-

up on

Magazine.

Tremendous



new source of fast-action profit. Smith-Corona representative today.

this

Call your

potential market. Full

MAIL CALL ietterpack

Announcing:

The end of the silent letter Now you can really "hear" from those you miss the most, A son in service. A child in college. A fianc6 in another in

your old home town. Mail Call — Smith-Corono's revolutionary

warmth and

joy of the

con erase everything and start again. Even put the whole family on one letter. When you are done, slip the cartridge out; mail in an ordinory envelope. When you receive o taped letter, insert it in your unit, turn the knob to PLAY, ond listen.

Parents

city.

new concept

in

distance correspondence— lets you receive and send letters with

longall

the AAAIL

human voice. is

WHAT

Mail Call

is

letters

HEAR FROM THEM MORE OFTEN.

EASY TO USE. As easy— and as personal — as call,

Simply slip

without the

static,

of two

knob to RECORD. Talk away. Stop and start at any point. You

Just

say

410 Park Avenue. Office* in

it

sale at Smith-Corona dealers, applionce

and hardware

stores.

With Smith-Corona's

5-year guarantee. The talking

— and send

it

letter

with

by Smith-Corona $70^ a pair (boMfiM not indu
CALL?-

Less than

SCM eO>K>RATION New York, N Y. 10022

Canada and mojor

cilie*

Hvoughovt the wofld.

^0

home, Moil Coll is your answer. Sets and extra Letterpack cartridges ore on

far from

Turn the

"MAIL

If

you're not hearing often from loved ones

or the cost I

in the Letterpack cartridge.

Coll unit

are available and re-usable time after time. Extra cartridges are inexpensive.

and play-back

o telephone

CALL GOES ANYWHERE. Each Moil

lightweight, fully-transistorized, battery-oper

oted, portable. Letterpacks for 3, 6, or 10 minute

a handsome, compact, combiunit. It comes in a set of two. One for the person you'll write to, one for you. With a Letterpack'^'*' cartridge for your letters. IT IS.

nation recording

is

here.

i

Schaai Teachers 3Move Over

PlayTape Sales Growth **Everyone**Benefits

PlayTape's educational and cultural library, expanding into the fields of poetry, operatic music, history, exploration, biography, science and literature, is rapidly moving into mass production. The firm will soon offer everything from best-selling books to language and memory courses on gray-coded cartridges, said PlayTape variety of material in

many

now offers light operas and operettas such as the works of Gilbert and Sullivan: selections of famous choral music; the favorite marches areas of interest, PlayTape

of every branch of the armed services; a poetry catalog listing such immortals as Keats, Poe, Kipling, to name a few; commentaries on jazz and its history; informative music appreciation cartridges from an introduction to every instrument in the orchestra on up; historical stories

of America featuring such moments as the voyage of Columbus, Paul Revere's Ride, California's Gold Rush, the Pony Express, the Wright Brothers, etc.; literary quotations that have become part of the mainstream of world literature and many others. Also incorporated is the catalog of "The Amazing But True" stories narrated by Doug Storer. The children's inventory has been enlarged too. encompassing a great number of fairy tales such as the "Emperor's New Clothes," "Sleeping Beauty," "Cinderella,"

"Alladin's

Lamp."

.

.

.

president, seated right. The Hialeah, Flu., firm has exclusive distribution rights for the machine in those areas.

and Charles Dascal.

for the distributor to

PiayTtBpt* Offers

Another Exposure 3€edium By

There are a variety



RexaU Finds PlayTape *Geared*for Drug Stores The

Rexall franchised chain of drugstores has en-

the nation,

is

selling

the $19.95 model, and Ken Ross, director of sundry merchandising, says "Progressive merchants handle it because it gives them a new market to lap. The people in the record business are aware of what teen-agers

want and

I

think this product

is

Ross says. Rexall has recently begun selling the units to its (its staff of 240 salesmen handle the item along with a myriad of other products). Ross says he will have to wait until the end of the year before he can a.ssess the market value of the item. Product purchased by Ross is shipped from Eastern, Midwest and Farwest points to the retail outlets. Rexall introduced the unit to its sales staff through a threemonth educational program. A player was purchased for each salesman, prerecorded sales messages were provided for the druggists and the field force "heard the word" as it moved through its territory. Ross believes PlayTape (including $1.49 tapes; franchises

big factor

library") will be a big success because drugstores are the best form of national outlet. is its

"They are open more hours than any other

outlet

their entire catalog.

Ampex. They

Ampex

to license

are

ma-

But the PlayTape licensing agreement was their second licensing arrangement. "If PlayTape ever becomes a definite part of the Ales commented, "we'd be interested in handling distribution through our normal outlets. But terial for the cassette.

business,"

we

are

some

not thinking about handling distribution for We do have a three-year contract with

time.

PlayTape."

The Motown

definitely geared to

teen-agers,"

"MGM's

on

a deal

Ales said, "We basically decided to license PlayTape because of the extremely good deal we got as well as the fact that we have an interest in promoting our artists through every available medium. Although Motown handles 8 and 4-track tape distribution themselves, they had previously only licensed also presently negotiating with

tered the cartridge field by lying into the PlayTape movement. The Los Angeles headquartered firm, with outlets across

company never leases out individual songs or artists to anyone, but Ales felt that if the system was a good

their catalog for reel-to-reel tape to

By ELIOT TIEGEL

IO..SO0 franchised

PlayTape.

According to Barney Ales, Motown vice-president in charge of sales of the Detroit firm, Frank Stanton and Clarence Avant contacted him in the latter part of 1966 about leasing masters of particular artists. The

Motown would make

tapes are

gineering department and

made up by Motown's

.

two-step the line to his trade.

Other areas involved production, ranging from availability of both machines and cartridges. But this mini-playback system took off so rapidly that PlayTape was inundated with business almost overthe problem was more how to fill night. Simply put orders rather than to write them. If this was not a modern approach to marketing, at least it certainly had two pretty good things going for it flexibility and sales. Faced with this situation, PlayTape moved into multiple arms of distribution at every level: on direct sales to resident buying houses (where one could enter small market areas quickly, providing exposure, if not concentration); on national chains (where orders are slower because of the many buying groups and presentations involved); on drug chains (the real "mass" vehicle); on department stores, variety and independent stores, and on catalog houses all over the country. Over and above this, PlayTape embarked on a "key city" program, varying the nature of the product introduction via newspaper, radio and TV media, customizing each program to meet the requirements of store policy and helping to create the distinct image or per-



LORAINE ALTERMAN

signed a contract with PlayTape April which licensed the entire Motown catalog to

one,

.



Motown Records last

the three R's (reading, 'riling and 'rilhmetic).

—MGM

Broadening this distribution was imperative, but a and there were marketing plan had to be devised a number of "sophistications" to be covered before the company could really embark on a program of consequence. One area was pricing because the machines had originally been priced for direct sale distribution rather than for a distributor program. This made it difficult .

Meeting with the sales force of Dyn Associated Importers to discuss the future of PlayTape in South and Central America are Solomon Yuken. seated left, sales manager,

of cartridges, too. featuring a child's introduction to "It's the first step in an all-out effort to bring the gray cartridge the educational part of the catalog on a par with the entertainment end." said Stanton. "In the blueprint stage are various language courses, memory exercises, highlights of world history, biographies of ereat men. stories of famous scientists and their contributions to mankind, operas and symphonies. In a word, we will cover every phase of science and art that we believe wil! be of interest to the average consumer."

Manager

Sales





president Frank Stanton.

With the acquisition of a

HAL DENNIS,

By

PlayTape, first introduced to the American consumer in October 1966, began sales operations with two channels of distribution: a major national retailer Records Sears and a single distributor which concentrated on specialty department stores.

en-

RCA

Victor and are then Plans call for 2-track cartridges to be primarily EP's by the Motown artists. What spurred Ales, somewhat, toward making the deal with PlayTape was that around Christmas time sent to PlayTape.

sonality of the store involved.

For many chains, such as Arlans and promotional

this

effort

succeeded

within an eight-week period

The

—and

Two

Guys,

doubling sales during the slowest

in

this

of the year.

selling period

program aimed at the was put into effect early in 1967 mainstream of the business the home entertainment field. Ideally, the product performs best when featured not necessarily where 45 rpm records are sold replacing that sale, but actually serving as an addition giving the dealer that vital "plus factor" he is to it forever seeking. In essence, the PlayTape cartridge is closer in relationship to the 45 or the mono LP than it is to other cartridges which are principally designed for the automotive field, and should be considered part originally conceived

over-all distributor



.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

of record inventory. Eventually, as it becomes an integral part of this self-service record inventory and with PlayTape carover machines, tridge sales running at a ratio of 1 1 to



I

when Stanton and Avanl people at

Motown

first

approached him, several had purchased

told Ales that they

PlayTape machines for their kids in the toy departments of stores. Ales, however, points to this as one difficulty with the machine. "I think there's a big problem of exactly where they are selling the players," he explained. "Last year they were selling the players in the toy department and not in the phonograph department. You can't convince the record-buying public or dealers until you sell the players in record or phonograph departments."

and

definitely

it is

moving

in that direction

—everyone bene-

fits.

Though its

to

by

the sales growth has been remarkable since

inception, the company attitude has always been not guage the effectiveness of any PlayTape promotion its Initial rising curve, but rather by the steady growth

on

a healthy turnover ratio.

The roughest period

is

over and the future looks key city distribu-

bright. Present plans are to strengthen

tors

areas

and

to

seek additional distributors in secondary

— with stronger emphasis on music and equipment

suppliers.

they cater to teen-agers."

Pochet-Sized Cartridge Otters Trunktut ot Htusic PlayTape's cartridge, smallest of the existing continuous loop cartridges, consists of seven pertinent parts, sealed with a single center screw. prime feature of the PlayTape system is its cartridge, which offers untold advantages to its users. Notable among these is its ease of handling, thus facilitating its storage and portability. Since the PlayTape system's design is aimed at the requirements of the portable user, the small size of the cartridge allows that user to carry a greater selection of recordings than would be possible with larger cartridges. The physical dimensions of the PlayTape cartridge are 2'A inches in width by 3 5/16 inches long, and 2 inch thick. The cartridge employs a '/i-inch lubricated tape which operates at iV-i i.p.s. It uses a self-aligning, spring-loaded internal pressure roller to propel the tape, and provides a maximum of 24 minutes playing time on

A

'

V

CD PT-14

fffflft

two

tracks.



Repair system of PlayTape is one of the best for dealers and distributors as well as customers in the world. Customer returns unit directly to PlayTape and another unit is sent out immediately, bypassing dealer and distributor entirely. This PlayTape policy was formulated on a very low percentage of repairs. Above, a staff member checks over a model just repaired.



SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BIIXBOARD

Cl

©lay^ape I

Milano

now in

Playtape previewSept.

22,23,24

Hotel Cavalieri Hilton,

Rome

PICK

PUSH

PLAY Via Pietro della Valle 13,

Telephone 564-600

IND. TEL.

Rome,

Italy

ENCOR-ROMA

ape

pi a now in

Latin America playtape

270 West 22nd

Street, Hialeah, Fla.

33010



Tel:

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Telex:

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AND (§)layti)ape

NOW

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TOGETHER KINGDOM IN

THE UNITED

The World's most advanced Music Machines. Playtape machines play cartridges. The tapes have two tracks and they're continuous. Discassette plays only Playtape cartridgesbut anybody's 45 rp.m. records,

-How's

that for

NEW

?

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3,

Canada

.

Phone: (416) 533-3521

.

Cable Address: "IRWIN SPEC" Bentley's Code

Nach sensationellen lerkaufserfolge in

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SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

WIDELY WIDELY RUBLICIZED CIRCULATED WIDELY READ -

YEAR-LONG

40

colorful years of fiddle tunes, mountain ballads and folk tale found a home in central Tennessee. Today over 35 million devout Country Music fans call this rich tradition the "Nashville Sound"... a Sound which developed universal appeal and has become a legend of our musical

heritage.

THE WORLD OF COUNTRY MUSIC ports on the events and the people ing our Country Music today.

vividly re-

who

are mak-

COMING OCYOBER

21

CONTACT YOUR NEAREST BILLBOARD OFFICE

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The World Radio TV Handbook contains •

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Supraphon Comes of Age By

MIKE HENNESSEY

In 1946, a year after the end of the second World War, an important and fundamental change occurred in the Czechoslovakian record industry. The President of the Republic issued a decree nationalizing the two existing record companies and ordering their merger the Gramophone Works, Nainto a new company tional Enterprise. Attached to this new company was an export division called Supraphon a name which, today, is synonymous throughout the world with recordings of the highest quality, particularly in the sphere of classical music. From being an export division in 1946, Supraphon has become the trademark of a big company with a production capacity of 12 million records a year. The company produces, distributes and exports gramophone records, runs a flourishing Record Club, a network of music theaters with daily programs of recorded music and regular art exhibitions in their lobbies, a cultural service which lends pre-recorded programs of concert music to other organizations and institutions and, last but not least, a large publishing house which publishes a wide variety of scores, sheet music and books on music. The Supraphon factory also includes a small but highly efficient Research Institute of Gramophone





Technology. This impressive organization has been built up during 21 years on the foundation of the assets and goodwill of the two record companies which were merged to form the Gramophone Works. The Esta company, established in 1928, formed part of the Melantrich publishing house which represented the Polydor, Brunswick and Siemens labels in Czechoslovakia.

The Ultraphon company, founded principally dependent

on

the

in

1929, was

German Telefunken com-

pany.

The

technical

equipment of these two firms, and deficient even before, Works had

neglected during the war

largely valueless and the Gramophone virtually to start from scratch.

was

The Esta and Ultraphon

catalogs consisted mainly of dance and popular music of little commercial value. Of the global total of 22,000 recordings listed in the catalogs of the two companies, the Gramophone Works deleted all but 2,300 after careful qualitative examination.

The most important first step for the new company to improve and replace the technical equipment the recording studios and to build a new, large factory for the production of records. suitable building was found a former textile mill in Lodenice about 15 miles from Prague which had been damaged in air raids during the war. Between 1946 and 1953 the necessary reconstruction was carried out and by 1953 the factory was producing 450 million records annually. The Gramophone Works also had to adjust to new technical developments in recording which followed one another in rapid succession during that period. In 1950, recording on wax was abandoned and tape recording substituted. In 1953, the first long playing records were produced and distributed and the production of 78-r.p.m. records reduced to a minimum. And in 1962 the production of stereo recordings was was

in



A

initiated.

Throughout

this period the

company was engaged

hard struggle to improve the quality of its recordings, but at studio and pressing levels. A number of difficulties had to be overcome, particularly in the matter of pressing, during the transition from imported in a long,

produced plastic material. The Research Institute helped to solve most of the problems connected with the introduction of a modern and rational production technique and today the Institute keeps pace with the most progressive foreign companies and even leads the way in the development and to locally

application of certain technical innovations. Although Supraphon recordings were finding a ready market because of the masterly performances of the company's artists and the high quality of recordings, there were frequently deficiencies in the pressings. This situation began to change in 1959. In that year a Supraphon recording of Janacek's opera "The Cunning Little Vixen" was awarded the Grand Prix of the Academic Charles Cros in Paris one of the highest European record awards. Since then scarcely a year has passed without a Supraphone recording being accorded an important international award.



Producdon and

Sales

In 1957 Supraphon's global production amounted 2,280,000 78-r.p.m. records. In recent year^ the production has risen to between 7,000,000 and 8,000.000 LP's, EP's and singles a year. The company is not able as yet to use its full production capacity of 12 million records a year and therefore undertakes the pressing of records for other European, Asian and African to

countries.

Since 1953, when the Artia Foreign Trade Corporation was established to handle the export of records, foreign sales have increased steadily and now represent 20 per cent of the total annual production. Over the years Artia has established an extensive

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

network of foreign representatives including Columbia in the U. S., Barclay in France, the Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft in West Germany and Music for Pleasure, a subsidiary of the Paul

Hamlyn

group, in

Britain.

In

addition to the export of finished recordings,

Supraphon's export trade is augmented by the licensing of record production from tape recordings. Arrangements of this kind have been made with Discophon of Spain, Nippon Columbia in Japan and a number of other companies. Since the first licensing contract was signed in 1958, Supraphon has negotiated some SO agreements with foreign companies with the result that a substantial proportion of its classical repertoire is now released

abroad under license. It is the superb classical repertoire of Supraphon attracts most of the foreign interest. As the biggest record company in Czechoslovakia which also controls the import of foreign gramophone records, Supraphon was able to plan the creation of a classical repertoire on an exceptionally large scale. In the catalogs of the Esta and Ultraphon companies, serious music represented only 5 per cent of all recordings made between 1945 and 1946, whereas in the Supraphon catalog,

which

43.4 per cent of the recordings lusted of serious music. Classical

last

year were

Supraphon repertoire and this is the strong tradition of an intensive musical life for which the Czechs have been renowned for centuries. In this respect the Supraphon catalog offers an exhaustive and wholly authentic representation of Czech musical culture. In view of the current lively interest in ancient music, the series Musica Antiqua Bohemia is of exceptional significance. In fact, a collection of recordings released in this series and containing works by such composers as Renda, Mica, Stamic, Myslivecek, Kramer, Rejcha, Kozeluh, Fils, Brixi and others, was awarded the Grand Prix of the French Academic Charles Cros in 1961. Unquestionably, however, Bedrich Smetana and Antonin Dvorak are the most important Czechoslovakian composers. Dvorak's Slavonic Dances have always been best sellers in the classical field and Smetana's cycle of symphonic poems, "Ma Vlast" ("My Country") was this year listed as 16th in the 100 best-selling records in America. Supraphon's recordings of complete operas by the famous ensemble of the Prague National Theater Opera have done much to popularize Czechoslovakian music abroad. Apart from the well-known "Bartered Bride" of Smetana, the recordings feature the lesser known operas of Smetana and Dvorak as well as the still infrequently produced operas of Leos Janacek and Bohuslav Martinu. In the field of contemporary music, the Supraphon catalog has a range of excellent recordings including performances of Honegger's Second and Third symphonies by the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by France's Serge Baudo which were awarded the Grand Prix of the President of France. The principal orchestral recordings in the catalog are by this celebrated orchestra which is well known for its tours abroad, including the United States and Australia. Karel Ancerl and Vaclav Neumann alternate as its conductors. Also gaining increasing attention are the recordings bv the remarkable and well-balanced Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, and the work of the young conductor Martin Turnovsky, winner of a recent contest in Besancon, France, who has been invited to conduct the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra. Czechoslovakia has a large number of outstanding ensembles noted for their interpretation of chamber music. The Smetana Quartet, the Janacek Quartet and the Vlach Quartet are particularly notable among many such ensembles which make concert appearances all over the world. Josef Vlach, first violin with the Vlach Quartet, has recently also won acclaim as the conductor of an outstanding chamber orchestra. Among the Czechoslovakian soloists, Josef Suk. great-grandson of Antonin Dvorak and one of the world's leading violin virtuosi, deserves special mention.

POP MUSIC, lAZZ, FOLK MUSIC In the field of pop, Czechoslovakian artists ate extremely well served by the excellent big bands of Karel Krautgartner and Karel Vlach. The country's leading male singer is undoubtedly Karel Gott, who sings in English and German as well as in his native tongue. Gott has appeared on radio

and TV in most European countries and recently appeared with great success at Expo 67 in Montreal and in Las Vegas. Rank'ng with Gott in popularity is Eva Pilarova, a girl singer with a brilliant, wide-ranging voice who this year won the Intervision Pop Song Contest in Bratislava.

Hana Hegerova and

critics'

jazz recordings made during the year, ture of the catalog. When this series

Judita Cerovska, both singing in international reputations as

is

a special fea-

was

initiated

in

it immediately received an award from the GerJazz Federation as the best European contribution to the development of jazz. Czechoslovakia is very rich in folk music and has always produced fine brass orchestras with their repertoire of typical polkas, waltzes and marches. The

I960

man

greatest world hit in this field

from Czechoslovakia

is,

of course, Vejvoda's famous "Beer Barrel Polka." Recordings of folk songs range from stylized interpretations by big ensembles like the State Ensemble of Songs and Dances which won great acclaim during its tour of the United States, to authentic "on the spot" recordings which reflect the transition from the central European type of folk music to the almost exotic variety from the eastern part of the country. However, Supraphon's folk repertoire goes beyond the boundaries of Czechoslovakia and one of the company's biggest export hits was an LP of Russian folk songs and dances by the Alexandrov Song and

Dance Ensemble.

Music

however, another important factor which There determines the high proportion of classical music in the is,

several languages, enjoy singers of chansons.

in the jazz field Supraphon has two big orchestras led by Karel Krautgartner and the other by Gustav Brom. Both were listed in the first ten of the poll organized by Down Beat in 1966. The Supraphon Jazz Antholog)', featuring the best

—one

DISTRIBUTION

AND THE RECORD CLUB

Supraphon has an extensive network of its own record shops which account for approximately 75 per cent of all sales. Although these shops arc directly owned by Supraphon, experience has shown that subscription selling through a club is a specialized

more

suitable form of distribution for certain categories of records notably serious music and jazz. Thus, the Supraphon Record Club in no way represents competition for the retail shops, for most of the members of the Club obtain the disks they order through these shops. The Club was created in order to create a large body of consumers whose expressed interests could stimulate the production of culturally significant recordings which, if distributed through the shops in the normal way, would find only a limited response. This situation has, in fact, been achieved and recordings released through the Club attain far larger sales than would be the case if they were sold in the normal way in the shops. Members of the Club have ony minimal obligations. Having applied for membership they need buy only one record a year. For every five records bought in a year, a member receives a sixth recording free. Currently the Club releases an average of 60 LP's annually. Of the 100 LP records of classical music produced each year by Supraphon, 40 to 50 are released through the Club. year after their original release through the Club, they are put on sale in the



A

shops.

The Supraphon Record Club has more than 25,000 members and since its foundation in 1958 its total sales of 447 different titles amount to nearly two million. This year its members have already bought 300,000 LP's.

MUSIC PUBLISHING In 1961, a music publishing house was added to the Supraphon organization. At first called the State Music Publishing House, it subsequently adopted the of Supraphon. Supraphon Music Publishers controls a vast catalog of works in all categories of music. Publishing activity is paralleled by record production so that when certain recordings of Bedrich Smetana or Antonin Dvorak are

name

released, a revised edition of the scores, piano reductions and orchestral parts are available at the same time. substantial part of the activity of Supraphon Music Publishers is represented by the orchestral service which hires out complete scores. The company is also increasingly active in acquiring local rights of

A

foreign

pop music

hits.

A

monthly list of the ten top sellers is regularly published in Czechoslovakia and of these eight or nine are usually songs of foreign origin, recorded in cover versions by Czech artists and published in sheet music

form by Supraphon. Recently some songs of Czech origin have found their way into other European countries. Publishing rights to polkas in the folk idiom, particularly favored the German-speaking countries, are an especially successful export item. There is increasing activity, too, in the export of film and background music. Supraphon is not the only music publishing house in Czechoslovakia. The Guild of Czechoslovak Composers has its own publishing company, Panton, whose activity has recently been extended to embrace all branches of the music publishing business. Like Supraphon, Panton negotiates separate and independent agreements with its foreign partners, although up till now Supraphon has actually published the compositions on behalf of Panton. This year Panton has also started its own production of records, exploiting chiefly recordings of classical and contemporary music. The company plans to enter the pop field and these records will be pressed in the Supraphon factory. in

S-1

Variety, vitality

and value for

Dr.

money

VojlKli

Umti,

Prnirfnt of S»tttpk9t.

VOJTECH STRNAD

By Dr.

President of Supraphon

Now

that the world's record-buying public is bebelter acquainted with Supraphon records, this 21.st anniversary year is perhaps Ihe right moment for me to lell you a few facts about Ihe company.

coming

>

Supraphon celebrated this year.

It

is

its coming of age in March not a great age for a record company,

compared with some extremely honorable have a long tradition, but

labels

which

supporters among those who don't consider that Ihe age of a company is its most important asset. When we came into existence in 1946, we learned a good deal from our predecessors, of course, and began producing 78-r.p.m. records. In 1950 we acquired new premises for our production, modernized it

has

its

our equipment and started producing LP's,

first



mon-

aural and then stereo. This evolution was paralleled by all other record companies, but we feel there is a difference between Supraphon and other companies and that difference lies in our catalogs, and Ihe skill and enthusiasm of our staff which are responsible for the good quality of our production. In the Supraphon catalog can be found, primarily, the great classic works. There is also a fine series of baroque music, "Musica Antiqua Bohemica" which is of more than mere local importance. Czech music forms an integral part of Ihe old musical traditions of



Europe.

pL

Artia and the

In the field of contemporary music we have an list of great 20th century names which are well known in the concert halls of the world, and we also have a number of records of Czech and Slovak contemporary symphonic music sufficient to show that Czechoslovakian musical life has as much vitality as ever and thai contemporary composers are upholding the great traditions of world-renowned composers like

imposing

nB

Czechoslovakian



Export of Music

demand. must not omit to mention our operas and choirs, and our folk music and brass music it has many admirers throughout the world. We also produce non-musical is

By

President of the Artia

Foreign

When for

tile

Trade Corporation

1953 Artia was formed as a corporation export of Czechoslovalc cuitural commodities, in

it based its export activities principally on two sorts of goods: books and recorded music. Anyone acquainted with the centuries-old musical traditions of our people will not be surprised by the fact that it was primarily recorded music which became the backbone of our export activity during the first years of Artia's existence, whereas the export of books a relatively negligible export commodity in the past had to wait some years before the advent of an unprecedented boom, unparalleled in any other coun-

— —

try.

The is

history of Czechoslovakian exports of records short. It began during the early I930's

relatively

when Soulhern and Eastern European countries were its first export markets. It was only in the post-war years, when Ihe Supraphon label came into being, that the Czechoslovak gramophone production, based on a rapidly growing catalog of classical, folk and pop music recordings, found outlets in all parts of the world.

North and South America, Australia and Europe became the principal buyers of 78-r.p.m. records. The dramatic technical developments in the gramophone the introduction of long playing industry in the 19505 and stereo recordings had a tremendous influence on Artia's commercial policy as far as foreign markets were concerned. Just as the gramophone industry in Czechoslovakia was coping with the problems of modern technology and production a new basic catalog of LP and stereo records was then being built up so Artia endeavored to achieve a high-ranking position in international markets, a position warranted by the high technical and artistic standards of the product it exported. Thanks to the fact that not only experts and connoisseurs, but also Ihe rank-and-file lovers of music were beginning to recognize the value and merit of Czechoslovak music and musicians, Artia succeeded, in the course of lime, in establishing contact with renowned companies as its foreign trade partners and in working with them as equals in the international trade in recorded music. In this 2Ist year of the existence of the Supraphon label, Artia can proudly point to the unusually complex character of its commercial operations. Based on a thoroughly modern trading conception, its activity

— —



S-2

kinds of commercial transactions in the field of recorded music. It exports all kinds of gramophone products including plastics for the pressing of records, record players and accessories, and all kinds of records. It presses the records of other companies on commission, licenses production of records abroad from tape recordings, manages the Supraphon recording artists, produces background music and music for automotive use. Artia also exports a wide range of musical instruments from organs to electric guitars a total of 10,000 items as well as books on music, scores and sheet music. The company has its own music engraving

embraces



a great I

PrcsMent vf tkt

AINTONIN NOVOTNY

all





and printing plant. Open-mindedness and a readiness to engage in all kinds of co-operation and business deals are the basic principles of our commercial policy.

The

significance of Artia's status in the international of recorded music is clearly indicated by the number of markets in which it operates. Artia is one of Ihe few companies engaging in record trading with both East and West. It is precisely this inlernalionality in trading relations coupled with a firm and profound conviction of the universal validity of genuine cultural values that enables Artia constantly to enhance Ihe reputation and popularity of Czech and Slovak musical art throughout the world and to stimulate a rapidly growing appreciation of the Supraphon label. Constantly striving for ever higher standards in the native gramophone industry, Artia is pursuing precisely the same aim in a recently developed branch the presentation in Czechoslovakia and of its activity where possible, other socialist countries, of foreign recorded music. While works of the world repertoire of classical, jazz and pop music, interpreted by native artists, have always formed a substantial part of the Supraphon catalog, original recordings made by American, Soviet. British, French, Italian. German, Polish, Rumanian. Hungarian, Belgian, Dutch, Danish, Swiss and other

trade



gramophone companies and

listed

,

Smetana, Dvorak and Janacek. We also produce pop music records for which there

in

our

domestic

catalog are evidence of a new dimension in our trade relations. In this way Artia has become an important link in cultural exchanges of mutual benefit to all parties involved. There is no doubt that the past 21 years have proved the vitality and strength of the Czechoslovak gramophone industry. The tremendous creative potentialities of our artists and the imaginative approach of our commercial partners in all parts of the world are a guarantee of its future prosperity.

— —

records with considerable success poetry, novels, plays, foreign language courses, fairy tales and adventure "Hounds of Ihe Baskervilles" and

stories, including the

the "Three Musketeers." Ten years ago our Record Club was created and is thriving well. Another enterprise we have initialed is the Theater of Music in which all kinds of music are performed in order to widen the public appreciation of

music. Several years ago Supraphon entered the music publishing field and is therefore now involved with music in all its aspects and is building up excellent contacts with all the major countries. This brief resume gives you some idea of the variety of our activities. The range of our catalog covers not only the best Czech and Slovak artists most of them known throughout Europe and many throughout the world but also a number of outstanding artists from other countries including Klecki, I. Markewilch, Andre Navarra, Fournel, Gertler, Pedrotii, Matacic. Richter, David Oistrakh, Bohm, Rampal, Barhirolli. Ida Haendel. Serge B.iudo. Konwitschny. Dcsormiere. Suzanne Danco. Carlo Zecchi. Haeffliger, Kim Borg. Janine Andradc and many more. We also have secured a license lo produce recordings by such international artists as Louis Armstrong. Ella Fitzgerald, A. Brailovsky. Bruno Waller. Eugene Ormandy, Bob Dylan, Leonard Bernstein and many



others. It has been our policy throughout our 21 years of existence to give our public the widest possible choice in recorded material material which could not be obtained elsewhere at all, or, at least, not in a comparable quality. This is the policy we intend to pursue in the years to come. The archives of old castles, monasteries and libraries are a long way from having surrendered all their musical secrets. We recently presented an unknown Josef Haydn and we have every hope of unearthing similar treasures in the future. Meanwhile we don't intend that our fine symphony orchestras, soloists, conductors and chamber music enintend each year to sembles shall be neglected. produce a choice of the best performances from the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, the conductors K. Anccrl. V. Neumann. Z. Smetacek, Z. Chalabala and



We

J.

Krombholc,

soloists like J.

Suk, Ruzickova Zuzana,

Ivan Moravec and some of our renowned quartets. Lovers of modern music in our country are quite well informed about music and musicians in western countries. feel it would be no bad thing if music lovers in the west look a look into Ihe unexplored musical regions of the old continent it could prove a most refreshing experience.

We

^



SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD Li

i

jteriai,! I

IP

, , Heuische \j hu/n mvpiivn QestUschaft.

Hearty congratulations

to

SUPRAPHON on

their 21st anniversary.

Best wishes for a prosperous future

and continual good co-operation.

SUPRAPHON represented by

DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON GESELLSCHAFT through

Metronome Records GmbH., Hamburg /Germany Polyphon Schallplatten Gesellschaft mbH., Wien/Austria Phonag AG., Winterthur/Switzerland

United States of America

Canoda

Mexico Brazil

Argentina

Colombia Venezuela

Uruguay Dominican Republic Great Britain

German Federal Republic^ France Italy

Netherlands

Belgium

21\

Luxemburg Austria

Switzerland

Sweden Denmark

in Service of

Norwoy

IN EVE

Finland Iceland Ireland

OF THE

Spoln GLOBAL

Portugal

DISTRIBUTION

THROUGH

Greece Hoiti

Costa Rico

AND

ITS AFFILIATES

REPRESENTATIVES

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

German Democratic Republic Hungary Bulgaria

Poland

Rumania Yugoslavia

Cuba Albania

Japan Australia

New

Zealand

Turkey Egypt

Lebanon

ears

Iraq Iran

Cambodia

Music &:Talent

FSYPAKT

WORLD

Ceylon

Morocco Libya

Kenya

Zambia Soudi Arabia Liberia

Rhodesia

Canary Islands CZECHOSLOVAKIA

-PRAGUE

Mali Czechoslovakia

AND DISTRIBUTORS

IN 58

COUNTRIES

BASF magnetic tape the world's first

and

finest

30 years ago BASF produced the world's first magnetic tape and the first recording was the London Philharmonic Orchestra under Sir Thomas Beecham.

Today BASF tapes are heard

in

more than

100 countries. Millions have discovered the hobby of tape recording. Many radio stations in all parts of the world send out their

programmes on BASF

tapes.

There are BASF tapes to meet all amateur requirements, packed in either the plastic swivel box or the economical Round Pack. BASF Magnetic Tape is known throughout the world for its superior quality and authentic reproduction.

Why

not contact your dealer

now?

Badische Anilin- & Soda-Fabrik AG 6700 Ludwigshafen am Rhein, W. Germany.

We

are the largest Distributor for

Supraphon

in

the

United States and Canada

Carrying the Full Line

of...

j^^y ARTIA .

.

and

CONNOISSEUR RECORD CORPORATION

mono

160

&

ftereo

Passaic Ave., Kearny,

New

Jersey

SEPTEMBER

23, 1967,

BILLBOARD

I

Copyrighted materii

SUPRAPHON AROUND THE WORLD ...

Britain

. . . f fl

By ^aGEL

HUNTER

The Supraphon catalog has been available In the United Kingdom for 10 years. Initially it was handled by specialist dealers and importers; later big distribuPaul Hamlyn marketed the cat-

tive organizations like

alog.

For the past three months the main British dishas been Keith Prowse, with regional support from Lugton's, H. R. Taylor, Clyde Factors and Symphola, and the clientele for this Czech label is growing continuously. "I've been staggered by the demand during the three months we've been the main distributors," said Lionel Rose of Keith Prowse. "We wholesaled the line for years, of course, and knew its popularity. But current interest and orders have exceeded my expectatributor

tions."

Supraphon covers the standard classical repertoire and also gives attention to lesser-known works with the ^emphasis on modern music. Relative obscurity is no hindrance to a record's chances where Supraphon is concerned as has been proved by the heavy sales for



Carl Oriff's "Carmina Burana" album featuring the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. An obvious attraction for buyers is the competitive budget price of $2.60 per album. But Rose is convinced that the line would sell as sweetly at full price.

"Supraphon records are magnificently performed and recorded." he said. "The standard of Czech musicianship and artistry is incredibly high." All Supraphon product is imported from Czechoslovakia and Rose's initial orders are in thousands. He

can soon gauge response and consequent demand, and re-order accordingly, although transportation and Customs formalities cause frequent problems and delays. "The sleeves produced by Supraphon are excellent, too," he enthused. "They are printed in four colors and have liner notes in four languages English, Russian, German and French." Keith Prowse releases six albums every month, with the exception of August and December, and there are now well over 100 Supraphon LP's available in the United Kingdom. Conspicuous good sellers, apart from "Carmina Burana." are Brahms' double concerto for violin and cello, featuring Josef Suk and Andre Navarra, and Bach's double concerto for two violins, with Suk and



in Tlie United States

. .

Supraphon product is available in the United Slates on labels of CBS Records and Connoisseur Records. The arrangement with CBS, which was completed last year, has provided almost all of the 70 albums released in the first year of Crossroads, Epic's low price classical label, as well as albums on Epic and CBS. Tentative plans call for expanding Crossroads scope by adding Czech pop, folk and jazz material this fall. Also, Czech soundtrack albums will be issued on the Columbia label as the films are released in the United

States.

Supraphon also has produced Mozart's "Don Giovanni." being released by Deutsche Grammophon this fall. The opera, conducted by Karl Boehm, stars Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Birgit Nilsson and Martina Arroyo.

The CBS-Czech agreement gives the American company first refusal on Supraphon product. Columbia and Epic officials said Supraphon had conformed 100 per cent to CBS recording standards and also were cooperative on repertoire suggestions. One Supraphon opera. Janacek's "From the House of the Dead," has been released on the CBS label, but future operatic releases, such as Janacek's "The Mikropolous Case," scheduled for this fall, probably will be on Epic. Several Epic releases have included Supraphon material, including those featuring violinist Josef Suk. Among the artists featured on Crossroads have been conductor Karel Ancerl, Czech Philharmonic, Suk Trio, Vlach Quartet, Smetana Quartet, Prague Symphony, and Prague Madrigal Singers. All releases under the CBS-Czech agreement are new pressings. Epic is readying a special release commemorating the year of Crossroads. Until about three years ago. Connoisseur also was imoortln" Siinranhon pressings and distributing them in the United States on the Supraphon label, but since thai time only the tapes have come in, with the pr,.ssing ai,d packaging done by Connoisseur. A new stereo version of Janacek's "Jenufa" probably will turn up on Artia, which currently has the only catalog listing of the opera, a mono version produced by Supraphon. Artia also has been successful with Dvorak's "Rusalka." while Parliament has a successful pressing of that composer's "Symphony No. 9 (From the New World)." Connoisseur issues about 18 Parliament and six Artia albums a year. first

Ladislav Jasik.

Supraphon

artists

have

visited this

cert artists.

At present there are no plans envisaged for the transference of Supraphon repertoire to cassette or cartridge.

...

in By

Spain WERNER

H.

Discophon of Barcelona has been the Spanish licensee of Supraphon since 1961 and was responsible for the introduction into Spain of recordings by such celebrated names as Sviatoslav Richler and the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. Discophon cuts and presses the records from tapes supplied by Supraphon and releases the disks in Spanish-made sleeves under the Discophon logo. At present there is a basic catalog of about 40 albums, half of them in stereo, and a dozen EPs availbatch of new titles is able on the Spanish market. added every year. Discophon

in

. .

Germany By

Metronome has distributed the Supraphon label in West Germany since Oct. 1, 1966 when the company began with an

To licity

cially

initial

stimulate sales

release of 65

albums.

Metronome launched

a big pub-

campaign and circulated 200,000 copies of a printed

brochure introducing the

label's

spereper-

toire to dealers and record buyers. The company also produced a sampler album, "Musik aus grosser Tradition Eine Einfuhrung in die Welt der slawischen Musik," which became a best-



seller

with 100,000 sales.

Other best-sellers on the label are Dvorak's "New World" Symphony by the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Karel Ancerl, selling at $4.50, and den Opern Tannhauscr. Meistersinger. Der fligende Hollander and Tristan und Isolde," by the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Franz Konwitschny, which retails at $2.70. Other popular Supraphon records are the Russian folk songs by the Alexandrov Ensemble of the Red Army and Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet," by the Czech Philharmonic conducted by Ancerl ($6.25). There is also a good sale for the cassette release of the Brandenburg Concerto. In October, Metronome will release 45 new albums from the Supraphon catalog including Slavonic Dances, Eine Kleinc Nachtmusik and other works by Beethoven, "Vorspiele zu

Dvorak,

Mendelssohn, Debussy, Smetana, Bartok, Mahler. Schumann all played by the Czech Philharmonic. Other releases will feature Eva Bernathova (piano). Karlovski (viola), Gertler (violin). Karin (piano). Josef Suk (violin). Zuzana Ruzickova (harpsichord) and the Smetana, Janacck and Vlach quartets. S-8

lists

the

best-selling

lines

as

Coppelia

by the Orchestra of the Smetana Theater, Prague; Beethoven's Fifth Symphony by the Czech Philharmonic; Bach preludes by the organist Jiri Rcinberger: Prince Igor and the Polovtsian Dances (Borodin) by the Czech Philharmonic and the Orchestra and Choru.s of the Prague National Theater; Tschaikovsky's No. I Piano Concerto by Richter and the Czech Philharmonic; Tschaikovsky's Swan Lake by the Orchestra of the Prague National Theater; Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe by the Czech Philharmonic, and an album of Wagner overtures by the Czech Philharmonic. Best selling EP's include those with a Spanish flavor, like the Ritual Fire Dance by de Falla, and (Delibes)

WOLFGANG SPAHR

By Dr.

Europe

LUBOMIR DORUZKA

between Supraphon and the East European markets differ in many way from those existing between Supraphon and the West. From as early as 1948 when the record industry in Eastern Europe was in its infancy, Supraphon began developing its operations systematically with the aim of becoming the major record company in Eastern Europe, not only manufacturing, distributing and exrelations

porting records but also supplying assistance to other socialist countries in developing their recording industries.

This was done and technical data

at

first

by submitting information

to new companies or by pressing the records of other countries. For a considerable period of time the entire production of LP records for the German Democratic Republic and the first Polish stereo disks were pressed in the Supraphon factory. The high technical standards of Supraphon and its services for the record industries of other East European countries made it the leading label in this part of the world, a position which has been maintained even now when the recording industries of other socialist countries have developed not only in ihc home sector but also on the export side. Supraphon records currently enjoy their biggest sales in the USSR, the German Democratic Republic .

and Hungary. In Poland, Bulgaria and Rumania, Supraphon records are introduced on the basis of a cultural exchange agreement in quantities fixed by bilateral agreements between Czechoslovakia and those countries.

While Supraphon's exports to the West consist almost exclusively of classical music, the Eastern market shows a lively interest in the company's pop music output. Of Supraphon's Eastern European exports, classical music represents 70 per cent and pop and jazz the remaining 30 per cent. Only about half of the disks exported are LP's, which means that singles and EP's almost none of which are exported to Western countries enjoy a considerable sale in Eastern European countries. In Hungary and East Germany, Supraphon's international classical repertoire is the most in demand whereas in the USSR the interest in Czech music, in particular that of the old baroque masters, is increasing rapidly. The USSR also buys considerable quantities of Czech pop music and sometimes these records achieve bigger sales in Russia than they do in Czecho-





In East Germany, Suprapbon-Artia distribute some records through their own Record Club which has already issued 80 LPs. Each member of the club is obliged to buy at least 1 3 LP's a year.

SCHEURING

A

.

in Eastern

slovakia.

country for con-

certs and have thus given a notable boost to sales of their records. Among them have been Suk. the Czech Philharmonic, the Czech chamber ensembles and pianist Eva Bernathova who is, in fact, the wife of the Czech commercial attache in Britain. Rose says the appreciation for Supraphon product is countrywide and not restricted to those main city centers boasting excellent concert and recital facilities. He aims in the future to arrange special promotion operations to coincide with the visits of Supraphon con-

.

The

Rhapsodic Espagnole and Bolero, all by the Czech Philharmonic. Though the market for Supraphon recordings in Spain is small, it is growing steadily and has been stimulated by the appearances in Barcelona and Madrid of David Oistrakh, the cellist Milos Sadlo. Sviatoslav Richter and the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra Ravel's

The export of records to the Eastern European countries forms about two-thirds of Supraphon's total export output. However, it has to be remembered that license contracts, which predominate in Supraphon's dealings with the West, do not exist in Eastern Europe except for a contract between Supraphon and Deutsche •Schallplatte of East

Germany.

Supraphon sees its position in the Eastern European market as being of great potential interest to western companies which are represented by Supraphon on a license basis. Almost all of Supraphon's license contracts include not only Czechoslovakia but all East European territories and Barclay of France, Supraphon's oldest partner, has had nearly two dozen of its records introduced to these markets which would normally not be accessible to the French company. An LP by Dalida sold more than 70,000 copies in Ea.stern territories outside

.

. . f

Czechoslovakia.

n France By MIKE HENNESSEY

Barclay in France has maintained excellent relations with Supraphon since signing the contract to distribute the Czech product here in 1962. Barclay international manager Henri Rossi .sees great potential in the reciprocal agreement, not only in bringing excellent recordings of Czech music and musicians to the French public, but also in opening up

cunlinued on pafie S-IO

conducted by Karel Ancerl.



iMflltf Kvlltnink, DIreftsr of Hie Artia Foreign Trade Corp.

Commmlal

Art

JirttiUv iti*. Director of Suprayhen.

Josef Mlrachy CSc, Director of the Grainoplionc Tcdiniqiie Research Institute.

Dr.

Sip, daft) iKcrdinf OirfctK sf piclwretf in tlie Svpraplloii Itudio durlnf

lt
recording oi

SEPTEMBER

Janaceit'i

23.

SwpnpliM, tho

"Makropwiol Cate."

1967. BILLBOARD

CONGRATULATIONS licensee of

RECORDS

^

"

SPARTON RECORDS

ftffhC

congratulates

Imported by Robert

J.

Stone of Canada Limited,

Distributed by Sparton of

ARTIA/ Czechoslovakia

Canada

'Working Together to Serve You Better

on

his 21st

J.

Stone of Conoda Limited

Ejercito Nacional 167 D.

F.

Canada'

MEXICO

P. 0.



-

Sparton of Conodo Limited Post Office Box 2125 London, Ontario

172 King St. East Oshawa, Ontario 416-723-0898 1,

in

anniversary

Robert

Mexico

Limited,

519-455-6320

Box 7762

(Phone: 45-73-60)

Congratulations to

SUPRAPHOH

on their

Anniyersary

NIPPON COLUMBIA TOKYO.

CO.,

LTD.

PRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL

JAPAN. 95

BROAD STREET, NEW YORK

4.

N, Y.

<,^(,

».v)rk(;,v;.s

World's largest manufacturer exclusively devoted to recording blanks

^^^^^^^^^^^ SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

S-9 Ci

ilenal

SUPRAPHOH AROUND THE WORLD ...

on the part of the public toward the product of countries from the Eastern bloc.

attitude

in trance

continued from page S-8 a market of enormous potential

for

Barclay's

own

artists.

In 1965 Barclay and Supraphon signed an agreement by which Supraphon represents Barclay exclusively in Czechoslovakia and on a nonexclusive basis in all other Eastern European countries.

"The

potential of the eastern

European market

is

truly immense," say Rossi. "Franch records sell particularly well in Czechoslovakia because the French

language is well known there and, indeed, 50 years ago it was more widely spoken than English." Until a year ago, Barclay imported

all its

stocks of

Nevertheless he had no doubts about the high quality and sales potential of the Supraphon catalog and he persisted in his efforts to establish the label in Italy. He decided to try a new sales outlet, concentrating on the dedicated collectors of classical music, and began a mail order service.

This soon began showing favorable results and is operating on a highly satisfactory basis. Trovajoli thinks the time is ripe to renew his attempts to sell Supraphon line through the record shops. He is conscious of the acceptance for classical music, which,

now now the

to a certain extent, is the result of the strong promotion of classical repertoire by other record companies in Italy over the last five years.

There remains, however, certain economic diffibe overcome. Artia's export prices, plus import duties and distribution costs, are such that they

Supraphon records, but in 1966 a further agreement was signed giving Barclay the right to press records in

culties to

France. One of the biggest pressed catalog has been an choir, the sales of which appearance of the choir in

outstrip the current average wholesale prices here. In 1959 classical albums were retailed at an average of $7.20. but prices have fallen steeply since then and the

successes

in

the

locally

album by the Red Army were stimulated by the Paris.

current average price

The Supraphon

repertoire is extremely highly regarded by connoisseurs of serious music in France and in recent years Supraphon recordings have won many of the annual awards made by the Academie du Disque Francais and the Academie Charles Cros.

Among the award winning records are SymphoNo. 2 and 3 and Pacific 231 by Arthur Honeg"The Cunning Little Vixen," Glagolitic Mass, String Quartet No. 1 and 2 Sonata for violin and piano by Leos Janacek; Songs and Dances of Death by Moussorgsky; Piano quintet in F minor by Cessar Franck; Martinu's Symphony No. 6 and Complete works for violin by Bela Bartok. nies

ger;

Celebrated Czech artists like Josef Suk, Eva Bernathova, Zuzana Ruzickova, Andre Gertler and the Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Karel Ancerl, the Czech Trio, the Suk Trio and the Janacek Quartet make regular concert appearances in France and have an important following among French mu-

minimum

S5.20 and a



$3.80 with a of $2.50.

is

maximum

of

...

Novak. Tours of Supraphon artists have become more and more frequent. Among the most important celebrities to visit Italy are Karel Ancerl, conductor of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, the violinist Josef Suk and the Smetana Quartet. Their performances at the Scala Theater, Milan, in the "Maggio Musicale Fiorentino" ("Musical May of Florence") and at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoletto have stimulated Italian interest in

ment. Bronkhorst says the Supraphon label has a high reputation among lovers of classical music who are reached through about 600 selling points throughout the Netherlands. "People who buy Supraphon records," he says, "are particularly impressed by the high qualit)' of performances, recording and pressing." In the last few years many modern works have found enthusiastic buyers in Holland and the Dutch radio stations give excellent exposure to Supraphon Sales of record players are good thanks to a combination of high quality and low prices. In 1960 Cinerec-Supraphon sold 10,000 record players in Holland. This year the figure is estimated at 14,000 with prices ranging from 60 guilders (about $17) to 270 guilders (about $75). Sales of record boxes are also impressive and the company expects to sell a total of 60,000 this year.

.

.



By ESPEN ERIKSEN

Josef Palenicek

has

been

catalog tributed in Italy by Master Records Italiana since 1959 on an exclusive basis. Master Records import the finished disks and no pressing agreement has so far been classical

dis-

concluded.

The Supraphon catalog enjoys a high reputation among cla.ssical record collectors. The albums are sold by mail order system backed by specialized publicity is aimed at sophisticated record buyers. The mail order system was instituted after sales through the traditional retail outlets had proved disappointing. Before 1959, a number of Italian record companies imported Supraphon records on a buy-and-sell, recordto-record basis but without any intentions of trying to

Tilt

Hmm

tf Artllls

h

LP s

Pr«f v>-

which

...in Belgium & Luxembourg By

establish the label in Italy.

S.

In 1959, a contract for exclusive Italian distribution Artia, the Czechoslovak Foreign

the

A. Disques Artone Fonoplaten N. V. has been distributor of Supraphon in Belgium

the

made

a considerable impres-

printed in Italy.

however, sales were not encouraging. sleeve design of the albums imported by other Italian companies before 1959 had failed to attract the public and many retailers were carrying stock of virtually unsalable Supraphon records. Trovajoli also had to counter a certain negative Despite

this,

S-10

in the

records

Artone

196S.

The company

imports

their original sleeves. feels that because of the richness of Suclassical repertoire, the high class of its in

praphon's artists and the excellent recording quality, the label ranks with the classic repertoire of the top international companies. In recent months Supraphon has produced some

beautiful sleeves which have evoked an enresponse from Belgian record buyers and Artone has made a strong promotion effort on the label. Said an Artone spokesman: "Whatever his budget, really

thusiastic

the classical music lover in Belgium or Luxembourg can build an unequaled collection of classical recordings from the Supraphon catalog because of their low retail price of 168 francs" (about $3.30). Among the most popular Supraphon recordings in Belgium and Luxembourg are Alexander Nevsky and Juliet by Prokofiev, "My Country" by Smetana, "Missa Pastoralis" by Brixi, Stabat Mater by Dvorak, Scarlatti sonatas, played by Zuzanna Ruzickova and Carmina Burana and Catrelli Cormina by Carl

Romeo and

Oriff.

between 43 and 49 krone ($6 to $7).

Sweden Sweden by Svereco, Supra-

represented in to

than a year.

Sonet

last

fall

and although

this

exploiting the catalog in Sweden for claims that the label

Dag Haeggquist

selling well.

The Supraphon LP's

exclusive

and Luxembourg since

The record sleeves were also below normal Western standard and slightly anachronistic in design. But at the suggestion of Master's managing director. Max Trovajoli, the two firms co-operated to make the Supraphon line more acceptable to the Italian public. They turned the cream of the catalog in the 12-inch album format and for a period the sleeves were redesigned and

sell at

company has been less is

MIKE HENNESSEY

Trade Corporation, and Supraphon Italiana, as Master Records Italiana was formerly known. At first only 10-inch albums were available from Prague, and the quality of the pressing was imperfect. However, the high quality of the recordings and the sion.

here

Initially

phon switched

was signed between

The unappealing

was launched

Denmark

GERMANO RUSCITTO

excellence of the artists

it

make a real

ing concert tours throughout the country each year. Among the Supraphon artists who regularly visit are the Smetana Quartet, the Novak Quartet and the Vlach Quartet. Among the best-selling Supraphon LP's in Denmark, reports Knudsen, are Dvorak's "New World" symphony by the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Karel Ancerl, and Bruck's violin concerto with Josef Suk as soloist. Dansk Grammophon imports only 12-inch LP's and they sell for 32 krone (about $4) whereas most classical

in ffofy

The Supraphon

to

the best market for classical music and it is also in Denmark that the Supraphon label has been longest established. The label is represented here by Dansk Grammphonpladeforlag, which has its head office in Copenhagen. At the beginning Supraphon imports to Denmark were handled by a record store, but in 1954 Eugen Hartkopp created a separate company to represent Supraphon in Denmrrk. At this time the records were being produced in four-color sleeves and beginning to compete with Western product. Ten years later Karl Emil Knudsen of Dansk Grammophonpladeforlag took over representation of the Supraphon label and reports that sales are very satisfactory, particularly in the field of chamber music. The publishing house of Wilhelm Hansen and the Danish pianist Goesta Schwarck have done a great deal to promote Supraphon artists in Denmark by arrang-

la return, Barclay artists are increasingly active in meeting the great demand for western pop music in Czechoslovakia and other East European countries. Charles Aznavour, Jacques Brel, Mireille Mathieu, Dalida, and Jean Ferrat have all had successful tours in Eastern Europe and Dalida and Aznavour are now well established favorites in Czechoslovakia. More recently the records of Mireille Mathieu and Jean Ferrat have been selling in growing quantities.

By

label

was not

until relatively recent that it beimpact. Today it is competing strongly with the classical catalogs of other companies, especially since its albums are cheaper than most other classical albums. Of the three Scandinavian countries, Denmark has

early 1950's,

gan

"Supraphon," says Rossi, "through the richness of its classical catalog, has achieved wider appreciation for such great composers as Brixi, Richter, Ryba, Smetana, Bruckner, Fibich, Dvorak, Mahler, Janacek, Suk and Martinu."

.

Scottdinavia

ffl

Although the Supraphon

and Alexander Plocek are members of the jury for the annual Marguerite Long-Jacques Thibault contest.

. .

.

the rich Czechoslovak musical heritage.



of the Czech Trio

HAGEMAN

recordings.

Sales figures for Supraphon were not revealed by Master, but the best selling records are those of works by Dvorak, Janacek, Martinu, Smetana, Fibich and

lovers.

Two members

Netherlands

By BAS

Czech

sic

in the

N. V. Cinerec-Supraphon, Hilversum. distributor of Supraphon records in Holland, has built up a strong market for the Czech label here since the company began operations in October 1959. The company is also selling a steadily increasing number of Supraphon phonographs. Peter Bronkhorst, president of Cinerec-Supraphon, reports that turnover has tripled between 1960 and 1967, both for the records and record-playing equip-

at 16 the average price of a classical sell

krone

($3.10)

LP in Sweden whereas 27 krone ($5.30). "Yet," says Haeggquist, "the Supraphon product is as good as that of the more expensive records." is

quality of

Recently a Stockholm dealer ordered a selection of 700 LP's from the Supraphon catalog and sold them all within a week. "The main problem," says Haeggquist, "is to get the records to the buyers. Classical sales in Sweden are so small that we are obliged to employ other marketing techniques than the normal retail shop outlets. We are therefore planning to start rack-jobbing in supermarkets to augment the record shop sales. Sonet imports only stereo material from Supraphon and the best selling albums are Dvorak's "New World" Symphony and works by other Czech classical com-

So far no Supraphon artists have visited Sweden. "It will take a long time," says Haeggquist, "to estaba classical repertoire like this in Sweden, but after

posers. lish

year of exploiting the Supraphon catalog 1 feel very encouraged. I am sure that in time Supraphon will become a very important label in Sweden."

Norway Although Swedish and Danish representation of the continued on page S-It

SEPTEMBER

23, 1967, BILLBOAIIO

...

in Seandinmitt

continued from

page S-10

Supraphon

label is handled by the Sonet group, in the distribution is effected by Artimpex. story of Supraphon in Norway is a complex one, although throughout the operation N. E. Larsgaard has supervised the exploitation of the label.

Norway The

Supraphon was introduced

to

Norway

in

1958

through the Cappelen record club. Then Cappelen sold the record club to the book club owned jointly by two big publishing houses, Aschehoug and Gyldendal. The book club created an organization called the Book Club's Music Friends and continued the distribution of the Supraphon label. Last fall, Larsgaard founded his own company, Artimpex, and began distributing the Supraphon product through record retailers. Says Larsgaard, "I am well satisfied with the way things have gone in the first year, but it is too early to predict what success Supraphon will have in Norway. Sales through the record club were good and I am hoping to boost sales still further by a big promotion campaign. 1 will be helped in this by the visits of Czech artists who return to Norway each year." The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, under the conductors Karel Ancerl and Smetacek, has appeared several times at the Bergen Festival and the violinist Josef Suk once paid a special visit to the small town of Gjoevik. Tills unexpected performance was arranged by local orchestra leader Rolf Bekkelund who has a Czech wife and who studied in Czechoslovakia. The Smetana Quartet and the organ virtuoso Jiri Reinberger have both appeared in Norway with great success and Stanislav Knor has also performed here. Supraphon LP's sell in Norway for 19.50 krone ($2.80) compared with 42 krone ($6) for most other classical

recordings. consistent

The most

sellers

from the Supraphon

catalog over the years have been the Tchaikovsky piano concerto by Svjatoslav Richtcr, Grieg's piano concerto with Jan Panenka as soloist, Beethoven's 5th Symphony, conducted by Karel Ancerl and Dvorak's piano concerto opus 33, with Vaclav Talich conducting and Fr. Maxian as soloist. In all cases the orchestra is the Czech Philharmonic. This year the most popular records, in addition to the all-time favorites mentioned above, are Organ Music by Bach played by Jiri Reinberger, Mozart's "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik," Dvorak's "New World" symphony, the violin recital by Ida Haendel and the Dvorak violin concerto by Josef Suk. "Bearing in mind the population of Norway, this country has been one of the best in Europe as far as the success of the Supraphon catalog is concerned," said Larsgaard.

WE ARE PROUD TO REPRESENT SUPRAPHON

HOLLANDA MEMRER OF IN

A WORLD-WIDE TEAM

PETER BRONKHORST President N.V.

CINERECSIIPRAPHOIV HOLLAND

CIIVEREC-

SUPRAPHOIV HOLLAI\D VAARTWEG

14, P.O.

BOX

89, HILVERSIJIW,

HOLLAND

PHOIVE: 15353

BEST WISHES Congratulations

SUPRAPHON And

Best Wishes

TO SLPRAPHON ON THEIR 21st

ANNIVERSART

For Continued Success

BARCLAY RECORDS France, Benelux

Switzerland SEPTEMBER 23, 1967, BlUBOARD

EUA ALUF MEDINA VE ORTAKIARI PlAKClUK

SKKHI Karakoy Necatibey Caddesi Cheref Building No. 29/303 ISTANBUL, Turkey KOIKTIF

S-11

to be

we send our

warmest ratolatioos

Ihe otaoy

ts

orusic

the

first

21 years

Scandinavian representatives

DANSK GRAMMOFONPLADEFORUG Dortheavej 39, Copenhagen

Denmark

SONET GRAMMOFON AB Artemisgatan 8 Stockholm 39

Sweden S-12

on

its

21st Anniversary

and hope to continue their happy and successful association

for

iii

many

Great Britain

years to come.

SEPTEMBER

23, 1967,

BILLBOARD

Country Music Nashville Music Industry Holds Fund-Raiser for 'Drink' Cause NASHVILLE ville



The Nash-

music industry,

led

by X.

Cosse, held a fund-raising organizational meeting Wednes(13) at BMI to promote the cause of liquor-by-the-drink in a Sept. 28 referendum.

day

Cosse, manager of Chet At-

Boots Randolph and Floyd Cramer, said the "by-the-drink" issue was vitally important to kins.

the stimulation of Nashville's growth, and particularly to the expansion of the music industry.

Funds were pledged for advertising purposes to offset the

more than {100,000 being used by the "dry" forces, most of which was given by church leaders of fundamentalist religions. The issue has evolved in-

an

to

emotional

campaign

this traditional "Bible belt"

in

area

of the South.

The

lack

of liquor-by-thedrink has in the past been a deterrent to good clubs and restaurants. Although not strictly enforced in the past, recent

crackdowns

were inaugurated on the issue and

to put pressure to force

such a referendum.

Wagoner, Jean Part; A Team for 7 Years NASHVILLE—Porter Norma

oner and as

a

Jean

Wag-

Jean, together

team for seven years on TV and road ap-

syndicated pearances,

are

(Bassler)

parting. is

Norma

leaving

to

marry an Oklahoma City furniture dealer, and will be replaced on both Porter Wagoner shows by Dolly Parton, Monument Records'

artist.

also tour with road.

Miss Parton

will

Wagoner on

the

Norma Jean will continue to record on RCA Victor in Nashville, but plans no further travel dates.

Norma at

KLPR

got her

Jean began her career Oklahoma City, and break in the busi-

in

first

ness appearing on a Wagoner syndication. She gained wide-

spread exposure in Wagoner's 80 shows a year which are distributed in more than 100 markets. This led to her becoming a featured act on the "Grand Ole Opry" in 1 965. She had given up

road appearances for a time, but continued on the two television

series.

Miss

Parton, a successful singer-songwriter, had a recent with her single, "Dumb hit Blonde," and her LP, "Hello, I'm Dolly." In addition to her Monument Recordings, she is a staff writer for Combine Music. Both firms are .owned by Fred Foster.

The entertainment industry generally has suffered in this area because of the inability to obtain mixed drinks. Forces successful in defeating the issue in Memphis now

have moved to Nashville in a concerted drive, by radio, TV and outdoor advertising, to supplement the negative drive from the pulpits. The "wets" have had no such forum and have lacked organization.

The

most

legislature,

recent Tennessee despite strong pres-

from the churches, passed an enabling act which afforded each of the State's four largest sure

(Memphis,

cities

Nashville,

Knoxville and Chattanooga) the right to determine if liquor by the ounce could be sold legally.

Girl

Singers-

Plenty: Sholes NASHVILLE tor has



more "good

try girl singers" then

any other

label, according to Steve Sholes, division vice-president of popular a&r for the firm.

Alluding to a report that RCA Victor is "bucking the trend" in not signing new female artists, Sholes said that some of the label's greatest strength is with female singers in the country field.

"It's true we arc not rushing out to sign people to contracts," Sholes added, "but we are doing quite well with the ones we have." He noted that Victor also is successful with it's male coun-

try artists.

be distributed in this country, aimed primarily at a large West Coast Nisi audience, but secondarily at the over-all audience bacause of the "different"

sound for

this

contemporary mu-

sic.

At the same time, Acuff-Rose. functioning as an independent would production company, take Japanese chart records, record them in Nashville with English lyrics, and then return them to

Japan for distribution. "These

songs would be primarily pop. hut also would include country,

depending on the material They would lean to-

available.

and promote Lynn Anderson would "give us an-

ever,

the "sentimental," since according to

sano

this

other

strong

whom

to

girl

artist

with

work."

Sholes noted that currently the Billboard charts are such as Connie Smith, Davis, Dottie West, Norma Jean and Liz Anderson. Others frequently on the charts include Anita Carter, Maria Dallas, Lorene Mann and Delia Rae, plus budding newcomers

performers Skeeter

'

Merger on 'N^w Sound'

would draw from a vast catalog, which includes hit songs from many nations. They would

He said the label's "deal" with Chart, enabling Victor to

on

FELTON JARVIS. a&r producer for RCA Victor, presents a Pop Ato Jim Ed Brown (center), whose recording by that name has shot to the top 10 in the charts. The gold-plated can was suitably inscribed. Looking on is Hubert Long (left), talent manager for Brown.

In

Vic-

coun-

distribute

Top" award

Acuff-Rose, Japanese Pub • Continued from page I

RCA

selling

EAST AND WEST are negotiating a plan for creation of a new sound in the American and Japanese markets. Left to right. Bob McClusky, general manager. Acuff-Rose Publications; Takao Kande, producer for Shinko Music publishing; Shoichi Kusano, owner of Shinko. and Wesley Rose, Acuff-Rose president.

Bobbl Staff and Lonesome Rhodes.

such

as

the

ward



howKu-

has the greatest market value in Japan. type

song

Kusano and Takao Kande, Shinko. a&r producer for brought McClusky a master cut in the Tokyo studios, featuring songs currently popular pan,

in

Ja-

some vocal and some

in-

strumental.

Kusano and Kande also pub"Music Life." the largest

with a 100,000 monthly circulation. Kusano also functions as a board member of JASRAC. the licensing agency for Japan.

"Among

the older people, old

pop standards are the most popular forms of music in Japan,"

Among the college students, though, there is a trend toward country music. This, he explained, is because the college students have learned to speak English, and they understand the powerful lyrics of country music. Kusano

said.

Wesley Rose, president of Acuff - Rose, noted that more than 1(X) versions of the "Tennessee Waltz" had been cut in Japan alone. It is, by far, the most popular American song ever to hit Japan.

The most recent Acuff-Rose in Japan had a full interflavor. It was "Short on Love," written by John D. Loudermilk, recorded in Nashhit

national

ville

kus,

by German artist Gus Bacproduced by Jim Vienneau It became the No.

MGM.

on

song

in

I

Japan.

Mod

Stations

lish

music fan magazine

in

Japan.

Out

inq

At KBUC's Recent Promotion

for

Kapp

On Oxford NASHVILLE



RCA

Vic-

tor's Vernon Oxford is "too country to be played on country stations," according to Victor producer Bob Ferguson.

According Oxford

tor.

new

stars

to is

who

the

a&r

direc-

one of the rare still sings "pure

country." "This hurts him in the modern country format stations."

Ferguson explains, thev plav

is

because

all

"middle-of-the-road

stuff."

AUGUST WAS KAPP RECORDS MONTH

at KBUC radio station. San Antonio, with members of the staff helping promote artists like Bob Wills, Cal Smith, Hugh X. Lewis, and Mel Tilirs by visiting onestops and record dealers with Chuck Chellman, Kapp country promotion and sales director. At left, from left: Dale Eichor. Jim Clemens and Jeff Britt of the station with Chellman. Center photo: Russell Sohram, left, owner of E&R One-Stop; Britt. Eichor, and Chellman. At right. Chellman, Eichor, Britt and Ken Fisher, right, manager of the record department in Joske's Department Store.

SEPTEMBER

73,

1967, BILLBOARD

Ferguson says he has received lellcrs nationwide and from several European nations placing Oxford in the list of true country greats with the Carters. Jimmy Rogers and others. "Oxford will tear up a live audience anywhere." he adds, because he's so genuinely country. And he does well at the iContimu'd on puiic 59) O.'

57

,,,,

Country

Musk SPECIAL SUIIVEV ftr Wetk

•illbaard

^ nis

STAR Ptrfemtr-Sldfi ri«itfirl«g |rtit«t proyirtiMitt vpwirrf profrtis

lITtE,

list

W«k W«V

ml)

LAURA (What's He Got That I Ain't Got) Leon Asiiley, Ashley 2003 (Galiico, BMI|

JACKSON AIN'T A VERY BIG TOWN

11

39

40

9

^

45

56

GRASS WON'T

42

42

GENTLE ON MY MIND

PARTY PICKIN' George Jones & Melba Montgomery, Muilcor 1238 (Glad/2anells, BMI)

12

Merle Haggard, Capilol 593] (Blue Book, BMI)

Kenny

Scab's not new single _

TURN THE WORLD AROUND

13

S

Eddy Arnold, RCA Victor 9265

WHAT DOES

12

9242 (GIner, BMI)

Victor

10

BREAK MY MIND

44

13

RCA

George Hamilton

IV.

(Windward

BMI)

Side,

Victor

'CAUSE I HAVE VOU Wynn Stewart, Capitol 5937

;ittlic

A

17

WOMAN

DON'T PUT YOUR HURT IN MY HEART .12 Conway Twitly, Decca 32147 (Wilderness, BMI)

52

TINY TEARS Liz

9239

46

46

I

Bill

4

Nat Stuckey, Paula 276 (Stuckey/Su-Ma, BMI)

Marty

Anderson, Decca 32146

HOW LONG WIU

.

Columbia 44271 Range/Mariposa, BMI)

Robbins,

&

(Hill

U

TAKE

IT

49

NOBODY'S CHILD

50

I

U

16

15

IE

8

U

Husky, Capitol 5938 (Tree, BMI)

9

& June

Cast)

MY HEART GETS ALL THE BREAKS

51

Carter, Columbia

5960

Jackson, Capilol

(Tree,

6

BMI)

YOU MEAN THE WORLD TO ME

BMI)

(Slarday,

1

David Houston,

.14

LONG LEGGED GUITAR PICKIN' MAN

3

Margie Singleton, Ashley 201 (Shayne, AiCAP)

Wanda

PHANTOM 309

Johnny

ODE TO BILUE JOE

58

5 BMI)

(Galiico,

YOU PUSHED ME TOO FAR Ferlln

15

1

13782

(Milene,

D0N7 WANNA PUY HOUSE Wynette, Epic 1021

MGM

Hank Williams Jr., ASCAP)

Warner Mack, Decca 32142 (Page Boy, SESAC)

Red Sovine, Slarday 81

HOW

Epic

10224

1

(Galiico,

FAST THEM TRUCKS CAN

BMI)

GO

1

Claude Gray, Decca 32180 (Vanio, BMI)

44158

(Perkins, SESAC)

WHEEL CANNONBALL

BIG

I'U NEVER FIND ANOTHER VOU

7

17

19

22

FOOL. FOOL, FOOL Webb Pierce, Decca 32137

20

JULIE

20

21

RCA

Tillii,

Victor

Slaller Brothers, Columbia

19

44245

5

1

DUMMY

BIG

Tommy

1

Collins,

Columbia 44360 (S4tsholl,

HARD LUCK JOE

59 BMI)

GOODY GOODY GUMDROPS

60

3

Wilburn Brothers, Decca 32169 (Sure-Fire, BMI)

BMI) I

TAUGHT HER EVERYTHING SHE KNOWS Walker, Monument

Billy

THE STORM

7

Johnny Duncan, Columbia 44196 (Unaft, BMI)

4

(Tree,

(East Star,

Alnt Got)

Decca 32184 (Sure-Fire, BMI)

Lynn,

Lorelta

5

92M

I

BMI)

UKE A FOOL RCA

(Whafs He Got That

WHAT KIND OF A GIRL (Do You Think I Am?)

9259

YOU CAN'T HAVE YOUR KATE AND EDITH TOO

Doltie West,

24

UURA

Claude King, Columbia 44237 (Galiico, BMI)

6 RCA

8

Ernie Ashworth, Hickory 1466 (Aculf-Rose, BMI)

56

U

CHOKIN' KIND Jennings, (Wilderness, BMI)

30

MY LOVE FOR YOU

55

9243

Kapp S37 (Cedarwood, BMI)

Waylon

37

Victor

GOODBYE WHEELING Mel

24

8 BMI)

(Sure-fire,

11

Porter Wagoner, (Wilderness, BMI)

4

Dick Todd & Appalachian Wildcats, Peer-Southern 373 (Soulhitrn, ASCAP)

16

5914 (Chappell, ASCAP)

Sonny James, Capilol

Bootc'w

ADORABLE WOMEN

.13

(Painted Desert, BMI)

4

Tammy

Bedvoom

& Range,

(Hill

GARDENIAS IN HER HAIR

18

Babe's

8 5948

BMI)

(Lin-Cal/Ring-a-

NO ONE'S GONNA HURT YOU ANYMORE

11

chart.

«Behin4M\

FORGOT TO CRY

Charlie louvln, Capitol

7 17029

Dot

Guitar, Ding, BMI)

4

Anderson, RCA Victor 9371 (Greenback,

BMI)

11 (Ctntril Songs,

IN LOVE

Bonnie

0O32 [Mayhew/

little Oarlin'

44

BMI)

is UnoGlang

3

9

4

Johnny Paycheck, Window, BMI)

10

Satisfied)

SCA

I'M STILL NOT OVER VOU Ray Prici, Columbia 44195 (Pamper, BMI)

6

t

STREO

A BUSY

THE CAVE

TAKE (To Keep a

IT

Man Uke Vou Skeeter Davis,

9

GROW ON

Boone 1063 (Pamper, BMI)

Price,

Glenn Campbell, Capitol 5939 (Glaser, BMI)

(Fingerlake, BMI]

10

6

Norma Jean, RCA Victor 9258 (Acclaim, BMI) .

BRANDED MAN

3

4

Label,

Artist,

CINCINNATI, OHIO

14

Connie Smith, RCA Victor 9214 (Moss-Rose, BMI)

YOUR TENDER LOVING CARE

5

9/13/«7

Number a Publisher

38

Wynette, Epic 10194

Buck Owens, Capilol 5942 (Blue Book, BMI)

johnnY

TITLE,

Chlrt

11

& Tammy

David houllon (Trea,

2

m

Weelu

Libel,

Arliil,

Number A Publliher

MY ELUSIVE DREAMS

1

Eirflug

wttk.

this

13

1

1024 (Piedmont,

ASCAP)

Jim Reeves, RCA Victor 9238 (Tuckahot, BMI)

BALLAD OF THUNDER ROAD 25

25

CALIFORNIA UPTIGHT BAND & Earl Scruggs, Columbia 44194

9

Jim

&

Jesse, Epic

1

10213 (MCA, ASCAP)

Lester Flalt

INewkeys, BMI)

GET THIS STRANGER OUT OF ME

63

lefty Friiiell, Columbia

26

23

POP A TOP

44205

LEARNIN' A

NEW WAY OF

Hank Snow, RCA Victor 9300

27

27

TRUCKER'S PRAYER

11

Dave Dudley, Mercury 72697 (Central Songs, BMI)

N'*TSfry single.

28

28

THROUGH THE EYES OF LOVE Tompall & Glaser Brottiers, MGM 13754

AU MY

17018

10

67

67

74

S

30

31

WASHED MY FACE IN THE MORNING DEW T. Hall, Mercury 727W (tlewkeyt,

33

TOO MUCH OF YOU

MORNING

MARY

IN THE

Tommy

Hunter, Columbia

LOVE OF THE

3

44234

COMMON PEOPU

Waylon Jennings, RCA Victor 9259 (Wilderness, BMI)

I

Tom

Lynn

Anderson,

Chart

ROLL OVER AND

1475 (Peach,

8

68

73

SHE'S LOOKING

7

69

75

THE WHEELS FELL OFF THE WAGON

BMI)

PUY DEAD

70

70

YOU'VE

DSN

SO GOOD TO ME

3

Van Trevor, Date 1565 (Summerhouse/ Harmony Hill, ASCAP)

5

Carl Smith, Columbia

2

2

Johnny Dollar, Date 1566 (Mayhew, BMI)

10

DEEP WATER

GOOD

Stan Hilchcock, Epic 10182 (Tree, BMI)

SESAC)

Jan Howard, Decca 32141 (Belton, BMI)

39

1

3

Warner i Suti Jane Hokom, LHI (Dirk, BMI)

(Pamco, BMI)

LOVE

31

26

66

LIFE (East Star, BMI)

HERE WE GO AGAIN

69

Virgil

Don Gibson, RCA Victor 9266 (Acuff-Rose, BMI)

32

65

BMI)

(Jack,

32

4

(Forrest Hills,

BMI)

19

Jim Edward Brown, RCA Victor 9192 (Stuckey, BMI)

44233 (Mllene, ASCAP)



YOU LOVE ME TOO LITTLE

1

lorene Mann, RCA Victor 92B8 (Novachaminjo, BMI]

41

ODE TO BILLIE IDE

35

QUEEN OF HONKY TONK STREET

47

TEAR TIME

3

Bobbie Gentry, Capitol 5950 (Shayne, ASCAP)



THE LinLE THINGS

IT'S

Sonny James, Capitol 5987 (Marson, BMI)

35

Kitty Wells,

Decca 32163

(Wells,

BMI)

I

WANNA GO BUMMIN' AROUND

Sonny

(Forrest

61

Hills,

Viva

617

(Viva,

BMI)

DALLAS

BMI)

Vern Stovall, Longhorn 81 (Saran/ Deepcross, BMI)

DOES MY RING HURT YOUR FINGER Country Charlie Pride, (Jando,

Curtis,

5

Wilma Burgess, Decca 32178

ASCAP)

RCA

Victor 9281

4

MABEL Billy

(You Hive Been a Ftiend to Me) 1 Crammer, Rice 5025 (Newkeys, BMI)

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967,

BILLBOARD

Country Music for Ohio, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Canada. It features Cart Smith and the Kilty WclU-Jobnny Wright show. Bobby Lord departs on a month-long trip wiht Harold Morrison, Ray Piilow and Lorene

Boots

package

Norma

Jean, about to be marshowed up with her husband-to-be after a long drive from Oklahoma to plan her gospel album, due to be finished later this

ried,

month.

.

.

will finish

CoDole Smith also

.

her newest

RCA

Victor

a split with the other side in airplay that it has been rcscrv-

spite

.

.

airplay.

.

It's

"Shadows

of his of the on the

.

record the same had on Capa, "Gay

his

will

.

.

jor.

.

.

.

.

St.

.

a

featured

Hustlers,"

.

role

.

in

an Andy

"The

Road

Devtoe-Scott

Brady film shot on location

Houston Coliseum Recording artist

.

.

line

.

artist,

000 at the Sam jn Houston.

Johnny Cipps, presiWall." dent of K-Ark Records, has signed .

is about to give up own label and go with a maMerle Haggard will heada show at Keil Auditorium in Louis Oct. 22. Appearing with Merle will be the Strangers and Country and Bonnie Owens. western performer and Rena artMcDowell has completed ist Bill

Dick Flood

former Capa recording

and

Jimmy Smart, a has recorded "Try Crossing Over," penned by leading singer-writer Hugh X. Lewis. ... A show including Cari Smith, Willie Nelson, Charlie Pride, Roy Dnisky, Bobby Bare and Jimmy Newman grossed more than $10.-

Mann. The "other side" new record is getting most

by Columbia for disk jockand pressed on t>oth sides. Promoter Abe Hanzer has booked, through the Meller Talent Agency, a special doubleiced

eys

Till,

artist,

record she Divorcee."

JED

South Carolina.

.

album on Tuesday (19). Ed Bruce is cutting some new singles. The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum will remain open through the winter, with at.

.

.

,

.

.

tendance remaining high. Top-notch entertainment scheduled for Baltimore at the Music Fair. Package includes Jimmy Newman, Sonny James and the Southern Gentlemen, Hank Thompson and Valley the Brazos Boys and Skceter Davis. Dave Dudley and Tom T. Hall are in for Mer.

.

.

.

.

WSM GRAND

42nd ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

cury recording sessions. . Loretta LyDn*s Double-L Rodeo will be the featured grandstand entertainment for the full run of the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show at Tupelo, TuesdaySaturday (19-23). This same outfit has purchased the rights for production and promotion of the NoBarvember Detroit rodeo. bara Allen appears at army in.

.

stallations

.

Germany

in

.

.

y"^^

through

September for the Gisela Gunther Agency. The performance of Hank WflIlams Jr., at Miami Beach drew

m^m

October 19-20-21

^^^^

AGENDA Registration

GRAND OlE 0PR7

four chartered plane-loads of fans Country music from Nassau. artist Sammy Jackson scored in .

OLE OPRY

.

Minnie Pearl's Luncheon

.

.

.

.

.

United Artists' Party

WSM BREAKFAST

Wanda

Jackson, Slinnle Pearl, Sue Thompson. Mary Taylor, Jerrj' Naylor, Buddy Cagle and Tex

Workshop

Johnny Duncan's WlUlams. "Hard Luck Joe" did so well de-

Spinit

.

Dot Records Luncheon

.

Is

Decca Records Party

New

WSM

Nashville Label NASHVILLE

RCA

— A Houston-

The

first

artist is Sid

ard of Birmingham, performer featured that city.

The release, produced by Henry Strzelecki, is "Pearl," b/w "What Kind of Man Am I?"

Both vein.

try

A BADGE OF

sides are in the counStrzelecki, guitarist

with Boots Randolph and a recording artist in his own right, said other singers are being added to the Spinit label. He will produce all the sessions.

& Show

WSM GRAND OLE OPRY Pamper Music Dance Columbia Coffee Clatch

This badge with your book of tickets will be your pass to It

all

official

represents your

1967 Opry anniversary

SIO

contribution

to

events.

the

Pre-register to

Opry

all

events.

The Opry Trust Fund provides

make

sure

you are among those

Trust Fund, and must be worn to gain entrance to

taking part.

assistance

during times of adversity to persons performing in the country music

Mod

Capitol Records Party

DISTimnON

Lin-

on the "Country Boy Eddie" show in

& Show &

Show

former

a

& Show

FRIDAY NIGHT OPRY

Victor Breakfast

Columbia Records Luncheon

based production firm, Adams & Ethridge, has inaugurated the Spinit label. It has just finished its debut single and is beginning its initial album cutting.

& Show

OPRY SPECTACULAR WSM-CMA Sales-Programming

on the West Coast. The artists include Hank Tompson, Roy Clark,

.

& Show

Fender Country Music Show

appearance as "Lil Abner" in The a network TV special. Ibn Habcy agency has made an agreement with William F. Wagner agency, Hollywood, to represent Halsey and his acts in the area of TV and motion pictures his

CONVENTION HEADQUARTERS: MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM

field.

Stations

• Continued from page 57 stations

which

still

program

"country" country music. His records sell well, according to Ferguson, so there is no doubt a great audience is being missed by the sophisticated disk jockeys who play only the modern sound. Oxford records with a modern song background, but his voice is unmistakably "old time."

Ferguson envisions a

APPLICATION FORM

for such artists, out of the format, which would give such performers a showcase to mod-

to

the

new almost

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

accustomed pop sound.

AVOID WAITING!

NAME_

P.O.

Box 100

Nashville,

AFFILIATION-

Tennessee

Iwfore October 12,

1967

BUSINESS ADDRESSYour badge and book of tickets to events will b« ready for you when you arrive at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium.

em

country audiences. He feels Oxford and others should be placed in a special niche, perhaps only a few times a day, just to expose this type of music to listeners who have been

NOW

OPRY TRUST FUND. WSM RADIO

special

slot

PRE-REGISTER

OCCUPATION(Send this form with your check for $10 to

WSM, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

register.)

—THE NATIONAL LIFE & ACCIDENT INSURANCE CO. 59

in

Country Music

THE

• lllbaard SPECIAL SUtVET Fgr Wiek Ending 9/33/e7

INTERNATIONAL INFLUENCE

Yesteryear's

Country Hits

OF 1.

DILLBOARD

2.

3.

^

Wtik

—Marty Robbins Mountain—

STAt Pvftrmcr— LP's

This

Clauda

lOHNNY CASH'S GREATEST



Song

a

Anderson

Bill

3

Me

Wynn

In-Between—

Mr.

the

You

II

Tell

mama

1^

10.

THERE GOES MY EVERYTHING

Hamilton

IV

Me—

Everybody But

Poner Wagoner, RC* Victor LPM 3797

(Hickory)

BEST OF EDDY ARNOLD RCA Victor LPM 3565 (M); LSP 3545

9

COUNTRY SINGLES-

13

10 Years Ago September 23, 1957 1.

Fraulein— Bobby

2.

Whole Lotta Shakin'—

3.

Bye

Lee

Helms

Lewis

Love

Everly

— Raydee

Daily

LSP 3797

(M),-

12

11

My Shoes Keep Walking Back Price

to

14

(Columbia)

14

duties, has guided the of writer-singer Dallas Frazicr, Capitol Records.

career

Baker and Daily worked out details of (he

Victor)

Four Walls—Jim

7.

Gonna Find Me a Bluebird-

8.

Geisha Girt— Hank LocUin

9.

Home

Marvin Rainwater

(MGM)

BLUE SIDE OF LONESOME

15

LPM 3793

MM

George Jones. Musicor

15

MY

DIESEL ON & Jesse,

Jim

Epic

Your

4 IS)

3793

(Ml; LSP

(S)

HITS BY GEORGE

21

begin build-

on Raydee im-

9 (5)

I'U NEVER FIND ANOTHER YOU

CARRYIN' ON WITH JOHNNY CASH & JUNE CARTER

17

ing a catalog mediately.

IS)

APARTMENT NO. 9

19

t&

16

They will continue Glad and Blue-

(S)

20

Reeves

Victor)

firm with Joe representative

22

of

12

Columbia CL 2728 (M), CS 953S

6.

new

SESAC

crest, but also will

7 LD 4006 (M)i SID 8006

Darlln-

Littlt

Jim Reeves, RC* Victor

You—

Inc.

vice-presidcni

in Nastiville.

(S)

COOL COUNTRY

Sonny James, Capitol T 2788 (M)i ST 2788

Teddy Bear/Loving Ehis Presley (RCA

is

($)

Bobby Austin, Capitol T 2773 (M); ST 2773

18

publishing

Music

also

and country a&r director for Musicor Records, working with such artists as George Jones. Baker, in addition to his pub-

operation

wilburn Brothers, Decca DL 4871 |W); DL 74871

Brothers

5.

(RCA

12

(Sun)



4.

(RCA

new SESAC

a

of

36 (S)

JUKEBOX CHARLIE Johnny Paycheck,

11

(Decca)

(Cadence)

You-Ray

DL 74845

COLD HARD FACTS OF LIFE

Ernest Ashwoith

Bye

mi

Jack Gfaane, Dacca DL 484S

Victor)

Jerry

u

Ernest Tubb, Decca DL 4867 (Ml; DL 74867 (S)

Gonna

Ain't

I

Heart

4

(S)

7 2128 (M); MS 3128

TAIL LN 24314 (M|i IN 26314

(S)

Fund

11 |S)

Victor)

of the

Blues—Johnny

Casii

10. Tangled

MY ELUSIVE DREAMS BN 26325

Mind/My Arms Are

—Hank Snow

(RCA

a House

Victor)

4

& Tammy Wynetti,

David Houston

(Sun)

Epic

LN 24325 (M);

(S)

COMMON PEOPLE

tt

22

LOVE OF THE

20

17

THANKS, HANK!

5

Waylon Jennings, RCA Victor LPM 3825 (M); LSP 3825

34

(M); SLP 1B073 (S)

ODE TO BILUE JOE

2

Bobbie Gentry, Capitol T 2830 (M); ST 2830

22

10

BUCK OWENS AND HIS BUCKAROOS

30

TONIGHT

2715

CapilDl T

(S]

JAPAN

IN

27

26

23

27

25

28

16

Tlllis,

diamorlti

and

Power Points*,

orders for sapphire needles. .

.

cartridges,

spin-

dles, tape and accessories are shipped from our central Mid-West location (near Chicago) the cam* day order is received and at direct to-you low prices. .

.

.



Save delay write for Pfanstiehl's self-mailer order forms now.

KL 1535

KS 3535

(M);

11

Anderson. Decca DL 4SS4 (M); DL 74886

Price,

Price,

WALKIN' IN THE SUNSHINE Roger Miller, Smash MGS 27093

30

31

ALL MY LOVE

31

33

TOGETHER AGAIN

37

CS 9477

(S)

14 SRS 67093

(S)

Don Gibson. RCA Victor LPM 3843 (Ml; LSP 3843

(S)

Kitty Wells

33

(S)

18 Ift);

24

Hi

(SI

35

Columbia CL 2606 (Ml; CS 9406

Columbia CL 2677

29

DIRBCT-TO-DEALER

9 (S)

DANNY BOY Ray

AU

t,

(S);

5

6

Red Foley. Decca DL 4906 (M); DL 74906

11 (S)

JACKSON AIN7 A VERY BIG TOWN Norma Jean, RCA Victor, LPM 3836 (M);

ISP 3836

TURN THE WORLD AROUND

42

CHIMICAl COirolATION • lOX «M 104 UkfVliW AVI. • WAUKEOAN, IlllNOIS Orifinw al Ik4 t9.9S Oiamsiirf N««rflt

3

28

37

38

2

3127

32

(M);

LSP 3768

14

(S)

TOGETHER

LCT'S GET

4

& Melba Montgomery, Musicor

MM

2127

(M):

(SI

FOLKSY

3

George Hamilton

39

(S)

CONNIE SMITH SINGS BILL ANDERSON RCA Victor LPM 3768

40

(S)

3

Smith, Kapp KL 1537 (M); KS 3537

George Jones

MS 38

(S)

GOIN' TO CAL'S PLACE Cal

36

(S)

MY TOMORROWS

Nat Sluckey, Paula LP 2196 (W); LPS 2196

35 39

Eddy Arnold, RCA Victor LPM 3869 |M); LSP 3849

Pfanstiehl

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE INBORN HEART DEFECTS

(S)

TOUCH MY HEART Ray

.

Ka'p'p'

CAN DO NOTHING ALONE

Bill

SHIPMENT OUR GUARANTEE

(S)

6

I'M A LONESOME FUGITIVE Merle Haggard, Capitol T 2702 (M); ST 2702 I

HEART ATTACK STROKE

4

MR. MEL Mel

25

18

ST 2715 |S)

(M);

CARMEN

Marty Robbins, Columbia CL 2725 (M); CS 9525

29

Fights

(S)

11

Monument MLP 8073

Jeannie Seely,

IV,

RCA

Victor

LPM 3854

(M); LSP

3854

LONELY AGAIN

(S)

29

Eddy Arnold. RCA Victor

LPM 3753

(M): LSP 3753 (S)

CARL SMITH SPECIAL (Country Gentleman Sings His Favorites) Columbia CL 2687 (M); CS 94B7

41

41

JUST BEYOND THE Tex

42

44

43

43

Ritler.

45

Samples, Chart CLP

SIX OF ONE. HALF A Del

44

1 (S)

MOON

3

T 2786 (M); ST 2786

Capitol

Just Released

(S)

WORLD OF JUNIOR SAMPtIS Junior

2

1005 (M); CLP 1005

UAL 6595

W;

UAS 6595

KING OF WESTERN SWING Bob Wills, Kapp KL 1523 (M); KS 3523

WINE,

E

4482 (M); SE 4482

McKinnon

"Castle Builders" 2

WAYSIDE RECORDS

(SI

DJ's needing copies write Little Richie Johnson

2 (S)

WOMEN AND SONG MGM

Jerry

(SI

DOZEN OF THE OTHER

Reeves. United Artists

Ben Colder,

of

lishing 13

(S)

story

president

Bluecrest Music, also BMI, have announced joint formation

Talbert,

You—George

(RCA

4 (S)

THE TIME

Jack Ginne, Dacca DL 4904 (M|( DL 74904

Fool—)udy Lynn

Know

Don't

|S)

Walker

(United Artists) 9.

14

2737

Suck Owans & His Buckaroos, Capitol T 2760 (M); ST 270O

AU

5

Weeper— Billy

(Columbia) 8. Footsteps of a

StewatI, Capllol T 2737 (H); ST

Ray Baker,

and

firm 10 (5)

YOUR TENDER LOVING CARE

Heartache— Eddy Arnold

Victor)

7. Willie

10

1

Dacca DL 4872 (M|i DL 74872

Lorclta Lynn,

t,

SUCH A PRETTY WORLD TODAY

IT'S

Ives (Decca)

Little

(RCA

VOL

(S)

AGAIN

Ernetl Tubb

(Dacca) Burl

A

Cbart

HITS,

W78

Columbia CL 2678 (M); CS

King

SINGIN'

Mama Sang

5. Call

6.

wttk.

this

Wetki in

Jim Reeves (RCA Victor) 4.

yrogr«»

t Nviabn

TITLE, Artill. llkll

Gonna Change Everything—

I'm

pr»yer1loKitt uaward

reilsttrini

Lail

Woniin

(Columbia) Wotverton (Columbia)

Glad Music, BMI,

president of

COUNTRY SINGLES5 Yean Ago September 22, 1962 Devil

Baker Form Raydee, Pub Firm NASHVILLE—Pappy Daily,

Daily,

Box 3

1

Beien.

(SI

SEPTEMBER

23,

New Mexico

1967, BILLBOARD

Album Reviews •

Cixilinitcti

from page 44

DL

Dccca

Irot.

Riirl

JAZZ SPECIAL MERIT

I

NATIONAL BREAKOUTS

-k

BROADWAY

BI RI-S

w

Jockie McLeon. Blue Note 4218

VcLmh is a powerful pfrformcf and or^e thai will make his m*fk as » major contributor rt \a7i. The influence of the talc Collraoc is evldtnl, but very it/btle Mc tean'i h^rddrtvinq ^Ito sax work on origi-

getting reported nerketfN) listed

CHILD OF CLAY 74901 (SI

AiM

Jimmie Rodgers,

Billy

871 (Moresco, ASCAP)

TRIP Mixlf Moixh Orcheilra. 200-250

PHS

IMI;

LIGHTNING'S GIRL Nancy

0620 (Hozlewood, ASCAP)

Sinatra, Reprise

SUZANNE

N'onnan N>wpll Ork. Epic Ml! BN 26,123 ISI

Wild

Dawii.

Bill

3799

(Ml; ISP

RCA

Victor

IPM 3799

MOT

Psjchnlcllc S«ili. Bell fi0O7S


PHS

PHM

Plilllps

600-251

ECHOES OF CHILDHOOD

74911

200-251

(SI

DL

4911

(Ml;

Sinuers

nl

Od!»e)

.32

reUil.

74870

(Ml;

(SI

iM); DL

Another in the popular "Echo" series, Itiis LP which should have pop appeal, loo, contains a grand lotal of 44 lurtes. There are tuch lunet here as "Mary Had a Little lamb" and "Waltz of the Floweri," all played in Feyer's free and swinging jtyle.

19r.7 rNTEnN4TION4I. BARBERSHOP CHORUS WINNERS Varlont ArlhK. Dccca DL 4869
LOW

No, 5 Minneapolis Symphony ISIlrowaezskil,

Woeid

ML

HS

2162

CAS

(Ml;

2162

CS

(S)

COUNTRY

years. Her warm French folk have an appeal that transcends She doesn't disappoint in this

JET SET

(Ml

,

AFTERGLOW Comerslonr

S86

BOLEROS RANCHEROS Victor

SYMPHOMOUE/FANTAISIE IN A/ PASTORALE World

Philips

London Festival Orchestra London SPC 21020 (S)

Series

IBkiek).

MARCELLO: LA CETRA Mosid. PUUpf Work)

I

9085

PHC

Series.

(SI

ASPEN SERENADE/SUITE DE QUATRAINS/SEPTET FOR STRINGS

most

900-

(S)

Dcller.

Series

SRV-3005

BRAHMS: CLARINET SONATAS Harold Wrichl/Harris Crossroads 22 16 0141 • 142 (S)

dealtrt,

handling

GoMsmlth, (M);

Marie-Jose

SOUNDTRACK

Philips

Ccnt«n-Fox

DL

74»19

(Si

VsuH

ISI

SEPTEMBER

23,

No,

(SI

6

CONCERTO FOR PIANO CONCERTO FOR HARP GalUns & Jamet. Turnabout Vox TV 34148 (SI HAYDN; SYMPHONY No, 85/CELLO CONCERTO IN D Ludwis Hoetscfaer / Nordwestdeutschc IG. Jochuml, Monitor

MCS ICI 2122 (S/Ml HAYDN: SYMPHONIES «

116

4.MJ;

Nos.

12.

13

14

Vienna

LP

Arais.

9067

Phllbannonic

4
THE LOOK OF LOVE THE SOUND OF SOUL 11«

Julien

PHC

manl. 32 16

1967, BILLBOARD

Opera

Stale Od.issc.s

0116

(S)

32

Orch. (Gobcr0115 (Ml;

16

Smile;

.

Eyes of

Love;

DL 4916,

FREDDY MARTIN'S Groatast DL 7490B

Hits;

OL 4908,

DL 74916

The EsplOBive Side el lOE PANAMA: DL 4890, DL 74890 OHTA SAN-Soul Time in Hawaii; DL 4894, OL 74894

TRUMPETS OLE-Con Mucho

Demos

bershop

CAPITOL

DL

KEN GRIFFIN-Ebb Tide; HL 7426, KS 11226 ANDRE KOSTELANETZ-Joy to the World:

SIX TRIO SONATAS -E. 364, U2S 764

THE

Power

M2L

Biggs;

KOSTEIANETZ Conducts Great Romantic

S&R

9560

HI 7432. HS 11232 THE NORMAN LUBOFF CHOIR - Songs o' Christmas; HL 7433, NS 11233 lerner & Loewe's Camelof; HL 7429, HS 11229

ANDRE PREVIN-Music From

Bai-

ML 6418, US 7018

MORMON TABERNACLE CHOiR-The Old Beloved Songs; ML 6412, MS 7012 Polivetiian Dances— New York Philharmonic (Bcrnjiein); ML 6414, MS 7014

HICKORY GAIL WYNTERS-A 138,

ORFF: CATULII CARMINA - Blegen/Kness Temple Univ. Choirs/Philadelphia Orch. lOrmandy); ML 6417, MS 7017

TOOTS

Seasons;

Girl for All

LP

LPS 138

JUBILEE THE FIFTH ESTATE-Oing Dong the Witch Dead; JGM 8005. JGS 8005

Is

GEORGE RENAN 8 HIS MANHATTAH STARSBola De FuegO; JGM 7003, JGS 7003

11037, CC 11037 SO

berg); CC

Singers,

His

DOM

COLUMBIA BACH:

DAMONE Sings: HL 7431, HS 11231 DE LUISE-Rumpllstiltskin; HL 9560. HS 9560

VIC T 2831,

GERSHWIN: PORGY 8 BESS/AN AMERICAN IN PARIS - Pittsburgh Symphony (Stein-

KAPP

THIELMANS ORCH. - Guitars and ... And Things; RS 918, RS 918 SC

Strings

820

WALT DISNEY PRESENTS THE FURTHER ADVENTURES OF CRICKET

JIMINY

DL(ne)land

DO ST

3965

5090

IMl;

A CHORAL TAPESTRY

Ambroslan Singers (McCarthyl. Murbo MLP 6007 (Ml; SLP 6007 ISI

FROM BANQUET

AT BINRATTY CASTLE Bunrattv Singers. Coral (Ml; CRL 75797 (SI

57497

LOS HNOS EN LA ONT3A DE CASTRO RCA Victor MKL-1743 IMI; MKS1743

,

DVORAK: SYMPHONY NO. 6-Ciech

Harold

0141, Philhar-

monic fAncerl); 22 16 0145, 22 16 0146

PRAGUE MADRIGAL SINGERS -

FEENJON GROUP-Jerusalem 488 S M THE SERBAN Goodbye;

MFS

VAMOS A BAILAR Los Hnos, Rlgaal, RCA

Victor

SOUL TIME IN HAWAII Ohta San. Decca DL 4894

74895

(

51

Martlnho D'Assoncao GuHar Qvartet, MF 484 (Ml; MFS 484 (SI

LOW PRICE INTERNATIONAL OLD ENGLISH VOCAL MUSIC Prague 22

Madrigal Singers. Crossroads IMI; 22 16 0144 ISI

16 0143

VACATION IN PORTUGAL Interna-

FPM-114 4MI; F5P-114

ISI

Celeste

Monitor

Say

Moscow; MPS

SERIES) BACH: SONATINAS IN E FLAT t D MINORMusica Viva Ensemble (Bolle); MCS (0 2125 HAYDN CANTATA MtSERI NOi MISERA PATRIA-Musica Viva Ensemble (Bolle); MCS ICI 2124 MOZART: SERENADE IN C FLAT-Musica Viva Ensemble IBollel; MCS (CI 2126

NEW All

MonUor

MARIA VICTORIA RCA Vldor MKL-1737 (Ml DUETO MISERIA RCA Victor MKL-IT45 IMI CELOSO THE HEART OF ITALY FranIt Pagani. RCA Victor

Ovi:r

VOICE

MITCH RYDER

Hits;

NV 2004, NV 2004S

DL

ISLAIXD SPOTLIGHT ON HAUNANI The Voice of HawaiL Decca DL

DL

MFS(C

VOCAL SUARTET-Don't 487, MFS 487

CHARLES SHIRLEY-Uoon (C) 606

MKL-

IMl;

74894 (S)

GUITARS OF PORTUGAL IC) 488

MF

of Gold;

MONITOR (COLLECTORS

THE ANDREWS SISTERS Greatest Hits; OL 4919, DL 74919 BRASILIA NUEVE-How Insensitive; DL 4910, DL 74910 GEORGE FEYER - Echoes of Childhood; DL 4907, 01 74907 HELEN HORH-Rhythm Is the First "R"; DL 4901, DL 74901

4895 (Ml:

OF GOLD

Feenlon Group. Monitor

(S/MI

tional

16

.

(SI

JERL'SALE,M

22

1746 IMI

CRL

Of

MONITOR

SONATAS -

Goldsmith;

DECCA T

Toxee

IS)

.

CLARINET

Old English vocal Music; 22 16 0143, 22 16 0144

Y'ALL ARE' Wilson.

MGM ERIC aUROON t THE ANIMALS-Winos Change; E 4484, SE 4484

CROSSROADS BRAHMS:

Wright/Harris 22 16 0142

1324

WALT DISNEY PRESENTS BEST LOVED FAIRY TALES Disneyland

JACK JONES-Our Song; KL 1531, KS 3531

CORAL - Music & Song From The Mediaeval Banciuet at Bunratty; CRL 57497, CRL 757497

BUNRATTY SINGERS

LOW PRICE CHILDREN'S

HOW

Bar-

4869,

Gave My Love a Flower; LN 24323, BN 26323 JOSEF SUK-Virluoso Violin Music; LC 3967, BC 1367

Decca

RUMPELSTILTSKIN Dom lie Luise. Hannoay HL IMI; HS 9560 IS)

&

DL

Quartets of 1967; DL 4B70, DL 74870 THE VOICE OF HAWAII-lsland Spotlight or Haunani; DL 4895, 01 74895

NORMAN NEWELL 0RCH--1

COMMAND

IS THE FIRST "R" Helen Horn (Preltv Penn^l, DL 4901 (Ml: DL 74901 (SI THE JOLLY PIED PIPER Staton

International

Winners;

Chorus

74869

VARIOUS ARTISTS-The Too Ten Barbershop

HARMONY

Shskarian. Cornerstone SS 805

Merrill

Gusto; DL 4911,

DL 74911

VARIOUS ARTISTS- 1967

9001,

T

ST 2831

Vannuard Everyman I.MI; SHV-73005 ISl

MI SIC » SONG THt: MF.niFVAL

Phiiharmonic lAncerll, Crossroads 22 16 0145 IM); 22 16 0146 ISI

IIVSKNSITIVE

Bntilta NacTi. Dicca DL 74910 ISI

FletclMr.

16

34a

Czech

4195

POPULAR THE ANDREWS SISTERS GREATEST HITS D«ca DL 491* (M); DL

Sam SLP

Biilard St Series

World

DVORAK: SYMPHONY

FATHOM

HOW

22

BRAHMS: SONATA FOR TWO

BOYS-Smiley

MARIANO a THE UNBELIEVABLES;

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61

Music

Classical

Montreux Continued from



pafie

sider the total production of the record: recording technique as well as musical interpretation. In addition to the United States,

which will be guest conducted by Leopold Stokowski. Also appearing during the festival, which will run from Aug. 30 to Oct. 6, will be the New York Philharmonic under Leonard Bernstein, Lorin Maazel de,

and the Berlin Radio Symphony and Sir John Barbirolli and the Halle Orchestra. Pressings of classical music issued between May 1, 1967

and April 30, 1968 are eligible for the award. The 1 1-man jury, chaired by Roland Gelatt, editor of High Fidelity, will con-

Bow Record Award

to

1

members of the panel

To Be

cording

Benjamin

of

"Midsummer

Night's

first re-

Britten's

Dream"

is

for release by London this the composer con-

set

Director

Rene Klopfenstein, who will assume the directorship of the festival next year, explained that "the prizes will be unique in that they will be free of either nationalistic or commerbias and pressure." Klopfenstein, who formerly was ar-

cial

Own

month with

ducting the London Symphony in the three-record package. A large cast includes Alfred Deller, Elizabeth Harwood, Peter Pears, Heather Harper, JoseHelen Watts, phine Veasey,

Owen

Brannigan and John Shir-

ley-Quirk.

Huge Advance For 'Traviata' Heavy advance orders from New York area dealers have caused RCA Victor to supply dealers with copies of its new package of two Verdi's "La Traviata" months ahead of schedule. The three-record set is being rushed r-to dealers in conjunction with ^the opening of the MetropoTilan Opera on Monday (18) with soprano Montserrat Caballe in the title role. Miss Caballe also sings Violetta in the album, which also features tenor Carlo Bergonzi and the disk debut of baritone Sherrill Milnes, who also are Met stars, and conduc-

Georges

tor

Prelre.

The package

still

is

as

listed

a November release since initial copies are being supplied primarily to dealers in New York

New

and

waxed

The opera was

Jersey.

Rome

in

this

two-record Brahms set fea-

tures the "Requiem" with Agnes Giebel, Hermann Prey and I'Orchestre dc la Suisse Ro-

mande under Ernest Anscrmct.



NEW YORK

A

summer.

Miss Watts is soloist in the "Rhapsody," which completes the package along with "Nani." Conductor Willi Boskovsky's series of Mozart marches and dances is being completed with the issue of the final three albums. Bass Nicolai Ghiaurov is featured in excerpts from Boito's "Mefistofele" with Silvio .Yar"TTiso^lcadtng the RCJft -^^era Orchestra. Conductor Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt continues his series symphonic the "Symphony No. 4." Rounding out the release are Bracha Eden and Alexander Tamir in Brahms and Saint-Sacns, and Ansermet and I'Orchestre de la Suisse Ro-

Beethoven

with

pianists

mande

France, to the tion

of Philips of now is artistic counselor parent Philips organiza-

and

Deutsche

Other features of

and History" series at the Castle of Chillon. This series will include the first performance of Cimarosa's "Requiem" since the composer's death in 1801. Also slated is an avant garde series called "Music of the 21st Century."

Leading music editors and critics from throughout the world arc being inVited to join an advisory committee for the awards. This committee will pre-select the list of nominees

in Prokofiev.

visory panel.

The

Montreux

fall

nick,

Kenneth Scbermcrhom has been music director of the Symphony beginning next year. He was guest conductor with the orchestra last season, and has been music director of the New StTsty Symphony since 1963 Ballet Theater American and Schcrmcrhorn will Hohn Brown, who resigning after the 1967-1968 is Arnold Amstein will season. teach a new course in music copying at the Juilliard School of Mu1957.

since

succeed Harry .

.

sic.

.

.

.

.

New

artists

signed for the

Metropolitan Opera 5ea.son inBoky, clude sopranos Colette Pyliis Brill, Clarice Carson, Ina Delcampo and Judith Dc Paul, Rosalind mezzo-sopranos Hupp and Gwedolyn Kiliebrew, tenor Peter Schrcier, bass Karl Kiddcrbusch and conductor Bruno Ama-

duccL Pianist Zadel give a Carnegie

Nov.

15.

Neiicnig

.

.

62

.

.

.

Cellist

the

joins

Music Texas month.

Siiolovsky will Hall recital on

George

University

Department .

The

of this

Indianapolis

Festival

been presenting classical music programs for more than 20 years. The jazz festival was inaugurated successfully in June and will be given in June in the future. The final voting for the awards will take place in Montreux with jurors as the guests of the city, according to Mayor Alfred Vogelsang.

Karojon to Conduct, Play in 3 Concerts NEW YORK — Herbert von Karajan will play the harpsichord and conduct the Berlin Philharmonic in Carnegie Hall concerts on Nov. 29, Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 in Bach programs. Alexis Weissenberg will be .soloist in the "Piano Concerto in D Minor," while Christian Ferras will be soloist in the "Violin

Concerto in E." The programs each will contain two "Brandenbcrg Concertos." The "Suite in B Minor" will complete the Nov. 29 program.

the

is

the

first

of a series of

parent corporation. Jac Holzman, Elektra president, explained "with records the primary medium for music today, it's time for the record companies to put aside a basically parasitic role and fulfill encourage to their obligation and actively participate in the creative music process." He said electronic music was particularly suited for composition specifically for stereo disks. Nonesuch also is issuing an album of vocal works by Dufay. Antico, Resinarius and anony-

centuries performed by Munich's Capella Antiqua under Konrad Ruhland. Joshua Rifkin conducts six Heinrich

early-16th

Biber sonatas

fund

drive produced a record $295,815.David Carp received 95 total. the 1967 Paul Mason Award for his woodwind quintet 'Tesserae." Victor Ailes-sandro, music director of the San Antonio Symphony, will conduct four performances of Rossini's "The Barber of Seville" with the New York City .

.

.

.

Opera.

.

.

in

another press-

Hans Swarowsky prano Teresa

Stich

directs

so-

Randall,

-

mezzo-soprano Nedda Casei, lenor Kurt Equiluz. bass Nikolaus Simkowsky, and choral and orchestral forces of the Vienna State Opera in a Haydn Mass. Completing the release is Noel Lee in a program of Bartok piano music.

Watts' France Bow PARIS



Andre Watts

will

play Liszt's "First Piano ConTheatre des at the certo"

Champs-Elysees on Wednesday his

concert

debui

in

NEW YORK ists

will

make

— Twelve

their

solo-

New York

Philharmonic

debuts this seaincluding pianists Martha Argerich. Anthony Di Bonaventura and Mischa Dichter, and violinists Pina Carmirelli and

son,

Kyung Wha Chung,

the Leven-

Award winner. Vocalists debuting will be sopranos Sena Jurinac and Jeannette Zarou. mezzo-soprano Christa Ludwig, tenors John Alexander and James King, baritone Walter Berry, and bass Michael Langdon. trilt

Other

instrumental

will include pianists

soloists

Gina Bach-

Leonard Bernstein, Robert Van Clibum, Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale, Lorin Hollander, Rudolf Serkin and Andre Watts; violinists Ychudi Menuhin, David Nadien, David Oistrakh and Henryk Szeryng; and clarinetist Stanley Druckcr. Menuhin will be celebrating the aucr,

Casadesus,

CBS, which has Walls under exclusive

contract,

will

release

an album by the pianist to coincide with his visit. It features Chopin's "Piano Concerto No. 2." conducted by Thomas Schippers and Liszt's "Piano Concerto No. 1," conducted byLjfonard Bernstein.

first

40th anniversary of his Philhar-

monic debut.

Among the vocal soloists will sopranos be Phyllis Curtin. Eileen Farrell and Eileen Schauler; mezzo-soprano Beverly Wolff; contralto Betty Allen; tenor Ernst Haefliger; baritone Gerard Souzay; and basses McHenry Boatwright nold Voketaitis. Miss Souzay

and

Ar-

Wolff, Haefliger and appear in Berlioz's

will

"Damnation of Faust," Miss inac will

JurRichard Strauss'

sing

"Four Last Songs" and appear with Miss Allen, Alexander and Beethoven's Boatwright in

"Symphony No. 9." Miss Farrell, King and Langdon will be soloists in the first act of Wagner's "Die Walkuere." Miss Ludwig and Berry will sing in Mahler's "Des Knaben Wunderhorn." William Steinberg will conduct the Berlioz work, with Leonard Bernstein

listed

the

for

other

vocal programs.

Promenade Concerts by BBC Enjoying Peak at Box Office included Schazi" were LONDON — The BBC-sponsored promenade concerts, now in the seventh week of the 73d season, have so far achieved the in

most successful box office iheir history.

All concerts so far have

enjoyed capacity audiences at the

Royal

Albert

Hall

which

acthe

concerts were scheduled to be networked on TV. and all are broadcast on radio.

in also the contemporary music coverage. Monteverdi, whose quarter

centenary

is

Contemporary music has had good showing which included performances at a first proms concert. Among new works in the programs this year were the "St. Luke Passion," by the young Polish composer Krzystof Pena

many

dcrecki; "Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum," by Olivier Messiaen (which the composer has advised can only be performed properly on a mountainside);

opera

'

"

Benjamin Britten's new The Burning Fiery Furfirst performed and spe-

cially written for this year's Al-

Festival, was given a mounted stage version, the first such staging attempted at the proms.

deburgh

specially

Stockhaiisen's work for three orchestras "Gruppen," and the young Soviet composer Audrey Volkonsky's work "Lament of

celebrated

being

this year, was represented by extracts from his operas "Orfeo." "L'Arianna." and "Lin-

coronazione

di

from

selections

Poppea," his

and

madrigals.

Resident conductor Sir Malcolm

.51

nace.

France.

a

Soloists Will Make N. Y. Philharmonic Debuts

commodates 7,000. Nine of

ing.

(27),

maintenance

Sympbony's

13th to

in

Twelve

tival.

has

directs the Clarion Concerts Orchestra

recording of works by Jan Dismas Zelenka, Czech baroque composer. The recording, which pairs two Zelenka pieces, is being issued by Decca this month.

committee and the jury Funds for the award will the Montreux Fes-

Electronic Music Work mous composers of NEW YORK — An

commissions of full-scale works by Elektra Records, Nonesuch's

NEWELL JENKINS

come from

Nonesuch Issuing Special music work specially commissioned for Nonesuch Records is being issued by that label this month. The work, "Silver Apples of the Moon" by Morton Subot-

appointed

the 1968 a "Music

include

will

festival

electronic

Milwaukee

Gram-

mophon.

for the jury to vote on. Gelatt is being assisted by Nicole Hirsch, general secretary of the Montreux Award, in forming the ad-

London Set

in

NEW YORK — The

come

France, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia and Germany.

Britten Conducts

^Dream"

will

from Japan, Latin America, England, the Netherlands, Sweden,

director

tistic

Sargent this

is

unable

to

season because of

conduct illness.

Bernstein, N. Y. to

Begin

2-Week Tour



ANN ARBOR, Mich. Leonard Bernstein and the New Philharmonic began a two-week Canadian and United States tour here on Tuesday York

(12). The next night, the orchestra will give the world premiere of Copland's "Inscape"

Canadian soprano JeanZarou will be soloist in Mahler's "Symphony No. 4" on Tuesday and throughout the tour. Other September tour dates are: Chicago (14, 15); University here. nette

sity of Illinois (17, matinee); gary, Alta. (19); "Vancouver (20, 21); Edmonton, Alta. (22); Win-

nipeg (23); London, Onl. (25); (26); Ottawa (27) and The tour (29, 30). closes Oct. 2 at Halifax, N. S.

Toronto Montreal

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BIILBOARD

Classical

Music lllkoiN SPICIAl SUIIVET ft Wetk

Artia Bartok,

Albums

Flute

KEARNY,

N,

— An album

J,

This

of Bartok quartets and a disk of flute music are being issued on Artia Records this month. The flute LP, which features Zdenek Brudcrhans, includes a first list-

We
Lait Title,

Artist,

&

Label

No.

ChArl

WEST MEETS EAST S

Flute and Piano," Other works are by Bach, Haydn and MesHarpsichordist Zuzana Ruzickova and pianist Pavel

36418

MAHLER: STMPHONV NO. 8 (2-12" LP's) Various Arlists/London Symphony (Bernstein), Columbia

3

4

ART OF DENNIS BRAIN Seraphim IC 60040 (M); (No

M2L 351

M2S 751

(M);

A

first listing for Milhaud's "Quartet No. 7" is paired with a Bartok quartet in a Parliatitle by the Dvorak Quartet. The low price label also has Vaclav Smctacek conducting pianist Eva Bernathova and the Prague Symphony in Ravel and Bartok. Smetacek also conducts the Prague in Chopin and Liszt with pianist Frantisek

5

6

MAHUR: DAS

LIED

3

7

10

8

Rauch. Vaclav Neumann directs the Brno State Philharmonic in a Rousel album, while the Janacek Quartet performs Beethoven.

77

8

9

9

10

12

2576 (M); LSC 2576

LIVI

(S)

36333

(DeBurgos). Angel 36333 (M);

Orch.

(S)

GERSHWIN: RHAPSODY IN BLUE New York Philharmonic (Bernstein), Columbia ML 5413

MS

6091

(S)

New Philharmonic

t Chorus

Orch.

(Boult), Angel

7

New

Yorii

(M);

MS 6988

Philharmonic (Bernstein), Columbia

13

13

11

In-

open the

series

Oct.

24.

The

Nov. 28 will John Corigliano, conof the New York Philharmonic for 22 years. Corsecond

igliano

is

of

currently concerlmas-

the

San Antonio Sym-

Two young beth

performers, Eliza-

Thompson and Alan

Smith,

winners of the Abilene PhilharMusic Award monic's 1967 Competition, will be featured on the Jan. 23 and Feb. 27 concerts

respectively.

Soprano

Ingrid Bjoner, of the Metropolitan 12.

Opera, will appear March The Philharmonic season 23 with a conclassics and show

will clo.sc April

cert

of light

SEPTEMBER

23,

Victor

LM 6711

28

30

BEETHOVEN: THE NINTH SYMPHONY Mormon Tabernacle Choir/Philadelphia Columbia ML 6416 (M): MS 7016 (S)

8

(S)

43 Victor

LM 2

3 Orch.

29

39

BERNSTEIN CONDUCTS BARTOK Gold & Frizdale/New York Philharmonic Columbia ML 6356 (M); MS 6956 (S)

30

33

ART OF GERALD MOORE

40

32

(Ormandy),

4 (Bernstein).

3

PUCCINI: LA RONDINE (2-12" LP's) Moffo/Barironi/RCA Italiano Orch. & Chorus (Mollnari-

34

35

36

15

TCHAIKOVSKY: CONCERTO NO, 1 Van Cliburn, RCA Vktor LM 2252 (M); LSC 2252

16

RACHMANINOFF: SYMPHONY NO.

ML 6386

RACHMANINOFF: CONCERTO NO. 2 Van Cliburn/Chicago Symphony Orch. (Reiner), RCA LM 2601 (M); LSC 2601 (S) WAGNER: DIE WALKUERE (5-12" LP's) Artists/Beriin

21

21

37

SYMPHONY NO,

Philadelphia

MS 7004

Orch.

scription Carnegie Hall concert the 60th the Phil-

on Oct. 3 will open New York season of

Houston Society

Wide HOUSTON — A

Fare

Sets extra

recital

tie

in

recital.

ML 5868 4

(Kertesz),

1

(Maazel),

London A

(S)

London

all-

L'HISTOIRE DU

sopranos Judith Raskin and Veronica Tyler; mezzo-soprano Maria Lucia Godoy; conCarol;

tralto

Maureen

Forrester;

ors Richard Lewis

1

CM

ten-

and George

1

Shirley; bass-baritone Norman Trcigle; and bass Thomas Paul. In addition to Maazel, guest conductors will be Leopold Stokowski and Istvan Kertesz.

The orchestra's 10 - concert Philharmonic Hall subscription opens on Oct. 17 with a including Mahler's 10." Lorin Maa-

scries

program zel will

conduct a Jan. 30 non-

subscription Carnegie Hall pro-

gram with

man

violinist Itzhak

Perl-

us soloist.

Guest

soloists

for

the

sub-

scription concerts will be pian-

Other

art-

ists Daniel Barenboim and Gary Graffman; violinists Isaac Stern. Nclli Shkolnikova and Norman

the recital scries arc pian-

ists in

Lorin Hollander, Dec. 9; prano Teresa Stratas, Jan. ist

pianist

and

Columbia

(S)

SOLDAT/PROKOFIEV: QUINTrr FOR WINDS t STRINGS Chamber Ensemble (Rozhdestvensky), Melodiya/Angel R 40005 (M); SR 40005 (S)

Beethoven program, conducted by Eugene Ormandy, music director, will have Anthony di Bonaventura as piano soloist.

Jones

Soprano Montserrat Caballe. makes her Houston debut in the opening

(Bernstein),

48

TOSCA

STRAVINSKY:

(M):

The

(M);

se-

by Houston's new Society for Ihc Performing Arts, which will open its inaugural season Oct. 21. All events will Hall.

Orchestra.

8

ML 6389

"Symphony No.

a dance series and four events will be presented

ries,

adelphia

(M);

1

MOZART PIANO CONCERTO NO. IS/SYMPHONY NO. 36

(S)

nonsub-

MS 6468

Bernsleln/Vienna Philharmonic (Bernstein). 9499 (M); CS 6499 (S)

60th N.Y. Opener Oct. 3

NEW YORK — A

ML 5793

(Bernstein), Columbia

(S)

4267 (M): OSA 1267

1

ML 6404

16

(S)

Nilsson/Corelli/Fischer Dieskau

Philharmoniker

(Ormandy), Columbia

3

MOZART: CONCERTOS 8 & 9 Vladimir Ashkinazy/London Symphony London CM 9501 (M): CS 6501 (S) PUCCINI:

Victor

DGG 39 229/233 (M); 139 229/233 (S) HISTORIC ORGANS OF EUROPE—SWITZERUND E. Power Biggs, Columbia ML 6255 (M); MS 6855 (S) NIELSEN:

Melodiya/Angel

BECTHOVEN: SYMPHONY NO. 5/HOW A GREAT SYMPHONY WAS WRIHEN (M);

37 (M):

(Von Karajan),

29

6393

New York Philharmonic (S)

1

(Ormandy), Columbia

23

(S)

Crespin/Vickers/Various

20

30

DVORAK: SYMPHONY NO. 9 (New Worid)

MS

Seraphim

16

RAZIN/

STOCKHAUSEN: MOMENTE

MS 6989 (Beecham),

SHPAN

STRAVINSKY: SYMPHONY IN E FLAT, OP. Columbia Symphony (Stravinsky), Columbia

(2-12" LP's) Orch.

2

(M); LSC 7048 (S)

SHOSTAKOVICH: EXECUTION OF

New York Philharmonic

BOHEME

17

17

LM 7048

Various Artists/Radio Cologne Symphony (Stockhausen), Nonesuch H 1157 (M); H 71157 (S)

34

BEETHOVEN: COMPLETE NINE SYMPHONIES (8-12" LP'S) Berlin Philharmonic (Von Karaian), DGG (No Mono); SKL 101/108 (S)

18

Victor

Moscow Philharmonic (Kondrashin), R 40000 (M); SR 4O00O (S) 33

(S)

PUCCINI:

U

RCA

SYMPHONY NO. 9

(M);

14

19

Liii

pianist

Kraus,

Gina

March

so18;

14.

Bachauer.

April 22.

The

tunes.

RCA

(Toscanini),

CONCERT (2-12" LP's) M2L 357 (M): M2S 757

19

18

concert

phony.

RACHMANINOFF: CONCERTO NO. 2 IN C FOR PIANO Graffman/New York Philharmonic' (Bernstein), Columbia ML 6034 (M); MS 6634 (S)

RAVEL: BOLERO/RHAPSODIE/U VALSE New York Philharmonic (Bernstein), Columbia ML 5293

MS 6986

certmaster

tcr

IN

14

Philly

spotlight

HOROWITZ

Philadelphia Orch.



1

28

32

Various Attists/RCA Victor IB 6000 (M): (No stereo)

pledge is payable over a period with an inof $700,000 scheduled for December. The Indianapolis received a maximum grant of $2.5 million from the foundation, part of the S80,2 million granted last year to 61 orchestras in 33 States. Of the grant here, $500,000 does not require matching. The $2 million from Ford, which was to be matched by 1971, will not be distributed until 1976,

musical talents will headline the Abilene Philharmonic's 8th season Oct. 24-April 23. Pianist Leonard Pennario will

27

A TOSCANINI TREASURY OF HISTORIC BROADCASTS

15

payment

ternational artists

RODGERS: VICTORY AT SEA. VOL 1 RCA Victor Symphony Orch. (Bennett), RCA 2335 (M); LSC 2335 (S)

31

ML 6388

(M): CS 6011

The

Four inplus two new

38

36420

Vladimir Horowitz, Columbia

three-year

Tex.

26

(S)

NBC Symphony

dianapolis Symphony will receive its $2 million grant from the Ford Foundation as the result of a pledge by Lilly Endowment of $2 million to the orchestra's endowment fund. The Lilly grant kicked off an $8 million endowment campaign by the orchestra.

ABILENE,

OLD TIMERS' NIGHT AT THE POPS Boston Pops (Fiedler), RCA Victor LM 2944 (M);

(No Stereo) 12

Grant

Abilene Lists 6 New Atf ists

13

24

Ptadelli),

Indy Receives

itial

(M); LSC 2896 (S)

25

BERNSTEIN'S GREATEST HITS

(5-12" LP'S)

— The

LM 2896

Various Artists, Seraphim 60044 (M); (No Stereo)

11

INDIANAPOLIS

Victor

50

Philadelphia Orch. (Ormandy)/American Symphony (Stokowski)/New York Philharmonic (Bernstein). Columbia ML 6415 (M); MS 7015 (S)

HOLST: THE PLANETS (M); S 36420 (S)

Parliament album features cellist Josef Chuchro and pianist Alfred Holecek in Beethoven.

Mil.

THE WORLD OF CHARLES IVES

LSC 2944 (M):

MY FAVORITE CHOPIN

(M);

sixth

$2

22

RCA

19 (M):

(S)

24

ORFF: CARMINA BURANA

New Philharmonic

6934

ML 6334

(Ormandy). Columbia

UONTYNE PRICE—PRIMA DONNA

29

ARTURO TOSCANINI CONDUCTING BEHHOVEN SYMPHONIES NO, 1, 4 & 6 (3-12" LP's) BBC Symphony Orch. (Toscanini), Seraphim IC 6015

S

Chart

t No,

Label

25

Stereo)

VON DER ERDE

Van Clibura, RCA Victor

Anist,

23

(No Stereo)

6

Weeks on Title,

ORMANDT-PHILADELPHIA ORCH.'S GREATEST HITS

(S)

James King/Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau/Vienna Philtiannonic OrcK. (Bernstein), London DM 36005 (IV1); OS 26005 (S)

ment

20

MS

2

5

Week

(S)

2

4

Last

Week

Philadelphia Orch.

siaen.

Stepan also perform on the set. The Prague Quartet plays the Bartok pieces.

Ttlil

22

Menuhin/Ravi Shankar, Angel 36418 (M);

Yehudi

ing for Hindemith's "Sonata for

The

Enlliig

four

extra

events

arc

Mantovani and His Music. Nov. Manilas Dc Plata, flamenco Nov. 25; Theodore 1

1 ;

Bickel, Feb. 24, and Andres Segovia, classical guitarist, March

HAROLD LAW/RENCE. left, director of Mercury's classical division, confers at the firm's recent New York distributor meetings with, from left. Harvey Snyder of the classical division, John Doumanian, Philips national promotion director and Lou Simon, Philips national product

21.

manager.

guitarist.

1967, BILLBOARD

63 Cl

aerial

News Reports

International

Dacca, Ltd. Unwraps Deramic

Sound System By

for Distribs successes of the year, including lion



LONDON ^Thc new Deramic Sound System its bow at the British Decca Records 1967 conference held at Decca House Sept. 7-8. Tagged as "The Sound of the 70'5," the Deramic Sound System (DSS) is aimed specifically at the huge market between buyers of "Spectacular stereo LP's that won't let you walk out of the room, and musical wallpaper LP's that soon fade sales

into dull familiarity." The main feature of DSS is its new fore and dimension, a near and far perspective as well further as the usual sideways spread of stereo. refinement of this "sound in the round" is that it

A

loses

played

none of its vitality at low volume.

and

presence

when

The technical data behind the system was not revealed at the conference beyond attributing it a couple of unrelated electronic breakthroughs in the past 12 months. 6 Deram LP's The initial DSS release will be six Deram to

albums next month, featuring the orchestras or choirs of Gordon Franks. Peter Knight, David Whitaker and Tony Osborne performing music with a night theme such as "Strings in the Night," "Voices in the Night," "Latin in the Night," etc. Demo albums containing cuts from these six LP's were distributed to the Decca sales force

The aspect to be concentrated that listeners can derive the full effect and DSS disks while moving about the room and not have tobc stationary between the two speakers. It was impressed on the conference that DSS was in no way a rival or competitor for Decca's Phase 4 stereo series. The latter will continue to cater for the connoisseur who wishes to sit down at the conference.

on

is

value from

and

music. Big Ad Drive Supporting the launch of the Deramic Sound System will be press and display advertising and leaflets, and Decca is hoping for a maximum amount of airplay for the first DSS LP's over BBC Radios I and 2. In his opening address of welcome, Decca listen to

W. W. Townsley drew

director

world-wide success of the Deram

attention to the label

during

its

year's existence.

Townsley enumerated Decca's outstanding pop

"Green Green Grass of Home" and

tered

on the theme

finest

opera catalog

the

that in the

company had

the

world.

The impact

of the Richard Strauss "Salome" in 1962 was recalled when were given of the November release of his "Elektra," starring Birgit Nilsson, Regina Resnik, Marie Collier and the Vienna Philharmonic under Georg Solti. The first opera featuring Joan Sutherland from Decca for a year is "Beatrice De Tenda," by Bellini, released this month. The soprano is also involved in hitherto unrecorded arias from operas by Montezuma, a Handel contemporary, and both ttiis album and the Bellini teamed here with her husband, conductor Richard Bonyngc. The young Greek soprano Elena Suliotis, who participated in Decca's complete recording of Verdi's "Nabucco," also stars in the October relea.se of the new recording of Mascagni's "Cavalleria Rusticana," with Mario Del Monaco and Tito Gobbi. She will be featured in a special

on the recording world details

TV

BBC program Oct. 20. Classical promotion manager Jack Boyce told the conference that the Decca label alone offered 106 complete operas, 50 opera highlight albums and 57 operatic recitals. Boyce also cited the Sept. 27 publication of "Ring Resounding." by John Culshaw, departing Decca classical recording manager who supervised the complete recording of Wagner's ring opera cycle. RCA Victor label manager Bob Angles concen-

on the label's 24 solo pianists, taking in 18-year-old Peter Serkin, 82-year-old Artur Rubinstein and Duke Ellington. notable feature of the RCA contribution to conference was a videotaped interview between Angles and Andre Previn. Previn. here for more recordings with the London Symphony Orchestra, will settle in London within two years because of the favorable musical scene and atmosphere.

By

MICHAEL CLARE

LONDON— Pye

Records

,

will

coverage of the U. K. business with a major drive on the classical market through a new full-price stereoseries. only Virtuoso, which bows Oct. 25. This was one of the major features to emerge from the company's annual sales conference held here Sept. 8 in the Europa Hotel. But the company is also deits

A

termined to build its share of the pop market. Pye managing director Louis Benjamin said his company has captured highselling artist

Val Doonican from

Decca.

And

so

that

company

the

would

have first-class knowledge of what was going on at retail level. Pye has acquired

a majority interest in the Strickland retail stores operating 14

shops

in the

London

area.

180 Attend

More than 180

attended the

one-day conference, including sales 5 representatives, 8 area managers, 1 1 area supervisors and 6 depot managers plus 16 of Pye's licensees from 12 Continental countries. Warner-Reprise executives Mike Maitland, Phil Rose and Joel Freidman were also present. Following an introduction by general manager Leslie Cocks, the Pye chief emerged from one of the company's vans to address the conference. The van remained on the platform throughout the conference as a backdrop to the speakers. In his address to the conference delegates, Benjamin said that home sales for the year ended March this year had increased by 13 per cent over the previous year and that Pye's sales in Ireland had a

previous

year."

Cassette Market Turning to the cassette marsaid it was the company'.s policy to license repertoire on a nonexclusive basis to any reputable company which could expose the catalog. But Pye was not going to manufacture cassettes itself until "this particular market has ket,

INTERNATIONAL GUESTS, Pye management executives force at Pye Records annual conference in London.

and

field

—Color

TV

TV

and Somerset ($2.70). The emphasis on color TV, however, derived principally from the spectacular showcase of international recording talent presented to 12 European countries. Artists featured included Juliette Greco (Philips), Mahalia Jackson (Odeon), Al Martino (Electrola), Esther and Abi Ofarim (Philips). Freddy Quinn and Bert Kaempferl (Polydor). German producers presented the latest singles recordings by Peter Beil (CBS. Rex Gildo (Ariola), Gitte (Electrola), Peggy March (RCA) Vicky (Philips), Nina Lizell (Metronome) and Wencke Myhre

on Aug. 26 and transmitted

who made a big impression with her song, "Komm Allein." The German record industry's public relations association, Arbeitsgemeinschafi Schallplatte. entertained 800 music industry guests at the Hilton Hotel at a midnight party hosted by the organization's chairman, Gunther Braunlich (Teldec) and deputy chairman Leif Kraul (Metronome). Graunlich said. "I am very satisfied with our work. The co(the associated radio operation between Radio Free Berlin and institutions of the Federal Republic of Germany) has been excellent." Miller International reported concluding a number of business transactions during the run of the exhibition. For the most part, however, record industry's representatives were present as observers. Said Peter Meisel of Hansa, "As far as doing business is concerned, nobody of any interest showed up. But at least the color TV spectacular should help restore Berlin's reputation as a show busi(Polydor)

ARD

ness center."

Hamburg's Stigwood-'Vaskiel International invited

and

artists

producers to a reception at the Hotel Arosa and outlined its plans extend operations, notably in collaboration with Philips with

to

whom

new

a

contract was recently signed.

'jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^

26TH BEETHOVEN FEST IS BEING HELD IN BONN BONN—

The 26th annual Beethoven festival is being held in Bonn Beethoven's birthplace from Sept. 16-Oct. 5. A varied selection of Beethoven's music is being presented by internationally known conductors, instrumentalists and singers. Igor Markevitch directed the Orchestra of Bonn's Beethoven Hall in an opening performance of the Ninth Symphony. Other directors include Hubert Brings, Volker Wangenheim, Scrgiu Celibidache (of the Radio Stockholm Symphony), Mario Rossi (of the Orchestra Sinfonica della RAI Turin), Anton Lippe, Jean Fournet (of the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra). Instrumentalists include Robert Casadesus, Geza Anda and Andor Foldes, piano, and Valerie Klimov. violin. Singers include





Agnes Giebel. Anna Reynolds, Ernst Haefliger, Martina Arroyo, Procter and Kieth Engen. The Hungarian String Quartet is featured, along with the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Netherlands Radio and the choir of St. Hedwig's Cathedral in East Berlin (singing Missa Solcmnis).

Norma

Ill

iiiiiiiiiiiiii

iiiiiiiiiiii

iiiiiiiiii

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

I

iiiiiii

iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii

Willi

11

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii

iiinini

1

"phenomenal percentage increase of 40 per cent over the

64

Radio and

trated

the

Pye to Bow New Classical Label; In Pop Buildup; Buys Strickland extend record

WOLFGANG SPAHR

By

Jones' mil-

Engelbert Humperdinck's "Release Me," which had reached 964.000, and his current success "Last Waltz." The RCA Victor "Sound of Music" soundtrack LP had also passed the million mark. Decca's own and affiliated classical repertoire received a prominent spotlight during the course of the conference. The opera presentation cen-

made

aft

seller

Tom

of

receivers stole the show at the German exhibition attended by 500,000. Miller International of Hamburg was the only German record company with its own exhibition stand which featured its budget line labels. Europa ($1.25)

BERLIN

NIGEL HUNTER

TV Catches Fancy

Co/or

500,000 at German Exhibit

he

(Continued on pane 66}

Subscription Offerings Get Big Sales Push by Electrola



COLOGNE

heavy

beginning tion

Electrola

is

promo-

sales

for five subscription offer-

ings for the

new season,

includ-

unusual recording includes numbers by Victoria de los Angeles. Elisabeth

by

ing

nied

tion

Moore

two Europe-wide subscripreleases which it is organizing on behalf of EMI.

The

offerings

Electrola

$9

at

are

headed by a 10-LP album of the complete string quartet compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven, performed by the Hungar-

Schwarzkopf and DieaccompaMoore. The Gerald album is priced

trich Fischer-Dieskau,

tribute

(regular

$12.50).

price

Rothenberger

Anncliese

and

Gedda have recorded

Nicolai

complete stereo performance of Franz Lehard's

the

first

ian String Quartet. The subscripprice is $31.27, compared with the regular price of $62.50.

operetta "Land des Laechelns." The album anticipates the 20th

The album has received Grand Prix du Disquc of Academic Charles Cros and Grand Prix du Discophiles.

hard's price

tion

Electrola

is

keying

.sales

the the the pro-

motion for the album to the appearance of the Hungarian String Quartet in

West Germany

during September and October. Electrola

is

offering

the

re-

cording of the performance by

Gerald

Moore

tribute in tival

Hall

at

his

farewell

London's Royal Feslast

Feb.

20.

anniversary

For

next

death. is

The

year

of Lesubscription

$7.25 ($10.50).

EMI's

European

affili-

Electrola is organizing the Willibald Gluck's opera "Orfeo

ates.

The

Ed

Euridice" and "Aida." The popular Gluck opera has the Vienna version (in the Italian language) with Grace Bumbry (Orfeo), Anneliese Rothenberger (Euridice), Ruth Margret Puetz (Amor), the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra and the Leip-

(Continued on

pafje 66)

SEPTEMBER 23, 1967, BlUBOARD (^opyrigmed

iiialetial

International

News Reports

Three More Companies Join Singles Revolution in France MIKE HENNESSEY

By

PARIS

On

— More

French record companies are

their annual congresses both Vogue and Polydor announced plans for new lines of singles and

Wonder

in single

There were no plans

form.



From

A&r

Oct.

Down

Polydor

ROME, Oct. 3-5,

Message

LOS BRAVOS (Columbia Espanola-Tlffany), NINI ROSSO (Durium), LES SURFS (Festival CGD), JULIE ROGERS (Philips) will participate in the Festival of Roses.

The impact of the Common Market on the record industry was discus.sed at length and plans were revealed for a determined entry into the singles market. Vogue,

it

They They

was reported, was enjoying strong by Nancy Sinatra and Lee

receive a

receive a

Billboard Aug.

Rome,

overseas licensees.

It

was held

the day prior to the Pye conference and at the same venue, as both companies share several licensees in Europe and elsewhere. Pye issues the WarnerReprise catalog in the U. K.

ternational manager Phil Rose to Paris, that the contract between Warner-Reprise and Vogue had been extended for a long term.

international

of Vogue, France; Holland; Hispavox, Pye. New Zealand; Belgium; Melodi, Tur-

Vogue, Norsk Phonogram, Norway; Deutsche Vogue, Germany; Ar-

Itcy;

Finlevy, Finland;

iola,

Austria;

RCA

Italiana, Italy,

and

Philips-

Sonora, Sweden.

A

surprise guest was EMI director Ken East, attended at the invitation Warner-Reprise President

managing

product through the "Turn On Tune In" film already screened

of

23,

Sammy

album of the "Dr.

who

Mike Mailland. Items in the film which created particular interest were

1967, BILLBOARD

Clodio

atid

contact

61—

Telephone: 35.39.96

General Manager: Maria Luisa Pisan.

VENICE

always exercises a deep fascination for the world-wicde public.

Master recordings of two hit songs dedicated to this famous Italian city are still

film

material,

Tommy

Dolittle"

the

Steele.

The Peter, Paul and Mary LP, "Album 1700." Already getsales action here, is the company's 500th pop album since operations began. An elite version of the "Turn On" film was shown at the Pye conference the following day.

ting

big

some

territories:

Davis

soundtrack LP of "Camelot," which has its London premiere in October, and, due for release next year, the film LP of "Finian's Rainbow," featuring Pet Clark and

audience

the Warner-Reprise sales force throughout America.

forthcoming

the Jr.

Negram.

was given a breakdown of the new and forthcoming firm's

to

the guests were rep-

resentatives

Spain;

Italy.

Warner-Reprise Canadian setup from Oct. 1. It was also announced, following the visit of Warner-Reprise president Mike Maitland and in-

available for Among

Bros.-

12 Issue (page 61)

I.SA— Piazzale

It was announced that distribution of French Vogue product in Canada, formerly handled by Francodisc, would be undertaken by the new

WB-Reprise Turns on' at Parley Warner

exposure in Italy through a airing on national networks.

FALL.

Check

My

Contineotales.

held an international convention here Sept. 7 for its

TV

strong promotion just when the sale push and the market

COME TO ROME AND ATTEND THE ONLY "HAPPENING" OF THE ITALIAN MUSIC

intensive promotion on Sullivan, who was shortly to record in German. Currently making a big impact in France were Fire," by the Doors, "I Dig Rock 'n' "Light Roll Music," by Peter, Paul and Mary and Dean Martin's "Chapel in the Moonlight."

this

Reprisc

full

YOU, THE MUSIC MAN,

The company planned

reported that year was "Lara's Theme" from the film "Dr. Zhivago" sung by John William. William was now recording the French version of the Dean Martin hit "Little Old Wine Drinker Me," published by Editions

will

summer hits exhaust their demands fresh releases.

Hazlewood, the recent releases by Antoinc. Les Chariots, Francoisc Hardy, Dionne Warwick, Petula Clark and the Rocky Roberts recording of "Stasera Mi Butto," which had enjoyed tremendous success in Italy.

director,

will

three night radio and

sales with "Jackson,"

($1.30).

1967

musicmen:

no. 6 to

Also

Cabat.

An introductory album of short pieces by Tschaikovsky, conducted by Herbert Von Karajan, will retail at 10 francs ($2) and is expected to reach the 10,000 sales mark. Lucien Ades, whose production is distributed by Polydor, introduced a new series of Walt Disney records for children, complete with illustrated booklet, which will sell for 6 francs

SEPTEMBER

ROSES

The annual Vogue congress at the company's headquarters in Villetaneuse united Vogue executives of the French, Swiss, German and Belgian companies under the chairmanship of Leon

subscription sets. The subscription offer, open from Sept. 1 to Jan. 15, 1968, includes the complete symphonies and concertos of Tschaikovsky on seven disks, selling at 1 65 francs ($33) instead of 244 francs ($48.80); Mozart's "Don Giovanni", a four-disk set selling at 95 francs ($19) instead of 140 francs ($28); a threedisk set of Haydn's "The Seasons" at '75 francs ($15) instead of 105 francs ($21); and an 11disk set of the complete symphonies of Bruckner for 225 francs ($45) instead of 384 francs ($76.80).

The

OF

of choirs,

Vogue

This company's main sales offensive in the field will be based on the Deutsche



FESTIVAL

1 ,

artist will sell at

the market,

classical

LONDON

of the

national

Pathe-Marconi, which now has 32 cassettes on is introducing another four titles, including Vol. 2 of the big hits of Gilbert Becaud, Vol. 2 of the big hits of Enrico Macias, an album of the golden years of French music hall and a compatible album of Viennese waltzes by Franck Pourcel.

Sept. cata-

Grammophon

EP

4th edhioa

New releases available at these prices will include the complete piano works of Ravel by the opera "Aida," Gluck's "Orpheus" and Borodin's "Prince Igor."

revealed plans to introduce a new series of singles with full color sleeves retailing at 6 francs 50 ($1.30). First releases will include

a&r

will pick the

"Silver Obelisk."

Philips:

Samson Francois,

log,

Bedos,

alter-

winning theme, which will be awarded a first prize of 300,000 Argentine pesos and the

standard classical albums featuring 25 francs ($5) and resymphonies, concertos and chamber music will be available at 30 francs ($6) instead of 37 francs ($7.40). a single cordings

the

singles bandwagon. manager Jean Fernandez said Barclay will continue to resist the efforts to impose singles on the French market. "We realize that it must come sooner or later, but our is to maintain the dominance of the EP for as long as possible," he said.

top-selling

backgrounds,

sical

Microfon: Nestor Fabian

and Sire San Roman:

group

Toscano and Armando Patrono. Twenty unpublished songs will be presented, and a jury composed of 10 with muOscar

Ramon, and Barbara and Dick; CBS: Leo Dan, Sandro and Herman Figueroa Reyes; Odeon; Yaco Monti and Requinto Gonzalez;

orchestral

cio Milena, Horacio Malvicino,

Plaisir Musical, now sells at 20 francs ($4) instead of 25 francs ($5) and the de luxe line. Angel, is retailing at 35 francs ($7) instead of 39 francs ($7.80).

aim

Jacques

The

Theatre. Each record label will be represented by various interpreters. RCA: Palito Ortega, VioRivas, Nacho Paz, Juan leta

Pathe-Marconi



Polydor's

nately will be directed by Lu-

Germany. The series,

the provisions of the Treaty of Rome take effect in July 1968 the tariffs will be removed from records circulating among Common Market countries the need for standardization of product and rationalization of the price and tax structure relating to records becomes increasingly pressing.

"Cold Sweat," by James Brown and "Come to My Boat," by Every Mother's Son. Other congress highlights:

Perez.

be held Monday (18) at the Martin Coronado Hall in the General San Martin Municipal

its

Common

At the annual Polydor congress, held on Andre Poulain, head of the international

reduce the price of

Las 4 Voces; Dis Jockey: Pepito

first

Buenos Aires Festival of Song will

Pathe-Marconi has slashed the retail cost of various classical lines by 20-25 per cent to bring prices into line with those obtaining in

singles in France, the switch to two-track records is seen as a move to bring France into line with the other Market countries.

jump on

to

BUENOS AIRES—The

in 1st

Buenos Aires

Festival in

its

French and foreign repertoire. Apart from meeting the increasing demand for

Barclay, however, has no plans to

the

Polydor's classical product, despite price cutting in other quarters of the French record industry. It was felt that the renowned' Prestige line with de luxe packaging would continue to find a ready market at 34 francs 90 ($6.98).

Both Polydor and Pathe-Marconi at present will confine single releases to their foreign repertoire, continuing to release local recordings in EP form. Vogue's singles, however, will embrace both

As more and more of

when

wholesaler in Frankfurt handling import-export business between Germany and France, would not be affected.

Pathe-Marconi has already released "Heroes and Villains," by the Beach Boys, "Ode to Billie Joe," by Bobbie Gentry and "1 Was Made to Love

50

Market, com-

were removed some importation of German product into France could be expected because German prices were lower. But Polydor, with branches throughout Europe and a special

At

1 ,

Common

tariffs

joining the swing to singles (Billboard, Sept. 16).

Her," by Stevie

the subject of the

merical manager Henri Belolo said that

20 Tunes to Compete

" VENEZIA NO" (non cambia moi) Venice Never Chonges





and

"NIGHT GONDOLA SERENADE" For dcjlingi and rcquettt of

umpl«

records, please apply to:

PEER EDIZIONI MUSICALI srI. 20122 Milano,

Piazzetta Pattari 2, Tel.:

I

Italy

864.038 65

International

News Reports

Mexico a Picture Of Strength for Record Artists Television in By KEVIN showcase

for

long talk shows interspersed with mariachi presentations. Capitol,

has become the recording artists here.

Musart and Orfcon maintain shows every week, showcasing local talent and pushing

Although there are only 2,000,000 sets in the country, several record companies spend more TV programs than any other medium to advertise product and promote talent. Although color is limited now only to filmed series imported from the U. S.. network executives promise live color broadcasts of variety shows before January. Song, dance and joke shows are the staple of live programming in prime time. Almost every

latest

who

appears mouths to playback his or her

of the prime-time variety shows are perlive for studio-jammed audiences free. As many as a thousand teenie-boppcrs cram "Studio A" Friday nights to watch an hour of go-go with hot groups. All

formed

years,

more than 10 years. Folklore and mariachi music enjoy guaranteed minimum built-in ratings during prime-time half-hour programs. the

in

same

an effort

week

set

to change the after week have

ico.

After airing in Mexico, the tapes are shipped to Central and South America for additional royalties. They come back for a final exploitation in

Lbs Angeles and San Antonio where the Mexican network operates partially, owned affiliates. the

air in the low-rated morning with newcomers who sing during

filled

New

Pye to Bow •

Continued from page 64

down and honest appraisal can be made for the future." "But we must always be prepared to move quickly if and when the whole situation be-

settled

comes a little clearer." Benjamin revealed that selected items of the Pye catalog, not currently on sale, were to be issued through EMI's World Record Club.

"We

Top Brass Series Discussing the company's Top Brass series. Auger said that Golden Guinea

this

continue.

He

line

will

explained the back-

ground behind the U. K.'s 10,000 brass bands operating a competition league culminating each year with a concert of the top five or six bands at London's Albert Hall.

Auger,

the

classical

responsible for Pye's product, gave details

of the company's

new Virtuoso

classical label. Albums in series will retail at $5.32

the the highest priced classical label ever issued by Pye. Releases will be in stereo only. The scries will be in a new format with a label symbol featuring Paganini, the famous violin virtuoso of the mid- 19th century.



The albums

be packaged in heavy board sleeves with a will

linen texture finish.

Calling him the "Father of Modern Opera," he used baroque composer Monteverdi to

explain his theme on repertoire. The 400th anniversary of his birth, taking place this year, had stimulated new interest in the composer. To celebrate this, three albums of his works were being issued on Collector. One by the Goldsboro Ensemble is

now

available.

The

next, in the

October release, features John Holborn Chorale.

66

the

Music

and

to Frankfurt, Cologne and Hamburg. In Cologne he had an

Kluger Palette

important meeting with Deutsche Vogue executives to arrange concentration of promo-

A

recording of concert was being

on

this

year's

made and

highlights will be featured a full-price stereo album.

General

sales

manager Roy

O'Dwyer outlined a special incentive scheme for representatives,

A

25-day cruise for two to South Africa on the liner Edinburgh Castle returning from

Town

Cape

in

the

Windsor

is the top prize in the six-week program. The prize goes to the representative achieving the highest sales over his quota between Sept. 4 and

Castle

Oct.

Second prize test

Assistant sales manager Nick Foakes unveiled the September album product on the Pye, Marble Arch and Golden Guinea labels. Foakes said that among the albums coming on Pye, the cream of the issue was un-

doubtedly

the

new

Pet

Clark

album, "These Are My Songs." Other albums to be pushed are "Something Else" by the Kinks and "Hipsters, Flipsters, Finger Poppin' Daddies" by Geno Washington and the Ram Jam Band. Spearheading the releases on the budget Marble Arch label is

is

seven

in the sales conin Madrid

days

a weekend in third prize. All representatives their quota get an

tankard.

by Palette

Paris

as

MEXICO CITY

was Mex-

an album, "Flamenco-Jazz," recorded in the Hispavox Madrid

• Continued from pafje 64

Radio Choir under Vaclav

Neumann. Orfeo

is

priced by subscrip-

tion at $9.50 ($12.50).

The Aida album wih

is

recorded

Grace BumCorelli and the

Birgit Nilsson,

Franco

achieving

hry.

engraved

choir and orchestra of the

Rome

Opera under Zubin Mehta.

is based on Father emotional impressions after gazing at a 17th Century cruifix he found, in deteriorated condition, in Andalucia. The crufix. for which he paid $13.

formed the

1966.

Musart Records offered a facsimile of the broken cross together with its de luxe album when Musart released its version here with a musical back-

Venezuela, though is the only record-

ground.

Iturralde Signs

HispoYOx Pact Hispavox has

studios.

basis of the religious

contained in the poem "My Broken Cross" which broke Capitol sales records in meditations

Capitol Records has asked for an English language translation of the disk, Father Cue revealed. The disk is offered on three different trademarks here



poetry.

The poem

Cue's

ico's top best-seller in 1966. an unusual attainment as talk records rarely cause interest.

MADRID

own

his

conferences.

Cristo Roto"

reading

with

ing

artist of "Mi Cristo Roto," Father Ramon Cue, arrived here to make new LP's at Capitol, visit his family and offer

graves.

zig

TV

emphasis on Donovan.

cial

and

signed Spanish jazz saxophonist Pedro Iturralde to an exclusive contract and will shortly release

Push

Clock" and "My World Fell Down," and on the new "Los Mayas in Japan" album, which includes some important Japanese copyrights. Pierre Meyer of World Music will shortly visit London to discuss promotion in Belgium and Holland for a number of British artists, with spe-

Cue Cuts for Cap, in Mexico — Author Father Cue

Lonnie Donegan, "You Never Can Tell" by Chuck Herry and "I'm Moving On" by Max By-

Electrola

motion on the new Mertens Brothers album, which includes the titles "Jerusalem," "Beat The

Seller Father

Albums

LP

recently.

plans a big promotion campaign to launch the new series in the Benelux countries. The company will also do strong pro-

Kluger met executives of the Sonet group which has released the first single in Scandinavia of the Loot, the Palette group which recenthad a three-week tour of the Scandinavian countries. From there Kluger traveled

Capitol's

Export manager Harry Castle a new agreement with Vogue France had been signed

10 different LP's and

lease of

this

in

said

Cinquetti

Palette is now preparing a new album series. Color in Dance with the simultaneous re-

Scandinavia

"Mi

Gigliola

and Simon and Garfunkel.

fall.

religious

good reaction to by Roy Orbison,

is also releases

new

the Troggs,

Belgium, to discuss with Funkler's Pete Felleman the exof 20 new albums

and two

titled

There

ploitation

from Dono-

van

has scored a big sales success with its summer promotion competition for dealers, in particular with the Will Tura single, one of the records featured in the contest, which has sold 30,000 copies in seven weeks. ette

tone,

In

in-

France Kluger met Roger Maruani of Festival Records, Palette's French distributors, and representatives of CBS Recand various publishing ords companies. Meanwhile in Belgium PalIn

Mertens Brothers. Kluger then visited Holland with Mr. J. Tybergheim of Ar-

release

also

will

Germany.

in

Further London meetings involved Ashley Kovak, manager of Donovan, with whom Kluger discussed plans for promotion of the artist in the Benelux countries, and Cyril Shane of Shapiro-Bernstein, from whom Kluger acquired Benelux rights of an important movie theme which will be recorded by the

will

Vogue

Deutsche

troduce the Palette album line

Kluger also met RCA's lack Heath and negotiated a deal for the release of the new Waikiki's album in Britain on RCA. The album, "The Waikiki's Golden Hits," will also be released in Japan and in the U. S, A. on Kapp.

which Palette

on Andre Brasseur's new

tion

vocal single, and singles by Will Tura, the Loot and Dee-Dee.

artists in for-

eign markets. In London, Kluger met Geoffrey Heath of Good Music and Derek Everett of CBS to plan new releases of Palette artists Andre Brasseur, the Mertens Brothers, the Pandemonium and the Loot, whose records are released in the U. K. by CBS.

"Universal Soldier" plus "Stars of "67," which was Sandie Shaw's "Puppet on a String" and Geno Washington's "Michael." Other albums on the label are Volume Two of "A Golden Age of Donegan" by

a collection of hits

14.

Representatives were given quotas in sealed envelopes during the presentation and were later shown a film describing the amenities and attractions of the cruise. details of their

with

returned to Brussels a swing through Europe which took in London, Holland. and Scandinavia, Germany France, and announced brisk

Classical Label Top

Another forthcoming LP feaby American comCharles Ives sung by Marni Nixon, Alexandra Kerr and Gerard Sharman. tures songs

poser

long-term benefits can be achieved by both EMI and ourselves in promoting certain product in this fashion," he said. Technical controller Robert feel that

fact

Newspapers ballyhoo semi-annual subscription on Saturday afternoons, presenting as many as 50 recording artists, groups and orchestras. But the most expensive program of all was a presentation by a popular restaurant featuring Mexican food which celebrated its 25th anniversary with a remote control aired live from the restaurant. Top recording artists and mariachi groups were paid unusually high fees for onetime performances. Television, still relatively inexpensive here ($5,000 for a half hour, network, live program) is one of the quickest methods to get a new name or new disk before the public. Although the programs follow a monotonous formula, they continue in popularity among the record-buying masses.

layed broadcast.

is

of the

raffles with three-hour specials

These tapes are bicycled to 17 provincial stations operating independently of the coast-tocoast networks covering the central part of Mex-

Time on

spite

aired in a special to a top rating. It was repeated several weeks later due to a flood of mailed requests. Part II was offered: there was no explanation why Part I had not been aired first.

convinced sponsors to pour thousands of additional pesos into location tapings. Crews, artists, remote control units and designers travel hundreds of miles to a "typical" colonial setting to tape an expensive hour for de-

hours

in

for close to two that few Mexicans

among the mass of viewers in the lower class understood what he was saying. Subtitles were flashed on the screen to interpret the patter. "Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music" was

Several of the weekly song shows have been air continuously, summer and winter, for

producers

minimum

here for a

known entertainers. The Dean Martin Show ran

on the

And

World

after

activity

program, "Nescafe," hires every

who comes

of two shows. Marlene Deitrich, Johnny Mathis, Vic Dana and a host of others have received as much as $5,000 (a large sum in Mexico) for each performance. Several artists who've been hot at the moment are offered their hour for a one-man show. Trini Lopez and Raphael each broke rating records with specials. With the weekly increase of sales of American music pressed here in original form, several sponsors have offered U. S. film series with well-

hit.

monotony of

releases.

A

top-rated foreign singer

on

artist

BRUSSELS—Roland of

Records

KELLEGHAN

MEXICO CITY—Television principal

Kluger Back After Europe Swing; Sets Release Deal

'

During a press conference at Capitol, Father Cue was given a facsimile of the broken cross on a velvet background by Capitol executives as a remembrance of his trip here and honoring his in

first

place in sales

1966.

Father Cue. who was born Mexico but has lived in Spain since the age of ten. is a Jesuit priest who entered the seminary at the age of 17. In Spain he is an author, TV in

Iturralde. who since I960 has appeared regularly with his own group at the Whisky Jazz Club in Madrid, last year was a mem-

ber of the international all-star jazz orchestra which played a concert in London's Playhouse Theater, organized by the European Broadcasting Union.

For his first Hispavox album, which features a musical blend of flamenco and jazz. Iturralde (tenor and soprano sax) was backed by Paul Grassl. Eric Peters. Peer Wyboris, Nuccio Intrisano and Paco de Antequera.

personality and poet as well as record artist. He's made 3 disks in Spain, all on 7 inch records 33 '/i rpm for Gramophone. He's planning a disk based

at

on one of

"My

First

his

literary

efforts,

Mass."

All royalties received from the sale of the disks have been turned over to his Jesuit superior, who spends the money on charities in Spain.

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

i;

ARGENTINA (Courtcsr EKslera a la

*DtntAn

local

20

40

FLOWERS IN THE RAIN—

21

19

CREEQUE ALLEY— Mamas

1

3

2

2

QUE PaSARA— Palito Ortega (RCA>— Fcrmala Ml AMOR Ml AMIGO— 'Barbara A Dkk (Vik); Marie Laforel (Music Hall); *Icas(o 6 (Disc Jockey)

5



QUE CAE-

ES LA LLUVIA

Los Iractindos (RCA); Rokes

(RCA)— Relay TRISAGIO DE SOLTERO— *Napoleon Puppy (CBS); Los Wawanco (Odeon)

5

VAMOS A LA CAMA—

1

'Las Ardilliias (CBS); Areta-Baralas-Rebollo-Moro (Quinio); 'Vlclorliia (Vik)

—Milrom

6

Rosamcl

Araya

Jockey)

(Disc

SILENCE

S

4

MUSIC TO WATCH GIRLS

IS Tretneloes (CBS): Las 4 Esiaciones

BY— Andy

(Philips)

(Tonodisc);

Singers Brass Wynds

(Music Hall): 'Malvicino (Microfon); Willie Bobo (Verve): Xavier Cwgat (Odeon): 'Icasio 6 (Disc

10

—Relay

Jockev)

SUMMERTIME— Billy (Microfon) CELOSO— Los Pancho

Solomon (Tommy

Scott Scolt)

23

44

HOLE IN MY SHOE—

24

24

THERE GOES MY EVERYTHING— Engelbett

25

(Decca) GIN HOUSE— Amen Corner (Deram) Carlin (Noel Walker)

17

26

16

27

25

21



1

4

20

UP.

26

A BAD NIGHT- -Cat

—Carlin

(Deram)

—Cat

FIVE

GOOD TIMES— Epic

LITTLE

VANGIN LAULU— 'Tapio

6

2

7



8

6

McBride (Emerald) Moss-Rose (Tommy Scott) Burdon Frankie

THE WORLD WE KNEW—

34

29

007

Frank Sinatra (Reprise)— Copyright Control (Jimmy

Rautavaara (Philips)— X-Savel ELSA— 'Marltl Innanen (Safir) Erik Lindstrom



10

9

(Courtesy

Modem

McRHMirne)

TMi Lau Week Week 2

TRAMP—Otis Thomas

SAN FRANCISCO—Scoll McKenzie (CBS)

—Associated

4

1

ALL YOU NEED

Dimension

(Liberty)

33

SOUL FINGER- Bar

37

43

RELEASE

38

32

SHE D RATHER BE WITH

tStax)

ME— Turtles Robbins

6

— —

— Davy

YOU'RE

41



42

50

POP)— Robbins

KATUPOIKIEN LAULU— *Katri-Helena (Top Voice) Fazer SILENCE IS

DAY

•Herd (Fonlana) Rowland)

MET MARIE—Cliff

I

(Columbia)—Col.

MOONLIGHT—Dean



TRY MY WORLD— •Georgie

36

MY MAMMY—Happenings

45



43

Penn) 46

39

BABY



•Denotes local odelB 47

Last

ODE TO

Week Week 1

I

Donna 2

ASCAP Bohbv

(Peter

—Gladys Knight (Tamla/ Motown)—Carlin (Norman WWtefleld)

{Peler

McKenzie (CBS)— Dick James (Lou Adler/John

TRAIN TO SKAVILLE—

3

SAN FRANaSCO— Scoll

4

EXCERPTS FROM A •TEENAGE OPERA"—

•Ethiopians (Rio)

Keith West (Parlophone)—

Robbins (Mark

P.

15

LET'S

6

10

rrCHYCOO park— -Small

I

12

7

(Deram)

—Carter-Lewis

Tkis

Last

Week Week 1 1 ES LA LLUVIA

Los Iracundos (RCA); Los Harmonic's (Arena); Pat

Henry (Odeon)

EVEN THE BAD TIMES ARE GOOD— 'Tremeloes (CBS>—Skldmore (Mike

2

3

3

2

Beach Boys (Capitol)— Immediate (Beach Boys)

10

a

YOU— Anita

(CBS>—Chappell Margolis)

WE LOVE YOU

DANDELION— 'Rolling

Stones (Decca)— Variety

(Andrew 11

9

12

5

I

4

5

Beatles (Odeon)

4

TEMA DE LOS MONKEES— SI TE VAS aan 91 (Arena) TRISAGIO DEL SOLTERO—

Monkees (RCA)

Armando Navarrete (RCA); Los Wawanco (Odeon)

9

9

10

7

(Oldham)

—Alan



9

9

6 8

AMOUR. MON AMI— Marie Laforet (Asfona) MIRA COMO SON LAS— COSAS—Yaco Monti (Odeon) PERO ALLI—Hermanos Arriagada (Odeon); (Arena).

23

Bobby

Rodolfo Dantes

(Philips)

I

1

2 4

5

3

6

6

14

14

DAY

I

Shadows

(Norrie Paramor) IS (Parlophone)

13

ALL YOU NEED

16

27

THERE MUST BE A

•Beatles

LOVE—



9



10

9

WAY—

17

11

— Frankte Vaughan (Columbia)— Chappell PLEASANT

II

22

YOU KEEP ME HANGING

19

18

BIIRVING OF THF

SI

WDAY—Monkees



Victor) Screen Dauffl"^ F. H^tcUd)

ON—Vanilla (f

Gems

Fi'dge

—CarMn

Frank Sinatra (Reprise)

*Dcno4es local

Exnericnce

ortgfai

1

BLACK VELVET BAND—

2

SAN FRANCISCO—Scoll

3

3

4

5

TAR AND CEMENT— 'Joe Dolan (Pve>— RobhiM FIVE LITTLE FINGERS—

5

4

ALL YOU NEED

2

J

3

2

4

7

5

4

6

6

6

BlUBOARD

7

NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN-Tom Jones

local

—Tyler

4

7

8

8

6

ADORO— 'Manzanero (RCA) —Emmi ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE—

9



Beatles (CanitolV—Pendinn

10

7

fi

3

SHE— Monkees (RCA>— Morro-Mundo CUANDO TU NO ESTAS—

7

10

8



9

8

10

9

(Gamma)—-Campci

8

A CHI— •Fauslo Leali (Rl Fl) —Curci LA ROSA NERA— •Gitllola

NEW ZEALAND 2

2

3

3

4

6

THANKS TO YOU—Mr. Lee Grant (HMV) ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE —Beatles (Parlonhone) TABATHA TWITCHIT— Dave Clark Five (Columbia) GOT RHYTHM—

5

5

CARRIE

1

1

4

7

10

8

7

9

8

NON

9

DIO

11

II

C

E'

10



13

15

12

— —

WINDY— Association (Warner Bros.) DONT SLEEP IN THE SUBWAY—Petula Clark SHE'D RATHER BE WITH

ME—Turtles

SUNDAY—Monkees

NORWAY

2

4

3

2

4

6

5

9

—Zafiro-Caitciones

Music

— 10

2

ALL YOU NEED

3

3

ALTERNATE TITLE—

4

5

GRAVEYARD PARADISE—

5

6

•1-2-6 (RCA Victor) SUSSE BASS— 'Oslo

Soiuhem SII.ENCE IS

Beatles Edition

IS

Gems

(Polydor)



«

10

JACKSON—Nancv

9

9

Dave

84

Lee

(Parlonhone)

LA PELLE NERA— Nino

Davies

7



(Pye) Sonora Sinatra A

Hazlcwood

ITnired

10

Mundo

(Novola)

Aulc

Manoio Diaz fSonoplay)— Canciones del Mundo ROSAS EN EL MAR—

(Covrleay t

LOVE—

(Parlophone)— Lvche

Harmontkvartett

Ricordi-

del

ALEUYA— 'Massiel

ALEUYA NO. 1— 'L. E. (RCA)— RCA POSTGUERRA/BIBI—

Thb Last Week Week 1

2

7

SETTEMBRE— •Eouipe

—Zafiro-CaiKionn

(Novola)

8

9

•Massiel (Novola>— RCA

Rocky Roberts (Durium)

Ferrer (Riviera)

5



a

VENEZUELA

GOLDENTremeloes (CBSV-Ewx DEATH OF A CLOWN—

R.

6

7

Mundo

LOLA— 'Los Brincos (Novolo) Zafiro-Universal Jazz NOTRE ROMAN— Adamo (Odeon)— EGO LA FELICIDAD— Palito OrtCfta (RCA)~RCA LA CAZA—'Juan A Junior del

orlitfai

SAN FRANCISCO—Scott

4

CANNELLA— An(oloe (Voeive) AI L YOU NEED IS LOVE—

NOS FALTA FE/BAJO EL SOL — 'Juan A Junior (Novola)

Last 1

orlgia

Vcffdens Gann)

•Denotes local

1

local

A WHITER SHADE OF

PALE— Procol Harum

10

6

Beatles

I

(Columbia Espanola)— Musica del Sur

(London)

PLEASANT VALLEY

(Columbia)— VdP

— R.

1

2

8

3

4

Monkees (RCA Victor)—

STASERA MI BUTTO— 29

PALE — Procol Harum

Screen

NIENTE DI

NUOVO— 'Canlaleonli (CBS) E' MORTO— 'Nomadi

(Ricordi)

14

'Denotes

Gnm Mukal>

Thb Last Week Week

A WHITER SHADE OF

(CtMirtcsy

This

Tank

13

T.Pupy)

Week Week

Curci 12

(B.

and

SPAIN

(Pve)

Maggiore-

LA MIA SERENATA—

5

10

SAME—Spanky

Our Gang (Mercury)

1

ANNE—HoUies

Valli

SUNDAY WILL NEVER BE THE

McKenzie (CBS)—Sweden

Ricordi

YOU—Frankie

(Philips)

I'LL COME RUNNIN'— aiff Richard (Columbia)

A BFJ.IEVFR— Monkees fRCAl— Morro-M'mdo AITNOUE SE OLVIDFN— 'Sonora Santanera (CBS)—

I'M

Week Week

(CGD)

NON C E' PIU' NIENTE DA FARE— •Bobby Solo

8

OFF

(Gam maV—Cam Dei

(Conrlesy Nciv Zealand Broadcaslinc) This Last

Bano (VdP)

PIU' BELLA DEL MONDO— Adriano Celentano (Clan)—Clan LA BANDA— •Mina (Ri Fi>— Clcogna A WHITER SHADE OF PALE — Procol Harum

LITTLE BIT YOU— Monkees (RCA)

SOMETHING nSHY— Dolly Parton (Monument) CANT TAKE MY EYES

(Courtesy of EI

LA COPPIA

9

(Pye)

TO BE A WOMAN— •The Boys (Philips) A LITTLE BIT ME. A

(RCA)—

(Deram)

—VdP

10

(CBS);

and Barry

(Decca)

ANNE— Hollies (Parlophone) WANDERLOVE—Claudlnc Longct (AAM) DONT SLEEP IN THE SUBWAY— Petula Oark

Mundo

odcin

NEL SOLE— •Al

Fono Film

I'LL

(Decca)

9

6

CELOSO— 'Panchos

6

(Deram)

Frankie McBride

(Emerald) —Mo!U-Rose IS LOVE— P arlophone)—Norihcm Sonfts

5

I

5

ITALY •DcMtcs

Ryan

5

(Parloohone)

(Courtesy Musica e DtscU, Milan)

1

CARRIE

2

Hannenings

Benelux

Thb Last Week Week

•Johnny KeUy (Pye)— Segway

(Track)

1967,

5

•Jimmy Fonlana (RCA)

1

—Schroeder-Stamp- Lambert 23,

BENT VOOR MIJ ALLEEN—•Heikrekels

JIJ



1

CLAIRE— Paul

3

2

Altfma

(

MIDNIGHT LAMP— Jimi Hend-ix

Belinda

THE WORLD WE KNEW—

—Orsa

2

Atlantic)

SEPTEMBER



SpofUshl. Dublin)

McKenzie (CBS)— Dick James

VALLEY

MAN—

IF I WERE A RICH Roger Whiltaker (Imperial) Chappell

HEROES AND VILLAINS—

(Telstar)

1

2

4

(Decca)— Essex Holland/ 5

S

(Ricordi)

New

TUs Last Week Week

Northern (George Martin)

(RCA

I

Aromando

(Courtesy

MET MARIE— 'Cllir

Richard (Columbia) 15

—Essex

DEATH OF A CLOWN— Dave Davis (Pye)—Belinda TAKE IT BACK— Sandy Posev (MGM) ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE— (Parlophone)—Leeds/Basan I'LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN—Tom Jones Basart

7

Last

4

Ranhael

LOVE YOU— Rolling

Stones (Decca) Holland/Basart

3

4

SINGAPORE (Courtesy Radio Slaitapore)

1

3

ESTA TARDE VI LLOVER— •Manzancro (RCA)— Emmi TffEME OF THE MONKEES fRCA>— Morro-Mundo YO SOL AQUFL— Raphael

3

SAN FRANCISCO—Scott

— WE

10

Morro-Mundo

McKenzie (CBS>— Bospel

7

EIRE



Molown) Jobele/Carlin (Holland /Dozicr)

4

•M. A. Muniz

TMs Usi Week Week

Cinquetti

REFLECTIONS— Diana Ross A the Supremes (Tamla-

*De»otcs local orlsla

1

2

HOLLAND

(Alan

Price

Sinatra

— Buiterfield

(Reprise)

2

10

SUNDAY— Monkees

(Colaems)

CELOSO— Marco Antonio M"ni7 (RCA) MISSISSIPPI DELTA— Bobbie Gentry (Capitol) SHE— Monkees (Colgems)

•DcncMes loeal origin

This Lu» Week Week

—Toumier

JACKSON— Nancy

— —

8

(Courtes; Audloaiuska)

•Dcntitcs local orfsln

Price! 13

AMOUR D'ETE— 'Johnny Hallyday (Philips)— Piuallc ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE—

9

7

9

This

(Barclay)

Beatles (Odeon)

10

RodriRuez Orch. (Alegre)

Week Week

MEXICO

ADIEU A LA NUIT— •Mireille Mathieu Salabcrt

— MON

8

WAS MADE TO LOVE

HER—Slevie Wonder (Tamla-MoiownV— Joljete



(Deram)

Artists)

Quijano Orch. (Cesta)

(D«cca)

6

—6

Richard (Columbia) Stevens

TO BE A WOMAN—-The Boys (Philips) THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT— Alan Price Set

Buiterfield

CONCIERTO PARA Tl—Jose Alfredo Fuenles (Caracol) ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE—

6

COME RUNNIN'—

Cliff

Frank Sinatra (Reprise)

8

(United

Boys

the

(Philips)

'Richard Anthony (Columbia)

EN BANDOLERA— Adamo

5

7

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT— 'Alan Price Set (Decca)

«

WORLD—

'Naomi and

—Carrcre

(Odeon)

Smith)

HEROES AND VILLAINS—

(Mike



10

7

QUE CAE-

(Carter-Lewis)

Harris

9

S

Tremeloes (CBS)

(Philips)—

AMOR— SheUa

Beach Boys (Capitol)

Faces (Immediale>— Avakak/ Immediate
JUST LOVING

3

3

6

CHILE

Wlru)

GO TO SAN FRANCISCO— Flowerpot

5

Men

4

•Paul Jones (HMVV-Two Fo*ir (John Bu'eess)

Philips)

9

ME—

THINKIN' AINT FOR

3

6

(Capitol)

Gordon/

Sullivan)

4

7

(Kelly

Paris)

TAKE ME IN YOUR ARMS

Sullivan)

NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN— Tom Jones

I'LL

(Decca>—Tyler

A BAD NIGHT—Cat

JOE—

BILLIE Gentry

Bol^hte

LAST WALTZ— 'Engelberl Humpcrdlnck (Decca)

2

A WOMAN'S I'LL

LOVE YOU—

I

Aretha Franklin (Atlantic) Aoril (Jerrv Wcxlcr)

(Coarlesy Recoed Retailer)

This

—Barton Tops (Dan

GROOVIN'— Young RaacaU (Aico) PLEASANT VALLEY

(Decca)

GOLDEN—

IS

7

and

THE LETTER—Box

OH. THAT'S NICE— Pete

5

SILENCE

9

Hunter

(Stateside)

BRITAIN

Day

LO DE BtXXJALOO—Joe

6

Peters

Si.

6

Fame (CBS)—Ivor (Denny

—Francis,

2

6

CrispL-tn

Cordell) (Pye)

3

5

ALMOST PERSUADED—

8

—Warkjrd

44

Martin (Reprise)— Albert

4

4

PALE— Procol Harum

CUANDO TU NO ESTAS— Raphael (United Artists) COMO NACE EL AMOR— Al Zcppy (United Artists) NO VUELVAS— Raphael

2

*Dcnolet iocal origin

ALICE— 'Eddy Mitchell (Barclay)—Semi THE WORLD WE KNEW—

I

3

(Parlophone)

3

Last

1

4

LErS PRETEND—Lulu CARRIE ANNE—Hollies

5

TE-VE Gnla and WL'NO)

Radio Tlib

(Columbia)

4

2 5

Son

Monkees (RCA' -Fllipinaa Record Corp.

(Deram)

2

3

7

Eddie Floyd (Stax)—Carlin

9

Posey

Inc.

BOAT— Every Mother's (MGM>— Mareco. Inc. I'M A BELIEVER— The

(Courtesy of

6

THINGS GET BETTER—

10

(MCM>—

TWO OF US— Harriclle Blake (Monument)— Mareco. Inc. COME ON DOWN TO MY

Week Week

oriidii

—Essex ARANJEZ MON AMOR—

10

lit

Bros.

Inc.

(MGM)— Mareco.

A WHITER SHADE OF PALE — Procol Harum

I

1

GOLDEN—

(CBS>—Fa«r

Claude Francois

7

9

Righteous

Lasl

FRANCE

(E>cram)

Whillield)

SiNCLE GIRL- Sandy

7

Week Week

MAIS QUAND LE MATIN—

(Steve

THE CHAPEL IN THE

IN

Tkls

A WHITER SHADE OF

Temptations (Tamla— Motown)— Jobele Carlin

SOUL A INSPIRATION—

8

PUERTO RICO

•Denotes iocal

ADIOS

(HMV/

5

8

JASRAC

(Courtesy Radio Malaysia)

1

(Walter

6

7

MAUYSIA

(CBS>— X-Savel

(RCA)—

Buckinghams (CBS) Mareco, Inc.

(King)—

Akira

2

MY EVERYTHING

(Jim Stewart)

— Aberback Tokyo BOUND— •The —Watanabe

4

1

DONT YOU CARE— —

IS Vinitxi

(Polydor)

KOI— -Fuse

Last

FROM THE UNDERWORLD —

Corn. 5

Vissert)

SOMEWHERE MY LOVE—

38

Bee Gees (Spin)— Belinda Richard

10

(London)

(Joe

45

Jones (Astor)

Tu-Con

TO LOVE SOMEBODY—

(Roulette)

Tigers

'Eino Gron (Scandia) Scandia-Music

(Philips)

39

(Norman

SEASIDE

9

3

(Charles

40

Ridlev)

10

2

ME— •Engelbett

6

Record Corp. MY SONG— Bobby (Epic)— Mareco, Inc.

Filipinas

Mareco,

9

Week Week

Pee

^Tee

Burlington

SLEEP IN THE

SUBWAY— Petula Oark (AstV—Leeds THEME FOR A NEW LOVE

This

Blackwelh

Mike Sames Singers

(Parlophone)—

Norlheni

— DONT



Kays

Humtterdinck (Decca)

LOVE—

IS



36

Belinda Beatles

Redding-Carla Sparta

(Stax)

5

Airplare

Jefferson

SUKISA

10



Tremeloes

SOMEBODY TO LOVE— THIS

—WatanabeCornels

SUKISA



SEURAMATKAT— -Reijo

(Leslie

Stewart)

(Jim

THEME FROM THE MONKEES— Monkees (RCA>—Tu-Con A WHITER SHADE OF PALE— Pfocol Harum (Deram)—Essex UP. UP AND AWAY— 5lh

3

7

30

35

(Columbia)

S

Dedtker

(Pyramid)— Island Kong)

3

4

(Victor)— lASRAC

LOVE YOU)— -The Cama Beats (Philips)— SHINKO HANKY PANKY—Tommy James A The Shondclls

KYYNELEET/LACRIME—

Bowen)

—Desmond

BLUE CHATEAU— J. Yoshikawa A •Blue



IS Beatles (Parlophone) Scandia-Music

Tani

9

33

AUSTRALIA

5

7

LOVE—

5

and Animals (MGM) Schroedcr Slamina (Tom Wilson)

41

6

Record Corp.

3

4

Comets (Columbia)— Watanabe

5

FINGERS—

31

42

BLUE MOUNTAIN— Yoshikawa A 'Blue J.

SUKISA

—Mareco,

LFiTLE BIT YOU—The Monkees (RCA) Filipinas

(I

(I

ALL YOU NEED

Stevens (Mike Hurst)

31

4

— Fazcr

— Essex

8

(Jack

32

5

(Finlandia)

(M(iM)

Inc.

NO MAX— •Araki

Ichiro

i

LOVE YOU—Connie

Francis

— Aberback

4

Tracy)

A LITTLE BIT ME, A

Yohichi (Polydor)

(Decca)

(Deram)

2

REALLY DONT WANT TO KNOW)— 'Sugaw.ra

Levy-Savel

Johnny Mann Singers (Liberty)

Tokyo ITOSHI

A WHITER SHADE OF PALE— Procol Ha rum

AWAY—

UP AND

29

30

SHIRITAKU NAINO

7

ILTATUULEN VIESTI— 'Aikamiehet

Gems

Carr (Liberty) Screen (D. Farthing Halelid)

3

Seppo

2

3

2



3

EREHDYIN KERRAN/ NESSUNO Ml PUO GIUDICARE— Hanski

(Pye)—Carlin

YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE JACKSON—Nancy Sinatra (Reprise)— United Artists IT MUST BE HIM— Vikki

WHOEVER YOU ARE

(King)—

4

FINLAND

DEATH OF A CLOWN—

1

Comets

'Blue

•Ito Yukari

*Denoles local orlRln

3

A

(Columbia)— JASRAC KOYUBI NO OMOIDE—

2

2

Last

1

1

MAKKANA TAIYO—Misora

1

Hibari

Week Week



•Dave Davis (Ray Davies)

1

Last

Tills

Week Week

Last

Week Week

McEvoy (Pye)—Tee Pee

This

PHILIPPINES

•Denotes local oelRia This

PHONE— Larry Cunningham (King)— Tec Pee FUNNY MAN— •Johnny

Traffice (Island)— Island

Humperdinck

JAPAN

—Carlin

•Johnny McEvoy (Pye) Waltons

THREE STEPS TO THE

(Wilson)

Siewart

(CRS): Jose Feliciano rRCA): Olci Cuillot (Music Hall)— Edami



Dubliners (Major Minor)

Williams (CBS);

Ray Charles

10

BLACK VELVET BAND—

28

GOLDEN—

8



22

28

7

9



Victor) Adler)

PROPIEDAD PRIVADA—

6

DEATH OF A CLOWN— BOSTON BURGLAR—

Dave Davis (Pye)

Essex (Denny Cordcll)

and [he Papas (RCA Dick James (Lou



Odeon 3

4

6 9

*Move (Regal-Zonophone)

F»m»)

ficlcin

Thb LaM Week Wefit

4

3

5

2

6



7

7

(Barclay)—-Vcne vox

LA FELICIDAD— Raouel Caslanos (Discomoda)

CUANDO TU NO ESTAS— Raphael (Orbe-Hispavox) Favedica

K

ft

PUPPET ON A STRING—

9

9

NIEGALO TODO— Julio

Rudy

Hernandez

(Velvet):

Sandie Shaw (Orbe-Pye)-— Favedica; Paul Mauriat

(Reprise)—

Artf«ts

ENGERDALSVALSEN— •Giermund Eniien & Dizzie Tunes rrrnll\— Ellertsien A WHITFR SHADE OF PALE—Procol Harum (Deram)— Reuier A Reuler

Exhflrfo)

RICHIE'S JALA JALA— Ricardo Ray (Tico)—Palacio PELEA— Altcmar Duira (Odeon)— Mitsltron ADORO— Armartdo Manzanero (RCA)— Hnos. Amor POR UN CAMINTO— Leo Dan (CBS)— La Discoteca CON—Charles Aznavour

(Phil ins)—Siemens

Jaramillo (Velvet)

10

— CUANDO —Marco

ESTOY CONTIGO Antonio Muniz Anior

(RCA>—Hnos.

67

ADVERTISEMENT

Tape C ARtridge

CARTRIDGE TIPS

Larry Finley

by

The

writer

almost time

met

first

years

eight

man

this

that

At

ago.

products

had

He

markets.

super-

in

become

just

in-

terested in the record business and,

although he was

in

a very small

In

it

he expressed his great faith the future of the sale of albums

way,

through racks in supermarkets and drug stores. His territory was very limited but despite this he felt albums would be a major portion business within the next 10

his

of

years.

warehouse and

Visiting his

was most impressed

I

of

ficiency

office,

the

at

A

field.

formed,

first

my

sat in

I

and phoned this man in an attempt to make my first sale. told him about the tape cartridge business and of my faith in this new industry. He told me: "O.K. office

I

.

.

me 500

ship

.

cartridges

.

.

.

you pick out the numbers you think should have." He was our first I

customer and, since that first sale, he has given ITCC many thousands

NARM

the

members

Convention cautious

be

to

and

comforted

he

aged

in

tape,

of

encour-

further

NARM Convention in At the Lancaster two weeks ago. when we unveiled our new "HOT SIX" plan, first

person

50

perhaps

for

cards,

containing

six

cartridges.

After

track

"HOT

the

containing

cards,

the four track cartridges, and

eight

SIX,"

from

order

this

we man

of

the

seeing

an

received

500

for

of

the four track cards, 500 of the eight track cards and a most sub-

back up stock. Even greater

stantial

than

this

initial

order

he expressed in this concept of merchandising. faith

man's

This

Australia;

many and Hong Kong.

in

territory

CHICAGO



Tape CAR-

here last week. One Cleveland (Ohio) buyer, Lou Resnick of Lx)uis L. Schaffer. commented. "I've heard that the tape cartridge player in general is going to be the biggest item at the

"I am considering a portable cartridge unit for use as a sales incentive." On the manufacturer's side of the picture, R. J. Clarkson. RCA's Record Division, said the firm just completed a contract

with a major oil company to record special messages on 8track cartridges to be mailed out to the sales force. The cartridges will also include music. Clarkson explained that the oil company will be buying 8-track auto units for each salesman. "We call this project 'carmunication',"

he commented.

RCA A tion

Pimnodfon

separate to

was the new ITCC

not

is

premium promo8-track

sell

cartridges

was also launched by RCA. "We're offering a two-speaker

the

tape

is

doing

Al

Driscoll

Pioneer

of

in

Elgin Division's

Unit CHICAGO

Production

in —

The

Elgin

Radio division of Elgin National Watch Co., which last week sent out the first shipment of the 15,000 8-track stereo portable tape cartridges It hopes to have in the stores by Christmas, is well along with development with its second model, a step-up unit in the $125 range.

The

firm's

first

entry,

$89.95, pays on batteries or is

at

AC,

composed of two halves which

may be

2d

separated for stereo play. It is being sold by representatives directly franto chised dealers, the majority of which are jewelry stores. The

also has distribution, through specialty salesmen, to department stores, and its radios are sold by every major depart-

ment

store

Christmas,

in

the country.

By

4,000 f ranchised outlets will have the unit. But Elgin expects department stores 1

to move most of its 8-track players. Elgin's products are fairtraded, and the firm does mini-

mal business with mass

-

mer-

chandisers. It does not sell Korvette, for example. The firm will not get into the distribution of tape cartridges (Continued on page 70)

is

confidence

in

tape to

Industry

cartridge

build

new

it

booth

where RCA's home 8-(rack unit was being displayed, the interwas still in looking. George

est

Fearnaught, manager of special sales for

we had

RCA, commented, "If many sales as we do

as

interest in this unit,

it

would be

Tiimeliness

our hottest item."

Many

brands of cassettes were

also gracing the

halls

Pier last week. of Admiral said

Chuck

of

Navy is

Belzer their portable cassette "has been going very well." He said the firm's biggest premium contract on the item was done with Pure Oil to be used as a sales incentive.

the latest

4 & 8 track stereo cartridge

liits

from:

AM/FM

• Otis Redding

• Mitch Ryder

Normajly

• Wilson Pickett

priced at $99.95, the unit w'as being offered for $59.95.

• The Bee Gees

cassette.

GE

• Dionne Warwick

Playback

General Electric was competing for the youth market in premiums with their $29.95 portable cassette playback for children and teens. Paul Jarvis, advertising and promotion of

• Mar Kays

• Booker T

• Percy Sledge

youth-selling for G.E., said, "We feel the cassette is the machine of the future."

GENERAL

RECORDED

Housewives

all over the counbeing introduced to the cassette by Tupperware. Richard M. Appelbaum, buyer of Tupperware Home Parties. Or-

try are

lando, Fla., said, "We are offering the cassette to housewives as sort of a memorandum machine, much the same way it is used in business." He explained that they use it to record needed groceries or things to be done as the thought occurs to them.

TAPE 1286 Lawrence Station Road Sunnyvale. California 94086 (408) 734-2910

when answering ads Say You Sow

It

.

in

Billbofld

ITCC and the stereo is

the giant

to

it

helping is

now

becoming. Ai was truly a pioneer this

neighboring

the

In

Wollensak

firm

the

Kansas, whose faith and

G R

unit and auto seven RCA 8-track cartridges for $99.75." Clarkson said.

radio with the built-in ca.ssette was one of their hottest items; while 3M was creating interest with a special show price on their portable

Distributing

In Wichita,

up to two flours of music from any AM or FM station. A single control starts, stops and rewinds the tape. Model F103 can also play back pre-recorded monaural or stereo tapes. Included among its features are AFC. remote control microphone, FM antenna and automatic shutoff.

John Wehrle of Norelco said

business.

cartridge

The man we are writing about

PORTABLE

CASSETTE

Radiocorder has been introduced by Concord Electronics to retail

Borg-Warner

their

thinking has reflected

his

the volume he

stereo

the worldwide campaign unprecedented in the in(Continued on page 70)

m /FM

$150. Operating on batteries or AC, the Radiocorder can record

Show's Star Attention-Grabber tridge units drew more attention than ever from buyers at the National Premium Show

biggest in the worid but he thinks

big and

ex-

magaheavy

CARtridge Units Are Premium

to

invited

ITCC suite to see our display. What we had looked for on this "HOT SIX" program was an order six of

Pty..

Tokyo Broadcasting Japan. PlayTape is also both East and West Gerthe

us.

he was the

for

call

TV. Major mar-

first, Sianlon said. The Tokyo Broadcasting Co. has a distribution division serving 15.000plus retail outlets. Similar projects are underway for other nations. Slanton

said

Hanimcx.

land;

NARM

the

50

ica.

Dyn As.sociated Importers Soulh and Central AmerMiami. Fla.; Discatron, Eng-

Los

in

March warned

last

for

was

track units for use in a dealer organization program." Another buyer, W. Harnden, General Motors of Canada, remarked.

NARM

at

ada;

Co..

encouraged us. When we had production problems at the inception business, he went along of our with us. When the keynote address

business.

Angeles

Japan

in

schedules on

kets will be primary targets at

and

Convention in At the Miami, two yeara ago when "skepticism" of the tape cartridge Inwas so predominant, he dustry

tape cartridge

stereo

in

Plans

tensive newspaper and advertising, plus

zine

tional.

(he heels of the virtually world-

show." General response from manufacturers and other buyers indicated that Resnick was right. Larry A. Wilson, a buyer for Advertising and Sales Promotion, Chicago, said, "I'm investigating both auto and home 8-

of dollars

International distributors of units and cartridges include Porst InternaChur, Switzerland; Ezio

PlayTape already

and Nino Consorti, Rome; Irwin Specialties. Toronto. Can-

PlayTape in Israel. The gigantic promotion campaign comes on wide introduction of the system on the market.

when

over two years ago,

little

ITCC was

— A multi-mil-

promotion campaign

ef-

adapted himself to

quickly he

the album

iion-dollar

will be launched by PlayTape in 28 countries this fall, president Frank Stanton announced last week. Stanton, developer of the 2-tack CARtridge system, has just wrapped up deals and is negotiating to launch

operation.

racking

his

more impressive was the thorough and complete knowledge that he had of the business and Even

how

NEW YORK

prima7 business was the

his

racking of drug

in

PlayTape Sets Multi-Million Promotion Drive in 28 Nations

in

field.

you are a distributor who has not taken advantage of the opportunities offered by tape cartridges, for you to is not too late it If

become

a

"Pioneer"

in

your area.

Write to ITCC al 663 Fifth Avenue,

New

Yori(

salesman

City, call

and we

will

have a

on you.

AURICORD'S new 4

tracK CAmridge deck is designed for front panel mounting, with all operating controls on one plane. The deck features an automatic cut-off switch and better than 50 db down hum level. is available with a record/playback erase feature.

LKCTRONICS .,

Copiague, S.

Y.,

INC.

S9S-1000

The device

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967,

BlUBOARD

BONSNZA

aPITOL'S l-TRSCK

ROUND-DP oi STARS

8XT 2585

8XT27(M.

Merle Haggard & The Strangers

Wanda Jackson

wn.i>riitniii«i

8XT 2777 Guy Lombardo

8XT2702

8XT 2760 Buck Owens &

Merle Haggard & The Strangers

The Buckaroos

SONNY JAMES NCCO VOU

Gountry&Western

ROUND-UP OF STARS AT A SPECIAL REDUCED PRICE! The biggest selling names Music

for the first

You can

sell

in

Country

time on one cartridge!

"Round-Up

of Stars" to your

customers for as much as $2 /ess— and still

Various Artists Buck Owens, Merle

Haggard, Sonny James,

Wynn

Stewart,

Wanda

Jackson, Jean Shepard, Husky!

8XL2741

keep your

A great

full profit

margin!

traffic builder! Advertising

leader! Start your $ales

$tampede

w^ith

Ferlln

"Round-Up Of

CUL TODB CBOC

W

Stars".

TODIT UOUT TBE STBOHBEST

@ TUCE TIFE CIBTBIDBE

C&W BEISISE EVEB OH

i

Tape CARtridge

Playtapes, Cassette Aussie Fight

Everything sounds better

on

.

.

JACK VEITCH

By

regarded the introduction of PlayTape as "a very important expansion of activities with the Haminex sphere of interest

selling Philips' cassettes later this year. Festival is the only local

Philips* battle

home

PlayTape has been launched here with a giant publicity campaign mainly centered on straight newspaper advertising although radio spots are being used. (See separate story.) Haminex has an extensive TV advertising campaign planned, with commercials already in the can. but it is holding off until the results of the newspaper and radio efforts are gauged. Introduction of the two systems has a few retailers worried. The sales manager of one of Australia's largest electricalgoods chains said last week: "I suppose it's inevitable we cct different cassette systems. But it seems a pity from the public's point of view that the com-

AMERICAN



SYDNEY

Playtapes and cassettes are about to out for the major shares of the Australian cassette mar-

CRYsl^UheH HBCanDlfMO TAPE

mm Awmm

ket.

manufactured by

11U

CMta Miu,

Ca
Calll.

it

come to Ausa giant spring promo1 Sept. to chal-

Playtapes have tralia

in

.started



on

duced

here

about

by

months

six

being

are

in Australia are lining up with the Philips system. Muntz and Lear Jet cartridges are imported

intro-

Haminex

here

supplier of

they

large sale.

EMI

has co-operated with Philips

the

Haminex

has

the

rights

giant Festival Records catwhich includes American Decca, 20th Century-Fox. Imalog,

pulse,

to the record,

including CBS. Warner and Chess, is at present importing Lear Jet and Muntz cartridges, but plans to start labels

ABC

Bros,

A&M

and Command label. An initial 200 cartridges were released on Sept. 1 Imports

music and tape

Pickwick

ponents for 20.000 PlayTape music playbacks from Japan, which will sell here for approximately $50 and $60. They will be assembled at Brookvale and models will be comD. Hannes. J. pleted there. managing-director of Haminex. announced last week that he

MEN WHO READ njljj BUaiNEBSPAPCR*

MEAN BUSINESS

company at present interested in the PlayTape system. record

panies didn't get together and decide to standardize on something."

FOUR 'N' EIGHT solid-state player just introduced by Arvin handles all major 4 and 8-track cartridges, stereo or mono. Unit six-watt amplifier, two 6has

inch by 4-inch speakers with 16 foot separation, weighs 33 pounds and carries a suggested retail price of $159.95. May be purchased as a complete unit or the amplified player com-

ponent and the two speaker components come separately.

PlayTape Sets

Promo Drive

Components Haminex has .imported com-

cartridge industry

yUlr

Atlantic.

Coral,

Paramount,

as yet small regular local cat-

its

alog. Philips' dealers have been encouraged to get their casfrom the United States. Britain and Germany. The Australian Record Co., which has Australian rights to

to

the

recording tapes

in

settes

vale here.

the world's finest

don't have a (Australia), Ltd.

but

Australian

its

firm photographic equipment, although it has been producing sound gear for several years in its factory in Brook-

nt36

PlayTape cartridges in the meantime will be aimed at the teens and 20's market, with the accent on pop and middle-of-theroad entertainment. Most other record companies

lenge the Philips system introago. Playtapes duced here Corp., the known for

entertainment."

Int-o

the Cassette

Running With Pickwick/60 LONG

ISLAND



N.

CITY.

Y. Pickwick Inlcrnalionul entering the blank cassette with the Pickwick/60, will have a total running time of 60 minutes at 1% ips and list for $2.6.'i.

It

can be mounted even in the

dismounted

dark.

Pickwick C/60 units are 100 millimeters wide, 65 millimeters deep and nine millimeters thick. The cassette shell is of heat and shock resistant styrol. Tapes are i.Si millimeters wide, 18 microns thick and 90 meters long Each unit also has an anti-erasure lock, a viewing window to

which

Any cartridge is only as good as me tape it contains.

positioning.

and

is

field

Ira

Moss.

L.

Pickwick vicebe in charge of

president, will cassette sales. He explained the C/60 was "completely self-guiding and self-

blank

Audiopaks contain Audiotape. Elgin's

2d Unit

• Continued from pai>e 6S at all either for promotional or basic inventory service purposes. "We have considered this," the spokesman said, "and we've had the opportunity to do so. We'd rather stay out of the cartridge business."

show the running length of tape, and an automatic stop. Initial shipments are slated for delivery by Saturday (30). Moss indicated that Pickwick will produce pre-recorded cassettes when the market demand increases.

only include the promotion of American product, but will allow for this promotion of popular national

IN

J.

electrical

HOLLYWOOD

tridge

CARTRIDGE

.

Forum

will

acknowledge will

FORUM,

enclosed lo cover

ell



Capitol's 8-track stereo carrepresent five

releases

unit.

Wilson with her LP "Lush Life" and the Letlermen's "A Song for Young Love." Tennessee Ernie Ford and Nat King Cole finish out the September

The Nancy

which will hit dealers late this month, can play 30 minutes each Lists for $2.65. The cassettes will be marketed as Pick-

wick

C/60

units.

other

cartridges

are

cartridge release with their "Faith of Our Fathers," and Thank You Pretty Baby," respectively.

$100.00 per person Fee includes •tiendance at all setfiont, wcrh malifUU, and lunchton on Monday and Tuttday. IT DOES NOT INCLUDE HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS. Payment Mgsl Acco
Merchandising Week

registration immediately upon receipt, and all details pertaining to procedures.

think-

packages which include the laBobbie Gentry LP "Ode to Billie Joe" in its entirety.

PICKWlCK/60 BLANK CASSETTE,

your

Avenue.

New

Torh, N. Y.

10036.

for-

Names

ward

Pleaie register

"Our

We

Australia. are sure it will have a tremendous impact." He predicted the system would be the major cartridge system in the

REGISTRATION FEE:

Sponsored By

The Tape Cartridge

of Hanimex.

bel's

THE TAPE CARTRIDGE FIELD

TAPE CARTRIDGE FORUM &

division

Pty.. Australia, said,

ing here is that PlayTape is a completely new concept to the mass market of teen-agers in

September

way.

Magazine

native

tape cartridge library. A. .Angus, manager of the

New 5 Packages

UsSIIli

is

2ND ANNUAL TAPE CARTRIDGE FORUM OaOBER 16-17-NEW YORK HILTON

Billboard

their

in

cilion

being offered to dealers at a 40 per cent markup, or $3555- on each unit

NOW

REGISTER

talent

tongues as well as the creation of a national cultural and edu-

'Ode' in Cap.'s

Elgin has no plans to introa hang-on car player, but it might come out with an undcr-dash mount for their new 8-track player.

FIND OUT WHAT'S HAPPENING

68

these countries, he said, "so that the marketing plans will not

either,

Audiopak»<^v^

pafje

diistr>'. Under licensee arrangements, separate manufacturing operations for the production of PlayTape cartridges have already been set up in most of

country.

duce

The new

Continued front



of Registrants

and their (Additional leitertiMd}

people from our compeny lo etiend the TAPE October 16-17, 1967 in New »otk. Cheek

registrants

can

be

Titles: listed

on

your

company

registrants.

Tour signature and

title

THE AURICORD CORPORATION'S new 4 Wt

are

We

are associated with

We

are

track tape deck, model F-6500 (115 volts, 60 cycles), and Model F-6600 (for 12 volts D.C.) plays 4-track stereo cartridges. The unit is designed for front panel mounting and a single lever operates the pinch roller. The player measures

manufacturers

now

in

the

ttie

mwsic-record

tape cartridge ricid

automotive

industry

Yes

No

field

other

1%

inches long. 7V2 inches wide and SVa inches high, weighing pounds. It has a separate azimuth and head height adjustment and allows replacement of its belt without disassembly of the mechanism. Angular error between face of head and tape is reduced due to the inches distance from pivot to face of head.

2^/4

70

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

Audio New

Retailing

RETAILING TRENDS

Stereo Portable Playable Upside Down

A

Look



LOS ANGELES Robcri Cheeseboro, president of Cheoseboro Products Corp.. Los Angeles, introduced a portable record player at a stockholders meeting (6) here in the Biltmore

C

of

Full

new

products and pricing precedents. Allied Radio's Electronics for Everyone catalog is out for

Hotel.

1968!

The Swinger, according to Cheeseboro. is designed and manufactured by Cheeseboro Products and is the only one in the U. S. which: • Is completely portable, plays while you carry it. • Plays without a tone arm; thus is playable in any position, including upside down. • Plays 3.1 and 45 rpm 7-inch records, stereo and monaural. • Has electronic servo-controlled printed motor, which assures absolute speed control during any motion of the player. • Has a fully transistorized dual amplifier system, distortionfree through full audio range, 6 peak watts per channel. • Has a detachable stereo speaker pack, the Swinger Playmate, which stores accessories and 1 3 records. The Playmate is insulated against heat, thus preventing records from warping in the car, beach, etc. • Plays on self-contained re-

chargeable batteries which never need to be replaced. • Weighs 5'/2 pounds and measures 9" x 7" x 2>S ".

The

portable

record

player

can be adapted as a home

unit,

with a built-in jack for charging with the AC charging unit. Additional loudspeakers may be

Here are some of the key

RECEIVERS $229.9.'!

has issued

its

1

seur creation.

RECEIVER TURNTABLES -

THE SWINGER, phonograph

a portable stereo

from

Cheeseboro

Products.

-Harman-Kardon's 60-watt model

lists at

repre-

New

Rngland. The appointee is located at 66 Dedham Avenue, Necdham, Mass. Tom Mullin, formerly national sales manager for the receiving tube division at Raytheon, lakes charge of the Harris sales operations. Rose Discount Record Stores in Chicago ran a back-lo-school sale on transistor radios, portable stereo phonographs, tape recorders, mono portables and pop albums, taking a full page in the Chicago SunPolk Bros, also took a Times. full page in the Chicago Sun-Times for its "'Easy Listenin' " record sale, with all RCA Victor and Dot sentative

in

.

.

.

.

.

.

$399.50 and minus

10 watts at $299.50.

AMPLIFIERS— In plugged into the external speaker jacks on the front of the player. An earphone jack comes with the Swinger. Available in variety of colors and textures, the Swinger is of all-metal construction and has a built-in beach stand, said

Cheeseboro.

The player can be

installed

planes or boats with

in vehicles,

mounting brackets, he said. It is shock and vibration resistant and highway-safe due to the slot loading and aiUoniatic operation.

LP's

watt

division.

.

.

.

$297.46 entry (with a model at $161.07). .Scott hits a $249.95 model. Sony has a $399.50 unit, and Martcl's Japweighs enese entry

STEREO

Gamble-Skogmo.

and Inc..

sales for August and for the seven months of its fiscal 1967 year. Sales for the first seven

were

$423.866, 1 29 comwith $410,537,414. Consol-

month

idated net sales for the

of

August, including leased departments, were 587.139,792 compared with $8.5.1)36,626. Gamble-Skogmo now consists of 185 companyowned grocery units. 3 1 drugstores. 590 general merchandise and variety stores. 89 mass-merchandising, self-service department stores, 24 conventional department stores. 106 catalog sales units and 3,384 authorized dealer stores. That's 4,409 units. Homestead. Pa housewife Mary Jane Scabora has won $15,000 and a console TV set from SyU'ania in its national Spring Styling Pageant Sweepstakes. She registered for the contest with .

.

$149.95.

PORTABLES



lius,

FM-AM

.

.

and glass-to-metal scaling materials. White and Kirk in Amarillo. Tex., is promolinf RCA's "Music to Write Letters By" LP with Eaton's stationery, offering a box of the paper and an album for .

.

$5.95.

.

.

.

Concord Electronics

Corp. has leased 5.01)0 square feet of additional office space at 2222 Feder.Tl Avenue in West Los Anfe'clcs, reports vice-president and general manager Robert L. Halpcrn.

.

.

PERSONNEl MOVES:

1'homas 0.

Fisher to marketing manager al Symphonic Electronic Corp.: William L. Mayo to assistant to the vice-president of Marketing at Controls Company of America: Thomas H. Cashin to senior vice-president of Sylvania KIcctric Products. Inc.

NEW Scott.

BROCHURE Inc.

includes

from

many

Informative articles on high fidelity, the role of music in the home, choosing the correct console to match decor and nontechnical explanations of modern stereo concepts. Copies may be

obtained from H. H. Scott, Inc.. Ill Powdermill Road, Maynard, Mass. 01754.

SEPTEMBER

23,

.

A

at 1827 Broadway. Albany. It'll be stocked with a large inventory of Phiico replacement parts, iiibes,

accessories and universal items. Parts not in slock are promised within 24 hours. Sylvania has acquired the assets and business of .

.

$27.95

at

portthe

and model

10-transistor pocket

AM

$9.95; the tiny Juliette portable from Hong-Kong lists at $6.95; the Panasonic stereo table radio lists at $99.95; Lloyds stereo table model topper, also from Japan, lists at $69.95; the 'York at

FM-AM

FM-AM

solid-stale

FM-AM

clock-lamp

radio is offered at $49.95 and the regular York clock radio

FM

with

is

listed

NordMende's

at

FM-AM

Hitachi's stereo eler" portable

at

lists

4-band

$29.95; "Trav-

$79.95; portable

$89.95; Panasonic's 3-band portable at $54.95 and Craig's 2-band unit for $46.95; the Westinghou.se solid-state clock-radio-lamp lists at $39.95. al

AM

$169.95;

Japanese-import is

Al-

.solid-

listed at

600

Concord's

solid-

recorder lists at $179.50. Panasonic's RS-760S $159.95, Wollensak's 5730 at at $199.95 and Sony's 200 at $179.50; stepping up, .Sony's 230 1720 lists at $219.50; Roberts' at $199.95; Wollensak's 5740 at at $229.95, Concord's 727 $249..50 and its 776 at $299.50. Sony's 530 at $299.50. Ampex' 861 al $299.95 and Viking's stereo

state

880

tape

$.169.95;

al

AC

mono

re-

corders offered are Concord's 102 at $59.50, Panasonic's RQ706S al $99.95, Aiwa's TP-802 104 at Sony's at $89.95, $109.50. Concord's Deluxe 220 .Sony's 105 at al $119.50, $139.50. Wollensak's 5710 at $1.59.95 and l.50()SS al $184.95;

Craig 212

in portables, the

is

of-

S37.95. the Concord $39.50, the Panasonic at $49.95, the Telmar $39.95, Ihc.Sony 900A at $69.50. the Concord F-90 at $69.50, the Aiwa 2-track TP-705 at $84.95. the TP-713 at $69.95 and the TP-716 at $39.95, the fered

al

F-85

al

RO-I02S

T-lOO

at

Panasonic

RQ-501S

and the Telmar

$99.95

at

AC/ DC 555

at

$69.95.

The

catalog. No. 270, is free request from Allied Radio Corp., 100 North Western Avenue, Chicago, 111. 60680.

on

PhiIco Mini, Other By

JERIANNE ROGINSKI

CHICAGO—Youth

electron-

ics were strongly featured items the National Premium Showhere last week. Philco-Ford's hip pocket records and portable phonos were receiving the most attention from buyers as they

at

walked the

isles

in

Navy

Pier.

"I think the Phiico mini records are the most exciting thing the show." said Larry A. Wilson, a buyer for Advertising and Sales Promotion in Chicago. "The quality is excellent for the size and cost of the package." Most of the other major manufacturers were showing the petite battery-operated phonos at

AM

phono unit. "We feel youth electronics make excellent premium items. said Paul Jarvis of G.E. Philip T. Geygan of Midland Electronics, remarked that the "

buyers were beginning to be inin higher priced transTransceivers in the one watt and above market are very he said. '"These units are big with hunters and sportterested

ceivers.

"

strong.""

ing

TWO STEREO available

HEADSETS

now from

are David Clark

enthusiasts, especially."' He that these units sell

commented lor about

$120 a

pair.

is

AM-FM

of $29.95 and a frequency range of 20 to 17,000 cycles. The Clark/1000 is the professional unit offered with complete frequency range and a retail price o* $85.

Radios continue to be an excellent premium item, especially those offering FM. "The most popular radios this year," said P. Dennis Stancik of Motorola, "are those which have both

Co..

Here has a

Inc.

which

the Clark/250, suggested retail

Youth

On Premium

as premium items. Among them was General Electric who was

.

.

lists

York

FM-AM

stressing a whole line of youthorienled products for the show. They included Iwo of the small portable phones, one with an radio; a rechargeable radio flashlight, a new line of transceivers and the "Show 'N Tell"

,

factures intricate components fabricated through photo-etching techniques. Philco-Ford Corp. has taken over direct control of all parts and service programs in the Albany. N. Y., area. new service training center will be maint.iinej .

H.

.

able

Wilbur II. Driver Co.. Newark. producers of special alloys

.

.

$69.95; the York

1

J.,

Homestead dealer. Kalil where salesman Ed Katlllius .

own

Allied's

4-band portable lists at $39.95. 5-hand deluxe at $59.50, 5-band at $49.95 6-band at $69.95 and -band al $99.95; Japanese import VHF portables under the York label list at $29.95, $39.95 and

rcceiver-lurn-

receives a Syjvania home entertainment center free. One of the first efforts of Doyle Dane Bernbach. Inc., for Sylvania is a "Sylvania Sale for Rich People." The point: rich people remain rich by buying good value during a time of savings, explains John T. Morgan, president of Sylvania Knterlainmcnt Products Corp. Harvey Radio Co.. Inc.. of New York has acquired Chcm-Fab Corp. of Doyleslown. Pa. Chem-Fab manu-

H.



name

own

lied's

stale stereo recorder



lURNTABLES Garrard's alone is offered at $129.50; the Fisher Model 110

SL95

N.

had record

pared

in at

The Fisher 30-walt unit at $199.50; Telex-Phonola's 40watt model at $189.95. a median model at $89.95 and a hudgct-unit listed at $49.95.

tllc

$2.99

$2.49.

at

Fisher

120has a 65-watt

the

Sylvania's

THIS

$49.50

is

Allied catalog.

the

RADIOS brand

Products

News

priced

months

high-fidelity

its

and

counterpart at $3.19.95; Pioneer's 4()-watt Japanese unit $199.95; Kenwood's 30-watl Japanese model at $339.95; Harman-Kardon's 70-watt (FM only) at $269 and Marantz' 80watt (FM) at $595, a connois-

Harris Co.

.

Fisher's

$-'!82.46

Scott's

$3.49.

.

at

at

and

1

1968 "Guide to Compact Stereo Music Systems." It's available free Harmanfrom the company. Kardon has named the Stanley A. .

watts

watts;

h.S

own

list



TAPE RECORDERS

is

has

$59.50 and the 400 in

Allied's

4.";

new 90-watler

Scanning The Inc..

for



(AM-FM)

models $179.95 for

stereo

H. H. Scott.

list-

ings:

lahel

offered at $349.95; Alits own label 4-speed unit listed at $49.95; the Garrard SL75 alone is $109.50, the SL55 alone is $59.50 and the SL65 is $79.50; BSR McDonald's Model 600 automatic alone is $74..50. the .500A alone Is table lied



HICACO

1968 Catalog

at Allied's

RAY BRACK

By

AM

Block

and FM. This is because more and more people are accepting

FM." George Fearnaught, manager of special sales

found

he

that

RCA,

for

AM/FM

said table

are the most popular with clock radios as second. Transissets

however,

tors,

bag '"It's

arc

a

different

altogether. He comments. the gimmick that sells tran-

radios anymore. This is because everyone owns at least one. For instance, our beanhag transistor has been doing very sistor

well."

For Norelco. radio sellers were the higher priced models. "We are doing a good business with our big world receiver and our multi-band radios," said John Wehric of Norelco. "Our portable with the builtin cassette has also received a lot of attention."

AM/FM A new

field

comer was H.H.

company was

to the .Scott.

premium The

Inc.

offering four dif-

ferent selections of stereo

com-

ponents, including speakers, tuners and stereo phonos, as

premium

items. Edward Mason commented, "We have found enough busines.s al this show to stay in it next year."

of

.Scott,

An indication that the popularity of high quality stereo is growing, he said. Channel Masters big premi-

um item is in a different category altogether. The company's two-station, solid-state interphone is doing well in many premium areas. Don Berg of Channel Master said so far the unit is being used by such major firms as Pro-Toolh Brush. Lever Brothers. Reader's Digest, Clairol.

and Farm Journal. The com-

pact unit

home

is

especially

made

for

use and retails for $21.95.

1967, BIILBOARD

c

71

Audio

ciassiFieo luiaRT IN DOWN town suburb, south of Chtcaco- Terrific rhythm & blue* and country 4 western

FOR SALE: RECORD SHOP

potentialities. Old and new stock, not discounted. Close to hich school and Jr. collece. Well establfihed. over 12 years. Box 329. Billboard, IBS W. Randolph St.. Br23 Chicaso. Ul.

DENVER— Karl

Tel.:

1921

Ave,, U.

S.

"We j

(

WE

ATTENTION, RECORD OUTLETS:

have iho lareesi selection of 45 rpm oldies and goodies at 25r each, also majur label LP Dstlnes at promotional prices. Send for free llstlnss. All orders welcome. Apex Rendezvous, Inc., 390 Un Kings Highway. Brooklyn, N. V.

AGENTS & DISTRIBUTORS

ROLLING

l*!vd.,

Hollywood,

oc7

Calif.

ACCOUNTANTS— RICORD INDUSTRY Lx.iandiiiR inlfniational nrcortl Kct-ks

two Accountants, with

bqual Opportunity Employer.

Greensburg. Ind.

perfect,

cally •-cted;

scats

sleep*

12.

ST

ear-

8,

permanent TV. cloteU. new

$S^CO. Call A.C. O01>

tires;

oe7

ft-lS22.

oc7

JUKE BOX MECHANIC WANTED

OPERATORS— WHITE TOR ADVEHTIS-

Ing and prices on our Imported Soccer Football Games, One game to each operator near co»t to get game advertised. Super Bowl will lake the play It.

RECORD SERVICES HOW TO

WniTK.

.SELL.

PUBLISH AND

Bens sc23

WANTED

SUCCESSFUL AirTMOR PUBLISHER OF

book of rollicking ballad* seeks strong melody writer to collaborate 50-50 ba«is new song lyrics. Box B 331, Billboard, 165 W. 46th St.. New York. N. Y. 10036. Be23

AT LIBERTY Box oeZS

Minimum:

25c a word.

inch, $20. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED AD: Box rt>le around oil ads.

SS.

First

Each additional inch

1

line

set oil cops,

lame ad. i\5.

in

FREQUENCY DISCOUNTS: able,

5^o

3 consecutive interlioni, nonconcelloble, nonchange10"»; 13 or more conieculive discount; 6 iniertioni,

insertions,

p.m. Tuesday, 11 doys prior to dot* of iitue.

lervice charge per insertkin, payable in advance; olso oilow 10 additional words (at 25c per word) for box number and oddreis.

INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE ADVERTISING RATES Exchonge is open to oil adverliiers of foreign counlriei or American advertisers whose service or sales meitoge it ipecificolly directed toward on international market. SI

per

Minimum: 4

line.

DISPLAY CLASSIFIED AD: S14 per discounts at obove apply.

inch.

Minimum:

lines 1

per insertion.

Some frequency

inch.

PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY ALL ORDERS SEND ORDERS tiling

(.

PAYMENTS TO: John

Director,

BillboorcJ,

O'Neill, Inli-rnallonal

18S W. Randolph

Andra de V«key, European

Director,

7,

St.,

Exchange Adver.

Chicago,

Welbeck

St.,

III.

60601, or

London W.

1,

England.

PIASTERS WANTED: HOLLYWOOD record company needi hit records. Heward and guaranteed exposure offered. Take 6 420.

Inc..

6565

Hollywood.

Sunset Blvd., Suite de9

Calif.

Classified Advertising

Department

BILLBOARD MAGAZINE 188 West Randolph Street Illinois 60601

National Record Promotion (You Record l»— Wc'lt Ptu( Itl

Chicago,

Music Makers Promotion Network * New York City *

Please run the classified ad copy

20 Years' DepervJable Service Brlte Stor, Cleveland, Ohio Covering All Mojor Cities, Nashville, Chicogo, Hollywood, Etc. * DISTRIBUTION ARRANGED * MAJOR RECORD LABEL CONTAaS * NATIONAL RADIO A T.V, COVfUCE * FOOKINC AGENT CONTACTS

rately) in

GeneralOfflce:

Send All

Records

music. So

Newbury, Ohio for Review to:

A room on the second floor Schmid's midlown Denver showroom has been set aside for

tape

JO

4-2211

NATIONAL RECORD PROMOTION & PUBLICITY CONSULTATION All questions aniwercd abniit Rrrordlnx. Distribution, Prinlini. Nhlpplnit.

:\luflr

Pnblblilnit.

PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT YOUR AD COPY IN THE ABOVE SPACE. FULL PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ORDER.

NAME

etc.

PRESSING N»

ADDRESS

.

Job Ion sniiil

DISTRIBUTION ARRANGED

-STATE-

cirr.

Type of

CODE-

ENCLOSED classified

REGULAR CLASSIFIED

HEADING

-ZIP

AMOUNT

AUTHORIZED BY

72

recorder

display.

A

dozen models are shown, including three nationally adverlised brands. The recorders are set a few inches apart along a waisthigh shelf on one wall of the room, with comfortable chairs on the other side which allow the customer to be sealed. Six salesmen the machines put through their paces. "We haven't found it neces-

sary to use any particular type of gimmick promotion," Harvey Schmid said. "Instead, we use a quarter-page newspaper ad about four times a year, and classified newspaper ads every week pointing out that we not only carry a full line of tape recorders, service them ourselves, and can match the tape recorder to the requirements. That latter point probably brings in as many prospects as any other."

Take

Home

When first

tape recorders were introduced, the 51 -year-old

Schmid Appliance Co. immediately saw the possibilities, and set out on an unusual training program. Located upstairs on the same level as the tape recorder showroom is a model kitchen, used both for demonstration and informal sales meetings with coffee and doughnuts. At every meeting a tape recorder was brought in, used to record Then the tape was all talk. played back to point up the machine's usefulness and such tech-

volume

placement of the the right sort of to use, etc. At one time

Demonstration

Newbunr. Ohio f216l

play up the fact is a never-

of

Brlte-Star. 1488 1 Overlook,

CALL: Cleveland

we

ending source of amusement and usefulness, along with its musicreproduction capabilities."

or another every salesman has taken the tape recorder home to record his children's voices, experiment with such accessories telephone pickups, foot as switches, extra speakers, double microphones with mixers, stereo recordings, etc. This personal training put enthusiasm and confidence mto sales approach.

issue(s):

.

Mailing Address: .,

involved,

microphone, (or enclosed sepa-

ao9 Slahlman Bidg., Nashville. Tenn.

Ov erlook Dr

Har-

DESIRED:

show

the usefulness of the tape recorder as a dictating machine equipped with a foot switch. Surprisingly, that's a use for the

machine which doesn't occur to many buyers. Then, where an executive of a large firm menare

there

that

lions

frequent

we always equipped microphones, which makes it simple to put one microphone at each end of the table and record every person at the table at just about the same sound level. We usually sell tape recorders to businessmen for full list price, and for cash, once they understand the versatility conferences,

sales

show

a stereo model,

with

two

of the machine in this category." There is no such thing as a "typical tape recorder customer" according to the Schmid brothers, who sell students, pensioners, businessmen, music students, and professional men. The only pattern which does exist is the steady traffic of tape recorder prospects, stunt often used by salesmen is the starting of several recorders simultaneously, all turned to "record" while a demonstration is going on, and the prospect is listening to his own voice, that of a salesman, a bit of music, sound demonstration tapes, etc. When time comes to

A

make up

his mind which model buy, the recordings which have been simultaneously made usually without the prospect paying much attention to them are played back to demonstrate the quality level of each machine. Recorders are suggested for

to

— —

parties, for recording children's for correspondence, school use, church use, for businessmen who want to study their own diction and speech delivery,

voices,

well music. as

as

"Nobody

for

dictating

and

the separate

leaves

upstairs showroom without a real appreciation of the many things which a tape recorder can

do," Harvey said. "Because we give such a thorough demonstration, we have never found it necessary to loan out a machine for a weekend, to set up any sort of a rental program, or to use price discounts to meet compe-

We

tition.

can

sell

300

units a

year on this basis, most of them for cash, and we feel that the dealer, whose salesmen who are accustomed to bigticket units, is the best qualified

appliance

retailer of all."

nical angles as

shown below

* MAGAZINE-NEWSPAPER PUILICITY * RECO RD PRESSING

148B1

first,"

considerations

International

REGULAR CLASSIFIED AD:

PROFESSIONAL LECTURER. SPEAKER. Doctor of Divinity. Cultural, meUWill travel. 112. Brownsville, Brooklyn. N. Y.

demos and masters, all new mitrrial. Write: Jim-Bar Talents, Inc., 414 W. 14th St., Ttfton, Ga. se30 Have

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES REGULAR CLASSIFIED AD:

CLOSING DATE: 5 BOX NUMBER: 50c

on

physical, social, etc.

trv artists, seeking recording contracts.

se23

02101.

ARL CURRV AND JIM THEVS. COUN-

I

Professional record your own songs. methods. Information free. Ace Publishing. Box 64, Dept. 2, Boaton. Mass.



Will pay moving expenses to Des Moines, Iowa. Top wages for experienced man; we have been in businrsa 35 years. Box 32B. Billboard. 188 W. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. se23

SITUATIONS

the flexibility, versausefulness

Room

INDEPENDENT RECORD LABEX. Lo-

cated In New York City, needs Man to supervise fhlpments, control Inventory, assist In record production. Experience In record industry preferred. Write background and salary required. Ek>x 727. Billboard, 165 W. 46th St., New York, N. Y. 10036.

con-

that a tape recorder

!

RF-CORDIN-t; ARTISTS WITIl MASTER. We will produce, press, promote and distribute intenAllonally your record!.. Fee S2S(I and S<' commission on each sold. Or place your masters material with major record company, fee tlOO. (Fee in advance only.) Thunder Record Co.. P. O. Box 271. Jenklntown. Pa. 19046.

DIESEL, MBCHANI-

Able to read SchcmaUc*. All equipment jukeboxes, shuffle alleys, Raney Music, 52fi N. Carver,

away from any game like Stamp Co., Lanesboro, Minn.

other

'

UNITED STATES

BAND BUS— CMC

25-38.

etc.

sell

and all-round tility, of the tape recorder

degree

BOX 737 1«5 W. 4«th St., New York, N. Y. 100M EXPERIENCED MAN WANTED, ACE

a

such as stereo phonographs, the convenience of individual records, etc., to dwell on the tape recorder as a source of ideal

SINGLE.

company

a

or related experience in the record industry, to handle publisher or artist Position Involve* royally accuunllne. direct contact with publishent and artExecutive advancement opportuniists. Please Hcnd resume of education, ties. experience and salary required to an

late

NEW

STONES'

'•Dandelion." out end of August, $1.75 airmailed. Stones' all-new cut* album, September. $6 airmailed. r xoerted Order yours now for airmailing on release date: Beatles' 16-cut oldlcs. Ilendrix. Plrjk noyd. or any other EnfUsh album from Record Centre. Ltd,, Nuntfn eaton. England.

Airnlanc. Ilratlcs (Sgt. Pepper). Doors 311(1 33 mare. These posters are all new. not previously released. Send for free Kiim^Ies of these big ornf It making Ili-mi'. Take-6. Inc.. Dent. B. 6565 Sunset

WANTED

HBLP

tfn

11510.

POSTER nisTRinirroRS wanted— The big teen craie is lo pouters, and we have them all. Including Jefferson

EMPLOYMENT SECTION

I

FOR SALE: ONE OF THE LARGEST discotheques in Europe. 2 dance floors. 4 bars, capacity for 1.500. situated In a central tourist area on the Costa Brava, Spain. Constitutes a sound Investment with a very high seasonal turnover. For further details write to Box No. 61, Welbeck, London W.l, 7 Billboard, tfn England.

Pnnlrl Crescent. Baldwin Harbor, N. Y.

sell

vey Schmid said. "The tape recorder is a fine source of music, of course, particularly where stereo models are concerned, but that's only a small part of the picture. There are loo many

Derbyshire, England.

COMEDY

LINES! 35.000 PROFESSIONAL 40 Books, plus Current Comedy, the loplcal gag service, Catalog free. SaraRobert Orben, 3536 nle selection, $5.

here,

300 tape recorders per

year in price brackets ranging from $179.50 lo $300.

ENGLAND EIRST CLASS GIT AR ANTKi:i> AIRMAIL service on British records to V. S. A. IT.K. albums S6 All titles available. All each, additional albums only S5. 24-haur service. breakages replaced. Free catalogue. Heanor Record Center.

16151 255-4163

West

Co.

pliance sistent

and Harvey

who head Schmid Ap-

Schmid,

NASHVILLE. TENN/S most convenient motel. Close to recording studios and business: courtesy cor strvice; 24-twur telephone; 100% oir conditioned; heated; swimming pool.

MOTEL ANCHOR del6 70W End

DISTRIBUTING SERVICES

How 300

INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE

Retailing

Appliance Dealer Sells Tape Units Annually

ad desired

—-checl<

one DISPLAY CLASSIFIED

Most customers are attracted simply by the regular advertising of the three top brands. The 51 -year-old reputation of the Schmid store, which is concentrated on high-end merchandise throughout its entire history, is a big help, as is the ability of the store to give an unconditional guarantee on everything it sells.

"When we

those facts are estab-

simply go through an active demonstration," Schmid said, "which might take as much as an hour, or even longer, depending upon the customer. One thing we always do, where a businessman is concerned, is to lished,

P-B, Telex In

Merger Move

LOS ANGELES Bell



PackardCorp. of Los Telex Corp. of

Electronics

Angeles and Tulsa agreed

in

principle

last

week (7) to merge in a stock and cash transaction amounting to about

$40 million.

Packard-Bell's

chief

business

is production of television sets, radios and phonographs. These poducts account for about 80 per cent of volume.

The

California

firm

is

ex-

pected to be the surviving corpoRoger M. Wheeler, chairman of Telex, the largest stockholder in the combined opration, with

eration.

A

merger attempt in 1966 beand the tween Packard-Bell Singer Co.. with Singer the surviving corporation, fell through. Packard-Bell, headed by Dr.

Wendell B. Sell, president and chief executive officer, reported 1966 sales of $45.3 million and earnings of $1.04 million.

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

Coin Machine News

MOA

Show

Exhibits

iniiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinwiH^

Julcebox Firms CHICAGO

CHICAGO—The



It'll be a very big show. Seven labels, six playback equipment makers, three

machine

video

17

distributors,

amusement game firms and

a

score of allied product suppliers have reserved space. The 54 firms signed will fill every inch of exhibit space at the Pick-Congress Hotel. And if another firm comes in, the show sponsor, the AmerOperators of music

(MOA), may have

ica

to

sur-

its own booth. Most important from the operator viewpoint, there will be new equipment shown by

render

FRED GRANGER, executive vice-president of the Music Operators of America (MOA), was busy last weel< signing exhibitor contracts for the MOA trade show to be held at Chicago Oct. 27-29. A flood of late registrants brought the total of exhibitors to 61, the highest in the history of the association trade show.

Arizona Twin-Meet

An

Historical Event

SCOTTSDALE,

— Ad-

Ariz.

vance reservations indicate the annual meetings of the State's vending and jukebox-amusement game associations will be the biggest in each organization's history.

The Arizona Automatic Merchandising Association will hold its convention here Sept. 29-30 at the Safari Hotel, while the coin machine organization will meet Oct. 1 at the same site. The coin machine association, formed in 1953, will be reorganized after several years of dormancy, says Stan Beasley, executive with Garrison Sales Co., Phoenix, and a member of the organization's board of trustees.

Music Operators of America (MOA) President James Toli-

MOA

sano, Past President of

J.

Harry Snodgrass of Albuquerque, N. M., and Executive Vice-President Fred Granger will attend the one-day meet

MOA

ing.

The

Automatic

Merchandis-

ing Association will hear reports public relations, public health and legislation during its

on

two-day meeting, according to Gerald L. Roseland, president of the vending group. Gov. Jack Williams (R-Ariz. will be featured speaker at the

banquet Sept. 29.

association's

FAMA

6

in

WEST PALM BEACH,

—The

Fla.

district

Florida

& Music Association meetings will be held

Amusement

(FAMA) here Sept.

19.

It

is

hoped

that

Beverage Director Don Mickeljohn, who addressed a meeting in Tampa reState

similar cently,

FAMA in

executive director Ju-

Sturm,

lius

Miami

in

last

week

preparation for another dis-

meeting there Sept. 21, said two more such sessions will be trict

held in October. One will be in Jacksonville and another in Florida's

Panhandle area.

"Our idea

for setting up disis to involve key officers, over our 1968 legislative plans and build up trict

meetings

FAMA

our membership," Sturm said. Sturm, who reported he is personally contacting all

over

the

State,

SEPTEMBER

23,

Phoenix, vice-president; Sam Robinson, Robinson Bros. Sales, Phoenix, secretary-treasurer. The t>oard of trustees include: Red Arnold of Arnold Music, Sal DeBruno of Sal's Music, Joe Koffman of Valley Vendors, Stan Beasley of Garrison Sales Co. and Paul DeSanti of Westside

Amusement.

Officers of the Automatic Merchandising Association are: Gerald L. Roseland, Watkins Cigarct Service, Phoenix, president; Art Kaufman, Valley Vendors, Stan Beasley of Garrison Sales Co. and Paul DeSanti of Westside Amusement. The board of directors include:

operators said,

1967,

"We

to introduce a host of at the show, according to Billboard. (See issue of Sept. 2, 1967, page 71, for an exclusive report.) Record manufacturers prom-

going

new models

in

stress

to

ise

exhibits

their

(Continued on page SI)

Jay Kindred, Kindred Music Co., Ajo; Claude Sharpensteen Jr.,

AA

Amusement,

land,

Kaufman and

Meets

joining

highlight of the meetings ha sbeen briefings by the beverage director on flipper game free plays and the operation of

coin-operated pool tables. At an Orlando meeting, Cecil Sewell. Mickcljohn's executive assistant, spoke when .his boss couldn't appear. Another topic has been approval of some dozen

FAMA

bills

Sturm

is

drawing up

in

preparation for the 1968 Florida General Assembly. counsel Leonard Pepper, who is on constant standby, has also been reviewing the legislative plans.

BIUBOARD

Speakers At W. Va. Convention CHARLESTON, W. Va.— Ranking State government officials and lop representatives of the nation's two major coin machine operator associations will address the

FAMA

annual conven-

West Virginia MuVending Association

and

(WVMVA)

LAST-MINUTE

SHOW SIGNINGS CHICAGO



By press time, another seven exhibitors had signed for the Music Operators of America (MOA) Oct. 27-29 convention and trade show. They are Discomatic, Inc.. Dilly (jukebox); Switzerland Vender. Bahama Islands vending units); Coin-

Disk

(record

Op Computor.

(knowledge skill game); Kiddie Karousel, Hopkins, Minn, (kiddie ride); Rolens Star, Sterling. III. (speaker unit); Teny'-Gregory-Airtown Record Co., Richmond, Ind. Detroit

P. Z. P. Associates. Cheshire. Conn, (table soc-

here Sept. 21-23.

sistant

tional

legislative council, NaAutomatic Merchandising

Association, and Chester Shanklin, deputy director of the cigaret and soft drink division of the State tax department are scheduled to address members of the association. 1 2-year-old

Business meetings, an exhibit of equipment and a big banquet and floor show are scheduled for the convention, to be Heart-O'-Town at the held Motel.

The

program

Thursday,

Inc.,

"Dutch" dinnir

may

have hang from the ceiling if more keep coming in," said Granger, of the tremendous interest building for "I

exhibits

to

Pick Congress Hotel event.

iMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiniiiiiiiRliliinniiiiiiiiriiiriil

guests set

invited.

Expect

600

MONTICELLO,



tives

are expected

here

at

the

Laurel Country Club Sept. 2224 as the Music Operators of

New York (MONY) The annual outing

MONY New

will

find

joined by the Weslches-

Operators

ler

celebrates

anniversary.

30lh

its

York

Guild State

and

the

Operators

A

Guild. golf tourney, softball and other recreational activities will dominate the weekend's activities.

Most

New York

City-based record companies and nearly all record distributors and one-stops

have representatives here. Manufacturers of amusement machines, jukeboxes and vending equipment and distributor personnel will make up another will

impressive

list

of guests.

Record people known to have advance registrations in were Don England, Mike Volksent

on

begins

with 21, 6 p.m. with

Sept. at

officers, directors,

members and

Exhibitors

may

up their displays at that time, At 7 p.m. on Thursday the

too.

officers

and directors will have registration

at Big

at 9 a.m. on Friday, and the exhibits will open at the same hour. At 11:30 a.m. a buffet luncheon will be served, compliments of the distributors. The first general session will convene at 7 p.m. on Friday with President J. C. (Buddy) Hunt at the rostrum. Officers

be elected, and talks delivered by Shanklin, legislative committee chairman Guy Moss and Billboard Coin Machine edi-

Ray Brack. Introductions be handled by Andrew Kniska, vice-president. On Saturday. Sept. 23, ex-

tor will

and

hibits

registration will

open

At 11:30 another at 9 a.m. buffet lunch will be hosted by the distributors, followed by a general membership meeting at 2 p.m. at which Granger and Brandstrader will speak. At 6 p.m. cocktails will be served, dinner at 7 followed by a stageshow. The welcoming address for the evening will be by Charleston chief of police Dallas Bias. Entertainment will be by George Bailey and dance music will be provided by the Collegians.

On are J.

the convention committee

Bill

A.

Leoma

a business meeting.

Convention

commence

will

Fred M. Granger, executive the Music of

vice-president

Operators of America (MOA), William R. Brandstrader, as-

(records);

cer game).

iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiimiiniii

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiinnniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^

MOA, NAMA

By

have overlapped in vending and also belong to the Florida Automatic Vending Council." are

New York Stock Exchange. Rowe's present management will be retained, Menger said.

has

sic

N. Y. Some 600 coin machine industry and record company execu-

responsible for carrying through. Right now, we're past the 12Smember mark. Many operators

who

was

field." Triangle, a fabricator of tubing, pipe and 12 plants in seven States and is listed on the

sumer

Purcell.

have set up membership goals in each dislict with key officers

fields."

S. Menger said that the the firm's "first major diversification into the conwire products,

Triangle President and Chairman Carl acquisition

Yuma;

Spencer Hoops, Gila Electric Music Co., Safford; Richard Garver, Canteen, Tucson; Rose-

&

&

tion of the

the

One

attend.

will

Offlcers Officers of the jukebox-amuse, ment games association arc: Ben Spalding, Spalding Sales Phoenix, president; Co., Bill Watts, Valiant Amusement Co.,

vending and service

food,

iiiiiiiiiiii

most of the equipment manufacturers. Seeburg and RockOla have just introduced models and Wurlitzer and Rowe are hinting that they'll have new models ready by show time. Game manufacturers are also

and a general membership

29,

meeting followed by a golf tournament on Sept. 30 at the Scottsdale Country Club.

District

third in a series of regu-

semi-annual

lar

Also on the agenda will be a board of directors meeting Sept.

acquisition of the Rowe Manufacturing DiCable Co., Inc., Canteen Corp. by Triangle Conduit of Newark, N. J. has been approved in principle. Subject to negotiation and signing of a definitive agreement and approval by Triangle's stockholders. Canteen will reportedly receive in excess of $30 million in cash, and Triangle securities, for the Rowe division. Rowe, which does over $40 million in annual sales, produces jukeboxes, background music units and vending machines. Canteen President Patrick L. O'Malley said the sale, "Is in keeping with Canteen's long-range plans for concentration in the

vision of

Anderson. W. T. Cruze, Wallace, Buddy Hunt, Ballard and Marie Kauf-

will

MONY

Outing

BRUCE WEBER

Frank Compana, Nick Barnc and Lou Weinstein, Columbia; Phil Wesson and Herb Goldfarb, London; SESAC's Sid Guber; Mickey Addix, Dot; Eric

Secretary Mrs. Gertrude Brown, Treasurer Mac Douglas and attorney Lou Werner. (Our 30lh anniversary salute starts on page 74). lo

Berney, A-1 Silverman.

iinniiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiii

ovitsch,

Distributing;

son.

MONY

Phil

Bruno-New York, and John Halonka, Beta Distrib-

utors.

MONY

Current officers of are President Al Denver; Vice-President George Hollzman, Secretary Bill Kobler, Treasurer Gil Sonin. Directors arc Mervyn Siskind. Albert Arnold, Leonard Irving Block, David Sachs,

Doc Shapiro. Albert Herman and Ben Rubin. Ben Fenichel.

Chicofsky is general manager and Ted Blalt is attorney. Officers of the Westchester Operators Guild are President Carl Pavesi. Vice-President and Treasurer Louis Tartaglia, and Secretary Seymour Pollak. New York State Operators Guild officers are President Mike Mulquecn, Vice-President Jack Wil-

'I'LL

RETURN/

SAYS WALLACE CHICAGO — "I'm on my way

to the Orient," said

Music

Operators of America (MOA) board chairman John. Wallace at a stopover at O'Hare Airport here last week, "but you can bet I'll be back in time for the convention. I never miss the convention, and I certainly don't want to miss this best will be the one. It convention ever." The will be held in Chicago at the Oct. Hotel Pick - Congress

MOA

MOA

27-29. tllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinilMIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIII

73

Coin Machine News

MONY By

o

BRUCE CORY

N

Oct. 6, 1947, a handful of Manhattan music operators met at the Brctton Hotel Hall, convinced that their problems "should be met through the medium of combined strength." Representatives from Boro Automatic, Maxwell Music, Ernest Caray Automatic Co., Noonan Amusement joined Alfred Broome, G. E. Brigs, L. Rosenberg and others at this first gathering. They contracted Michael J. Levy, an attorney for the National Cigaret Merchandiser Association and the National Cigaret Merchandise Association of New York, to serye as legal counsel, set their first meeting for Oct. 20, and adjourned. This first gathering was the genesis of the Music Operators of New York (MONY), 30 years old this fall. The organization, headquartered at 250 W. 57 Street,

New York, started with some 15 members. Today, 100 operators are part of MONY. Over the years, it has served as watchdog for and booster of Manhattan operators.

Rubinow That first gathering was followed by several weeks of further planning sessions. The first elections were held Nov. 13 at the Broadway Central Hotel. Lee Rubinow was elected president; William Suesens. viceprfesident; William Albert, treasurer, and Alfred (King of Harlem) Bloom, secretary. Messrs. Bogin, Dandio, Fcinstein, Wes,serman

and Tucker were elected

to the

board of directors and Sidney Levine was named legal counsel to the Automatic Music Operators Association. name was changed to in 1952.) The association was bom into a music world very different from the one we know today. Radio was live, bands were big, and records were 78 r.p.m. The Dorseys, Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman were the big names in music. Harry James was still unknown. So was

MONY

(Its

Frank Sinatra. The operators' first social, a dance, held Oct. 30, 1938, in the grand ballroom of American Women's Association, featured entertainment by Fats Waller, the Merry Macs and Les Brown's

his singer,

the

band,

ALBERT

S.

DENVER, long-time president

of the Music Operators of

New

among

others.

A note struck in 1938 was to become a familiar one in MONY's history. Magistrate L. Brodsky on Feb. 25 decided against the right of unions to picket locations in which non-union machines were located. John's Bar and Grill on West 41 Street, and Garay were the

York.

The court reasoned that since Oaray did own work and employed no labor, he did not have belong to a union, and was therefore out of labor's By March 1939, however, pickets of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 786 were once again marching in front of locations with Garay machines, claiming the decision had been based on misleading signs and had not been an injunction against picketing. Labor difficulties were to plague complainants. his

to

jurisdiction.

Manhattan

for

filled the role

many

years,

and

MONY

frequently

of arbiter.

By

1940, the Automatic Music Operators Associahad weathered the difficulties of its first three years and was slowly growing. The October social gathering was fast becoming a regular event on the tion

New York

calendar, that year featuring entertainment

by Kay Kyser and band, Dinah Shore, Eddie Duchin and Ella Fitzgerald among a host of other big names. Rubinow and Bloom had become the mainsprings of the organization.

Any Bonds Today? But the future of the association was being shaped When the annual dance was held that fall, Poland, France and Denmark had already fallen, and all but out of the war. Russia was mopping up the last resistance in Finland. The Battle of Britain was about to begin. As the threat of war drew closer, a patriotic fervor swept the U. S. Kate Smith's version of "God Bless America" had been one of the biggest jukebox sellers of the year. The week of Nov. 9-15, 1941, was designated Phonographs-for-Defense week, and a campaign began that fall to put Irving Berlin's "Any Bonds Today?" on every machine in the country. New York operators were in the forefront of the campaign to put this record, commissioned by the Treasury Department to help sell defense bonds, on in Europe.

Norway was

No. 1 spot in the nation's phonographs. Billboard estimated that more than 100 million citizens heard the song during one week in November. When the week ended. Pearl Harbor was 22 days away. The attack threw industry, as well as the entire nation, into the fight. Automatic phonograph production was cut to 25 per cent by Feb. 1, 1942, and jukebox manufacturers immediately began converting their factories for wartime production. The war years were years of retrenchment for the New York operators, as well as the music industry in general. New machines became unobtainable. A shellac shortage caused rationing for the record companies, and cutbacks in record production. And to add to these woes. President James Petrillo of the American Federation of Musicians in 1942 declared a ban against union (Continued on page 75) the

74

DISTRIBUTOR VETERAN Johnny

FORMER OPERATOR Ben

Bllotta, right, was honored at a MONY meeting several years ago; Is here congratulated by Jack Wilson, Modern Vending, Newburgh, N. Y.

sky

was sworn

in

secretary in 1959.

as

Chicof-

MONY's

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967,

BlUBOARD

Coin Machine News •

Continued from

A compromise of sorts was finally reached when Supreme Court Justice Ferdinand Pecora decided that convertibility of coin-operated games to give free games was grounds for outlawing. With a definition of legality finally in their hands, the city Department of Licensing and machine operators thrashed out their differences and licensing of amusement games after a thorough testing by police to prove that skill and not chance was the deciding factor in the game, began

74

paf;e

members making records to be played in jukeboxes or over small radio stations and demanded the use of union musicians in hotels and places of recreation. Record production by the major companies came to a (One off-shoot of this ban was the string-pulling and coaxing needed to persuade Petrillo to allow Benny Goodman and his sextet to perform at the October banquet of the Music Operators Association.) Not until October 1943 did Petrillo and the industry come to terms, and production resumed. halt.

once again.

The years following these stormy post-war growing pains were comparatively quiet. The birth of Israel inspired Al Denver, Levine, Charles Aronson, Arthur Herman, Nash Gordon, and others to throw themselves

Quiet Change

But the years of stagnation were also years of quiet change in the record industry, changes prompted by the shifts in the music audience. The need for workers in the war factories of northern cities brought people to them from rural areas all over the country, many from the South. Country and western, or "hillybilly" or "folk" music as it was then called, became increasingly popular. "Hillbilly" music consisted mostly of cowboy and spiritual songs in those days, but the classic "Born to Lose" was also a product of the war years. In the same way, "race" records by Negro artists were in greater demand. And with the record shortage, operators were willing to put these songs, along with standards on played before.

old

machine where they were

into the United Jewish Appeal campaign and their efforts included a $19,000 dinner in September 1951.

was the city's need for additional revenue and its machine tax plans to raise it. A $25 tax was placed on jukeboxes and a $3 to SS levy was placed on each amusement game. According to Levine, the city obfrom Manhattan's 10,000 music tion

never

machines.

Labor problems came back in 1947.

York

On

State

to trouble the operators July 5, the Appellate Division of the New that it was legal for

Supreme Court ruled

of

unions to picket locations not serviced by union memthe group in question again being the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 786. had The union charged that members of the made an effort to prevent them from servicing the machines, but the court dismissed the charge.

AMOA

Reflecting the fine job that Denver had done and the concern over the new problems facing them, the 200 operators represented at the Nov. 25 meeting reelected Denver by acclamation, and also sent Charles

Bemoff

Harry Wasserman

and

back into

(vice-president), Sal Trella (secretary)

Dead Nickel

A 1956,

office. In his report

membership, Denver said that 23 new members, whom had posted a $2,000 bond signifying his intention of abiding by the rules of the association, had joined in the last year, bringing the total number of bonded members to 172. He also predicted that once novelty of television had worn off and television the production had reached a stable level, further gains by each of

the jukebox industry could be made.

Berie and Baseball

large New 'V'ork operators to come out for the 10-cent, three-for-a-quarter play. "I think it is a good idea and that New York would go for it," he said. Bob Jacobs of Amusement Games, Inc., flatly stated, "It won't work." Wurlitzer announced its plans to convert to dime play that fall and the increasing cost of machinery and service were to sweep away opposition to first

Morris Kahn, Oscar Parkoff, Harold Roth, Al Simon and others. The years of tranquility came to an end in 1957, and Local with the spectacular battle between .

MONY

I960 of the Retail Clerks International Association (RCIA) (on the same side in this fight) and Locals 465 and 531 of the United Independent Unions. The two "paper" locals were accused of racketeering, coercion, strong-arm tactics and misappropriations of funds before Judge Samuel Hofstadter, April 18,1957. Denver charged Local 531 with attempting to take over the New York jukebox industry by force. According to Denver, the local had called a meeting of Manhattan operators in a restaurant in October 1956, and announced its intentions. Denver accused Local 531 of using strong-arm tactics on location owners. The case against Local 531 began May 16 before Judge Hofstadter. The McClcllan Committee of the U. S. Senate took up the investigation as the trial continued. On Aug. 2, in the midst of the trial and investigation, Sidney H. Levine died of a heart attack at the age of 53. He had

carried off.

Machine test

the

association attorneys prepared a case to of the police seizures, which, after

legality

delay, was admitted to the State Supreme Court. At the same time, an administration-backed bill to ban amusement machines on city locations was passed 12-10 by the City Council after a brawling, namecalling debate. The strong opposition to the bill was finally broken by an administration-bloc filibuster. Op-

some

the plan. threat to the jukebox industry appeared with the advent of television. In the years just after the war, when home television was a rarity, tavern patrons frequently decided they would rather watch a baseball game on television then listen to the phonograph. The entertainment hold jukeboxes had on such locations

new

ponents characterized the ordinance as a "disgraceful bill" and "a sham and a delusion," and councilman Edward Rager charged that "he had been more corrupted by councilmen's speeches than by pinball games."

was broken with a bang. Denver and counsel Levine urged a "well-thought out promotion campaign" to fight this threat.

Another new feature of the postwar machine

situa-

a gathering of

a

Amusement machine operators had their own problems that summer. Starting in the beginning of May, sudden police crackdowns struck machine owners and all forms of machines were carted off to the police station. Charges that the coin industry was a racket run by gangsters and ex-convicts rankled Manhattan operators. Many shared the experience that one Manhattan owner had when he passed a location with one of his machines in it, saw a crowd gathering outside it, and entered just in time to see his machine being

might work if "it were System, Inc., done on a new machine that looked new," but remained skeptical about the change-over. Stephan Hodge of Stephan Hodge Music Co. was one of the

when

gathering drive for the benevolent organization became major concern for members of MONY, men like Bcrnie Boorstein, Tom Greco, Abe Green, Ben Haskell,

The leveling off, however, did not come soon. Although the number of home sets began to increase noticeably, operators still complained of profits lost to Milton Berle and baseball in 1948.

it

was posted in January more than 200 operators

sign of the changing times

from the New York area held a forum on dime play and decided that nickel play was all but dead. The only locations left with 5-cent play were ones with 20 and 24-selection machines, where the jukeboxes were left in only "for old times' sake." They agreed that the result of conversion to dime play had been fewer service calls for greater dollar volume. The early 1950's, years of quiet growth and prosperity for the organization and its members, was also marked by the growth of the bond between the United Jewish Appeal and the coinmen. The annual fund

(treasurer),

to the

Problems

of the war brought new prospects and new problems to the association. As President Al Denver explains it, "A lot of new machines and fresh young blood were coming into the industry." The operators began a stepped-up drive for new members with personal contact and letters to nearly every New York operator. "And," said Denver, "it paid off. The membership began to swell fast." Postwar inflation hit the jukebox industry just like everyone else, and the great debate of nickel vs. dime play began. Most New York operators were wary of dime play at first. Harold Aronson of Popular Music

New York (MONY).

Dorothy Wolk, who had seen membership climb from 95 to 175 in her seven years as secretary, retired to take up the duties of a wife in 1953. The entertainment names had changed too. The stars of the 1955 banquet included Harry Belafonte, Frankie Laine, Georgia Gibbs and Les Paul and Mary Ford.

bers,

The end

A

camps. Special television coverage, like the Kefauyer crime commission hearings, still drew juke location patrons away from the machines, but the threat of television, once considered so pressing, faded into the background. The association continued to grow and prosper and Denver was continually rewarded for his efforts by being re-elected each time his term came up. The annual banquet continued to grow, too, 600 attending in 1950, 700 in 1951, 900 in 1952, 1,000 in 1954. Probably the most lasting event of these years was the name change from the Automatic Music Operators Association to the familiar Music Operators of

all

gathering included the note "Arthur and Albert Herman were drinking everything but the real stuff." On Nov. II, 1944, Albert was informed that his brother Lieut. Milton Herman had been shot down

thought that

(left)

tained only $250,000

Another development was the comparative youth of of the jukebox patrons during the war. "Teen-age clubs" sprang up all over the country (and folded just as fast after war's end), and the jukebox was the center of every club. They were hailed' as the answer to the rising tide of juvenile delinquency. The teens preferred the hot jazz of artists like Dizzy Gillespie to the big band sound. The sixth annual banquet was held in 1943 at the Waldorf-Astorial Hotel, and was the biggest one yet. Four hundred and ten guests attended and the usual big-name talent was on hand. Billboard's story on the

New Guinea. New Prospects,

Denver

Al

many

over Dutch

Denver also planned a raffle in June 1949 to help relieve the suffering of displaced persons in European

the attorney who guided congratulated by president during a meeting in the 1950's.

THE LATE SIDNEY LEVINE, MONY for so many years, was

continued as council for

The

organization,

MONY

now 20

since

November

1947.

years old, had grown (Continued on page 79)

niiiiMmiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiPiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii^^

CONVENTION PROGRAM

NeWi

Roto Magic Feather Touch

Mechanism

Here is the schedule of meetings for the Music Operators of America (MOA) convention Oct. 27-29 in Chicago. All meetings and exhibits will

be

Pick-Congress Hotel.

at the

FRIDAY, OCT. 27

— — 3 p.m. — Exhibits 3:30 p.m. — Industry

9 a.m. Exhibits and registration open. 12 noon Ladies' Luncheon.

"How

to

• NO More Service problems

close.

on

Seminar.

Two

parts: (I)

A

• NO Jamming • NO Cheating • Just a Sure Money Maker

manufacturer

Make Money With Games" and

(2) a

forum

of record artists on "How a Record Is Made." Evening Hospitality suites open.

— —

SATURDAY, OCT,

28

Exhibits and registration open. 9 a m. membership meeting (with brunch). 11:30 a.m. 5 p.m. Exhibits close. Evening Hospitality suites open.



—MOA

— SUNDAY, OCT. 29 10 a.m. — Exhibits and p.m. — Exhibits 6 p.m. —Cocktail hour. 7 p.m. — Annual Banquet

registration open.

3

close.

Write for FREE Color Brochure or Phone (201) 228-2700

"CORONET'V.M.

Shu/Jlchoard and Stage Show.

& Billiard Co.

Pecan — now 46"x78" • —

Available in White and in these sizes: Cor.

NATIONAL

I

— 49"x84" —

I



Cor. Ill 4-x8' 4V2'x9- PRO.

dept. b

1275 BLOOMFIELD AVE., FAIRFIELD,

A

N.

J.

Cor.

PRO.

also

Cor.

II



52"x92"

Cor.

IV



07006

niiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH

SEPTEMBER

23,

75

1967, BILIBOARD

Cl

jteriEll

Ending News New

Suggest —

WASHINGTON

Cigaref Excise

Anti-

said

smoking forces may put new federal excises on cigarets. Sen. Robert Kennedy (D., N. Y.) is

end

he would like to see an to cigaret advertising on the

air,

eventually.

urging legislation to tax cigarets on a sliding scale, depending on the amount of tar and nicotine content, which would be stated in the label under requirements

of another

The

bill.

battle against increase in

During

last

ference on

climaxed proposed cut back the

air.

week's World ConSmoking and Health

New York

and

cigaret,

aluminum cigarets,

the

require

prevent

far to the

where

cigaret

tars

come most concentrated. Under the proposed

cigaret

the tax increase

would

tax

bill,

not hit brands with less than 10 milligrams of tar and 0.8 milligrams of nicotine these



G)inmen N.W. Model *: T( or U .. fU.SO N.W. Dslux*, l< or U Comb. li.oo N.W. tO-Col. \t Tab Gum M*ch. It.DO .

.

Atr*s

l( I. %t 100 Ct. Ball 8 lb. Glob*

Oum

13.00 10.50

,

Jumbo Quttn,

» .« Rtd Jumbo Qucon, V7 White Afocn Crown Rod Lip Plitochie

Pistachio Nuts,

Nuts Affon Princo Rod Lip Nuts Cashew, Wholo Cashew, Butts

"

Plitoctiio

57 B3 79

Jumbo

Peanuts, Spanish

45

« M 3S

Mkxed Nuts Baby Chichi Rainbow Peanuts Bridge Mix Boiton Bailed

32 32 33

Beans

.33

Jelly

Licorice

M A

Gems

M, 500

33 4t

,

«t

Mwnchiet, i*-tb. carton, per Herihey-eti

a.

Sen. Warren Magnuson (D., Wash.), chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee has already introduced a bill requiring all cigaret labels and advertising to di.sclose amounts of tar and nicotine, according to government standards to be set up by the Federal Trade Commis-

sion.

lb.

Pal,

4M

pes.



dampening

spirits.

Pete Gerite, president of MounDistributing Co., is leaving early in September for a tour of Hong Kong, Singapore and Japan. Gcritz, a veteran Rock-Ola distributor, has won numerous overseas jaunts in sales drives. First, he toured Continental Europe with several other prize- winning dealers. The following year he won a similar sojourn in Isreat and the Middle East, visiting many of the areas which developed into "trouble spots" shortly afterward. Now. the Denver old-timer will be add-

.39

47

The News culture to

his

operators with headquarters in the high mountain area of Durango, Colo.

lohnny Knight, prexy of Skyline Music Co., in suburban Lakewood, has announced that the company will continue the same name, although all music routes have be to Continental Music Co., headed by Bob Rothberg. Knight

sold will

confine his operations entirely

vending

to

and candy

in cigaret hereafter.

brackets

Eugene Zlgman, partner with Zollan Gancz in Cheyenne Music Co. of Cheyenne. Wyo.. reported himself thoroughly pleased with volume during Frontier Days, which drew more than 100,000 visitors

Cheyenne.

to

..tT4.00

.

Jim Hall of Pueblo Music Co.. Pueblo, Colo., was another visitor, attending shows.

new

product

-

Guests of Pete Gerilz

at

Moun-

tain Distributors during his recent

Rock-ola showing included Smith of Colorado Springs, Lewis McClung of Yuma, Colo., Claude

Esh of Acme Cigaret Service in Colorado Springs, Dan Woodruff from Las Animas, Colo., Charles Lauthem from Casper, Wyo., Paul Scott of Lander, Wyo., and Joe Spackman of Cheyenne, Wyo. All

Write Complela line of Stands, Globes,

Everything for the operator.

One Third Deposit, Balance

several

new

CHARMS AND CAPSULES." for complete li»t. Parts, Supplies, Brackets.

In

Phonograph shopping in Denver, and taking a look at the 1968 models were Don and Roy Kaiser,

.

CCD.

are active operators.

IMMEDIATE DEIIVERY

VICTOR VENDORAMA

Geritz announced that his son will report for Navy duty shortly, for a two-year lour, after a simitar amount of lime in the

Jim

CHARM

Va. Vendors

in

Charms attract kids kids mean profits!

— and Large-

and frontshowcase

displays charms. Up-to-date design gives you an attractive

Cireuiar anti Prltes. Folders, lowest Prices, Write

that's

in

swing

the younger generaProven mechanism, chute and foolproof unit

tion.

Write tor BeautHul Illustrated

unit

wide coin

With

makes

this

one

A-OK. No skipping or crushing of merchandise! Start

moving to profit with the Model 60 Capsule Vendor. Wire, write or phone for complete details.

NORTHWESTERN AND SERVICE MOe MANDEIL

SALES 446

W

36th

Sf

.

Utw

CO.

York 10. N. Y

lOngocre 4-6467

CORPORATION

Attending Wurlitzer service schools under the direction of field engineer Leonard Hicks: Don Aken Continental Music, Denver; Edward Bronish, Roger Wiesc, R. L. Hayhurst, Peter Baros, Larry Lindsay and George Wyscaver, Midwest Music, Denver; Chuck Estta, Acme Music, Colorado Springs; Lloyd Cleary, Al Roenfehet, Trav. les Byrd. Bob Bell, Bruce FerguHenry

Saltang-

ghi and Chitosbi Yashida,

Modern

sen, Yosfa Furuige,

Music, Denver;

75% on servicing costs.

VICTOR VENDING CORP. 5703-13 W. Grand Ave. Chicago,

Named

Morris,

Phon.; WHitncv 2-13M

III.

III.

60639

tional

activities

were

VENDORS

ARULMLIS STIMULATOR IN ANY LOCATION

planned

The meeting was

Beautiful ey*-

organized by Jack Bess, Roanoke, executive secretary.

catching

Makes mvrchindlM

design.

AVAV

Bess is also executive secretary of the Music Operators of Virginia which is scheduling its annual convention and trade show at the John Marshall

In

Richmond,

Nov.

VICTOR 77

GUM & CAP§ULE

Business sessions and recrea-

Hotel,

Minn. Firm

Save

Drop us a card today tor advance information to be announced soon.

Rayomond Turek,

Convention

Dec.

30-

1.

FTC Complaint

irreiiitibl*.

Convenient, interchangeable merchandiie displav panel-

Vends 100 count gum, V. Vand V-2 capsules. Available with U. 5<. 10<. 25r or 50< coin mectianism. Removable cash box for easy collecting Large capacity. Holds 1800 balls (lOO count). 575 V capsules, 250 V-1 capsules »nd 80 V-2 1

capsules

CHICAGO—King Minn.,

Minneapolis,

named

in a

(FTC).

Dist. Co.,

has

been

consent order from

the Federal Trade

The

FTC

Commission complaint

charges that the company's offers to sell existing businesses through advertising are "exaggerated" and contain "misrepre-

An

St..

Now You Can

tion

(AVAV).

sentations." 37,4 Armftron,

BULK VENDING OPERATORS

Sam Keys, of Apollo-Stereo MuSystems, has been named head of the Music Merchants Associaof Colorado. sic

for each day.

NAMA

VENDOR

plastic

reserves. After this hitch, young Geritz will return to complete a Masters Degree in education.

National Automatic Merchandising Association (N A) Vice-Pesident William Martin, Eastern manager and counsel Herbert Beitel and William Franklin, a Norfolk security system expert, were to be featured speakers here Sept. 1517 at a semi-annual convention of the Automatic Vendors Association Virginia, of Inc.

AM

SUPER 60 CAPSULE

globe

Cigaret Vender

ver.

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va.—

Northwestern's

mounted

— 880

NIW

THE KIDS

capacity

National Vendors

National Vendors' electric 22 selection cigaret merchandiser Is a Crown 880 series, holds 880 packs, including the new imperial lengths and flat boxes. Among its features are three quick-change price settings from Bt to $1.25; "first in first out" vending with "elevator" delivering cigarets into top tray: column couplers allowing two sets of 40-pack columns to be united for increased capacity of top brands.

Kenneth Catt, George Campbell, Bob Wheatby, Lury Burlie, Jack Hackelt, Apollo Stereo Music, Den-

with

l\mp

Equipment

cigarets.

ing some Oriental experience.

Rain-Ble Ball Oum, laoo per ctn. «.33 Rain Bio Ball Cum, 1100 printed per carton A 40 Rain-Blo Ball Oum, S3S0 per ctn. 1.33 Rain Blo Ball Gum, 4350 per cin. 3.35 Rain-Blo Ball Oum, 3S00 per cIn. 1.35 Maltetlei, 3400 per carton 1.40 15 Carleni minimum prepaid on all Lear Brand Ratn-Blo Ball Oum. Adams Cum, all flavors, 100 ct, .45 Wrlelay'i Cum, all flavors, 100 et. .45 Betch Nut, TOO ct 45 Herihey'i Chocolate, 300 ct. I.JO Minimum order, 25 Boxes, assorted.

PEN

New

I

excise

Operators report volume slumping sharply in the face of an "unusual summer" with low temperatures, rain and clouds generally

Wrapped Cum — Fleers, Topps, Batoeka

present

at

DENVCk

tain

PirtBchio Nuti,

be-

stay

of $4 per 1,000 cigarets. But on sliding scale, cigarets with more than 30 milligrams of tar or 1.6 milligrams of nicotine could go to $15 per 1,000 rate

City, the senator

MANDEll GUARANTEED USED MACHINES

Acorn

an

band on all smokers end

cutoff to

from going too of

youthful smoking has in a number of bills by Senator Kennedy to cigaret advertising on

in

Cutofr

The New York senator would ban the new longer 100

like to

mm

would

"Agreed to order" lists the firm's president: the document is for settlement purposes and

does not imply that the firm has violated the law. The FTC complaint says that net profit claims of $400 to

pRicH

$39.00 .;;':.",',:::„ Wme OR PHONI

WRITS,

GRAFF VENDING SUPPLY CO., INC.

$600 per month for 15 machines exceeds the income purchasers report. Other misrepresentations the mentions is the promise

FTC

machines will be purchased back from dissatisfied buyers, that buyers are not required to so.

when answering mfs

sales and that the machines advertised have a market value of from $50 to $100. licit

SEPTEMBER

Say You Saw

It

.

.

in

Billboard 23,

1967, BILLBOARD 'erial

Ending News SET BOARD MEET

NVA



ses.

How

per-machme

to

tion of the

licen-

encourage

new

adop-

definition will

be a main topic at the NVA board meeting here Oct. 28LaSalle Hotel. Another important topic will be a progress report on the long-time fight against the use of bingo chips as slugs in vending machines. Reports from re31

at

the

gions where tax relief measures have been passed will also be heard and plans will be formulated for the 1968 and 1969

conventions. "Disproportionate and discriminatory per-machine licenses is one of our continuing problems," said counsel Don national

NVA

Mitchell, who drew up the new definition. Mitchell, and his Chiago law partner, Ted Raynor, are NVA's attorneys. "We often discover that legislators are sympathetic to ex-

empting

bulk

vending

equip-

ment but they usually complain can't discriminate they against other vendors. needed a definition that would show legislators that the bulk vending industry is unique." Definition Mitchell set out the definition of a bulk vending machine as, "A non-electrically operated that

We

vending machine, containing unsorted confections, nuts or merchandise which, upon insertion of a coin, dispenses the same in equal portions, at random and without selection by the customer." Mitchell said he favored a definition that did not attempt to identify equipment in terms of coinage. "While we are still basically a penny industry we cannot escape the fact that

more and more we arc becomand less dependent ing less upon the 1-cent machine. "The reason for the exemption is just as valid in the case of a machine vending 25-cent capsules as in a machine dispensing penny gum and charms," he said. "This is true because the sale of the same merchandise over the counter does not require a special license. In this regard a per-machine license fee is

unreasonable with a relation-

ship to the cost of the bulk vending machine. "There are really only three

areas

which

in

a

that

vendors

bulk

One was by

can be taxed.

the

was declared vending machine

police, wherein

bulk

it

was an amusement device. This no longer applies because even old statutes such as New York had on the books have been redefined

Model 60 Bulk-Pak Will not siiip or

jam because of specially

desifned wheel

and housing. Holds 1,000 individually

wrapped FlEEirS

DUBBLE BUBBLE TUB GUM, the most popular in bubble gum. include (»mics, fortunes

and premium redemption. Bulk loading.

BIRMINGHAM VENDING COMPANY

mIrmlnthim,

tocond Av«.[ MMttI

Alsbama

Ph0n«; PAIrfax.4-nU

SEPTEMBER

23,

of lawmakers. North Carolina

Sneed

tive

NVA

1966

Run

representa-

High has agreed speaker at the convention at Pheas-

here.

Problem

Slug

The North Carolina exemp-

"Another area has been

in

food, but here again, many of our machines dispense merchandise and many dispense a combination of food and merchandise. This leaves us with one area

where we can expect continued taxation and why we needed the

reminiscent of a similar one scored by Roger and Harold Folz. Folz Vending, Ocean-

tion

is

side,

N. Y.,

Directors: Paul Whitson, Knoxville. lenn.: Sam Weitzman, Oak Mfg. Co., Los Ange-

who have

recently

gained ground in the direction of solving the three-year-old slug problem.

genheim Co., Jamaica, N. Y.;

why

it

becomes necessary for

"As an example, H.

B. Hutch-

inson has recently been involved fighting

in

a

change

the

in

ordinances in Atlanta, which is reviewing per-machine license fees. We furnished him with a copy of this definition." Hutchinson is a veteran bulk distributor and vice-president of NVA. Mitchell

points

significantly vic-

exemption

to several recent

through industry efforts. "In California the sales tax has been raised from 4 to 5 per merchandise sold cent but through vending machines for 10 cents or less will only be taxed on the cost of the item, not its gross selling price. tories

"Sam and Norm Weitzman and Herb Goldstein at Oak worked with Manufacturing Ted Raynor and Sid Kallick in getting this tion written

important into

defini-

new

the

tax

law," Mitchell said. Kallick is counsel for the National Automatic Merchandising Association.

N. C. Victory Probably one of the most notable, recent tax victories was achieved in North Carolina,

where

Lee

Smith

and

Jack

Thompson

of Smith - Regal, Charlotte, won an exemption vending machines, 1-cent largely by distinctly identifying the bulk vending industry. director Smith is an and president of the Carolina Bulk Vendors Association. He

on

AVA

and Thompson,

also

an

NVA

In

LONDON

"The use of

not only a serious matter in terms of the revenue lost to vendors." Mitchell pointed out, "but it is damaging to the morals of chilslugs

is

dren because it leads them to feel they can gel free merchandise by using slugs. Conventions Heading the list of convention planning will be the 1968 annual spring affair at Pheasant Run, a suburban resort near Chicago and the 1969 spring convention, set for Los Angeles. Convention chairman Rolfe Lobell and executive secretary Jane Mason will present a complete report at the Sunday, Oct. 29, LaSalle Hotel meeting here. Lobell

N.

Mandell,

&

Service,

Leonard

Quinn,

We've got

MICKS

a

for

big

of

line

and

5c

Ic.

GIMIQc

our Picture Price List (available on request). in

But good GIMMICKS need dam good DISPLAYS. The combination is what sells 'em best. It's

a good idea to take a long

look at the ideaful line of

Charms.

and,

of

EPPY

Rings

and

course,

the

Gimmicks.

Capsules;

DISPUYS.

ideaful

Co.,

163 Denfon Ave. Lynbrook, N.V.

Soy You Saw

It

in

Billboard

Please rush complete information and prices on Northwestern SUPER SIXTY Ball Cum-Charms Vender (at illustrated) at well at other North-

western mjchtnes.

NAMECOMPAMY_ ADDRESS CITY-

coupM, dtp end mail

Fin in

lo:

KING & COMPANY

T. J. 2T00 W. Laka

Clil 2.

Si.

P)K>i>a:

We

Ill

KC 3-3302

handle complete line of machines, parts

Also Ball Cum,

all

sizes; Ic

&

supplies

Tab Cum. 5c Package Gum, Spanish

Nuts, Virginia's Red Skin, small Cashews, small Almonds, Mixed Nuts,

in

all

vacuum pack

or bulk.

Panned Candies;

I

Hersheys

320 count and 500 count Candy Coaled Baby Chicks; Leaflets, Coin Wrappers, Stamp Folders. Sanitary Napkins, Sanitary Supplies, Route Cards. Charms, Capsules, Cast Iron Stands, Wall Brackets. Retractable Ball Point Pens, new and used Venders. Write: T.

geant at arms. Honorary Presidents Alvin R. Kantor, Confection Specialities, Bitterman, Chicago; Bernard Bitterman & Son, Kansas City; Sales

the

monsters.

Minneapolis; Murray Gross, Whitestone, N. Y.; Arnold Goldman, Providence, R. L; Sheldon Goldberg, Miami and Michael Goldberg, Franklin Square, N. Y.

vice-president, sales and Jane Mason is sales manager, bulk vending division.

Moc

Dist.

in

Grotesque

vending. There are over ISO to choose from. It's all illustrated

St.

Earl Grout, Vendall

FINGERTIPS:

protuberances.

Irwin Katz, S. P. Louis; Charles

J.;

Co.,

is

Leaf Brands, Div. W. R. Grace & Co., Chicago. Other officers to be here for Irwin the meeting will be: Nable, Schoenbach Co., Brooklyn, N. Y., president: H. B. Hutchinson Jr., Atlanta, viceNicholas Schiro, president; Schiro Vending Supply, New Orsecretary; leans, Herman H. Fischer. Chicago, treasurer and Mike Sparacino, Chicago, ser-

FALSE

DINOSAURS: Skeletons you put together yourself and make

Ronny McClure, Dal-Tex, Ed Muckenthaler, Wichita, Kan.; Albert Martin, Mount Vernon, III.; Dave Mark, Clifton, Dist.

an

FALSE TEETH: You can talie your mouth (gums & teeth) in your

LIGHT BULBS: That glow

Also: John McDanicIs, Seat-

ing units.

is

revenue,

is

.

hands.

tle;

vending equipment.

State

tax

of

basis

.

.

dark.

Dallas;

us to identify the bulk vending unit as against larger pieces of

NVA

Revenue Tax municipal and

machines on through per-machine license fees. This the

For example

Indianapolis; Paul Price, Paul A. Price Co., Roslyn, N. Y.; Samuel Phillips, Samuel Phillips Dist. Co., St. Louis; Walter Parker, Enfield, N. C; Jack Nelson, Logan Dist. Co., Chicago.

Kanak, Houston; Edward Jordan, Chicago; Vernon Jackson, Grand Prairie, Tex.; Max Hurvich, Birmingham Vending Co., Birmingham; Lcs Hardman, Penny King Co., Pittsburgh; Robert Guggenheim, Karl Gug-

"Many

governments

GIMMICK

every

IDEA,

Los Angeles; Tom Thcisen, Theisen Vending Co., Minneapolis; H. R. Rich, Salt Lake City; Robert Raleigh,

Roger, a former president of and now head of the New York Bulk Vendors Association, and Harold, together with Mitchell and NVA, have exerted pressure on the U. S. Treasury Department. Currently U. S. Treasury officials are calling on a dozen manufacturers of bingo chips, used widely in bulk vend-

definition.

Behind

When the IDEA is good, the GIMMICK is good, and it sells.

Leo Winer.

les;

to be a special

ant

GIMMICKS ARi IDEAS

Paul Crisman. Chicago.

director, passed out bushels of tive sessions and won the praise

exclude bulk vend-

to

ing.

G)inmen NORTHWESTERN

Nnppeis

Everett Graff, Dallas; Roger Folz; Bertrand Fraga, Standard Specialty Co.. Oakland, Calif.;

Defines Bulk Vending Unit

CHICAGO The National Vendors Association (NVA) has developed a new definition of a bulk vending machine for use as a weapon in combatting one of its most pressing problems: discrimatory

Products Co., Columbus, Ohio;

|.

King

Gr

Co. for prices and our

new 12-page

calalog.

GOING STRONG

Northwestern New York; Confection

The News from

his

Double-R prodtKtion

out-

fit.

Dccca group profits for the year ended March 31 dipped to $7,731,000 compared with the 1966 total of $7,851,000. But actual pre-tax profits were higher at $13,353,000 as opposed to $12,969,000 in 1966. The year's turnover was $120,000,000, including $35,700,000 in exports. Disk sales for June this year in the U. K. improved by 36 per cent compared with 1966. Their total value was $6,162,900. Home sales climbed by 31 per cent, and exports, representing 16 per cent of the total, rocketed by 65 per cent. Home sales for the second quarter arc up 16 per cent, and exports rose by 24 per cent, giving a total rise for the quarter of nearly 18 per cent more than 1966. The June pressing figure was 6,299,OOO, with album output up by 41 per cent, and singles and EP's still declining.

Independent

producer

Camp

Rowland has acquired the label from Campbell-Con-

nelly

for the release of material

Steve

1967, BILLBOARD

Accidental death was

recorded

Sept. 8 on Beatle manager Brian Epstein. The pathology report disclosed he died of carbrital drug poisoning. The drug induced drowsiness and had cumulative effect which made accidental overdoses possible. ... A musical called "The Four Muskteers," based on novelist Alexandre Dumas's characters, will be produced at Drury Lane with book by Michael Pertwee, music by Laurie Johnson and lyrics by Herbert Krttzmer. Johnny Danltwortb and Benny Green are colanother musical laborating on based on the life of George Bernard Shaw. Latest popsters to be affected by work permit blues are Los CInos from Gibraltar. They have been at the Grosvcnor House for eight months, but have to exit Britain by Nov. 4. The ruling

ironically followed tar's solid

VANISH-INK is a blood red fluid when squirted on > white or any object will appear as a ted blotch or spot and will disappear in seconds. A package of VANISH-INK and a specially printed squirt bag with that

shirt

simple instructions is packed in each capsule. Shoots up to 15 feet. Not a few drops but— a liberal amount in each packaeeT

news of Gibral-

or

referendum vote to stay PAPCO

British.

(Continued on page 79)

PAUL

5 SUIIman

K

St.,

(direct

fi

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY Is a mult your madilaes.

This ittm

PRICE CO., INC.

ttnlyn, N. V.

fer

1197*

77

Coin Machine News

Billion in '67

See $4.5 CHICAGO—The food

institutional

growth of

which vending

contracting and the vending of canned soft drinks are among factors cited in the record $4.5 billion sales in of products through vending units this year, predicted by the National Automatic Merchandising Associa-

(NAMA)

tion

bile

sales





Leading the rate-of-growth parade in vending, according to

NAMA

Western Meet SAN FRANCISCO — Vend-

labor and hikes in sales taxes.

ing

operators

from

numerous

western States are expected here Sept. 22-23 for a National Automatic Merchandising Asso-

Auto. Products Affair

ciation

(NAMA) management

conference

Brier,

tel.

Automatic

at the

NAMA

Jack Tar Ho-

officials

anticipate

a large gathering and have warned that obtaining last-minule accommodations will require

Co. here, said last that the firm's three new cigaret units will be displayed at the National Automatic MerProducts

week

a "miracle."

Workshop

chandising Association trade show in Chicago's International Amphitheater Oct. 29-31.

sessions

with

NAMA experts and management specialists leading the discussions, will concern such sub-

"Our new units are Model 630. Model 850 and Model 900, which

said that the sale of

commissary-prepared foods such as salads, sandwiches, entrees and pastries will hit more than $180 million, up 70

drink

profit squeeze is related to rising costs in products and

at

and mo-

truck catering.

per cent from five years ago.

Expect Large

The

manager

own food production Many have gone

their

commissaries.

NAMA

maior factor in vending growth is diversification

Equipment

institutional food service contracting and in-plant feeding by vending firms. Of 6,000 vending firms, some 1,500 now oper-

into concession services

A

MINNEAPOLIS—Art

New

into

ate

said.

Diversification

NAMA

sales

Vending

and candy from the traditional iO( to 15^ is another factor

figures.

NAMA

units cannot col-

cited.

lect,

While this would be over twice the $2 billion in sales 10 years ago, net profits this year are dipping. In 1966, industry net profit before income taxes averaged 4.7 per cent of sales. estimates current profit rations are "trending lower."

At

NAMA

Since coin mechanisms can't allow for increases of less than a nickel, the difficulty of raising beverages

service

as

jects

supervision,

recruiting,

union relations, policy determination and communicating with employees. Special emphasis is being placed on keeping the sessions on an informal basis so that operators can obtain ideas, data and methodology applicable to their own operations back home.

a modular," Brier said. Each has nine columns for 100-mm length cigarets. Model 850 is a 36-column unit, the other two have 27 total columns. "Our production schedule on these units is .so is

heavy we can't make any announcements about other new products," he said.

canned

statistics, is

Production

vending.

soft

of

canned cold drink dispensers has increased 21 times in the last four years. Production last year

was 36,870

units.

Cigarets, candy and hot and cold beverages continue to account for 80 per cent of all sales

through vending machines, said

NAMA. creases

have

Annual

volume

in-

from 7 to 10 per cent occurred during recent

years.

Confection sales of 5,012,652,000 units were reported in 1966 and says over one

NAMA

third of all candy bars are now sold through vending machines.

In

hot

beverages

— where

single cup fresh brew coffee units are a big trend 1966 sales



amounted compared in

cups 2,091,000,000 cups

to 3,426,000,000 to

CartonmatIc Vender Cigaret Carton Vender, developed by Cartonmatic Vending Corp., vends 30 selections in five price ranges through use of special plastic tokens purchased at check-out counter of location. The unit is available in two sizes: 4'x6'x6' or 3'x6'x6V4' and holds 650 cartons ready to vend and stores an additional 450 cartons. The woodgrain Formica exterior finish can be keyed to various decor requirements.

1960.

The formation

of

new vend-

ing companies has balanced the

IHTERNAIIONAL

mergers of other vending organleaving the total number of operators at an estimated 6,000. izations,

still

^^Th^/viggler

DETROIT.

BUILDERS

MICHIGAN

0

23 WAYS

wiggle UP

TO

HIGH SCORES From the 2000 per cent Top from 10 to 200 when

Rebound, ball

Rollover, which

ball is skill-wiggled off

to the Free-Ball-Gate,

GROUND-BREAKING

jumps the

for Canteen Corp.'s new 50,C00square-foot office, food preparation and distribution center In Dearborn, Mich., Is celebrated by, from left. Dearborn city councilman Thomas D. Dolan, Canteen Corp. president Patrick L. O'Malley and councilman Vincent

lit

which delivers an extra

Fordell. The new facility will consolidate the services of several Canteen branches in the Detroit area. It'- located at a major link of Detroit's Edsel Ford Freeway. Headquartered In the building will be Canteen's Lake-Central Area Division, Paul Q. Duffy, area director, and

and 50 pomts. THE WIGGLER playfield wiggles

with score- boosting, play promoting, profit-booming action, suspense

THE WIGGLER

and

challenge.

skill

Get 8ally

Cigarette Service Co.,

Benny Koss,

president.

today for top earning power.

Machines

All

Ready Uiiiled

for Location

Dllli

UnitW

ts.

Futurt

395.

UnileJ 7 Slir

9S

Wms. Pinch HHttr

Snoknbip ally

Mirfil

lucliiiii

95.

V 17

IrliKO

Seiburg KD

includes all newest Bally refinements Lift-Up Top-Glass Frame, insuring quick, easy maintenance access to "vacuum-packed" clean playfield .

.

195.

WurllRlf JJ10

175.

3500

Wurlititr

MOO

Wutliliar

2ai0

new Light-Up Coin-Drop

Cabli:

.

Inserts... .

distributor for the Scopltone machine in the U. S. He had been a regional vice-president for See-

.

See youi disliibulor or wrile BAllY

MANUFACTURING COMPANY

LEWJO.

RICHARD G. MURPHY has been named national sales manager for Cameron International Ltd..

.

Finger-Fit Flipper Buttons and supersensitive flipper-switcti numerous other improvements. Avoid backlog blues. Order THE WIGGLER now.

78

Wurlltlir

.

.

burg and was Albany, N. branch manager for Davis •

2640 BfLMONT AVtNUt, CHICAGO

IS, ILLINOIS,

60618, U. S. A.i

ISS.

J4I0

Wurlifiif

THE WIGGLER

U. 49].

125. S9S.

495. Call,

Writi sr Cabit

Diilribulint (t

«

EiclMiie Wurlitief Diilributcr

Dis-

1311 N. Capitol Ave. Indianopoliv Ind. Tel.: MEIrose 5-1593

SEPTEMBER

23,

Y.,

tributing C^.

1967, BILLBOARD

G>in Machine News Local 19. Judge Arthur Markewich declared it "nothing but a paper organization," and virtually elimiated the group from the labor scene, this clearing the decks for the struggle between the RCIA and the Teamsters. Later that year, five game groups resigned from the

MONY/30

association to form their own group erators of New York, Inc.

• Continued from page 75 and prospered since the first years with Al Bloom and Lee Rub. now, when the three of them had been the mainstays of the fledgling AMOA. Denver expressed his personal sorrow and MONY's b.iard of director set up a Sidney Levine Memorial Foundation with funds to be allotted to universities and hospitals for scholarships and research. In December, and six jukebox operators expanded the fight against "paper" unions by seeking an injunction against Local 19 of the Cigarette and Coin Vending Machine Employees Union from the State Supreme Court. The charges were approximately the same as those made against the other two locals, and cited the injunctions placed on them as

MONY

tration as a

settling labor disputes.

The new

ciation.

A

the situation. month later, attorney Samuel Mezansky that a federal grand jury would be called told to investigate the jukebox racketeering situation. Gotham operators were apprehensive about a possible

MONY

MONY

new State tax, but still found time to raise $23,240 for the UJA. It was a calm before the storm. It broke in May when the New York State Attorney General asked and to show cause within 20 days why they should not be dissolved under the Donnelly Act, New York's anti-monopoly law. The State charged that the association's location lists and arbitration procedures were illegal. attorney Samuel Mezansky prepared a brief categorically denying the charges, explaining that the lists were voluntarily compiled, and stated that the arbitration clause of the bylaws, in no way violated

Bye-Bye Bums Despite all the furious fighting in 1957, there were a few bright spots in the operators' situation. The city council considered a more favorable licensing law, which would put a ceiling of $250 on arcades and $50 for all locations with fewer than five games. The entire slate of officers was re-elected by acclamation: Denver, president; Joe Conners, vicepresident; Harry Wasserman, treasurer, and Ben Chicofsky, secretary. Nash Gorden was also retained as managing director. Both the Giants and Dodgers moved to the West Coast, eliminating two-thirds of the TVbaseball threat to jukebox locations. And 446 coinmen attended the 13th annual United Jewish Appeal dinner at the Sheraton-Astor Hotel May 15. More than 1,000 attended the annual October banquet, topping off MONY's 20th (and one of its most exciting) years. In the amusements games field, an organization. United Coin Machine Operators of New York, was formed in January of 1958 and promptly merged with the Associated Amusement Machine Operators of New York in February. The new organization (still under the name) announced its intentions to negotiate with the Teamsters and called for one organization and one union for all coin machines in the city, much to the consternation of and the RCIA. AAMONY's position in the labor field was uncertain. In March, 1958, won its injunction against

AAMONY

MONY

MONY

MONY

restraint of trade laws. a consent decree of the State

agreed to comply with Supreme Court and alter

procedures. of the coin machine industry, troubled by the years of strife and bad press, formed a permanent public relations organization to represent New York coinmen that summer. Sen. Al Bodkin was named chairman of the committee, whose other members were listing

its

Members

Harry

Siskin,

Mack

Polloy,

George Holzman, Larry

and Ben Linn. A new city jukebox tax was signed by Mayor Wagner July 1, 1959, charging the operators $25 per machine. Coinmen had vigorously opposed the measure some and estimated that up to 2,000 locations might be lost because of the move. In September the associa•Scrlin

AAMONY

MONY

tion moved to challenge the Supreme Court on the basis

MONY

In

means of

Comparative quiet reigned for the next few months. Al Denver explained the New York labor difficulties to the Senata Rackets Committee in February 1959 and the committee devoted much of its time to a study of

precedents for the same action in Local I9's case. The operators charged the union with trying to create a "climate of fear" among location owners.

GDinmen

Game Op-

bylaws provided that the arbitrators would in most cases be drawn from the American Arbitration Asso-

MONY

• Continued from pane 77

—The

Labor Peace A step toward labor peace was taken by June 1958, when they approved compulsory arbi-

in

The News

license fee in the State that it singled out juke-

CHICAGO COIN'S

CARDINAL SPELLMAN was presented

MONY of

in

check

a

from

the 1950's. From left, the late Barney Sugarman Co., Senator Al Bodkin, the Cardinal,

Runyon Sales

Father Kelly and Meyer Parkoff, Atlantic N. Y. Corp.

boxes alone of amusement machines for taxing. The cased was filed in the name of the Lincoln Service, Inc., Al Denver's company. The I950's, probably exhausted by the furious pace of events in its last few years, passed away without any further noise.

The pace slowed down in the new few years, as it had after the postwar flurry of activity. Denver spoke out in 1960 against copyright legislation in the U. S. Congress designed to permit collection of jukebox performance royalties. He also recommended that dues per machine per operator be lowered to encourage new membership. In 1961, members of participated in the first joint convention of New York State Coin Machine Association, New York State Operators Guild and in the Catskill Mountain resort of Sackett

MONY

MONY

Lake. In 1962, representatives of

erators gathered at

MONY's

amusement machine opoffices to talk over the

game organization situation in the New York Denver also warned operators about fly-by-night owners

tion

who

specialize

in

milking

area. loca-

jukebox

and

amusement machines operators dry by asking for machines and advance commissions from operators, stashing the equipment in the basement and running. And second straight year,

for the

with the

NEW

New York

State

MONY held

a joint session

Coin Machine Association.

6-PLAYER AUTOMATIC

BOWLING LANE

Gnimpus

with Essex. Shapiro will star in a 90-minute color movie, "Winkles and Champagne," opposite Anthony Booth and directed by Michael Winner. Picture will follow

Helen

Atlantic President Ahmet Ertegun here for talks with Polydor's

Roland Rennie and Atlantic's British label manager Frank Fenter. He also visited NEMS' managing director Robert Stignood for dis-

cussions about the Bee Gees and the Cream. Eric Burdon» leader of the new Animals, has married Anglo-Indian model Angle King, and the group's bass guitarist Danny McCullock is engaged to former secretary Carol Fielder. Chart topper Engelbert

NEMS

Humpcrdinck

will star in this year's at the

Robinson Crusoe pantomime

FLEETWOOD

the growth of show business from the early vaudeville days. The Troggs are slaying with the Page One label after all, and have cut a new single. Ember will release material from the Lupine catalog here on the and Speciality labels. Songwriter I.es Reed plans to bow his Donna label in December with releases by Denny De Costa, Jason Cord, and an album by the Lifeguards Military Band. personality Jackie Rae has been named exploitation .

.

.

.

.

FAST PLAY!

.

CBM

.

.

GREATER "REPEAT" ACTION!

.

TV

London Palladium. Premier Harold Wilson's interlocutory injunction against the

Move

and manager Tony Secunda was renewed in the high court. Wilson alleges a postcard sent out by the group libels him. Bud Prager, .

.

of Felix Pappalardi in Windfall Music, here for talks with David Platz of Essex and Atlantic's Ertegup. Pragcr produced an album by the Cream under Robert Stigwood's auspices, and fixed a deal concerning the Bo partner

SWIVEL SCORE RACK

manager, and Donna is expected to capture a big name from a major label's production staff. The soundtrack album from "The Happiest Millionaire" headlines an October release of seven LP's from Walt Disney Productions. .

.

.

Ahmet

Organizational Meet in Wichita WICHITA, Kan. Music

(MOA)

WRITE, WIRE or CALL COLLECT Will top

any

price for

Funspots. Need urgently.

sano,

(MOA)

BONUS FRAME

— Talks by

Operators of America President James ToliClearwater, Fla. and Executive Vice - Presi-

A

Attn.:

N.

Robinson

2722 Vine

Street

Cincinnati, Ohio

45219

(513) 751-2523 or 351.2114

1



SEPTEMBER

23,

other States this siunmer. In several instances have traveled to meetings to help operators co-ordinate local activities with that

MOA



officials

of the national organization.

MOA

vice-presi-

Cazel,

MIrs ol

The

meeting here was planned by Harlan Wingrave, an Emporia

who

In

Strike Scores

The association reactivation move here is typical of that in

operator and dent and Ronnie operates locally.

Any Frame

Receives

2 Extra Shots

A Spare

dent Fred Granger, were to be the highlight of a reorganization meeting of Kansas music and vending operators here Sept. 16-17.

several

SUPREME NOVELTY CO.

Strike In

:

PROVEN MAKERS

PROFII

Any Frame

Receives

Extra Shot

30

Spare Scores 20

4>i" LONG-LIFE BALLS

• AVAILABLE 16']' and I3'>' LENGTHS LARGE CASH BOX with REMOVABLE PARTITIONS

ALSO IN

PRODUCTION

TWINKY

CHICAGO COIN MACHINE



SKI-BALL



RIVIERA

DIV.

CHICAGO DYNAMIC IIMDUSTRIES, 7

inc.

ins w. nvBtsir uvo.. chkaoo, uunos «mi4

1967, BILLBOARD

79 Cl

Coin Machine News

Big Pool Accessory Array

MOA

By Wico at CHICAGO—The Wico devote

will

much

of

Corp.

at the Music Operators of Amer(MOA) trade show Oct. 27to showing the pool table supplies in its new "holiday special" catalog supplement just is-

ica

29

sued.

manager

Advertising

Robert

BE THE FIRST TO SEE THE

Arrange

a for

Preview

Equipment

The new 24-pagc catalog supplement, issued with Wico's new 160-page 1968 vending machine parts catalog, lists such items as pool table cloth, cue sticks and such general items as lamps, fluorescents, cleaners, lubricants, pucks, bowling balls, plastic pins,

NEW

phonograph needles,

speaker and baffle combinations, coin chutes, leg levelers, hardware items and radio tubes. Both the big Wico vending catalog and the supplement are being mailed out this month. All items in the holiday sup-

CINEJUKEBOX We'll

New

Exhibit

Garrott said the firm will also show "several brand-new products" at its trade show booth.

exhibit

its

Showing

You

plement

are

available

special prices through

at

the

Dec. 22.

Free

The new vending

catalog has 30 additional pages, including new sections devoted to replacement parts for Rowe, SeeburgBally and Vendo machines; coffee, cold drink, hot and cold food, ice cream, milk, cigaret and all-purpose merchandise

MOA SHOW

machines. The vending catalog is free to vendors on request and will be distributed at the Wico exhibit in booth 176 at the National Automatic Merchandising

Booths

32 & 33

Assoication show Oct. 28-31 the Eicluiive

fa.Po.

Rowe AMI

S.lersey

in

Dislribulor

M.

International

tii

N laOAD

ST..

Phone: i2IS

PHILA

.

located at 2913

is

Pulaski

iiiiviiimn

at

Amphitheater

Chicago.

Wico

Md. -O.C.

Road,

Chicago,

N.

Chicago Coln-Bowler

A newly

cabinet incorporating a wide playfield, bonus frame ways to play and adjustable pricing are among in Chicago Coin's Fleetwood 6'player bowling lane. A continuing feature of the cabinet is the swivel score rack. The bonus frame feature gives the player two extra shots for a strike in any frame and one extra shot for a spare in any frame. Play is priced at 15c and two for a quarter but is adjustable for 10c play. The unit has 5c-10c-25c individual coin chutes. styled

features with

six

prominent highlights

III.

60641.

inc

Say You Saw

PA ItllJo

It

in

Neb. Assn. Plans Show NORFOLK, Neb.— Planning

CEnlrf 2 }«00

Billboard

December

for a

trade

show and

convention was to have dominated the business session at a

meeting of Coin Operated In-

from United

of Nebraska (COIN) Sept. 16-17. To be held in December, the affair

Operators

and

Ted

treasurer

of

of America Nichols, an

Music

(MOA)

MOA

vice-president. Ellis was to

have explained

MOA's

insurance

various

pro-

dustries

grams and explore the

here, early

of a COIN junket to the national convention in Chicago 27-29. Nichols was to Oct. have reviewed the status of the U. S. copyright law revision affecting royalty on records. An industry - backed copyright measure has passed the U. S. House but is pending in the Senate.

will

or

be at Holiday Inn Sheritan-Continental in

likely

the

Omaha. Operators from South

PLAYER BOWLING ALLEY

COIN and

Dakota, Iowa, Missouri and Kansas will be invited. Other highlights of the meeting here were to be addressed by Howard Ellis, secretary of

possibil-

ity

Sees Background Music as Threat to Jukebox Trade PHOENIX



Background

music firms here arc crowding

on

the financial take of jukeoperators, according to Stan Beasley, an executive with Garrison Sales in Phoenix. in

BOTH FEATURE

MATCH BONUS 5 WAYS TO PLAY •

dual flash

• flash •

regulation

• •

match bonus bonus lane

box

not interested in their take off the

jukebox."

"Many

Cocktail lounges and sophisticated restaurants already have switched to background music but operators are trying to hold the line on bars going over. Operators now are frightened of losing established jukebox locations to the background music firms, says Beasley. Operators in Arizona also are beset with tax problems and depressed business years. While there are no State taxes in Arizona, operators are plagued by high city taxes, explains Beasley. In Phoenix, jukebox operators are hit by a $10 a year per machine tax, while the tax on

Phoenix locations, suitable for jukebox operations, have shifted

amusement games Is $100 and $48 on pool tables.

Operators are losing ground aggressive sales tactics by three Phoenix background music firms, all bidding for jukebox and amusement game locations, explains Beasley. "They have many of the class lounges and restaurants wrapped up and now they're going after many bar-taverns." to

A spokesman for a background music firm admits there "fierce competition between is jukebox operators and his firm over locations." "It's strictly bushe says. "We're out to our share of locations."

iness,"

PLAYER SHUFFLE ALLEY

to background music. Location owners believe background music adds class to the establishment. All of a sudden they're

get

Beasley

declared:

ROIMICB, INC. 3401

CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 60618 NORTH CALIFORNIA AVENUE CABLE ADDRESS WILCOIN CHICAGO

AVAILAtU



FM

lUMCOUTt DCUVEIIY THROUQH YOUR WIUJAMS OISTIMBIJTOH

SEPTEMBER

23,

1967, BILLBOARD

G>ln Machine News

MOA

PROGRAMMING

Show

SPECIALS

No Hot Box Trends Advent of Alpert: LOS ANGELES—New mu-

• Continued from page 73

trends here are having

sic

many

of

artists

the non-chart active who are out with sin-

gles.

MOA

The annual exhibit and convention (see program schedule below) will be held here Oct. 27-29 at the Pick-Congress Hotel.

Labels to exhibit are Capitol, Decca, Epic, London, and RCA.

Columbia,

MGM

Jukebox manufacturers on hand will be Rock-Ola, Rowe, Seeburg, Wurlitzer and the import firms. Associated Coin

Amusement

Co. and Jupiter Sales of America. Tape-Athon Corp. will show its background music systems.

Game

makers on hand

will

be AU-Tech, American Machine & Foundry Co., American Shuffleboard, Bally, Chicago Coin, Fischer, Irving Kaye, Midway, Mike Munves Corp., National Shuffleboard, The Northwestern Corp., Sega Enterprises (the first foreign-based firm outside Canada to ever join the MOA), Sutra Import Corp., U. S. Billiards, United Billiards, Valley and Williams.

little

on jukebox programming, according to Marvin Miller, president of Darvin Corp., distributor of coin-operated maaffect

chines.

Except

an

for

occasional novelty or gimmick tune, there has not been a strong or continuous music trend developed for jukeboxes since Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass made their foot-stomping music popular,

said Miller. Miller, an executive with

And

Coin-A-Tune,

a

subsidiary

of

Darvin, sees no new music on the horizon that will influence

jukebox programming. Because most locations favor rock music, he said, it's difficult for new music to take its place on jukeboxes, unless it's as distinctive and distinguishable as the TJB. Miller feels it's easier for new to influence programming in specialized locations, rather than in general jukebox spots.

music

Fall

Since

PIN

Miller

Shankar did well with music in ethnic locations but didn't fare as well in general spots. The same is true with music trends developing in rhythm and blues and rock. Specialized Psychedelic music has appeal to specialized locations in Southern California but has fallen into disfavor in cadiUac bars and lounges. "It only attracts hippies," an owner of a class location said, "and we sure don't want them in here." Coin-A-Tune has psychedelic music spotted in about 12 locations that cater to the longhaired crowd. "It's becoming Ravi sitar

more popular

in

cations," reports it's a long way

specialized loMiller, "but

from being

— SPECIALS — SPECIALS — Cup

Coffee Specials

All

Single

Fresli

OAMCt

Brew

KIDDIE RIDES

Billy Trio IMS CIGARETTE VENDORS B*lly M*0ic CIrct* ... 250 PMced to Vend it I4S Bally Sky Dlytr Bally Orand Tour .... 1?S 35c and 40c. Bally Happy Tour ... 17S Reconditioned to Bally Harvtit IK Its Cott. Aloha specifications. Gelt. Cantral Park ... MS Colt. Bowlinv Quaan 3M Corsair 20's $145 Oott. Cowpoka 315 195 Continental 30's Colt. Hurdy-Curdy .. 375 Celt. Subway 3*5 National 9ML 95 Cott. Plaaiure lile ... 350 Celt. Paradlsa 350 National IIML 155 Celt. Norlti Star 375 National 113 225 CC Pira Crackar 275 CC Hula-Hula 345 National 20 Col. 325 CC Kicker 350 CC Sun Valley 275 CC Royal Flaih 375 Wmi. Big Strike 375 CC Super Scope Rifles Wmt. Hot Line 375 Oott. King of Diemondt. Wmt. Casanova BuckarooB, Cross 495 Wmt. Pet O' Geld ... 425 Towns, Kinos A Ouaeni Wmt. Tom Tom 325 Wmt. Stop 'N Co 325 Wmt. Top Hand 325 Wmt. Full Houta 325 .

All

Tach Hiway

Patrol

5450

All Tee*> Slaoe

Tutko Elephant tjativ Wattarn

Ceaeh. 3fS .

450

.

Expreti 355 All Tech Train 3« Flinttton* stone Ala. 345 Old imokey 395

ARCADE

.

Ideal tor Bowling Allayl Mini Golf 5235 «v-ni. Road Racer 195 Southland Speedway 335 Southland Time

Wmt.

.

.

Trials

225 335 375 295

Midway Rifle Champ. Midway Captain Kidd Midway Trophy Rifle DuKane Grand Prix (like

new)

DuKana Ski CC Playland

595 'N Score 595

Kaenay 3-Cun Fun

195

.195

Cleveland Coin

EQUIPMENT WANTED AMI Phonographs H, K, 200 (M A E) AMI Diplomats Wms. 1957 Baseballs

t,

J,

International 2029 Prospect Ave., Clevclana, Ohia 44115 CABLE: CLECOIN (}l«) a«1.«7l9

a

new music

trend thai will increase jukebox spins." The only new sound that may crash the jukebox barrier. Miller believes, is the "Nashville

More LIVE

Sound," country and western music sans hillbilly influence. (Continued on page 82)

will

the more

you GIVE

HEART FUND

Video

Cameron

International,

Ltd.;

Color Sonics, Inc., and David Rosen, Inc., will exhibit audiovideo machines. And exhibitors of allied lines and services will be Bankers Life Co.; Brad, Inc.; CineSonic Sound, Inc.; D&R Industries, Inc.; E>ynaball Co.; Institute of Coin Operations; Lo-

gan Vending, sociates, Inc.;

Inc.; Lubin AsMutual of Oma-

ha; National Coin Machine Distributors Association, Record Source International, Spindel Insurance Agency, Star Title Strip Co., Sterling Title Strip

Co., and the

Wico Corp.

Billboard,

always,

as

will

have a large booth and provide a convention floor paging and message service.

Higher Nevada Tox Suggested LAS VEGAS, Nev.—City Attorney Sidney Whitmore, charging that cigaret vendors and some retailers were "gouging the public" with a 5-cent-a-pack price hike, asked for a new 3cent cigaret tax boost. The request came Aug. 31 in a letter from Whitmore, president of the Nevada Municipal Association, to Gov. Paul Laxalt.

"There will be demands for increased revenue for the municipalities of this State to the next Legislature," Whitmore wrote. He asked the Governor to increase the cigaret tax to 10 cents a pack "even though it may be insi^ificant to meet needs of the cities." Present per-pack tax is 7 cents. The 3-cent increase would "relieve the gougcrs of their additional profit,"

ney

A

the city

attor-

said.

proposal

for

a

3-cent-a-

pack tax boost was defeated ia the last

Assembly

"Immediately

session. after adjourn-

ment of the Legislature," he noted, "the price of cigarets was increased S cents a pack by cigaret machine Venders. Likewise, the cost per carton in many retail stores has been increased. If one solicits the reason for this increase, the answer given indicates there is an ad-

TtlMt Extra

OMiiir K«i

Ttmck at

omBiMAun

1140 N. Koslner Ave.. Chiirogo.

III.

60651

ditional tax."

SEPTEMBER

23, 1967,

BILLBOARD

81

*

Coin Machine News BLBCTMC SCOREBOARDS

NEW SIDE-MOUNT MODEL

OVERHEAD MODEL

<

• Two-faced.

Walnut Formica

finish

easy to clean) 15-21 ond/or pti. Also 15-21

• Scores

Scores 15-21

ond/or 50 pt>. F.O.B. Chicogo

2 Models

t^jCQ.SO

pts. only.

.107

F.O.B. Chicogo

50

here,

S7>IO-50 7X*ly

EACH model

also has these features: 1 -ployer or 2-ployer by simple plug switchover. Also 2 for 2St

• tO<

BILLIARD SUPPLIES 5

01,

set

21/4"

Bumper

Belgian

of

10.

$9.00.

15 Belgian

Pool

ploy. Easily serviced. Balls,

Others $5 up

numbered

and 2%" Cue Bolls. Set. 519.95 57" Cues str., 52.95 ea., $33 dz. 57" Jointed Cues $7.50 up Heath and A.B.T. Coin Chutes. Complete line. Write for new list. .



Fight

• "Came Over"

light

flashes on ot

end of gome. • Large metol coin box in

them

MARVEL 28J5 W.

bol.



Billboard

last

111.

60647

all

Heort Affock Stroke

The program opened with

a

Sales.

"This is an annual event with Pepple said. "We have been holding such classes every us," fall.

We've given them a

lot of

with the operators and we've spread them across the country to make attendance convenient. It's difficult to estipublicity

Give Heart Fund

classes

be sup-

is

gan

Northwest

High Blood Pressure Rheumatic Fever

will

figure

west States and Alaska.

two-day (II and 12) session in Spokane, followed by a one-day

Chicago,

the

I(X).

"Each of the

posed to last about four hours. Sometimes, however, they turn

(13) stop in Boise and a twoday (14 and 15) school in Portland. Next week, schools will be held in Seattle (17 and 19) and in Anchorage (21 and 22). The classes are given twice daily, first at 1 o'clock in the afternoon and then at 7 in the evening. Instruction is being provided by Bill Hcrborg. factory engineer from St. Paul, and representatives by of

Phone 1312) 342-2424

pect that well over

week

$500

holds

Mfg. Company

Fuiierton,

told

that his firm has started a Smokeshop series of and service schools Candyshop which will cover three north-

C.O.D. or S.O.

dimes.

-

Terms: Vj dep.,

Northwest Stages Schools —

SEATTLE R. W. Pcpplc, head of the Northwest Sales Co.

mate how many men tend

all

will

the sessions, but

I

at-

ex-

into

marathon

events.

I

remem-

ber one evening class that beat 7 and didn't end until 2

morning. Things start off with an instruction period which is followed by a question-andanswer session. The latter sometimes becomes very involved and in the

very profitable cerned."

for

all

con-

— Amuscmeni

Sept. 19 Association Scpl. 19

Machine

The

Philadelphia.

— Florida Amusement &

Music Association, district meetWest Palm Beach.

ing.



&

Florida Amusement Association, district meet-

Sept. 21

Nlusic

Miami.

ing,

21-23— West

Virginia MuVending Association, annual iic convention. Heart O' Town Motor Inn, Charleston. Sept.

&



Sept. 22-24

No Hot Box •

Conliniieti

New

Sept. 22-23

Although not yet accepted in locations, the new country all and western sound is slowly leaving the specialized locations and crowding into general spots.

"Dean ular

Music Operators of York. Laurels Country Club,

Monticello.

from page 81

Matin," among pophas given country

artists,

and western music in jukeboxes a shot in the arm," asserts Miller. "While not yet a trend or an influence among jukebox listeners, the new 'Nashville Sound' could develop into a financial windfall for the operator."

meeting.

nual

lantic City.

Seaside

Hotel,

At-



Sept. 29-30 Arizona Automatic Merchandising Council, annual

meeting. Sept.

Scoltsdale.

1— South Dakota Vending Association, St.

&

Music

Hotel.

Safari 30-Oct.

Charles Hotel. Pierre. Oct. I Arizona Coin Machine



Operators meeting. Oct. 3

DEMAND for FISCHER?



National Automatic Merchandising Association, western management meeting. Jack Tar Hotel, San Francisco. Sept. 22-24— New Jersey Automatic Merchandising Council, an-

Association, Safari Hotel,

— Missouri

Council, Trenton.

What's behind the BIG

of

Wynne. Philadelphia.

special Scottsdale.

Coin Machine announced,

be

to

site



Oct. 7 Missouri Automatic Merchandising Association, comfall meeting, Tan Tara Re-

bined sort,

Lake of the Ozarks.

Oct.

—South

14

Carolina Coin

Operators

Association, Holiday Inn, Greenville. Oct. 16—New York Slate Coin Machine Association, Inc., Dewiti

SOLID QUALITY!

Clinton Hotel, Albany. Oct. 27-29- Music Operators of America. 17ih annual convention and trade show, Pick Congress Hotel. Chicago. Nalional AutomaUc Oct. 28-31



Merchandising Association, 22d annual convention and trade exAmphitheater. Chicago. Oct. 29 National Vendors Association, directors meeting, LaSalle Hotel. Chicago. Illinois Coin Machine Oct. 29 Operators Association, fall meetposition. Internationa!





ing.

Washington Room, Pick Con-

gress Hotel, Chicago.

2

Nov. 30-Dec.

— Music

Oper-

ators of Virginia, 9th annual convention and trade show. John Marshall Hotel, Richmond. 16-18. 1968 Jan. Amusement Trade's Association annual exhibition; Alexandra Palace. London. Feb. 27-29, 1968— Seventh An-



nual Northern

Amusement Equip-

ment and Coin-Operated ExhibiBlackpool, England. April 26-May 5, 1968— Hanover Trade Exposition, Hanover, West tion.

Germany.

Jukebox Burglary



SACRAMENTO

Burglars broke into the Club Mai Tai here and stole about $600 in currency, checks and an undetermined amount of coins. Police said the burglars jimmied a jukebox.

DE-GREASED

DISCS More and more smart operators are installing Fischer tables in their choice locations. They find them to be the answer to more profitable operation. That's because

FOR STANDARD 18 YEARS OF

See your Distributor or write

MITAL nrPERS

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WEDGE-LOCK and Cushion assembly

unii-lock clamps replace more Ihan 50 wood screws Wedoe*ock cushions locks top (ail.ptaytield and trama logether in a single, perfectly rigid unit

12

for further information

MANUFACTURING 82

HARVARD

Paletue;!

Fischer tables are consistently solid quality throughout, all the fine features you expect from the ultimate in coin-op billiard equipment, and new-

embody

advanced developments that make service problems practically a thing of the past. Got the message?

AND

PROVEN SUPERIORITY

and



Pscktd



Avair.bit with special Imprint

Call our

In r«llt of 100

PARTS & SERVICE Depl

for all your Typer

needs

prices.

CO., INC., TIPTON,

MO. 65081

U1B CHICAGO

SEPTEMBER

N.

WESTEHN AVt.

22. ILL.



IV 4-3120

23, 1967, BILLBOARD

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