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i^4.^*

THE LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES

y

HISTORY AND

ANTIQUITIES O

F

TH

E

COUNTY of NORFOLK. VOLUME C O K T

The

A

I

X

I

X.

.N"

(?

City and County of Norwich.

Pro me :

Ji Jiiercar,

in me»

NORWICH: {"RINTED BY

J.

CR0U3E, FOR M. BOOTH, BOOKSELLER. M.DCC.LXXXI,

t^-^'<^'^^^.'(^^J^'<^'^-^=<^'^<^'^'<^^'^^'^

THE I

S

T O R O

F

NORWICH, *^'^'(*).^<*>»^^*>.^^,<*>.^^^^=<^s^^^o(^4.^^

G32S7G

INTRODUCTION.

THE

of Norwich, according to fir Henry Spelman, lies in 52*' 43' north latitude; 1' 19' of longitude eaPi of the royal obfervatory The liberties of the city and counat Greenwich. by Mary I. in her 3d year, anno confirmed ty, as comprehends a circuit of about 14 miles, 3556, city

and contains about

fix

thoufand

fiiJ.

hundred and

thirty acres.

M. From

To

the guild hall, in the market-place,

Mile-crofs,

on the north,

Thorpe, eafl, Harford bridges, fouth, Earlham bounds, weft,

The

-

is

-

-

-

-

-

city itfelf is beautifully fituated

-

-

F.

16 4 22 1

2

4

on the banks

of the river Wenfom, by fome called Bariden, or Winfber, and towards the center of the county of Norfolk. It is 108 miles from London by Newmarket, 112 by Bury St. Edmund's, and 113 by Ipfwith and Colchcfter. The diftance from Nora 2

wich

IV

INTRODUCTION.

wicli to the principal towns VIZ.

round

it

are as follow;

INTRODUCTION. ( St. Peter,

Maxcroft.

Wymer, T

or the \»r

Lono; *>-'^5 Ward 1

Mancroft

<

St.

Giles

^

St.

Stephen

i

<

Eafl Wvmer ,t-j n wr Wymer W^yn

Middle

,w n -iw „ Wymer (Weft J

wards Con is ford choofes twelve common-council, Coflany twelve, Mancroft fixteen, and Wymer twenty in all fixty.

Of

thefe four great

;

The number

of votes polled by the freemen and and hamlets belong-

freeholders in the feveral ^vards

ing to the city and county of Norwich, in London and the country, at the conteflcd election, March 1

8,

1768, for rcprefentatives in parhament.

Candidates.

Harbord Harborp, efq. of Gunton. Edward Bacon, eiq. of Earlhara. Thomas Beevor, eiq. of Heihel,



INTRODUCTION. and four

pels,

dilTeridng mceting-houfes.

xl

The

roof

whole fleeple is higher than Granadorned with hiftorical parages of the

jof the caihcdial,

tham's,

is

in little images. St. Peter's of Mancroft is reckoned one of the chief parilh churches There are two churches for the Dutch in England. and French Flemings, who ha^'e lingular privileges,

exprcffed

Bible,

\\hich are flriclly preferved. Some of the churches are thatched, and all of them crufted with flints cuthough the town ftands in a clay foil, rioufly cut The caille twenty miles from any tlints, or chalk. Its guildhall is the common gaol for the county. ;

was formerly a monaflcry. "

Here

is

a bridewell,

which

beautiful building of fquare

173 J there was a

is

flint

and and in

a very large

and (lone

;

of free-ftone. founded by Edward VI. for teaching grammar learning to boys that are nominated by the mayor and aldermen.

Here

is

lofty market-crofs.

that called the King's

" Here are four hofpitals

fchool,

one of them, St. Hefounded originally for the entertainment of Grangers, was by Henry VIII. appropriated to the and here are maintained eighty poor of the city poor men and A\omen, who are all cloaihed in grey, and mult be fixty years old. There is another for fixteen poor men and eight women, whofc livery is ;

len's,

;

The boys and girls hofpital conLain thirty purple. of each, and the boys are from hence put out apprentices

:

here are befides tvvelve chariiy-fchools,

Vvhere two hundred

and

and

ten boys,

fon)'-four giris, are taught,

and one

hur,clred

cloaihcd and iup-

plied with books.

"

two

It

is

governed by a mayor, recorder, fleward,

fherilis,

twenty-four aldermen, and iixty com-

mon

;

INTRODUCTION.

XII

with a town-clerk, fvvord bearer, is always chofen by the freernen, on May-day, out of two aldermen, whom they then return to the court, is fworn into his office with great pomp, on the Tuefday before Midfammer eve he is, during his year, a juftice of

nion council-men &c. The mayor,

;

who

:

the peace,

and of the quorum,

(as

are

alio the re-

corder and fteward) within the city and its liberties and after his mayoralty, he is juftice of peace dur-,

ing his

life.

Two

before the mayor, •'

The

fheriffs

filver

gilt

and

are alfo

maces are always borne finely chafed.

annually elefled, one by

the aldermen, the other by the freemen, on the

and fworn September

lafl

The

Tuefday

in Auguil;,

common

The fliecouncil are chofen in Mid-leat. by their charter to prefent the king

liffs

20.

are obliged

wdth twelve herring pies yearly, on the 23d of Qd. this city being pofleffed of the manor of Carlton,

whofe lord holds

it

by that tenure.

" The worfled manufaclure, for Vvhich this city has long been famous, and in which even childreri earn their bread, was firfh brought over by the Flep:iings, in the reign of Edward III. and afterwards very much improved by the Dutch, ^vho fled from the duke of Alvas profecution, and being fettled here by queen Elizabeth, taught the inhabitants to

make .

fays, baize,

ferges, flialloons,

they carry on a vafl trade, both

and weave camblets, ftuffs, of which it is

at

Sec.

in

home and

druggets, crapes, faid this city

which abroad,

and other

vends to the va-

lue of 2oo,Qool. a year.

" The weavers here employ fpinflcrs all the and alfo ufe many tlioufand packs country round *t yarn j]>un in other counties, even as far as York;

ihirc

;

INTRODUCTION.

xiii

By a late calculation, and Weftmoreland. from the number of looms at work in this city only, it appeared that there were no lefs than one hundred and twenty thoufand people employed in their manufaclures of wool, filk, &c. in and about the town, including thofe employed in fpinning the yarn ufed for fuch goods as arc made in the city. fiiire

"

The

inhabitants are generally fo

employed

in

manufactures within doors, that this appears a melancholy place, except on Sundays and public days, when the flreets fwarra with them. their

"

By an acl in i 7 26, certain duties arc laid on goods brought into this citv, for the repair of its bridges, walls, gates, the flaiths, wharfs and roads. Mar* kets on Wedneldays and Saturdays and four fairs, on the day before Good Friday. St. Faith's, the Tuefday after St. Michael, and Maudhn or St. Ma-



:

ry Magdalen. "

The

Yarc, which runs through the

city,

is

na-

vigable fo far without the help of locks. •'

The

of the county, that f^ood on

fliire-houfe

the hill near the caftle, having been burnt

down by

accident, an acl of parliament paffed in 174G-7, fot holding the fummer affizes, and general quarter feffions,

and

in the city,

for

raifmg

a

till

money

new

fhire-houfe was rebuilt

defray the charge of

to

it.



A

houfe and garden are opened on the Tide of the Yare, called Spring Gardens ; and on a hill on the other fide of the river, are the remains of the caftic of Kett, the tanner, of Wymondham, by whofe rebellion,

in the reign

reduced

to a

ruinous

of

Edward VI.

this city

was

flate.

There

INTRODUGTIOlSf.

xiv

" There is now but one parochial church in the fuburbs, which had three, befides three chapels, a nunnery with its church, a priory and church, an

and chapel,

hofpital

and

with their chapels fynagogue here." gates,

;

five

leper-houfes

at

the

and the jews had once a

Mr. Arthur Young, in his Tour thro' the Eaft of England, (1771) fays, " The city of Norwich is one of the molt; confiderable in England after London it Itands on more ground than any other: but in number of inhabitants, fome others aiTert an equalityi By an accurate account taken a few years ago, the number reckoned by the houfes amounted to fortv thoufand; but by the bills of mortality only td thirty-fix thoufand; the average therefore of thefo (thirty-eight thoufand) may be taken as more proba^ ble than cither. ;

*'

blets

The ;

damafks,

up

flaple

manufa£lures are crapes and cam*

bcfides which, they fattins,

alopeens,

make See.

in great

&c.

8cc.

abundance

Thev work

and Lincolnfliire wool chiefly^ brought here for combing and fpinning, wliilft the Norfolk wool goes to Yorkfhire for carding and cloths. And what is a remarkable circumthe Leicefterfhire

which

is

many years, is, that the Norwool about their necks equal to the bed from Spain and is in price to the reft as

ftance, not difcovered

folk fhcep yield a

;

twenty

to feven.

•' The earnings of the manufa6lurcrs are various. but in general high.

"

Men

a week boys of

;

on an average do not exceed five fliillings but then many women earn as much ; and

fifteen or fixteeii likewife the

fame.

Draw-boys,

INTRODUCTION. Draw-boys, from lo to 13, Pipe-boys and girls, from 5 Combers, on an average, Dyers,

Women

7s.

13s.

by doubling yarn,

2S.

8s.

filk,

Ditto by fpinning, *'

6d. a week.

to g years old, gd.

1 'jS.

Hot-prefiers,

Ditto

2s.

xr

2S.

The weaving man and

6d. to 3s. his boy,

who now

earn

in general 7s. a v/cek, could earn with eafe 11s. if But it is remarkable, that thofe men indullrious.



and

their families

who

earn but 6s. a week, are

much

than thofe who earn 2s. or 3s. extraordinary; for fuch extra earnings are moflly

happier and fpeut

better off

at the ale-houfe,

or in idlenefs, which preju-

This

dice their following work. effeft as

they have found

when

is

precifely the

fame

the prices of provifi-

it refults from the fame ons have been xerv cheap And this city has been very often peftered caufe. with mobs and infurrections under the pretence of an high price of provifions, merely becaufe fuch dear;

would not allow the men that portion of idlenefs and other indulgence which low rates throws them into. nefs

•' In the management of the poor, there was once a circumflancc that deicrvcs noting. Previous to the year 1727, the rates throughout the city were immoderatelv burthencd with weekly allowances to the

6d. 25. 2§. 6d. or 3s. a family, in

poor, of

is.

manner

1200I. a year was given.

A

which was

refolution

taken in that year to Rrike them all off: it was accordingly done and nothing enfued but murmur;

ii^g

;

no

ill

toniecjucnce

at all.

" Seven

INTRODUCTION.

xvi

" Seven or eight hundred fouls are kept in the two wcrkhoufes for g or lo.oool. a year in all expcnces, and between 2 and 5000I. is now (I779) paid in weekly allowances to poor out of the houfes.

" In refpecl

of the manufacflure,

to the prefent flate

it is

neither brifk, nor very dull.

cute

more orders than they have

;

They could

them complain becaufe they have not as during the war;

for then they

exe-

and fome among fo great a trade

could not anfwer

demand, it v/as fo uncommonly great (from 1 743 1763 was their famous aera). This was however owing in fome meafure to many manufadurers exporting fo largely on fpeculation, that the markets and have occaiihave been overftocked ever fmce oned that falling off which has been perceived fmce. Indeed the unfortunate difference (ubfilting bctweeri Great Britain and the colonies is an injury to them. the to



" rica;

North AmeTheir foreign

They now do not fend any thing but much to the Wefl-Indies.

export

is

to

to

Cadiz,

Rotterdam, Oftend, Middleburgh,

Lifbon,

All Flanders,

Hamburgh,

Leghorn,

All the Baltic, except

Barcelona,

Triefle,

Sweden, where

Naples, GciiOa,

are prohibited.

" In feventy years

they*

Eaft Indies. lafl pafl,

the maiiufa£lurc

is in-'

creafed as from tour to twelve.

" During the lafl; war, Norwich fupplled the army and navy with four thoufand recruits but her ma;

nufa<^ures did not fufter in the Icafl

j

for they car-

ried

:

INTRODUCTION.

'

xvli

on more trade than ever. The truly indudrious do not inhfl; and as to the idle, the greateft favour away. to be done to any place is to fweep them all riod

;

"

They

are in this ciiy curious in building ^vith

they cut it in regular fquares, and form as The Bridewell neat 'joints as with the bell: bricks. is worth is thus built, and fo well executed, that it

flint;

a traveller's notice.

" fure

A

The may

o-eneral

amount of

the Norv.'ich

be calculated thus

manufac»

regular export to Rotterdam by fhipping, every fix weeks, of goods to the

amount of per annum

-

480,000

Twentv-fix tons of goods fent by broad wheeled waggons weekly to London, at 500I. a ton on an average, 13,000 tons per

By

annum:

occafional Ihips

value

and waggons

calculated at

rious places;

-

676,000 to va-

200, oco

1,336,000 "

Upon

a re-confideration of this table,

it

was

thought that the 676,0001. by waggons was rather too high: fuppofe therefore only 10,000 tons, it is rhen 520,0001. and the total i,2oo,oooi. " Another

method taken to calculate the amount was, by adding up the total fum fuppofed to be reand turned annually by every houfe in Nonvich ;

This fum coming 1,130,0001. {q near the other, is a flrong confirmation of it. this

method made

it

b

*•

A

tliir4.

INTRODUCTION.

xfiii

A

"

method

third

taken,

was by various ways to thefe were made

number

of looms

:

12.000; and it is a fuppofe each with all

common

idea in

the

calculate

alfo

this

aiin.

its

Norwich

to

attendant works lool. per

makes the

total 1,200,000!.

which

the whole, appears to be very near the

fum, upon real trudi.

" Refpefling the proportion between the original material, and the labour employed upon it, they h^ve a very fure and eaiy method of difcovering it.

The it

is

average value of a piece of ftufi' is fifty fliillings (ix pounds, at ten-pence a pound, which fo the material is a tenth of the five fiiillings; ;

weighs

total

manufaclure.

£ Total

A

-

-

-

_

tenth

Amount



In which faclurer.

is ^1

-

of labour

-

1,200,009 120,000 i,oSo,ooo

included the profit of the mailer manuhere is no occafion to feparate that from

the grofs fum, as it is in facl labour as much as the manual part. All the people maintained and employed by a manufacturer are the fanie in a publitk

view, whether they earn ten dioufaud pounds a year, or but ten pounds.

"The many

material point remaining is to difcovcr howpeople are employed to earn the publick one

million per

annum

;

and

for this calculation 1

to the purpofe.

They

have

generally

one datum which is imagine in Norwich, that each loom employs fix persons in the whole-; and as the number is twelve thoufand, there are confequently i'eventy-two thoufand people

s

INTRODUCTION. people employed by this manufafluje.

xk

And

this

is

confirmation of the preceding accounts ibr 1 uas in general told that more hands worked out of Novvvich, for many miles around, than in it 1,200, cool, divided by 72,000, gives 16I. each lor

a

fitfli

;

:

the earnings of every perfon.

" This,

I

mufl confefs, appears

me

to

a very large

for I have no conception of all the perfon fum employed earning 16I. a year, which is one fliilling ;

a day

if

;

account,

muft be

amount of

any millake in the

is

in the

preceding

number of looms,

the manufa61ure

—The

taken from clear (not fuppolitions) there muft confcqueutlv be

total la(5ls

looms year

therefore

it

fufficient

may

to

work

to

much above

not be

is

amount: 16I. a the truth, though pro-

that

bably famething for we fliould confider that women, and boys of fifteen or fixteen, earn as much as whereas in various other manumoft of the men fadures with which I am acquainted, they do not neaily equal them: and we flipuld further conficer, that we include in this 16k a year, the whul- pro;

;

fit

of the mafter maimfa«^urer.

from

The

deviation there-

cannot be very con fiderable: for if the mafter manufacturers profit is calculated at 14 per cent, and deducted accordingly, this ibl. a \ear is thereby reduced to about ill. 11s. a year. lore

"

fa6t,

may

no contemptible fa£l thoufand people emploved in whatever it may be, will earn one s. manufadure, million a )^ear. I fay lohatever it may be, becaufe I conceive that the variations of earnings in the general number not to be very great. Provifions arc pretty much on a par ; and few of them more than It

therefore be taken as

that feventy or eighty



work

to Hve.

"

The

INTRODUCTION.

kx "

The hufbandry near Norwich is generally good. About Earlham farms rife from 50I. to srscl. a year; the foil a loamy fand with both marie and chalk under

it: lets

from

14s. to 20s.

an acre; average iGs."

K7^

F^

^:^-

k..!^

#^§ §*§

XX ^^ f^ XX §*# k.^

ml ^i^

I

THE

HISTORY O

F

NORFOLK. CITY

of

NORWICH.

)'(MX)^'r:0'M!>KHE emperor Claudius Cs^far was the firft Roman who gained any .^^^^^

X

.•v»

f •!

/

I

A

confideiable footing

in

this

part

of Great Britain, which he entered the forty-fixth year of the about {^ %:^^^.^a^ a:ra, and the fourth of Chriflian Qvi't'/Vi'Vi'-'i'Vi" Having conquered the his reign. inhabitants, and fettled the form of government, he appointed Oftorius his lieutenant ; who, upon fome dikontent fliewn by the natives, took occafion to difarm all thofe of whom he had die leafl fufpicion. The confequence of this was an infurre6tion, which ^vas foon quelled by the Romans who, in order to guaid againft any future attempts of the •i"*!:

§

^

•f'';:

-vt.'

;

A

fame

C

2

T Y

I

^amc kind, began to fortify military encampments in

O

F

tliemfelves,

different

and

parts

to

form

of

the

country.

From hence we may date the origin of Caflor near Yarmouth, and of Burgh caltle in Suffolk for at that time, the mouth of the Yare extended in breadth from the ifland of Lothingiand (in which Burgh caflle is placed) to Caflor in Flegg, where the oppofite camp was formed: the fpot where Yarmouth now ftands being fea a large arm of ivhich extended all over the marfhes to the place where Norwich is fituated, and much higher that way as it did alfo to Callor by Norwich, and up thofe flats as far at leafl; as Tafeboro, where the Romans afterwards raifed a fortification to guard It is moff probable that long after that flream. this time Norwich had its original, much in the fame manner as Yarmouth before had, by fifhermen and merchants fettling there on account of traffic. It is plain that it was a fifliing town in Canute's for in his reign, Alfric, the bifhop, gave to time the abbry of Bury his hagh by Norwich, which paid yearly to that abbey a laft of henings. St. Lawrence's church was afterwards built on part of The account therefore of the Danes coming it. :

;

;

;

with their fhips to the caltle here was a fa6l an the fea reaching hither 'till the Conquerors when the fands at the mouth of the river time where Yarmouth ftands increafing, by degrees beand in procefs of time, the came firm ground marfhes, rivers. Sec. fettled in the manner they now This being the cafe, the R.omans followed the are. as appeared by their camp at courfc of the water Cafi-or near Norwich, where they certainly had a and if that ^\as not the Vcnta Iccilation fixed norum, as has been generally fuppofcd, it was certainly the moft confiderable fortification and ftation ;

arm of ;

;

;

:

ill

NORWICH.

3

and purpofely made to guard that winds fouihward into the country, as well as to be a commodious and pleafant fituation in the interior' part of the land, which they by defixing camps to fecurc what grees penetrated into they had got as thev advanced forward. Thus purfuing their courfe more foutherly, Tafeboro ^vas pitched upon as a proper place to guard that ftream anciently called Tefc, and the ftation ad Taum ; and advancing further into land by the northern Tiver, beyond where Norwich now fi-ands, they proceeded as far as the flream continued any thing confiderable to Elmham which feems mofl probably to have been the Venta Icenorum, as it every way anfwers the Itinerary as well as C aft or, with refpe£l to diftance its road too is more direcfl, and befides, its fituation near the centre of the county the many Roman coins and urns which have been dug up here clearly prove that it was a place of principal note under the Romans, if not a city with Indec;d here do not feem a general burying place. to have been any confiderable fortifications but as the city was populous, and every way defended by ftations and camps, extending from thence to the fea, they might not think them neceffary. But what mofl ftronsrlv favours this oninion, is the name of the river on which this place and Nonvich fland. It was formerly called Wentfum, or Wenfum, and lately Werifar, which means the way or pafiage to Venta, the name of the city. Mr. Cambden and others are iniftaken when they place Tafeboro and Caflor upon the Wenfum, for they are plainly upon the Tefe, as the name Tafeboro or ad Taum, evidently prove and make Norwich, in thefe parts

;

river, ^vhich

;

;

:

:

;

;

Attlebridge,

Sec.

records agree to takes

its

hand on be fituated on to

name from Venta

A

2

;

the Yare,

which

all

Wcnfum, which and if fo, Elmham the

aion«

:

C

4 alone

is tlie

T Y

I

O

F

place that can claim that appellation.

The river which divides at Trowfe was never called Wenfum for in the Nonvich evidences mention is ;

often

made of

from Trowfe -bridge leading could be no part of that In fad, the river running through Nonvich

to the river river.

\Vavency

^vvater

name

the

retains

the

Wenfum;

fo

of

Wenfum

'till

it

meets the

and they being joined become the Yare.

;

Norwich took

its rife

from the time of the

Roman

forces quitting this ifland, about the year 418, on?

account of the dillracled the

camp or

flate

of the empire

flation at Caflor being in a

;

when

good mea-

the few remaining Romans joined with the natives, and became one people and the fituation oF Norwich .being thought preferable to that of Caftor, many of them retired thither for the better convenience of fifhing, and the eafier communication with the country, even as far as Venta which place, though almofl deferted, yet kept up fome reputation, 'till the water retiring cut off all commerce with it that way, and reduced it almoll to nothing. Thus the new formed city of Norwich laid the foundation of its prefent trade and opulence in the ruins of the ancient Venta and Cailor.

fure deferted,

:

After the defertion of the

made them '

Romans,

themfefves mailers of the is

chiefly

owing the

the

cotmtry,

further progrefs

Saxons

and

to

of this

Norih-'vvic fignias well as its prefent name and fying a northern fituation* on a winding river becaufe they ufually placed caftles at fuch fituaNorwich tions, the word wic was ufed for a caflle city,

;

;

:

therefore

may

winding of the

fignify

river

;

the it

northern

caflle

at

the

being lituated north of the

ancient flation at Cailor.

The

NOR

\V

I

C H.

5

The Saxons divided their conauefls Into feven kingdoms, each king erecfting crdtles and fortificaNorwich caftle was moft tions for his ow'n defence likely built in the time of Uffa, the firft king of :

About the EalL Angles''', foon after the year 575. 642 it became a ro\al caille, and one of the feats of Anna, king of the Eaft Angles whofe daughter on her marmage with Tombert, a nobleman or prince of tlie Girvii (the people inhabit^ ing the fenny pans of Norfolk, Cambridge, and Lincolnfliire) had this caflle, with the lands belonc:ing to it, given her by her father. About 677 this ;

Ethclfrcd,

Tombert and his wife granted to the monaflery of Ely, which they had founded, certain lands held of Norwich caille, by caftle guard to which (ervice they muR have been liable before the grant for bv ;

:

the laws of the Saxons, lands granted to the church were not liable to fecular fervice, unlefs thev were in the hands of fecuwhich proves that this was a roval caflle, and had demefnes and large poffeffions in kinoAnnas time. In the Danifh wars it \vas often taken and retaken. Rut after Alfred had fubdued the Danes, and erefted flrong caftles and forts of brick and Rone, among others he improved the fortifications of this caftle: that he was here, and that this was a royal caflle and a place of note is evident from a coin ftruck in this city about 872, having this infcription round the head at firfl fubjeci thereto whilft

lar

men

:

iELFRE,D REX, and monogram cypher N O r'^D W IE a

on the

reverfe.

Edward

or

On

the death of Alfred in 901, to the throne, who

the elder fucceeded

A *

The

3

kept

kin5;dom of the Eaft Angles contained Norfolk, Suffolk, and

part of Cambridgefhire

the inhabitants were called by the Rojrans Icenij j and afterwards UfTkincs, from their king UfFa.

C

6

T Y

I

O

F

kept tlie Danes in fubje^lion; Erickc, their king, holding thefe provinces of him peaceably 'till 913, when he rebelled: and being overthrown and (lain by King Edward, his dominions were added to the Saxon monarchy.

expelled the Danes,

dom

itthelftan, his fon,

and reduced

the

totally

whole king-

In his time the city probable that he was here in or near the year 925, a coin of his ftruck round the head is at that time being flill extant

under

his

government.

and

flourirhed greatly:

it

is

iETHELSTAN, ;

on

the reverfe

is

a crofs in the midfl, and round

it

BARBE MONETARIUS DE NORDWIE, e.

i.

Barbe,

mint-mafter of Northwic.

There was alfo a coin flruck here of Edmund, his brother and fucceffor, with his name round his head

EDMUND on the

REX,

reverfe

EADGAR MONETARIUS DE NORDWIE. i.

e.

Edgar, mint-mafter of Northwic.

In his reign and

in

that

of his fucceffor Edred,

or Eldred, the city increafed in w-ealth and extent, as is evident from the money made ufe of by the laft

named

prince about 946, with this infcription,

EADRED

REX,

and

HAUNE MONETARIUS DE NORDWIE, i.

e.

Haune, mint-mafter of Northwdc.

that about this time the city be governed by a ferjeant, named by the king to hold courts, Sec. but this is certainly a miftake, the city entirely belonging to the king, and who had a the earl who governed under the king for earldom third part of the profits annexed to the two are There his government. f,he fupport of

Mr. Watts fuppofes

began

to

;

coins

NORWICH. coins extant

973

;

of Edward the martyr,

have round the head

EDWARD

thefe

7

flruck about

REX,

and on the reverfe

LEOFWLXE MONETARIUS DE NORDWIE, e.

i.

Leofwine, mint-mafler of Northwic. likevvife three coins of Ethelrcd llruck

There were

In his rei^ the Danes began to make commotions, and had fo far the better of the kings forces that he was obliged to let them enjoy thele this encouraged them to fend parts undifturbed over for more troops, with which they fo terribly harraffcd the Englifli, that in 991, to induce them 10 quit the kingdom, they agreed to pay them ten thoufand pounds yearly this fum was levied by the name of Dane-gcid, hgiiifying in the Saxon lanbut notwithflandlng this guage a tribute or tax agreement, they ftill continued their incurfions, till by degrees thev had raifed this tax to forty thoufand pounds which reduced the Englifh fo far, that they became little better than fervants to thofc Danes the natives being obliged to %vho remained here here.

;

;

;

;

:

ground, whilft their haughty mafters de^ vou'"'d the The kingdom being thus produce. weakened, the king refolved to difpatch all tlie Danes at once and this malTacre was made on St. the

till

:

November

Brice's dav,

S\v'ain,

the Dane,

1^,

1002.

determining to revenge this

dreadful carnage, the very next year rafed Exeter to the ground, and committed many other outrages. On the king s approach he retired but being re;

inforced, he

failed with his

whole

fleet

direftly

up

Northwic, and entirely burnt and wafted the city from this dme therefore we muff date the origin of the prcfent city, the old one being then ento

;

tirely demoliflied.

Ihe Danes

A

4

proceeded thence to Thctford,

C

S

I

T Y

O

F

vvliich place tliey alfo burnt and deUroyed on their return to their fhips they were meS by UUketel, earl of the Eaft Angles, when a terrible engagement enfued; in which many of the They hereupon beEaft Anglian nobles were flain. took themfelves to their fliips, leaving Norwich quite defolate: in which ftate it continued 'till loio, In when thev returned again and fettled here. 1011 they entirely fubdued the Eaft Angles when the 'tis moft probable, they refortified this caftle Panifti, plainly or fortifications of which are works as is evident from their roiundity, exactly correfponding with their caftle, camp or fortification at

Thetford, :

;

;

Thetford.

The

next year Turkil, or Turketel, a DaniOi earl, all Norfolk, and held it under

took poflcihon of

Swain Cnute

his death in 1014,

'till

or Canute.

ering their

fpirits,

who was

The

Englifh

fent

for

fucceeded by time recov-

at this

Ethelred out of Norwlio loon drove out ;

mandy, whither he had retired Canute, and forced him to go

to

Denmark

for rein-

forcements Turkil ftill continued governor of the Eaft Angles by Etheldred's confent, vvho intrufted him with his fleet of forty ftiips but the traitor proceeding with nine of tliem to Denmark, and ad? vifmg Canute to return, he accordingly let fail with one hundred and fixty fiiips, and landed at Sand:

;

wich

in 1016.

From

the time of Swain's fecond invafion in 1010,

this city in

owing

as will

about

fifty

years increafed prodigiouily,

number of Danes who fettled here appear from Edward the Confellor's furvey,

to

the

:

who

beftowed this earldom on Harold, fon of earl Godwin, afterwards king of England. Upon earl Godwin's rebellion it was feized by the King and given

;

N O R

\V

C H.

I

9

given to Algar, fon of Leofrick carl of ClieRer ; after whofe death it fell again to the king, and re^ mained in his hands when he took the general fur-

vev of his land, afterwards called Doornfday-book liom thence we learn the flatc of the city in his time, which was exceedingly grand, if wc conlidtx the few years that had elapftd from its ioundation.

The

furvey '^ diftinguifl-ies one thoufand dirce hundred and twenty burgeffes, according to the jurifdiflions they belonged to, whereby (befides the

new borough)

it

were

appears, there

three divifions or manors, the

whole of

in it

the

city

belonging

Of thefe burgeffes one lords or owners. thoufand two hundred and thirty eight dwe^lt in that part whereof the king and the earl Jiad foe, fac and cuflom, i. e. the intire jurifdiction ; for foe is the power that any one hath to hold courts, wherein all that dwell on his land, or in his jurifdiclion, are anfwcrable to do fuit and fervice fac is the right of having all the amerciaments and forfeitures of fuch luitors: and cuflom includes all other profits, as land-gable or tax, tolls, heriots and oiher cuftoms, which diifer'd according as thev were uled in, difierent places : but every where the divifion between the king and an earl, was two parts to tlie king, and in the a third to the earl in right of his earldom, fecond part dwelt fifty of thefe burgcfles, and they belonged to Sti2;and's court, vvho had their amerciamcnts, protection or patronage i. c. to fpeak after the old Roman manner, he was their patron and they his clients but 'tis not faid he had the cuftoms of thefe burgeffes, fo that they probably belonged to the king and the earl; for the foe was fometimes one perfon s, and the cuftoms another's. This Stigand was bifliop of the dioccfe, and aftenvards to three

:

;

:

archbifliop * Toomfday.

p.-gc

i}.

C

10

I

T Y

O

F

arciibiniop of Canterbury

and

in king Edward's time ; the part of the city here referred to is St. Mar-«

Plain and Tombland, where St. Michael's formerly flood. The other thirty-tvvo dwelt in that part which was the land of eari Harrold, who had therefore

tin's

jurifdiclion over them, received their amerciaments,

and was

he was the fon of Godwin and after the ConfeiTor's death king of From hence it appears, that at that time

their patron

:

earl of Kent,

England.

this city liad tv.ent\ -live parochial

churches

at leaft

:

2nd that it exceeded Lincoln, Ipfwich, Yarmouth, Cambridge, Canterbiny, and the chief places of England, in the number of

its

burgeffes.

Such Nvas the magnitude of Norwich feven hundred years ago, being then a hundred by itfelf, and containing eight hundred and eighty-three acres of land and meadow, with a flieep's walk within its juiifdiction lo that it feems to have extended 'then about a mile beyond the prefent walls. It continued dailv increafmg till 1075, when William the Conqueror gave the earldom, city and cafile, to Ralph de Waiet, Waker, or Guader, a Norfolk man who during the king's abfence in Normandy, married Emma, daughter of William Fitz-Ofborn or Ofbert» fdler to Roger eavl of Hereford, coufni to the Conqueror, and celebrated his nuptials with Weltheof, the great earl of great pomp in this city Northumberland, Roger earl of Hereford, and many bifho^is, abbots, and barons being prefent at the (blcmnitv. EarF Ralph, on his v.edding day, pelfuadecl his guells to join with him in rebellion :;gainft the abfcnt king; to which they all confented: but earl Waltheof refleding on \vhat he had done, ;

;

:

went the next day guardian of the -plot.

The

carls

to archbidiop Lanfranc,

realm, and difcovered

who was

the

whole

of Norfolk and Hereford betook

ihemfelves

NORWICH.

i\

themfelves to arms,' and endeavoured to join their In the mean time Odo, forces, but were prevented. bifliop of Bajeux, and Jeffrey, bifliop of Conftancc,

and forced earl Ralph to retire to when, not being joined by the inhabifuch numbers as he expected, he fled into

raifed a large armv,

Norwich tants

in

;

Britannv with the chief of his adherents, leaving his wife to' defend the cadle; which flie held out till

famine obliged her

Thus

the

to furrender.

caftle,

city

and earldom paffed again

into the Conqueror's hands, and became part of the Great part of the city was burnt royal demefnes.

during this liegc; many of its inhabitants who had joined the earl fied, and others were fevefely fined and taxed by the king all the Englifli who were prefent at earl Ralphs wedding were feverely pu:

fome with lofs of their eyes, other by banifh^ mcnt, and cdiers by forfeiture of their v/holc fub-

nifhed,

llance.

In 1085 the king ordered an exa£l account to be taken of every hide of land, and the feveral owners thereof; and how much rent, cattle, Sec. every one in fliort, the fubfiance of every man in poffeffed :

England, whether in land, cattle, or money, was reand from diis record we have the exacl turned ftate of the city in the year 1086, as foUowcth. ;

'

The hundred

of Norwich

is

the king

s

land.

In Norwich, in the time of the Confeflbr, were Now Roger Bigot holds of 1520 burgeifes, &:c. the kings gift, Edifan the burgefs, and his land, churches, &c. And Wihenoc had alfo twelve acres and a half taken from the burgeifes, which now belong to Rainold, fon of Ivo St. Martin's church '

*

'

'

'

'

:

'

alfo,

CITY OF

12

with twelve acres of land, which Stigand had Edwards time, belong now to William de Noiers, who owned part ot the fee formerly of

*

alfo,

'

in king

*

* *'

* *

*

Stigand, St. Michael's church on Tombland is biihop William's, of his own inheritance ; and the church of the Holy Trinity, or St. John's of Maddermarket, which belonged to twelve burgeffes in the Confeflfor's time, is the bifhop's alfo by the king's

*

* *

* * *

'

*

* *

gift.

* Nou- at the time of the furvey there were In the borough one thoufand five hundred and fixty-five and four burgeifes, Englifhmen, who pay cuflom hundred and eigiity bordars*, who, becaufe of and in that land their povertv, pay no cuflom which Stigand held in the time of king Edward there now remain thirty-nine burgeffes, and in the fame there are nine manfions void. And in that land, whereof Harold had the foe, there are fifteen all which burgeifes, and ("cvCiUeeu manfions void and in fee, of the caftle or occupation, the are in the borough one hundred and ninety manfions void, in that which was the foe of the king and the earlt; eightv-one of them in the occupation In the borough are alfo fifty houfes, of the caflle. of thefe of which the king hath not his cuftom:|: Rainold, a man or tenant of Roger Bigot, hath and Robert ^ the two houfes and two manfions§ and the abbot (of St. Bennet) baron two houfes one ;

:

;

*

'

'

'

'

'

*

*

'

;

:

;

;

*

* Eovcbrs, were labourers who held cottages or fmall Pieces of land,

and

thro'

povcny were unable

to

pny the cu.'loms

cuftonis to have been pecuniary, and not fcrvile

have been no excufc

f That •

for nottlifcharging

;

:

and

this proves thofe

otherwife poverty couli

them.

part of the city under the jurifdiflion of the kir.g and

earl, as being

f>ir

the largeft,

was peculiarly called

the burgh.

* Thefe wore freeholds. § Void pieces of ground where formerly dwclling-houfes had flood.

ths

NOR W *

C

I

II.

!3

and Rable two houfes and two manone houfe and two manfions \vhicli two women hold ; fions and Afcolf, an Englifhman, one houre and Teobald, a man or tenant of the abbor, one houfe ; and Bur2;hard one houfe and ^Vala, one houfe; and XVilliam, a tenant of Hervy the burgefs, one houfe andMeinard, tlie ^^•atchm3n, one houfe; and Mein, the burgefs, one houfe and Hervcy, the inand Ralph, the arbalirter||, two valid, one houfe houfes and one manfion and Herebcrd, the ditcher, three houies and Roger, the Pictavian, two houfes; and Meinard, a tenant of the abbot of St. Bcnnet, one houfe and Peter, a man of the abbot of Sc. Edmund, one manfion; and Everwin, a burgefs, one houfe and Baidewin one houfe and William one houfe; Englifliraan'" one houfe and Gerard, the watchman, one houfe and Rodbert, the iorim.crr, one manfion; and Hildebrand, the lorimer, one houfe and Godwin, a burgefs, one houfe and William, a m.an of Hermer, one houfe and Gilleand Fulbert, a bert, the -watchman, one houfe and Walter certain pried of Hcrmcr, one houfe one houfe 'and Reinold, ihe Ion of Ivo, one houfe and Richarct' de Senibcr one houfe and Hugh, a man of William de vScoies (le Efcois, or the Scot) one houfe and the tenants of the biiliop ten houfes and in the biihop's own court (or palace) fourteen manfions, which king William gave ;

*

;

'

;

* '

;

*

*

;

'

;

*

;

*

;

'

;

'

'

;

*

' * *

* *

;

;

;

;

;

*

*

;

;

;

'

;

'

'

;

;

'

*

;

;

*

'

'

;

to Erfaft,

for the principal feat

of the bifhopric §; and.

*

II

Thefe

arbalifters

than archers

;

for

feem rather

they were

Doomfday-book among

men

the great

to

Have been the makers of crofs-bovvs

of confiderable note, and reckoned la

men

of the county.



Anglicus, hence the furname of Englifli. -j-

The

fadler or bridle-maker.

§ This proves that Norwich wns defigned the time of Herbert that in:enc

;

:

to

be the

biiliop's fee

but tho' the Conqueror gave the houfe*,

yet neither Erfaft nor William had

before

&c^

vvicii

their ufual reHdencc ia

C

14

I

T

O

Y

F

the arbaliiler, one houfe and fwd and William de Scoics one houfe ; and Meinard one houfe and die abbot of Ely A.nd die bur2;errcs held forty-three one manfion. And this whole town chapels in the borough. to the king and one hunpays 70I. bv weight dred fliillings, by tale, as a free gift to the queen, and sol. blanch, or and an ambling palfrey and twenty fliilto the earl filver uncoined, St. lings, by tale, as a free gift to Godric. Simon and St. Jude's church was now held by bifhop William, and Wicman's land was held by

and

Giflcbcrt,

manfions

;

;

|!,

;

;

;

Reinold, the fon of Ivo, reign.

—Of

the

burgeffes

&:c. as in

who

the Confeflbr's

dwelt in Norwich,

twenty-two are gone away, and dwell in Beccles, a town of the abbot of St. Edmund and fix dwell in Humilgar hundred, and have forfaken the burgh ; and in King's Torp or Thorp, one and in the and under William de land of Roger Bigot one Senteelcr one. Thofe de Richard and Noiers one who fled, and thofe remaining, are quite irapoverifhed, either by carl Ralph's forfeitures, by fire, ;

;

;

;

In this by the king's tribute, or by W^aleran. borough the bifhop may xiave one moncyer, or Here was a certain decayed houfe, mint-mafler. which Ralph, the fon of Walter, liad of the king'^ gift; and \Valter, the deacon, hath one houfe: " and Korwicli

;

the

reafon of wluch feems to have been that Erfaft had re-

folved upon fixing his fee at the rich

who had

Herbert,

abbot and

Monks

the

abWy

fo ftrenuoufly oppofed

it

they not only hindered their projefl takinj; corfirma'.ion from

the

ar

Bury

fame intention, cculd carry

pope,

at

;

but neither he nor

their point

the court of

effect

;

;

for the

Rome,

that

but alfo obtained

a

of their total exemption from tpifcopal ju-

rifdiftion. (I

At

this

pound we4);ht

T)Ound.

in ;

time, and

loii^^

after, a

pound of pood money by

weight; every pcjany weighing what

v/c

now

tale,

was a

a

penny-

call

20 pence weighed an ounce, and 240 pence, or 12 ounces, a

NORWICH. men

and two

took away from

H

Sepulchre's, or

St.

of meadow, which, afterwards the prieJil had again, of the grant of Eari Ralph had fourLe.ni acres of land, the iheriiF. and an hali of meadow, which afacre one and church, two

Bcrftreet

acres

terwards Alward de Niweron (or Newton) held. land of the burgeilcs in the hundred of FIumilait was alwavs eighty acres, and there we;c

The

and

thirteen bordars,

there are of

and

reckoned

at

three acres

;

tis

meadow

one carucato; and the whole

In the new burgh'' there were Frenchmen, and fix Englilh, and by cuftom every one paid yearly d. beiides of all which the king had two parts, forfeitures Now there are fortv-one the earl the third. and French burgeffes in the demefncs of the king and and Roger Bigot hath fifty and Ralph the earl de Bellefago fourteen and Hornier eight and Roand Fulcher. a man of the bert the arbalifler five abbot, one and Ifaac one and Ralph Vice de Lien one; and in the earfs bakehoule Robert Blund hatk three and Wimer hath one decayed manfif?n. All this land of the burgeffes Avas in the demefnei of earl Ralph, and he granted it to the king to make a new borough between himfcif and the king; and all thefe lands, as well of the knights as of the burgeffes, pay to the king his cuftom. There is alio in the new borough a certain church, which earl Ralph built, and gave it to his chapis

valued

thirtv-fix

at 13s. 4d.

burgeffes,

1

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

lains

;

now

a certain pried of the

Waia, holds

itt

by the kings

named

flicriff's,

gSt,

and

'cis

worth 60s.

* This new borough was chiefly inhabited by Frenchmen, tnined the pleafantelt St.

Peter of Mancroft.

The two

fireets

to St. Giles's church, are called in old

and port •j-

is

S:. Peter's

coq-

ani

leading from the market-pla:*

deeds Upper and Lower Nev.'DO:*:

an old world for a gate, and fometimes

This was

ar.d

part of the city, viz. the Parifhcs of S. Giles

of Mancroft church.

fignifies

»

to-.vp,

G

i6 '

'

T Y

I

O

F

and fo long as Robert Blund held the county, he had thence every year an ounce of gold.' fio s.

Upon

the Conqueror's

Roger Bigot held

death,

the caftle for Robert Cunhofe, duke of Normandy, Availing the citv and county, elder brother of Rufus ;

and fpoiiing all thole who refufed to join Aviih him. At length a peace was concluded between king William Rufus and his brother one article of which being, that the lands and inheiitances of all fuch as had alTifled Robert Ihould be rePiored, Roger Bigot remained in pofleffion of the caftle, and held it ;

peaceably during

began

to recover

this

Lofinga, then billiop hither

;

after

king's reign.

The

city

now

which determined Plerbert de of Thetford, to remove the fee

itfelf,

having made

many

unfuccefsful at-

^Thus was the fee fixed and in 1096 the firft ftone of 1094 laid from which time the was church ; the cathedral in increafing wealth, trade and daily citv has been

tempts to fix here April 9,

it

at

Bury. ;

buildings.

Hcnrv

I.

on

his accelTion to the

great oppofition from

many

crown met with who were

of the nobles,

in the interefl of his elder brother, Robert Duke of Normandy ; but Roger Bigot ftrongly efpoufmg his

In the firil year caufe, became a great favourite. of his reign, the king gave him Framlingham in Suffolk, and continued him conflabie of the caftle He was fucceeded in this governuntil his death. ment by his fon W^illiam Bigot on whofe deceafe ;

Hugh

Bigot, his brother,

who

inherited his

honour

and eflatc, was appointed conftable of the caftle, and fole governor of the city ; and fo continued 'till 1122, in which year the king kept his Chriftmas at Norwich \\ hen being plcafed with the reception he :

met

with, he granted the citizens a charter, contain-

ing

NORWICH. ing

fame franchifcs and

tlie

17

as the

liberties

city

of

London then enjoved. From this time the city was governed by a provofl, or portreve, chofen by the of whofe office was to colled

king,

part

kings

duties.

The Q-ovemmcnt

all

the

of the citv was now, for the firfl the conftablc

time, fevered from that of the caflle

;

of which had always heretofore been fole governor, and anfwcred the king his two parts of the profits, referving the third to himielf and the flierilf who was then under him, was the officer that colleded them. No one can fay exaclly what were the liberties granted to, and exercifed by the city in this king's reign, for want of copies of the records but whatever they were, they enjoyed them peaceably to his death in 1135. ;

;

King Stephen granted his favourite

Hugh

the

llrument in advancing him therefore, takhig this

cuRody of

who

Bigot,

Tvas

to the

the caflle to

a principal in-

crown

;

the citizens

made what inteobtain a new charter,

opportunity,

reft they could with the king to veiling the government of their city in coroners

room of

and

but the affair took a contrary turn to what they expected for the king feizcd die caflle, and all the liberties of the city, into his own hands and foon after granted to his natural Ion William, the town and burgh of the city of Norwich, in which were one thoufand two in the

bailiffs,

provofls

;

;

;

hundred and thirty-eight burgeffes,- and alio the caftle and burgh thereof, m which were one hundred and twenty-three burgeffes that held of the king in burgage

;

(the -whole rerit

of the

city,

fee-farm, being then 700I. per ann.)

including the and alio the

royal revenue of the vvhole county of Norfolk excepting what then belonged to the bifhopric, religi;

ous

li.oufes,

and odier

earls

B

;

and particularly exceptin?;

C

i8

I

T Y

O

F

cepting the third penny of the cuftoras, the propetey Hugh Bigot as earl. So that to fatisfy Hugh, we find that the king had made him carl of Norfolk,

of

and granted

the third part of

the profits

of

the

and the two part3 county to him in inheritance which belonged to the crown he afligned to his fon ;

In the mean time the citihis heirs. king for a regrant of their earneAly to the zens fued but were put liberties, which they at laft obtained under the government of a provofl as formerly. And in 1139 the citizens paid into the hands of the fherifF 25I. as a compofition aid to the king, for this their pardon, and the relloration of their liberties.

William and

;

Hugh

Bigot

being dilpleafed

at his

lofmg the

and not thinking his earldom a fufficient recorapence, in 1140 openly declared for Maud the emprefs. Upon thcfe commotions the liberties of caflle,

Norwich were again his alleo-iancc,

feized

:

but Bigot returning to

them all and had a new charter but without any alteration or enlargethe citizens were reftored to

again granted them ment of privileges. at

intercelfion,

his

;

the year 1 150, the king fent William Marfewer or fleward, to Norwich, as his dev.ho fummoned the chief perfons of the coun-

About tcl,

puty

his ;

meet him in council fir Robert Fitz Gilbert and fir Adam de Hornyngefheth were charged with confjjiring, together with Ralph de Aland fled and Roger his brother, to feize the king to murenemies or him deliver to his up cither to der him: hereupon the abbot of St. Edmund claimed declaring they were men thelc two knights as his of the bleffed martyr St. Edmund, and therefore could not be made to anfwcr in this place, or any where clfe, but in the court of St. Edmund at Bury; ties

of Norfolk and Suffolk

in the bifhop's garden.

At

to

this aflcmbly,

;

;

for

;

W

N O k

C H.

I

ig

of which he appealed to all the bifiiops, abbots, barons, knights, and gentlemen there prefent; and therefore demanded refpite of judgment, for the truth

This 'till he could have a conference with the king. being granted, the abbot, with his barons, monks, and friends, on application to the king were told, that all juftice originally belonged to the county alid court there they muft, therefore, return back again to the county and council from whence they came and whatever thev did, as to allowing the liberties On producing or not, the king would abide by. their cliarters and liberties, in confcquence hereof, to the fliire mote of the countv, or countv court, fif Henry de Glanvil oblerved, that he had conllanilv ;

attended that court above

years,

fifty

them, that he remembered a queftion nature to have arifen

the

in

and affured of the

county-court,

like

in the

time of Henry

I, concerning the liberties of St. Edmund, and the eight hundreds and an half; when it was allowed by the court, that all pleas, fuits, and

concerning any perfon in the lithe pleas of murder or treafure found, belonged to the court of St. Edmund, and were to be tried bv the abbot, his ftevvard, or other officer appointed by him. Upon this, the bifhops and barons then prefent returned the liberties as good, and delivered their tefliraonies thereof actions whatfocver, berties of St.

Edmund, except

William Mattel, the

king's flew^ard; which being he immediately confirmed the prefentment and ordered the abbot to appoint a day, that he might have juflice done him in his court. Soon after the king went to Bury, where, bv the mediation of the barons of the church, and thofe of the king, he pardoned the two knights, and to

notified

to the king, ;

thus the matter ended.

Henry reign,

II.

took

A. D.

1135, and the

this city, caftle,

B

2

and

firft

liberties,

year of his

from Wiliiam

C

20

I

T Y

O

F

Ham, the natural fon of king Stephen but as a recompence, reRored to him all thole lands which his father held in the rei2:;n of Henry I. He prevailed likevvife with Hugh Bigot to yield up all his caftles, whereby the whole right became veiled in the crown; the king governing the city by the flieriff", who paid the profits and aids arifmg therefrom into the exchequer: and this year William de Nova Villa, or Nevill, fheriff of Norfolk, paid fifty marks for the aid due from the city. In 1138 the city gave the king 414I. 13s. and 4d. for the fecond fcutage of Wales; and in 1160 the flieiiff accounted for 20ol« ;

for the tallage of the city for that year.

About the year 1163, Hugh Bigot was reftored and title of earl of Norfolk, and at

to the dignity

the fame time appointed con liable of the callle of

Norwich

by which means he became

:

nor of the

and the

flieriff

fole

as being then in the king

gover-

hands ; from that time a6led wholly under

city,

s

his authority.

On felt

the 26th of Januarv, 1165, an earthf|uake

and

here,

bridgefliire

;

was

over Norfolk, Suffolk, and Camthe fliock of which was fo great that all

the bells rang in the fleeples,

and many people were

thrown down. In 1167 the burgeffes of Norwich paid 200I. towards the aid, or portion, for marrying the king's and the mint-maflers 25aid ten maiks. daughter ;

On ther

;

the rebellion of prince

Roger Mowbray, Hugh

Henry Bigot,

againft his fa-

and others who

joined him, got under his leal charters, confirmations, Sjc. of lands and revenues, as a recompence particularly Bigot got this caftle, for their Icvvices ;

city,

hon(nir of hye,

8:c.

confiinied to

him and

his

heirs

NORWICH. iieirs.

91

This bufinefs was tranfa^lcd

and upon

at Paris in 1 1 74 ; they immediately aarainft the old kins;.

the conclufion

commenced

lioftilifies

of

it,

In the conrfe of thefe troubles the eaii of Flan-

hundred and eighteen knights, or men of arms who, joining The earl earl Hugh, marched direclly to Norwich. reached the city the 18th of June, and, on his being refufed admittance, immediately affauked and took it. Being highly provoked at the rcfiflance he met with, he plundered the town, and burnt great ders fent over Rait de la Haye, with three ;

part of ers,

it

;

toGk

all

the principal inhabitants prifon-

and fined them heavily

for their

entering the caflle, he fortified

it

ner he could, and received into (on of French and Flemings, as

ranfom

in the it

it

befl:

thea

:

man-

as large a garri\vd.s

containing.

capable of

_

King Henrv having defeated the king of Scots, marched directly againft Bigot and took his caftle of Walton in Suiiolk, which he demohnied intirelv. ;

He

then

advanced

to-.vards

thoie of

Framlinghara

and Bungay, which were garrifoned with no more than five hundred foldier^"; Bigot now defpairins; of any further fupply, was obliged to compound matters with the king, at the expence of one thoufand marks, and the furrendering up all his caftles the king, on his part, granting leave to all the Flemings :

Norwich or elfewhere, as well as to came with Ralf de la Haye, to return into their own countrv, upon taking an oatli never to enter England again in an hoftile manner. of Bigot's party

at

the foldiers that

The

king, to make the citizens fome amends for damages they had fuilained in oppofing carl Hugh, taxed them in the year 1175 only 16I. in the

B

9,

lieu

:

C

22

I

T Y

O

F

From this lieu of ihc whole profits of their city. time the city began to recover itfeif, through the king's clemency; the whole continuing in his hand^ 'till 1182, when the citizens petuloned to have their which was granted ihcm, on payliberties reftored ment of a fine of eighty marks. ;

The citizens having thus regained their liberties, were very exa£l in the fupport of them indeed in :

84 they carried tile matter too far for forae of them being warned to ferve on juries, either at the views of frank-pledge, or court-letes, belonging to or at the letes belonging to the kings caftle, refufed ferving and pretencity, the within others ded an exemption therefrom by their charter. The affair being tried, the citizens were cafl, and fined 1

1

;

;

nine marks to the king for

the future in that

;

and commanded

lete,

to ferve

or view, wherein they

dwelt.

On

November, iiSg, in the reign cf Roger, fon of Hugh Bigot, v;as created, earl of Norfolk, and ifeward of the king's houfhold. By his means the citizens loon after obtained as ample a charter as the ^^ity of London then had for in 1193, in confideration of two hundred marks to be paid into the exchequer, by the citizens of Norwich, the year following, the king granted the paying into city in fee-farm to them and their heirs the exchequer, a fee-farm rent of 180I. a year; out of which they had an annual difcount of 25s. for lands and meadows in the fuburbs, which king Stephen had granted to his nuns at Canowe ; and this fee-farm exceeded all profits that the king ever received from the city, by more than 40I. a year. The original charter in the Guildhall, is very fair, and hath a perfe^l broad feal of red wax, of this the 27th of

Richard

I.

;

]s.ing s,

appendant

to

it.

NORWICH.

23

In the firft year of the reign of king John, John de Grey, a NorfoLk man, afterwards bifhop of Norwich, on the promife of three hundred marks to be paid by the citizens, obtained a confirmation of all their Hbenies. This charter is fiill extant in the Guildliail at Norwich, with a broad feal of green wax appendant thereto and bears date at Caen in Normandy, September 22, 1199. ;

In 1202, the affize of bread was fixed by the baker of Jefferv Pitz-Peter, lord chief juflice of England and all were bound to obey it, under penalty of the pillory. :

The following year, the citizens convicled and executed feveral elfavers''' or triers of money, that "were arrefted in diis city; but it appearing from their charter, that all perfons belonging to the mint were excepted out of their jurifdiclion, the king in by

1205, for this offence, feized all their liberties, the liands of the flierilf of Norfolk.

In 1215, Roger Bigot, earl of Norfolk, joining the rebellious barons, the king feized his caflle, and

William Marfhail, Robert, joint

by

patent,

earl of

Pembroke, and John

Fitz-

of Norfolk and Suffolk, \vere, conffables of the caflles of Nor-

fheriffs

made

wich, and of Orford in Suffolk. Their appointment, however, was but of fl:iort duration ; for on the 19th of July, in the fame year, Hubert de Burgh, a Norfolk man, and afterwards earl of Kent, was

nominated

to the

This king, .concihate

in.

governm-ent of both of them. oider to raife money, as well as to of his fubjecls, granted a

the affeclions

B 4

greater

* Thefe eflaj-ers were perfons deputed by money was ceined agreeable to the ftardard :

Vibed by of

little

the mint mafters, the cu;rent coin

value.

the king, to fee that the

but

became

many

of them being

fo debafed, as to

be

C

^4 greater

I

T Y

O

F

number of

charters than any of his predche incorporated Lynn, Eye, Dunvvich, Ipfwich, Yarmouth, Sec. and likewife granted to the citizens of London the privilege of ele(rting a mayor. In this reign there arofe a conteft between the monks and citizens, concerning the lattcr's right of commoning with the priors tenants, on the lands between Eaton, Lakenham, Hertford Bridges, and Norwich: but the matter was adjufted by a fine

ceffors

had done

:

levied in the king's court. Vv'ho had obtained a grant of kingdom from the pope, on his depofing king John to effe6l which he had brought over a large force (iill continued to ravage the kingdom after that prince's death. Having taken the caftles of Heningham and Orford, he marched fonvard to Norwich and leizing the caflle, put a garrifon into it, and m.ade William de Bellemont, or Beaumont,

Lewis, the dauphin,

this

;

;

;

his

marfhal, confiable thereof: he then plundered

the

citizens,

and reduced the

city

to

a very low

condition.

In 1217, the king taxed his royal demefnes the citizens paid lool. Yarmouth fixty marks

;

;

wich one hundred marks to have been thtn in

wich

thirty

;

(which fhews that town

;

a flourifliing condition)

and Orford

and

DunIpf-

fifteen.

In 1223, the citizens obtained a grant, that the government of the city fhould be in four bailiffs, inflead of a provofl ; but they had any charter for it.

it

does not appear that

In 1224, the faflious barons were obliged to furrender up all the royal caflles into the king's hands; and. amonell the reft, Roger Bigot was forced to deliver

up

that of

Norwich. In

;

NOR In

W

I

G H.

25

1226, the king acquainted the citizens, that tallage, or tax, of Norwich, now granted

though the

on all ancient royal demefnes, amounted to four hundred and fixty marks yet for the value he had for the citizens, he had fixed it at two hundred marks only. ;

In 1228, the citizens petitioned the king for a charter, with a confirmation of their antient privileges, and an addition of new ones particu-

new

;

power of trying all writs of novel diiTeihn'". This was granted on the payment of eighty mai"ks and fix palfreys to the king. larly the

About for

had

fubrifled

between the monks and

citizens,

this time, the animofities that

many

years,

The former having broke out wirli great violence. charters of liberties, prior to thole of the citizens, were extremely uneafy at the privileges granted them by Richard I. and his lacceffjrs as thev pretend«?d that they interfered v/ith their ancient liberties which both parties were very ready to flretch to the utmoft. The monks being refolute, fo far enraged the populace, that they forcibly entered the convent, and plundered and burnt part of it. The king being then at Bromholm in Norfolk, fent the OierifF of Norfolk to take incjuiii!:i')n of the depredations This the burgciles would that had been committed. neither fuffer him to do, nor take the inquifition themfelves, as their charter obliged tliem whereupon, in the 19th year of his reign. A. D. 1254, he ieized all their liberties into his own hands but ihortly after, upon their fubmiihon, rv:fl.ored them. ;

:

;

In *

A

UTir,

which

lies for

Services, ia time of peaCe

:

one ejsfled out of his lands, tenement', or

by virtue of

perfons fo pay their aids and cuftoms,

this writ,

whg

they could compel

h.id hitherto rcfufed to

do

all

fo.

CITY

^o

In 1239, Ralf, abbot of Ranifeye, Williavn of York, provoft of Beverly, Henry dc Bath, RogeiThirkelby, Jeremy de C ax ton, and Gilbert de Preiton, were appointed to fettle all matters in difpute between the convent and city but they n«t effeding :

it,

the king himfelf

came

an agreement between the

hither

and it feeras made and convent for

;

citizens

:

finding that the difpute arofe by reafon of their lithe monks claiming a free exercife of all berties their privileges, in their own jurifdi^lion and lands; ;

the citizens afferting a right of exercifmg theirs, within the menaftery and lands of the monks, he

and

commanded, moleft the

to the convent;

and

own

monks

exercife

jurifdi61ion,

the

in

fliould ufe all their

citizens

the

that

privileges in their

who,

but fhould not

lands or places belonging

in all fuch places fliould tife

own privileges, as 244, when the tallage

their

Accordingly, in

1

heretofore. for the city

men, or tenants of the prior of Norwich, who dwelt in Norwich, and held of the kin<^ lands and tenements there, were taxed at 201. part of the faid lool. which they v/ere obliged to pay: fo that, although the prior carried his point, Vvas laid at looi. the

the citizens carried theirs too prior,

and

tax of the

his tenants, city,

for

to

;

fo fat as to oblige the

pay the

fifth

enjoying the fame

part of the iibcrlics

as

they did.

In 1240, the cuflody of the

caftles of

Norwich

Hamon

Paifelew^

and Orford were committed to fheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk

to hold the fame during the king's pleafurc, under the fame form, and with the fame authority, as Henry dc Neckton, late flierifF, held them. ;

In 1249, the

mouth

citizens fued

the burgcffes

for detaining their veffcls,

of Yar-

and not permitting

and convent demanded four thoufand marks,

for

damages.

;

N O R

W

I

C H.

27

proceed with their goods and merchandizes to the city, as they had ahvays heretofore done.

them

to

In 1252, the citizens, having regained their liberties, obtained the king s roval Hcence, impowering them to incloCe their city with a ditch.

To Qr^r,, the king granted a fecond charter: beloved citizens of Noi-wich, that they, and their heirs for ever, have this privilege throughout In



'

1

his



*

all

his realm,

and

jurifdiilion

;

viz.

that neither

they, nor their goods, in whatever place they be found in his jurifJiclion, be arrefled for any debt

'

^

which thev



fliall

not be

pal debtors themfelves

.*

;

bondfmen unlefs

it

for,

or princi-

happen, that the

and jurifand have fufficient to pay part, or all their and the aforefaid citizens lliall neglecT: to do debts juftice to the creditors of the laid debtors and they can plainly prove that they have fo neglccled: and we forbid, under the penalty of ten pounds to be forfeited to us, any one unjuftly to vex, (hiturb, or molefl them, in any cafe, contrary to the aforeGiven l3y our hand, at Woodllock, (aid liberty. the 3d day of June, in the 3gth year of our reign.'

debtors themfelves be of their fociety, *

dii61ion,

'

;

*

;



*

*

<

The next year the king came to this city, as is evident from the charter of liberties granted to the port of Yarmouth: it being dated March 25, 1256, by

the king at Norwich.

On

the

fame day he

like-

wife gianted his third charter to this city, as folThat the citizens, for e\er, have the return loweth ' of all writs, as well of fummons out of our exchc'

:

' •



*

"

all other things relating to our city of Norwich, and the liberty of the faid city and that the faid citizens anfwer all debts and demands belonging to them at our exchequer, by their own ' hands

quer, as of

;

'

'

'

C

28 hands

"'

and

;

ours, for the

T Y

I

that

no

O

F other

or

(heriff,

enter the

future,

bailiff,

aforefaid,

city

of to

take diftreffes for any debts, unlefs for neglefi of the citizens doing

it

and

;

that

none of them be

forced to plead out of the aforefaid city, for anv offences committed in that city, contrary to the

and that all tenor of their charters and liberties merchants, enjoying their liberties and merchan;

dizes,

pav

to the lot,

fcot,

and

aids of the afore-

wherever they dwell, as they ought, and ufed to do and that for the future, no gild, (or fraternity of merchants) be held in the aforefaid citizens,

:

faid city,

we



*

damage of

to the

the

faid city.

And

on pain of forfeiture of ten pounds to us, that any one prefume to difturb, molefl, or trouble them, contrary to this liberty and grant. Giyen by our hand, at Norwich, the 23th day of March, in the 40th year of our reign.' In

forbid,

1263, profecutions

were commenced againfl

feveral of the ciLizcns, for firing one another's houfes,

and many other enormities and indeed the w^hole the bifhop city was divided into various faflions and clergy took part with the barons that v.-ere in arms againfl the king; whilfl the city bailiffs and commons, with thofe of the caflle fee, declared for T. hcfe unhappy divifions revived the royal party. the old grudges which had fo long fubfifled between the citizens and monks, and exafperated them againfl :

:

each other

many In

to that degree,

as to occafion the lofs of

lives.

1265, Simon Mundford, and his adherents,

fcized all the

kings

caflles,

and committed the cuftody,

* 'Tiil

tliii

time, the

bailiffs

city, to the flieriff of Norfolk,

were anfwerable and he returned

but for the future, the bailiffs weie to anfwer

it

for the fee-farm of the it

into the exchequer

by themfelTCs.

^

NORWICH.

2g

todv of them to their oxvn friends having alfo gotten the king s perfon Into their power, they obHged him to fend circular letters to the flierihs of the fc:

veral counties,

and particularly

to

Roger Bigot,

earl

of Norfolk, and conftable of the caftle of Norwich, commanding them to oppofe all attempts that might be made again ft the provifions of Oxford, and the But the king ordinances agreed upon at London. having routed the barons at Everfham, remo\ed all

which the confederates had appointed, and amongft the reft Roger Bigot in whofe ftead John de Vallibus, or Vaux, was made conftable of this caftle, and fherifF of Norfolk and Suifolk and foon after, on account of the late difturbances in the city, he was ordered to enter it, noiwithllandmg the con (tables

;

;

Its liberties.

In 1266, about the middle of December, the difplaced barons, with fir John de Evile, or EyviHe, at their head, entered the city where they killed and ;

number of perfons and havinotown, canied away with them in tri-

im.prifoned a great

plundered the umph many of

its

;

weakhieft inhabitants.

In 1267, the bailiffs were fummoned to anfwer for many murders and diforders latel)' committed here but they contemptuouily departing the court, without leave, the king feized the liberties, and kept them in his hands.

the

;

On

the 2gth of June, 1271, whiift the monks prime, the cathedral fleeple was fo violently ftruck ^v'ith lightning, that feveral large ftones were

were

at

thrown down with fuch force, that they funk a confiderable way into the ground and the whole choir was filled with ftench and fmoke but happily no lives were loft. The city and adjacent country alfo ;

:

received

C

3a

T Y

I

O by

received confiderable damage,

happened

a great flood

which

this year.

In 127

at a fair

2,

granted to the church by char-

and then kept on

ter,

1^

Eafler Sunday, but

upon Touibland,

Trinity

Sunday (probably, on

now on

the TJmrfday before) monaftery gates, there

before the

between the citizens and the fervants of the monaftci y in which fome of the citizens were killed warrants were thereupon iffued out, in confequence of the city coroners inqucft, to take this the murderers wherever they could be found fo highly provoked the monks, who infifted that the place where the difpute arofc was in their jurifdiction, and entirely exempt from that of the city ma-, giftrates, that they procured a number of armed ^rofe a quarrel

;

:

:

men, fhut

up

their

gates,

fired

upon

the

citi-

and wounded fevcrai of At length, on the Sunday before St. Lawthem. which rence's day, they fallied out into the city they ravaged all that day and night, committing many extravagant infolences, killing feveral merchants and citizens, and plundering their houfes. zens as they paffcd by,

;

The

magiltratcs

imniediaicJy difpaiched

letters,

to

and oracquaint the king with thefe proceedings dered the citizens to meet them at ten o'clock the next day in the market-place: \vhen, the populace being enraged at the depredations of the monks, ;

proceeded dire£lly to the priory, and afTaulted every

fide

:

letting fire to

the great gates

;

it

St.

on Al-

church, which flood 'dole to them; the great almonry the church doors, and great tower; which were all burnt down in a very fhort fpace of time.

bert's

;

In

fine,

the whole church,

ry's chapel)

entertaining hall,

belonging

to

(except the Virgin

Ma-

together with the dormitory, refectory,

it,

and the infirmary, with the chapel and alraofl all the buildings in the court,

N O R clerks,

of the fub-deacoiis, killed in the cloifter,

and

out,

5i

many

confin-ned:

precincl of the monaflerv

and

C H.

I

and feme laymen, were

were

court,

W

killed in the city

The monafteiy Avas

others were carried and others imprifoned.

;

;

plundered of all the gold,

filver,

books, veftm^nts, and whatever the fire had not deflroyed the monks, except two or three

holv

vefTels,

;

Not larisHed wiih this very aged ones, haA-ing fled. they continued for the fpace of three -days fucccHiveand favourers Iv, to Hay and plunder the tenants, of the church I'he prior himfcli fled to Yarmouth, where getting together a company of anned men, he entered the city f\vord-tn-~hand, and in his turn, and deflroAing tlitir fell to kiUing the citizens, Ijoufes.

The that if cither

king, on hearing thefe matters, gave orders, any Norwich men came to any of his ports, in England or France, they fhould be feized,

and imprifoned and, further commanded all the and nobles of England, to meet him at Bury on St. Giles's day, to counfel and advile him what was to be done in a matter of fuch importance. in the mean time, Roger de Skerning, biOiop of Norwich, had convened his cler2,"V at Eve in Suffolk \\lien an excommunication a\ as denounced againft all perfons concerned in thefe outrages, and die whole city put under an interdicl. ;

biQiops,

;

On *at

St."

Giles's day, the king held his parliament

Bury; and, by

their advice,

punifh thefe violent outrages.

September 14; when, took off the interdiel.

at

came

He

to

Norwich, to

entered the

his requeft,

the

city,'

bifliop

The kings jufticcs caufed of the offenders to be drawn by horfes through the ftrcets till they died others were hanged and quartered; and their bodies afterwards bunu;

thirty-four

;

lh€

*

CITY OK

S2 v/om.in

the

alive

that

fired

firfl

the

was

gates

and twelve of the inhabitants

;

tiirat

forfeited their

goods to rlic king: the cit\Mvas aiffl; fined three thoufand marks, towards rebuilding the church, and lool. for a cup, weighing ten pounds, in gold and it appearing that William de Brunham, then prior, was in a great meafure the caufe of things coming to this extremity, the king committed him to the biPxiops prifon, and fcized all the manors, and whatever belonged to tJie prioiy, into his own hands. ;

He

fcized alfo the city,

and

liberties,

iis

cultodes, or keepers, to govern

On and

it

in-his

and alTigned name.

the 2yth of September, the king left

William dc Brunham,

the day after,

and hands

voluntarily, bifliop's

freely,

Norwich; the prior,

refigned the priory into the

when William de Kirkcby was room to whom the kine, fliortlv after, ;

elecled in his

reflored the

:

whole revenues of the m.onaftery.

On

the 1 Sth of Odober, on the citizens refufing pay the lam they had been amerced lor damages, a)id on the the bifiiop again interdi^led the city

to

:

icth of

November

the king died, being then in pof*

feffion of the caflle,

the city,

and

all its liberties.

Edward I. Roger Bigot, earl of Nor1 had the cuflody of the caflle granted to him and William Gih'ard was appointed fiierifl of tlie count} The interdict, laid on the city, was not taken oif 'till Chriftraas-Eve, 1273; and was renewed again the day after Epiphany but at the reIn 1273,



folk,

.

;

of Robert de Kilwarby, archbifhop elect of Canterbury, it v/as again taken off 'till the octaves

qucft

of Eafier

;

and then renewed the

third time.

In 1274, matters contmucd unfettled between the of \vhom, the prior monks, and citizens and

bifliop,

;

;

NORWICH.

33

In the beginning of November, they fent damages. two of their monks to Rome, -vvith a relation of complaining of the citizens, and the whole affair citing them to appear, and anfwcr in the pope's The pope, hoAvever, delegated the matter court. to be tried before the bifhops of Ely and London ; but juft as the fuit began, the bifhop of London ;

who left dying, it was again referred to the pope and at length the fole determination to the king ;

;

ihe affair was fettled, as foUoweth 1.

All parties

2.

The

fliall

become

real friends.

citizens fliall within the fpace of fix years,

pay three thoufand marks towards rebuilding the church viz. five hundred marks a year. ;

3. They fliall give, to the ufc of the church, a pix or cup, weighing ten pounds, in gold, and worth

one hundred pounds in monev, to ferve crament, at the high altar in the cathedral.

at the fa-

4. The monks may make new gates to their monaflery; and go into any part of the city, injuring

no man And,

own

in his property.

laftly,

fome of the chief make a journey

charge, fhall

citizens,

to

fure the pope of the truth of this agreement

humbly

to

their

at

Rome,

to af;

and

beg his pardon and peace.

Thefe conditions being complied with, the king its ancient privileges and li»

reflored the city to all berties.

Matters being thus

November

fettled,

the bifhop took

:' and in 1276, the pope's general abfclution arriving from Rome, was publifhcd, about Palm-Sunday, by the priors

oft the interdici,

1,

1275

«f the Minorites and Dominicans in Norvsich, by order

;

C

34 order of the

I

T Y

O

F

arclibifhop of Canterbury.

Immedi-

ately after this, the prior obtained a patent to ere6l

what gates he pleafed, leading into the monafterv and to open and fhut them at his pleafure; and alfo to build a gate, twenty feet broad, thereto adjoining;

which mod probably sate and brid2;e.

are thofe

now

called Bifliop's-

In 1277, the king made a military progrefs thro' Norfolk, Suffolk, and Effex, to fee the flate of his caftles and forts and to 2;ive orders for their being: put into good condition, and fupplied with all necefTary {lores : and during this progrefs, he kept his Eafler at Norwich. :

In 1278, the cathedral, being now finifhed, was confecrated on Advent-Sundav, by William de Middleton, that day inthroncd billiop of

king, Eleanor his queen,

John de

Norwich: the

Chifil,

bifhop of

London, 7 homas de Cantelupe, bifliop of Hereford, Stephen, biOiop of Waterfo-rd, and many other earls and barons being prefent at the iolcmnity. In 12 So, (?Qnfiderab}e damage was done to this and the circumjacent country, by tempelts and

city,

inundations.

In 1284, the king was in Norfolk, during the time of Lent and at Ealter the liberties were ieized, on account of the citizens having taken up, and executed clivers perfons, without the king s warrant, for fa«^s committed out of their jurifdi6lion: one of them, who was hanged, came to life again, and afterwards obtained the king's pardon. On St. Peter s day the liberties were reftored, on the citizens accounting with the exchecjucr, for all arrears then ;

due.

la

NORWICH.

55

in the courfe of the next year, they obtained a charter, dated at Weflmmfter, May 7, 1285» which recites and confirms all their former ones j

new

but grant them no ne^v privileges. in England ^ver^ In 1286, May 2, all the Jews apprehended, and their fynagogue in Nonrich dc'"•

They

ftroyed.

and in

neverthelefs remained here,

the other cities of England,

1290

'till

when the number oi

;

whole body of them was baniflied, to the 15,000, and upwards, for ufury, and clipping and defacing the king's coin.

In 12S8, many pcrfons died here of heat and drought and fo great a fcarcity fucceeded, that wheat was fold in London at forty pence a quarter ; an extravagant price at that time. ;

In 1289, in June, the liberties were feizcd and Walter de Redham, and Richard de Belhus, ap;

pointed cuflodes upon the citizens petidoning the parliament hereupon, they were told, that they ftiould firll compound with the king for their tranf:

grelTions,

by way of

fine,

and pay

all an^ears

the exchequer; and that then his Majefty

them

\vhicli being complied with, their li-were reftored again, to^vards the latter end

juflice

berties

due to

would do

of the year

:

;

when

the difpute bet\yeen the priorefs

and nuns of Carrowe, and the fettled,

the latter agreeing not to

city,

was likewife

demand any

tolls,

or molefl the priorefs, during the time of her fair at

Carrowe.

The

king, during a pilgrimage he

his queen,

to

the blefled Virgin at

C •

The Jews

ty ene next

at this

now made with Walfingham in

2

time, as to their civil government, were governed

principal officer, called the jufticer of the Jews,

to the

Norfolk,

barons of the exchequer.

who

took plac«

^

C

I

T Y

O

F

Norfolk, granted the citizens another charter, of following tenor.

th
Whereas our beloved citizens of the city of Norwich, hold the faid city of us in fee-farm ; and the faid citizens have given us to underftand, that bv the often coming of our juftices, affigned to hold affizes and goal-delivery, warn juries, grant certificates, and take inquifitions of felonies and other tranfgrefTions and by their holding theii* '

;

of the holding the

feffions in divers places, within the liberty city aforefaid,

which are appointed

for

pleas belonging to the city, before the city bailiffs;

and fiom which

places,

iffuing

great part of the fee-farm

the

bailiffs themfclves are not only hindered from holding their pleas, butalfo greatly damaged, in collecting and levying their fee-farm aforefaid: they have therefore fupplicated us, to ordain and command for their indemnitv, that all fuch fefTions fhall be held only in our houfe called the Shire-houfe, which is in the fee of the caflle of our ciiy aforefaid, and no where elfe within the liberty of the city aforefaid ; to which we have lavourably confented, and do will,

aforefaid

is

;

and firmly command,

for us

and our

heirs

for the future, the jufllces, inquifitors *,

;

and

that all

other officers, of us and our heirs, which are, or ever fhall be empowered, to hold afhzes, or gaol delivery, warn juries, take certificates and inquifitions,

houfe

fliall

fit

aforefaid,

and hold called the

their felfions,

Shire-houfe

;

in

our

and no

where

elfe within the liberty of the city aforefaid : provided neverthelefs, that this fhall not be prejudicial to our chancellor, treafurer, chief juflice, or jufliccs itinerants, or to the fteward or marfhalls of the houfhold, of us or our heirs ; but '

• Coroners,

efcheators,

&c.

that

;

NOR *

that they

come



\V

I

C

H.

37

and every one of them, when he or they

to the city aforelaid,

may

Tit

in the liberty

and may exercife and do all things, belonging to them or any of them, where or when

aforefaid;

'



or convenient.

Witnefs our

felf at

*

they think



Walfingham, the 2d day of February, in the 19th

*

year of our reign,'

In

1

fit

291, the liberties were again feized, but foon

after reftored.

the city walls were firfl begun; for purpofe a mtnage was granted'", and another which expiration of the former. the on in 1297,

In 1294,

In the year 1300, Roger Bigot, to fave his life, forfeited by confpiring againft the king, refigned into the king's hands his earldoms ot Norfolk, his conftablcftiip of Norwich caille, together with all his demcfne caflles, honours, manors and lands but the next year obtained a regrant of

which he had

:

himfelf for Hfe, and to his remainder to the king with heirs by Alice his wife, dying without iffue. they defcended his whom by to

them

in tail fpecial, to

In 1302, it was determined, that Tombland and Ratton-rowe, were out of the liberty of the city, and in the king's hundred of Bloficld and loon ^fter the tallage of the city was afieffed at 40 ol. ;

In 1304, the citizens petitioned the king in parliament, for a grant of the lete of Newgate which he not only complied with, bu; on their paying a fine, and advancing their old fee-farm lol. a year, he confirmed all their former charters. ;

C *

A

»own.

3

This

tax levied for the tuiWing, or repairing the walls of any city or

C

jS

I

T Y

O

F

This year the citizens, to enable them to go on with their walls, obtained a third murage, which was to continue for five years. In 1306, the king underflandlng that great aniflill fubfifled bet\veen the church and the city, referred the whole matter to his privy council ;

mofities

and by

their advice

made

a final compofition and

agreement between them: by which all their jarring intercfts were adjuflcd, and their refpe^ive rights

The original difpute was and convent claimed all Tombland and afferted that their coroner, as their demefne and other officers, had a riorht of exercifine; their offices, not only in the priory, but in Tombland, Ratton-rowe, Holmeflrete, and Spytelond in Norwich, where the tenants of the piiory refided which tenants, they further faid, might lawfully exercife particularly afcertained.

this

:

The

prior

;

;

their trades there, v/ithout contributing at all to tal-

on the other lages, Sec. with the other citizens hand, the citizens infifted, that all the jurifdiftion originally belonging to the crown was now vefled that this juriidiftion had not only extended in them to the places which were the fubjeft of their difpute, but alio to the priory itfelf and of confequcnce, whoever traded in any of thofe places, were liable to pay all charges, equally with the reft of the ci:

:

;

tizens.

Now

therefore

it

was agreed,

that

Tombland

&c. and always kept fo ; except at the time of the yearly fair, belonging to the prior and convent, held there at Whitluntide fo that for the future, neither the church, nor city, fliould ufe it as formerly ; either fliould be

cleared of

all

timber,

;

as a market, or to lay timber on, or for the ;-opes

;

the times of holding fynods at

making

Norwich, and Sundays

;

N O R

W

Sundays excepted when be fold at the prion' gates, ;

mer

C H.

I

vicfluals,

as

39

friiic,

may

^c.

was cuflomary

in for-

Before the follo\ving Afcenfion-day, the be meafured, and equally divided by and at every doles, both in length and breadth which half fair, the citizens were to choofe firll, times.

ground

-^vas

to

;

they would have to build their

flails

upon

;

for

cuflom was

to which no picage, be paid the other half to remain to the prior, to make what advantage he could of it. That part of the flreet between the fione crofs lately erecled and Ratton-rowe, in breadth, and from the crofs to the priorv wall in length, was not to be built upon, but to be left open as a paffage to the priory gates and for the horfes and cattle to fland there, as ufual, for fale. The prior to have all rights as before, and all cuftoms, belonging to this fair, both in the and his officers to take diftrelTes, city and fuburbs attachments, and all things belongmg to the fair, in the fame manner as the bailiffs, and under baiflallage,

toll,

or

:

;

liffs

of the city do,

During the fummoned,

fair,

all

at all

other times in the year.

citizens,

and others, may be and amerced in the

attached, diihained,

and when the fair be over, all put into the prior's prifon during the fair, fliall the day after be fent to the kings city prifon and be delivered into the cuPiody of the city bailiffs, until they be releafed by due courfe of law ; but in cafe they be convicted to lofe life or limb, the ofEcers of the prior (ball execute the judgment. The coroner of the city was empowered to take inprior's

fair-court'*;

prifoners,

;

quilitions in the prior^',

and the other places before-

mentioned but with refpect to the precmcts, Holmefirete, and Spytelond, whenever he had occafion to cxercife his oflice there, the prior was to name a, perfon to be prefent and affifting and to fee, that C 4 he ;

;

• The pie-powder

court.

:

C

4d

I

T Y

O

F

he did nothing malicioufly, or contrary the jury

to

be inhabitants of thefe

to his

pariflies

dutyj only :

no pcrfon living in the precinft was to be comon any jury, or inquifition out of the precin6l: and further, the coroner was to deliver an indented iranfcript of the verdict to the affiftant fent bv the prior which affifiant was to be fworn by the coroner, to difcover none of the king's fecrets and no coroner to enter the above places, 'till he had given the prior notice and demanded anaffidant. The prior and convent were to hold their free, or courts barons with their letes, in Spytelond, and Holmeflrete, without any baihfF, or city oflicer being prefent. The city was not to intermeddle, as to any ;and

pelled to ferve

;

pleas, or concerns for any lands, houfes, or things within the precincl ; nor to pretend to exercife any jurifdidion there: and the prior was to receive no one that fled from juftice, out of the hands of the city officers, unlcfs he be intitlcd to the privilege of

holy church. Spytelond, for

All perfons taken in Holmeflrete, and theft, were to bs judged in the prir

any be condenmed in the city, and belong to thofe places, the prior was to execute fuch judgment; and the forfeited chatties were to remain in the pariQiioners hands, until the king s itinerant juflices fliould determine, whether All perfons, they belong to the prior or the city. prefented in the prior's lete, that belong to the jurildi6lion of the city, to be delivered to the bailiffs ; or's

court there

;

and

if

perfons, prefented hi the king's city lete, bethe baililfs, if they belong to Holmeflrete, or Spytelond, to be delivered to the prior's officers on

and

all

fore

Tlie city not to hinder the the day after the lete. prior of the amerciaments of his own men, and tenor of the chatties of fugitives and felons, nants which the king's charters have granted him. Nei;

ther fhall fucli of the prior's tenants, or farmers, as live

NORWICH.

41

Ratton-rowc, Holmeftrete, and Spytelond, and s lete, be compelled to ferve but. if they do not In the king s lete in Norwich belong to the prior s lete, they fhall be fubjc6l to

live In

owe

fervice In the prior

;

neverthelefs, their amerciaments ihall s None of the priors family belong to the prior. grofs wares in the preclnfl, fo as (liall merchandife cuflom. or The baililfs not toll, %hc city lofe any Holmcilretc, into or Syptclond ; enter or diflraln to nor to levy any tolls or cuftoms there for the city ; they being excluded from merchandifmg: but if any nierchandife there, they are to pay, according to

the king

;

their trade or merchandile,

who

all city tolls,

or cufloms.

anfwer tliem to the city and if the prior will not do it, he may be bailiffs compelled in the king s fuperior courts by due courfc of law: and which ever party breaks this agreement, the fame remedy to be taken. Sec.

to the prior,

is

to

;

In 1512, the 5th of Edward II. Thomas de Brotherton obtained a charter from the king, in tail general,

of

all

the honours formerly polTefied

by Ro-

ger Bigot, marflial of England, and carl of Norfolk;

bv which means he became conftable of this caftlc and it is very probable, (by his arms llill remaining carved on the walls) that he built the llair-cafL, added the battlem.ents, and fitted up the caflk, in the manner we now find it. :

In 1314, the price of provifions was fo extra^-agantly rifen, on account oi a great dearth, that it occafioncd the holding a parliament in London in ;

which

was ordained,

an ox fatted wiili corn fhould be fold at 24s. if with grafs, at 16s. a fat cow at 12s. any oiher cov/ at 10s. a fat mutton fed with com, together with its wool, at is. 8d. if (liorn a fat hoci:, of two rears old, at 3s. .{d. a iit IS. 2d. it

that

fat

C

42

I

T

O

Y

F

at sd. a fat capon at 2d. a fat hen at and twenty- four eggs id. and whoever took

goofe

fat

id.

larger prices fhould forfeit his wares to the king : but the fcarcity ftill increafing, the aft was repealed and fo great was the want of corn, that bread could not be got to fupport the king s houfhold: and what greatly added to the calamity was, that the fucceeding vear a dreadful peflilence broke out, occafioned by the unwholfomnefs of the food on which the 25Cople were obliged to feed corn being then at the extravagant price of 20s. a comb. This famine and mortality ceafed in May, 1316, after having raged above two years. ;

;

In 1317, another murage was granted, which enabled the citizens to finifli their walls about the year

'

1319 or 1320.

About Michaelmas, queen timef,

Edmund

kings brother,

Ifabel,

of VV^oodPtock, 8cc.

landed

carl

at Or\vcll

Roger de Morof Kent, the near Harwich,

and foon after came to Norwich: from thence they went to Bury, where flaying fome time to refrefh and lo fuccefsthemfeh'es, they proceeded forward fully profecuted their wicked intentions, as to dcpofe the king on Chriflmas-dav following, and murder him on the 21 ft dav of September, 1327. ;

Edward

III.

to his mother,

on his coming to the crown, granted queen Ifabel, an hundred pounds to

be paid yearly by the bailiffs of this city, out of the fee-farm; which at this time amounted to 1 26I. 1 is.5d. and to fir John Montgomery 26I. fo that the city was refponlible to the exchequer for 11s. 5d. only.

At

this

time the king, by charter, confirm'd to

mas de Erotherton,

in

tail

Tho-

general, all the eilates

and honours heretofore granted him in the 6th of

Edward

NORWICH. Edward

among

II.

wlilcli

43

was the conftableOiip of

this caflle.

In that king's reign, one John Pccock. fen. had obtained a patent, for the affay or mcafuring of all worlleds made in Norwich or Norfolk ; fo that no maker could fell a fingle piece, 'till he had affixed, which patent he immediately affigned his fcal to it but, upon the city's reprefenting to Robert Polcye ;

:

how

injurious

this

practice

was

to

their trade,

as

well as expenfive to them, the patent was revoked in

132S; and a

may

this

of to

this city this

free trade for all

fljew us,

how

worfleds granted:

confideiable the manufaftory

was, even in ihofe earlv times

caufc

its

;

and that

prodigious incrcafe and popuiouf-

nefs were owing.

In 1330, another difpute arofe between the prior city but on the 6di of June the matter was

and

;

agreed,

by the

prior's

releafmg

all

right

to

the

ground on which the citizens had built their walls, between Barr or Pokcthorpe and Fibridge or Magdalen gates and the citizens yielding up to the prior, all ;

the lands adjoining to the fite of the monafterv, lying between the precin6l wall and the river Wenfum and allowing him the liberty of building houfes on each fide of Bilhop's-bridge fo that a ;

;

on both fides tliereof, for watering horfes, and lading and unlading goods ; and alfo a further liberty of building upon thp bridge, and making gates there, and enjoying the whole profits of them, provided the citizens and their fucceffors have the keeping thereof. fufficient

paffage be

left

In 1331, the king fixed ftaplcs for wool, fiieeps and other commodities none of which were to be fold any where but in a Uaple town Norwich fkins,

;

:

was

G

44 was

I

T Y

O

F

the only one appointed for the counties of Nor-*

and Suffolk. This fo provoked the burgclTes of Yarmouth, that they flopped all fliips, veffels and boats, coming through their port to the city the confequence was, the renewing a fuit which had been commenced in 1327, but dropped foon after : in the courfe of the proceedings, the burgelfes profolk

:

duced the charter of Edward I. by which their town was conftituted a port, and had divers privileges annexed to it; and infifled, that no one could merchandife, pafs, or repafs, contrary to their charter.

To

the

this

citizens

pleaded, that

Norwich was a

mercantile and trading town, and one of the royal cities of England, f tiiated on the banks of a river,

leading to an arm of the fea, and from thence extending to the main ocean; upon which fhips, boats,

have time immemorial come to day in the week, and to their public marts or fairs, held twice in the year, with

and other

veffels

their market, every

and and denizens and all this done, when the fpot where Yarmouth now flands was main fta and that thcv hav^e alwavs bought and fold, laded and unladed, all their goods free from not only at Yarmouth parva, but tolls and cufloms at every port on the arm of the fea, which they now call Yarmoiuh port, and all over England and that all foreign merchants paid all their cufloms at NorW'ich, which was then the port, and in the king's hands viz. 4d. for every ihip of bulk, and 2d. for everv boat, and all other cufloms whatever for their mcrchandifc all which were due to the kings of England, 'till Henry II. granted the city, with all its tolls, rights and cufloms, to the citizens, and all

manner of

flrangers,

raerchandife, as well of foreigners

of Englifhmcn

as

;

:

;

;

;

;

their heirs for ever

a year: (iivers

kings,

;

they paying a fee-farm of icSl.

have been confirm d by and enjoyed by the citizens to this day;

all v.hicli

privileges

N O R day

;

for

W

I

G H.

45

which reafon they humbly begged

that the

king would either revoke the charter or Edward I. granted to the burgefTes of Yarmouth, or not fuffer The king hereupon, bv prejudice the city. it to advice of his privy council, directed his writ, commanding the bailifts of Yarmouth to m.ake proclamation, that if anv hindered, or anv ways molefted the merchants veflels, of what kind foe\er, in paffing or rcpaffing through the port of Yarmouth, to and from the city of Norwich, they fhould forfeit all their goods and chatties forfeitable.

The

the eleventh year of his reign, dated at Weftminfter the 4th dav of Oftober, reciting and confirming all former charters granted to this city, but ^vithout the addition of

king,

in

gi-anted a charter,

any new

The

liberties.

memorable for the great worded ftufts, fo called froni Wurlled, or W'orfted, in Norfolk, the place where the, manufaclory was fir ft fettled, in the time of Henry I. by a colony of Dutch, who were driven out of their country by an inundation for on the king's marriage with Philippa, daughter of William carl of Hainault, great numbers of Flemings came over, and lettled at Worflcd, Norwich, Lavenhara, year 1336

is

likewife

increafc of Flcmifli or

:

Sudbury, years,

Sec.

became

by reafon of

infomuch

that

Norwich,

in a

few-

the moft fiourifhing city in England, its

extenfive trade, in worfteds, fuf-

and other woolen m?.nufa(5iures and fo much hath the government thought this trade. worth protecting, that there have been no lels than fourteen llatutcs made, befidcs divert nrits, and proclamations ilTaed, and ordinances eflablifljcd, ta guard and nourifh it. This, Edward 111. took very proper methods to effecl, by prohibiting any un-

tians,

freezes,

:

WTOUicIlt

C

46 vvTOUglit

wool

bv granting

who

ficers,

fame time

to

1^

I

O

Y

F

^

be carried out of the kingdom, arid and liberties to all arti^

great pri^-ileges fliould

come over and

fettle

here: at the

none fliould v. ear any other ufe any facing of filk. or furs, or

enafting, that

than Englifh cloth,

except the king, the queen, or

tlicir

children, unlefs

and

thev could afford to fpend lool. a year;

fumptuary

diefiril;

law'"'

we meet with

this is

our hif-

in

tory. t

Tlie earls of counties who had the cuflody of the royal callles, having frequently hindered the flieriffs in thofe caflle^,

from imprifoning criminals

an

3.8:

was made in the fourteenth year of this king, by which it was enabled that gaols, which ufed to be in ward of the (lieriffs, and annexed to their bailiwicks, fliould be given up to the fherifls of the feve;

ral counties

and

;

that

the

fiieriffs

fliould

have the

cuflodv of the fame gaols and prifoners there, as they formerly ufed to have and from that time, this caltle became the pubHc gaol of the county of Norfolk, and in the fheriff's cuftody to keep his pri:

foners

time

and

;

after,

flable to

we

remains fo nevcrthclefs for forac king continued to nominate a con-

ftill

the

keep

it,

:

as to

find that in 1354,

its

defence, in his

Roger

name

:

for

Clerk was conllable of

the caille.

In 1340, and the fifteenth year of his reign, the king appointed a tournament to be held at Norwich; at which himfelf, and queen Philippa were prefent : it

began in February, and

ing.

Two

lafted

till

Eallcr follow-

years after, the king and queen vifited

the city again.

The gates and towers of the city were now fortified and made habitable, by Richard Spynk, citizen of Norwich, * Laws made to rcfaain cxcefs in diet, or apparel.

;

N

O'

R

\V

C H.

I

47

Nonvich, who gave thirty efprlngolds, or ^\•arllke inAruments, to caft great flones with, to be ahvays kept at the following places; two at Collany or St. Martin's at Oak gate; two at St. AuguRine's gate; two one at Bifliopfgatc at Fibridge or Magdalen gate two in the tower on the river by tlie dungeon one at Conisford gate fix in the great black tower by Bertwo at Nedham or St. fix at Berflrete gate flretc two at two at Si. Giles's gate Stephen's gate and t^vo at the \V^elhy\-ck or St. Benedict's gate and to every toll-houfe, now the hall in the market alfo four efpringold one hundred gogions or balls ;

;

;

;

;

;

:

;

;

;

great arblallers or crofs

bows

;

and to each of them and two pair of grap-

one hundred gogions or balls, he alfo gave t\vo ples to draw up the bows with hundred pounds towards enlarging and deepening and exthe ditches belonging to the city walls pended a large fum in repairing a low place between he built likewife the river and St. Martin's gate fortv-fn e rods of wall, and four towers, between St. Augufline's and Magdalen gates; and in a great meafure thofe gates themfelves; he made the portthe inlfrumcnts thereto belonging, cullis""', with all both bars and chains, at St. AuguRine's, St. Martin's, :

;

:

BerRreie,

St. Stephen's, St. Giles's, St. BenedicTs, Conisford. Heigham, and Pockthorp gates, and covered them with lead: he rebuilt Bifhopfgate, and repaired that bridge and its arches, aiid erected a Rone wall at Rolcehne's Rathe: he built alfo the tower, on the odier fide the river, by Conisford gate,

and made two

great chains to go crofs from tower to tower: he leaded; arid fortified the great black to^vcr of BerRrete, and the two towers between that and BerRretc gate and offered lool. if any one would ;

raife

as

much

more,

to finifh all the towers,

in

the

fame •

A

frrtjfiei

falling g»te, in form of a harrow, let

pUceSj

to

keep out

down

the «nc;ny, and an»oy

in tlie

them

g:Uc-fpace ct

thrsiisii it.

C

48

T Y

I

O

F

fame manner with thofe he had already repaired and and when no one would join with him, beautified For thefc he undertook, and performed it himfelf. :

pay

him

the citizens gave

fervices,

their part

;

their

common

feal to

grant, that neither he, nor his

and a

fliould be obliged to bear any on any juries in the city, without and that they fliould be, for ever, their own confent quit and free from all tallages, taxes, kc. in the citv, and from all cuftoms for merchandife bought and fold, and from all murage and pavage whatfoand the citv agreed to find conftant guards at ever and if fuch guards neglected the gates and towers complaint made by him or his on duty, their to do heirs, the city was to turn them out, and appoint and if the faid Richard died without heirs others male, his eldeil; daughter, and her eldeft heir, was and if he to fland in the place of his heirs male had no children, his next heir was to enjoy the fame heirs male,

for ever,

or ferve

office,

;

:

;

:

;

privileges'".

A.t an aiTembly held on St. James's day, in the iSth of Edward HI. at the reciuefl of the laid Richard Spynk, it was ordered, and cflabliflicd, that of a year it fijould be proclaimed every quarter

throughout the city

;

that

any one fuffered any

if

beafi. to enter the city ditches, or call or laid any thing what'bever into them, or into the arches of the

city wall, or into any of the gates, tliey fliould be The day after he had fined for every fuch offence. perfeftcd thele his great undertakings, he figned a

general releafc to the

demands heirs,

to that

day

of

city, ;

afcions,

and

to himfelf,

and

all debts,

only referving

the liberiies aforelaid.

In • Tlic witnefTes of Car.teibtiry Ufford, cirl

de Norwich

;

<-f ;

fir

fir

to this

agreement, were John de Stratford, archbiihop

William de Claxton,

Su;FoIk

;

fir

prior of

Norwich

;

fir

John Bardolf, lord of Wormgeye

Edward de Cretyng

j

and

fir

Peter de

Ty,

Robert de ;

fir

kpijhtt.

Joh»

;

NORWICH.

''

49

In 1344> Richard de Lyng, parfon of Rcdeham, John de Berneye, and John Ch.cvclee, gave the citizcns a piece of ground; on which die city wall was built,

extending from Pockthorp gate to the river

Wenfura.

This year the king and queen honoured the city and, the year following, again with their prefence John de Bemeye and Richard Clere were appointed commiffioners, before whom a writ, ad quod damnum, was executed, concernnig the fee of the cafile of it being doubtful, from its long continuNorwich 3ng in the poffelhon of the earls of Norfolk, whewhen, ther it belonged to them, or to the king only upon a folemn hearing, it was adjudged to be the king's right; and that the earls of Norfolk held it only as the king's con Rabies. Whereupon the cafde ;

;

;

of Norfolk, to^^p the as fuch continues annexed to the county of Norfolk, for a county gaol jbut as to the jurifdiclion belonging to it, i'^turn was ariade by John Howard, then fneriff of Norfolk, that it would be no damage to the king to grant it to the citv, except the lofs of 1 2d. arifing from the pleas

was confirmed

jking's

to the flieriff"

prifoners

there

;

and

of the jurifdidion: and, at the fame time, the citi2ens informing his majefly by the queen, who had always ftrongly cfpoufed their interefts, that the inliabitants of the cafile ditches, being in the fee of the cafile, were not only not taxable with the city, but exempt alfo from the city bailiffs, and entirely without their jurifdiclion and that the citizens often took refuge there, and avoided juflice, being fcreened by the fheriff of the county, and his bailiffs the king taking thcfe matters into confideration, granted them a charter, dated at Hertford, Auguft ig, in the igtli year of his reign over England, and 6th over France by which, the better to enable the bai;

;

;

D

liffs

;

C

5« Jiffs

and

1

pay

citizens to

thus ordains

T Y

F ancient fee-farm,

their

lie

:

They and their fucceffors, for the future, fball have jurifdiclion in all places adjoining to the ditches of our caftle of our laid city, whether they be now, or fhall be hereafter inhabited: and that ihoiz places be of the fame nature, and condition, as other places and tenements of the faid citizens in the city aforefaid (the houfe called the Shirehoufe''', where the common pleas of the county arc heldj only excepted). And alfo, that they fliali have the full trial, as well concerning the tenures '

;

of the faid

fee,

as

of

all

other picas v,dlatfoe^er,

and by our writs and fummons of our ex.and the execution tliereof; and al!o,

iffuing within the aforefaid fee

;

alfo the returns of writs

chec[uer,

power of enquiry concerning

all

manner of tranfand fu-

grefhons, felonies, concealments of felons

hereafter happening Avithin the faid fee and thereupon may do, and ejcecute juflice, according to the law and cuflom of the city aforefaid. gitives,

And

alfo,

tliat

the perfons

aforefaid places, or that

be of the

lot

fliail

now

dwelling in the

hereafter dwell there^

or fcot of the laid citizens

and do

;

contribute, according to their rated portions, tallages,

aids,

faid citv,

and other burdens belonging

W'ith the

men

of the faid city

;

to all to the

and

if

there be occafion, that they be compelled fo to do

by

the bailiifs of the faid city

fheriff for

:

and neither the

the time being, nor his officers, Ihall

nor concern themfelves enter the places aforefaid with thole \\ho refide in them; nor any \vay hinder or dniurb the bailiils of the city, or the citi;

zens, * This was the old «f the

c;iftlc ciitchej.

(hire-

houfe, which formerly flood on ihe fouth Hde

NORWICH. from

zcns,

free ingrefs

and

51 and from

egrefs to

all

the faid places ; provided that the fald bailiiis and citizens do anfwer to us, at our exchequer, for all tenths, taxes and aids, already due, or which fhall

our heirs, from the refiOver and above the ancient portion, which the bailiifs and citizens ufed And moreover, heretofore to pay for their city.

due

hereafter be

to us or

dents in the faid places

and

the faid bailiffs fhall

have po'vcr of

raeiirs,

all

;

now

perfons in

hereafter inhabit,

and their fucceiTors, and levy all fuch pay-

citizens,

to collecl,

any

inhabiting, or that

of the places

fliall

aforcfaid

;

rendering to us, and our heirs, at our exchequer, over and above the old fee-farm of the city, the annual fura of 26s. lod. for the rent of the faid inhabited places 9s. for the pleas

to

belonging

;

the faid places

of the

valued

Icte, ;

as

and and 6s. 8d. for the lete and perquifites of the court there-

;

;

the annual rents of already inhabited, and the profits

at ^vhich funis,

and of the pleas aforefaid, are now bv the inc|uifitions may more fully ap-

pear: and alio ics. lod. a year, befides the aforeand the yearly faid funis, as an increafe of rent ;

fum

of isd. which by this grant,

is

it

faid,

will

be loft to us, bv amerciaments, and other profits of the pleas aforefaid and from the rents of the ;

places

now

inhabited and built

upon

;

and which

might accrue by licenfing other places to be in like manner inhabited and built upon. Furthermore, confidering ihs cofts and charges which the faid citizens have been at, in inclofing our city with walls, without any expence to us and being will;

ing to

make them fome

grateful

acknowledgment

of our fpecial favour, and at the requeft of Ifabel, queen of England, our moil dear mother, have granted, and bv [his our charter cortherefore,

*

firmed, to

-^ve,

the aforefaid bailiffs

D

2

and

citizens,

that

theVj

I

T Y

heirs

and

C

5ft

and

their

O

F

fuccefibrs,

dwelling

ias

'

tliev,

'

the faid city, fhall be for ever free from the juril-

'

dittion of the clerk of the market of our houfhold,

'

and of our

heirs

'

ficer,

in

'

fee

'

fliall

;

fo that the faid clerk,

aforcfaid, to

make

affay

or his of-

or the of any meafures or

no wife enter the

faid

city,

weights or to exercife or do any, other matter, any way appertaining to the faid office of clerk of the market: neither fliall they, in the prefence or ab;

'

'

*

fence of us, or our heirs, exercife the laid office

'

in

any manner whatfoever.'

Thus the citizens became proprietors of all the exempt jurifdidion of the caflle, the caflle ditches, and the lands belonging to the bailiwic of the cadle ;

of

the

fitc

hill

on which

the caflle it

(lands,

to the foot of the

itfelf,

and

that

the

is,

the principal

ditch round it which is, and and alfo the old

firft

principal bridge,

always Mas repaired by the county which Hood fouthward of the laid bridge, only excepted. ;

fliire-houfe,

In 1347, Robert Poleye, notwithftanding the reof his patent, ftill exercifed the aflay and alnage"'' of w^orfteds in Norwich and Norfolk; and inlilled, that his patent was of force during his life. The worlled weavers and merchants hereupon petitioned the parliament to revoke this grant, and to permit the bailiffs to appoint an alnager; all which was complied with, refpeding the meafurement and fcaling of all worfied ftulis, but with a particular exception as to whole woollen cloths. call

In 1348, the plague, which had already ravaged the greatcft part of the known world, broke out in this Aln;igc, (from the French aiine, as ell) fignifics the mcafuring any fort of

goods by the

ell.

NORWICH. tills city,

53

wherein there died, according

to the

moft

credible accounts, within the fpace of twelve months, upwards of fifty-fevcn thoufand perfons, befides religious

and beggars

;

when we

furpriiing,

and

this will

confider, that

not appear very

fomc places

in

and not one-fifth part of the people were left alive that Norwich was more populous at that time, than It then contained fixty pait hath ever been fince. withm rifii churthcs, befides feven conventual ones, and Pockthorp pariflies of and the large the walls Mary of St. chapel conventual the Heigham, and ;

;

Magdalen, without them.

This

fevere vifitation

was not confined

alone, but cruelly extended

itfelf

all

to

the city

over the dio-

fo that in many monafteries and religious cefe houfes, there were fcarce two out of twenty left ali\'e. From the regiflei-book it .appears, that in the courfe ;

of the year there were 8G5 inflitutions ; the clergy dving fo faft, that they >vere obliged to inducl into

numbers of youths, who had but juft receivClement the 6di, by his bull, daed the tonfure. Oilober Avignon, at ted 13, at the inffance of William Batcman, bifliop of Norwich, difpenled v;ith fixty clerks at one time, though they were only 21 years of age, to hold re6tories and other livings, that the bifhop having divine fcrvice might not ceafe acquainted him, that there had been, and were, above

livings

;

a thoufand

parifiies

void of incumbents in his dio-

One account fays, that this infedion did not onlv extend to the human race, but that the cattle were almoft entirely fwept off in many places. ccfe.

In 1350, a great tournament was which were prefent Edward prince of monly called the Black Prince, and iiobiUtyj when the city made a grand

D

q

held here,

at

Wales, com-

many of the entertainment for

C

54

I

and

for the prince

his

T Y retinue,

O

F

at

the expenge of

37I. 4s. 6d. city was fined 100 marks, for ufing and this praclice was and meafures become fo general, that the fines on that account in the county of Norfolk only, amounted to more than

In 1351, the

falfe

weights

:

loool.

In 13','), the k?ng commandrd the baihfFs and commonalty of Norwich, to pro.-ide him one hundred and twenty armed 'men, 10 ^ittend him on his expedition into France.

In 1357 died Ifabel, queen dov/ager of England; ihe hundred pounds a year paid her out of the fee-farm of the city, reverted to the and the bailiffs became anfwerable to the crown

by whofe death ;

exchequer

for

it.

In 1561 there liappened a great dearth, attended by the plague this was called the fecond pefiiience. And on tlie 15th of January, in the fame year, there aroie fo furious a ftorm of wind from the fouth-weft as to throw down the tower of the cathedral, which :

falling it

upon

the choir, demoliflred great part of

it :

and was luc-^ which occaiioned

ra"-ed violently for fix or fcven days,

ceeded by a prodigious incredible

damage

fall

of rain,

by inundations.

In 1364, the king directed his writ to the doners, commanding them not to trouble the zens of Norviich for any tolls, cuhoms, &c. in

Lonciti-

Lon-

they being exempted dierefrom by his own grants and charters, as well as by thofe of his royal

don,

anceftors.

In



NORWICH.

55

In 1369, the plague broke out afrefli, and carried numbers of people very fuddenly.

off great

And dils year, notwidiftanding all die endea^'Ours of the citizens of Npnvich to hinder it, Yarmouth vvas made a ftaple town. In 157

I,

the citizens

v/cre

commanded

to furnifh

the kinsr with i eood barjre, fLdficierit'v equipped for war, to fcrve agahiO; his enemies, the French and Spariiaids.

About ihi: lime, the bailifFs and commons granted to Robert Popingeay, all their tenements and garpart dens iti the pariih of St. Mary in the Mai-fli inn. of this grant was aherwards the Popinjay :

he died on the sift of June, 1377 king that in his title uled the words pojl couffcjium, to diitinguiOi the Edwards after the conThere were feveral coins queif from thofe before.

Edward

xvas the

III.

:

firft

of his ftruck here, which are

ftill

At this time the amounted to isgl.

of which

was

extant.

ivhole fee-farm rent of the city 5s.

lOd.

2I.

14s. 4d.

and

for the fee of the caflle lately purchafed:

becaufe the baihffs of the city, by virtue of their office, always paid the whole rent, thev ivere allowed, towards difcharging it, all the tolls of the bakers, butchers, fullers, tauners, elvers,

and

fifiicrmen

;

the

cuftoms of the river Wenfum the tolls of the fifh and beaft markets; the rents of the fliops the nev/ incrcafed rents all the fmall farms or old rents ; the tronage, or cullom paid for weighing at the pub;

;

;

lic

beam

in the market,

and other

rents

and

cufloriis:

By anfwer the fura. the book of ciifloms, every thqufand hcmngs brought

but

all

were not

fufficient

P

to

4

19

:

C

56

T Y

I

O

F

by land or water, paid one penny eveten-pence; every hundred of falt-fifli two-? pence; every hundred of mackerel a halfpenny; a cart two-pence. Sec. to this city,

ry

j

lall

In the cufLom-book before-mentioned, tL^ number of battlements on the city walls are thus entered from the river, to Coflany or St. Martin's at the Oak

and lo upon the gate and and towers to St. Auguffrom thence tine's gate 69, and upon that gate 12; to Fibridge or Magdalen gate, on the walls and towers, are 153, and upon that gate 13; and from thence to Barr or Pockthorp gate, on the wall and towers 17S, and on that gate 10; (thofc from that gate to the river, being about 40 in number, arc gate,

1

12 battlements,

from thence on

tlic

;

walls

omitted, as perhaps, at the time of this return, they

might not be cjuite finifhed) frorn thence the river pafTes by the call fide of the city till we come to the dungeon or round tower, Handing on the oppofite fide of the river to Conisford gate, wdiere was the and old boom'\ on ^vhich tower are 1 2 battlements on the tower and wall to Conisford gate are 26, and on that gate 14; and from thence to Berflrete gate are 150, and on that gate and the wicket adjoining ;

2y ; thence to Nedham or St. Stephen's gate, on the towers and walls, are 307, and on that gate thence to St. Giles's gate, on the and wicket 38 to

it

;

walls and towers, are 2 8g, and on that gate and thence to Weflwick or St. Bcnnet's gate wicket 1 5 are 100, and on the gate and wicket 16 from thence ;

;

to

Heigham

on the walls and towers, 79, and and thence to the river, on the wall

gate,

on that gate 4 and tower, 16; ;

in

all

1630.

Richard

A bar of

wood, laid acrofs

a river, to hinder veflels pafTins,

:

NOR

W

I

C H.

57

II. in the hril year of his reign, A. D. the city a charter, confirming all its granted '37 7' former ones, and containing the following additional

Richard

claufes

be any cuftoms contained therein, not hitherto ufed, neverthclefs for have which they occafion, they may freely ufe any on future, the them, wiihout having a noa-ufer or dif-ufci-^leadAnd further, that no pri\'ilegcd ed again ft them perfon or perfons, having the king's protection, fhall by virtue thereof enter the city, and purvey'" whether or bargain for any victuals before-hand voyage for any to or ufe, it be for the king s own forefuch that all and fervice be made for his hand bargains iliail be intirely void, and fuch pro-

That

'

'

'

'

'

if

there

:

'

'

*

;

'



;

'

te61ions not pleadable in the city/

'

In 1378, the citizens petitioned the parliament to them, to prohibit all ftvangers from felling any merchandife by retail, within their liberties, on

empower

pain of forfeiiure; and '

*

'

'

'

That

if

it

the cuftoms

was accordmgly enabled:

and ufagcs of the

city

of

heretofore ufed, or hereafter to be ufed,

Norwich, be difhcult in any part, or defective, or that the fame require any amendment, on account of new matter ariling, whereof remedy was not before that that then the bailiffs, with die time provided confent of twenty-four citizens, of the fame city, ;

*

fo therefore yearly to •

'

*

'

be chofen, or the greater part

of them, fnall from henceforth have power to ordain and provide, from time to time, luch remedies as are moft agreeable to faith and reafon, and moft profitable to the good and peaceable govern-

ment * Purveyor, was an ofHcer appointed by the king to purchafe provifions fyr

liis

ufe, in any part of the

kingdom,

at a fiated

price.

C

58 ment of die

T Y

I

citizens,

O F

and of other our faithful fub-» as to them fliail fefem befl;

*

jc£is repairing thereto,



fo as fuch ordinances be for the benefit of the king and his people.'

*

On

afl, orders were given for all be landed at the public city ftathe and the tolls and cutloms were fettled; which all foreigners, as well as citizens, were obliged to pay.

goods

the paffing this

to

;

This year the tax raifed on the citizens amounted 4s. Sd. and the ^vhole income of the city

to 128I.

to 374I. 17s, 4d.2

In 1379, the citizens leafed St. Stephen's gate, with all the houfes and conveniencies thereto belonging, to John de Tafeburgh for life, paying yearly therefore to the baililfs and cornmonaltv, one launce

and

target,

The

handfomely adorned,

king

year granted the city another charand various colours, and dated at Weftminfter, Feb. 1^. In it all former charters arc confirmed, and recited vvhich

ter,

at large

this

is

beautifully adorned with gold

together with

;

at Gloucefler,

tlic

claufes in the aft palled

and mentioned

in the

foregomg page.

In 13S0, the parliament granted the king a new (and at that time flrangc) fabfidy, by way of polltax to be levied on every perfon above 1 5 years of ;

age,

monks and nuns not

excepted.

This tax was

the occafion of various difcontents amongfl the peo-

ple

;

which the year following broke out

into

open

commons

thinking themfelves aggrieved thereby, and galled with the opjireflion of the lords and gentry, rofe in many parts -of the kingdom, with a full rcfolution of forcing the king rebellion

:

for

the

to

NOR

\V

I

C H.

59

them free, and releafe them from the of viilanage under which they groaned. to mal
flate

This infurre(rtion firft began in Kent, on account of fome indecencies offered by a collector of tlie for poll-tax to the daughter of one Walter, a tiler which the father, with a hannner, knocked out his The common people applauded the aflion, brains. and promifiug to fland by him, he foon found himfclf at die head of 100,000 men, who declared him 1 hev were their chief, and protector of the poor. prefentlv joiiied by one John Ball, an excommunicated prieft, ^vho, bv his feditious difcourfcs, crrcatIv inflamed the minds of the common people telling them, that all men, being fons of ndam, there ought to be no diilinicion amongft them and that the great difiicrence in men's prefent eflate, was di;

;

;

rectly contrary to Chriilian Itibjeft

liberty

:

the favourite

on which he molf commonly preached, was

gomprifed in the following diilich; ^V^hen

Who Thefe

dom

Adam

v^^as

rifings

delv'ti,

and Eve fpan.

then a gentleman

?

were univerfal throughout the king-

the populace of Suffolk afTembled themfelves together, to the amount of 50,000 men, and com:

mitted numberlcfs

John CavendiOi,

outrages

Cambridge, prior of Bun/, and io unbounded was

fury

;

kind of

and

barbarities.

lord chief juftice, fell

and

fir

Sir

John

a facrifice to their

their rage againil eveiy

and deflroyed all abbey of Bury, and univerfity of Cambridge. Another body of rebels, compofed of the people of Thetford, L\nn and Yarm.outh, proceeded to Norwich, where they were headed by one John Litefter, a dyer, an inhabitant literature,

diat they burnt

the ancient charters in the

of

C

6o

I

T'

Y

O

F

who filled himfelf king of the comIn their progrefs they feized, and carried along Vv^ith them, all the gentlemen they happened of; fome of whom Litcfter obliged to ferN-e him at table on their bended knees: fir Stephen de Hales, being a very comely perlon, was appointed his chief

of that

city,

mons.

The ci'izens treated with the rebels, and carver. advanced them a large fum of money to preferve the town from fire and plunder: but notwithllanding tills, LiteRer entered the city, and demoliilied the houfes of the noblemen and lawyers, as Tiler fhad before done in London, pretending that they were not comprifed in the agreement.

Henry

le

remarkable

Spencer, bifhop of Norwich, a for his bravery,

man

as

as for his charity, lenity

and liberality, hearing of thefe commotions, fet out from his manor-houle of Burleigh, near Stamford, and entered the city with what forces he could colfrom thence he marched diredly to Northlet^ wailham, where the rebels lay ftrongly encamped, and putting himfelf at the head oi his army, he brifkly attacked thevu in their trenches, which he foon carried; and after a fcvere conteft, obtained a ;

A dreadful flaughter of the rebels complete viflory. enfued: Liteder, their king, with the principal leaders were taken prifoncrs, and foon after received the jufl reward of their crimes. The

Kentifli

and Effex

rebels

having difperfed

themfelves on the death of their leader,

who was

Wat

Tyler,

by William Walworth, mayor of London, at the head of his followers, the troubles were foon appeafed, and in a much happier way than This inlurrcclion was could have been expeftcd. ilain

called the rebellion of the Icvellerii. Ill

NOR

W.

I

C

H.

6t

In 13S2, a confpiracy was fonned here, in order a frefli rebellion, which was to have been

to raile

opened with the murder of die bifliop, and all the nobles and gentry of the county the time and place of rifmg was fixed at St. Faith's fair; but the matter being happily difcovercd by one of the confpirators, the reft of them were taken, and juftly fiif:

fered.

This vear a veiy

many

parts of

tlic

pcftilcntial

fe\cr broke out in

county, and very

extraordinaiy

and on the 20th inundations happened in the fens of June, a violent fliock of an earthcjuake was felt ;

here.

At the great affembly held on Holy-rood day, was ordered, that no perfon fliould fifli in the ri\

It

er

Wenfum,

within the liberties of the city, with drag between St. Peter ad vincula and Michaelmas, on the penalty of lofmg their fifli and

nets,

Sec.

nets,

was

unleis

and no drag and being fined by the bailiffs have ilones of above two pounds weight hung ;

to

to the

lower

line,

Norwich, and in 13S5, the earls of Nottingham and Suffolk, and the duke of Lancafler, paid the city the fam.c honour, and were nobly treated the earls buGnefs was, it feem^s, to In 1383, the king and queen were received widi great pomp.

vifited

And

:

kinp;, towards carrying on the war againft the Scots for v.hich purpofe the city gave him 30 m.arks, and lent him 1 50 more: they alio gave 30 marks to the duke, towards carrying on his own foreign affairs, and expended 10 marks on the earl of Nottingham, and prefented the carl of Suffolk with t\vo pipes of wine, and a lafl of oats. folicit

a loan for the

;

The

C

6i

The

1

city ditches

t Y

O

i

were no^v thoroughly cleanfed,

and a general furvey was taken of tow ers, and a return ihcreupoii made

and by which it repair, and

the walls ;

appeared that they ^^ere all in fufficient that each of the towers had three, fix, or eight men In this return, Heigham gate as a ccnRant guard. is called Porta Jnferni, or Hell gate, it being the lowed next the ri^'er on that fide the city and from henceforward wardens were yearly chofen to infpeft the walls, gates, towers, and river, and to fee that they were kept in proper repair. :

In 1386, on the French threatening to invade England, the king fent his privy feal to the city,

commanding them to fortify their town, and to lend him 500 marks but upon application to the king's ;

council, they got

it

reduced

to lool.

In 1389, on John of Gaunt duke of LancaPier's arrival here, at Eafter, the city refolved to pay him for which purthe highefl honours in their power one who every that made, proclamation was pofe was of degree fufhcicnt to ferve as bailiff, and did not ride to meet him, fhould forfeit forty pence, and ;

eveiy

common

h eeman twenty pence.

In 1390, after much felicitation and great cx'1 he followpence, the wool ftaplc was fixed here. ing year the duke of Gloucefler came hither, and and every was met by the cinzens on horfeback ;

man who was

abfcnt from his livery, was fined two

fiiillings.

A

great mortality at this

time broke out, which

laflcd twelve mondis, occafioned

eat-

by the people's

and this not fo much from ing unw holefomc food it a fcarcity of corn as of money to purchafe it ;

:

raged

O R

iSI

ra"-ed ffreatlv in

\V

C H.

I

Norfolk and

many

63

other counties,

and was nearly in degree equal to the great peililence. In 1392, for the fum of lool. the king licenfed the bailiris and commonalty to receive, in mortmain, to the ufe of the city, three raefTii^iges, eighteen forty-two flails, and fifty-four fhillings of yearly rent in Norwich, held of the king in burgage, and to appiv the profits thereof to the repair of the or for any other city walls, tOAvers, and ditches

fhops,

;

and

the eafement of the poor

purpofc, tending to

middlincr o lort of citizens,

In 1395, the Danifh pirates infeflmg

this

coafl,

Yarmouth, and the other maritime places of the county of Norfolk, fitted cue but \\\ire a number of foips, and engaged them the inhabitants of Norwich,

;

defeated with great

iofs.

that no wool fliould b= it was ordered, any place, but in the fliops in the wool-

In 1397, fold in

market only.

In 1398, the

fum of money pecfted here

:

city

was taxed,

in order to raife

to prefcnt to the king,

and orders were

fliould ride with the bailiffs,

gi\'en,

a ex-

who was

that every

man

in his bell apparel,

to

meet him; that every one of bailiff s rank fhould have two perfons, at the leaft, to attend him in good liveries, under the penally of 5I. that every lubitanrefufmg to ride, fhould forfeit 40s. every freeman 20s, and every fervant and apprentice 6s. 8q. and that eveiy perion, not able to go himfelf, fhould fend fome one in his room. Six affiftants to the bailiffs were likewife appointed, three for the court, and three for the commons. The d^iign of all this parade, and the prefent they intended for the

tial citizen

king,

C

64 was

Ivin^,

I

T Y

fo far to ingratiate

O

F

themfeh-es witli liim,

him to grant the requell they now demake of a charter, empowering them to

as .to induce

termined to elcft a mayor, Sec. inftead of baihffs but as the king did not come, there was nothing done till the Ibliowing yeaj-, when they applied to the duke of Lancaflcr about it, who frankly told them, that it would not bear then, and that they mud wait a more favourable opportunity: but foon after the duke ;

died.

This year brother John, abbot of Wendling, let city the meffuage and c|uay in Conisford, belonging to his convent, lying between the land of lady Audele on the fouih, and the church-vard of .St. Clement in Conisford, and the tenement belonging to the city, formerly Hugh Holland's, on the north the king's highway welt and the river Wenfum eaft with the advowfon of St. Clement's church there, and 6s. 8d. rent, for 600 years, at the annual to the

;

;

;

rent of 15s. 4d.

In 1399, the bailllTs having put the city into proper poflure of defence, openly declared for Henry duke of Lancafler, fon and heir qf John of Gaunt, the late deceafed duke, their efpecial

Henry gave them

this declaration,

that,

whenever

it

was

friend.

On

flrong affurances

the charter they mayor, &c. fcould and he was as good as his word, in his power,

fo earncfdy defired for elefting a

be granted them ; will appear afterwards. The great conne6lion tliere was between John of Gaunt and the city, arofe through means of iir Wiliia.m Norwich, knight; a great follower and friend of the duke's, and the occafion of his frequent vifits to, and the great value he alv.ays exprciled for it. as

In

;

NORWICH. "

In the

firft

year of Henry IV.

fir

6D

Thomas de Erplng-

Norfolk man, warden of the Cinque Ports, and lord chamberlain, obtained the kings charter, dated at Weftminiler the 6th of February, ever giant1399, confirming all the former charters ed to the city. The charter itfclf is loft, but is infertcd in every infpeximus, from the reign of Hen-

ham,

knight,' a

ry V.

At an affembly, held on

Sunday preceding which the bailiffs, and the

the feaft of St. Valentine; at feventy-four of the principal citizens were prefcnt letters tcftimonial were figned and fealed with the common feal of the city, at the requeft of fir Thorelative to fome cermin matters charged on die famous Henry le Spencer, bifhop of Norwich, This was done to oblige the king, who fulpeded that the bifliop was engaged in a conlpiracv to deihrone himx, in hopes, thereby of obtaining their new charter; an objecl they were fo flrongly bent upon, that thev made no fcruple of facrificing that very man, v.ho had fo lately laved them, their lioufes, 2;oods, and families, from death and devaltadon. But, notwithftanding the tefUmonial, the bifhop cleared himfelf, and remained unmolefted.

mas Erpingham,

In 1402, the grand affair of procuring the new took up the greatefl part of the citizens time but as nothing could be done \\ ithout the concurrence of biftiop Spencer, who had fully convinced the king and council of his integrity and loyalty, notwithftanding the charge laid againft him by the city; they at laft found means to ioften him, and to obtain his promife, that he would not opAll obftapofe them in this their favourite point. they offered to lend the cles being now removed king one thoufand marks ; wiiich fo far obliged him, £ charter, ;

;

;

C

66

I

T Y

O

F

him, tliat tliey were given to undcrfland, that tliev might draw up a charter as large and full as they This was could devifc, and the king would pafs it. accordingly done, and the new charter paffed, bearIn ing date at Weflminfler, January 28, 1403, the preamble it is recited That, by realon of the * great affedion that we have and bear to our city of Norwich, and the citizens, and commonalty of the fliid city; and in cohfideration of the good behaviour of the citizens of the faid city towards us '

;

'

'

*

'

'

'

'

'

'

*

'

'

'

'

'

'

*

the voluntary fervice by them in time pafl given us being defirous to advantage the faid city, and in a fpecial manner to provide for the profit of thofe citizens, their heirs, and fuccelfors, of our fpecial grace we have granted; that the city, and all the land within the city, and the

and of often

;

libertiy of the fame, with the fuburbs, and their hamlets and bounds, and all the land round the liberty thereof, (the old fliire-houfe only excepted) fliall be, and are hereby feparated from the county of Norfolk, and altogether exempted therefrom, both by lan4 and water and are hereby made a county of, and by themfelves, which fliall be for ever called The county of the city of Norwich.* ;

;

By

this

charter,

the office of bailiff

is

extinguiffi-

have power given them, to elecl a mayor yearly and two flierilfs for the city and its county; which mayor, as foon as ele6led, and every his fucceffors on their election, fliall be the kings efcheator"^' in the city and liberties thereof.

and the

cd,

citizens ;

The

flieriffs are to be fwom by the mayor in the Guildhall, and their names returned into the chancery. The elcheator and fheriit of Norfolk, are not to enter

the city or county of Norwich.

The

flieriffs

of

Norwich •

An

Jbing,

officer,

who

obfcrves the cfchcats, or forfeitures, that

and cercihcs them into the exchequer.

fall to

the

N O R

\V

I

C H.

67

Norwich are to hold their county court, from month to month and have the fame lil^erties and privi;

leges,

as other fheriffs of counties have,

and are to

receive all profits thereof, as the bailiffs of the city heretofore ufed to do. No citizens arc to plead, or

or concerning anv lands, in any bounds of the city and its county ; nor for any bargain made, or fault committed ^vithin thole bounds neither arc the king's juflices to enter, or concern fhemfelves in anv thing thereto belono-ino;, but all fliall be done before the mavor and fheriffs, according to the law and cuflom of the city. The flcward and marflial of the king's houfe-

be impleaded,

foi

court, out of the

:

hold, are not to intermeddle, either in his majefly's

prefence or abfence

;

unlefs in cafes of tranfgreffions,

and debts in the king's houfehold, or concerning thofe which are members of the houfliold. The citizens and commonalty, are bargains, contracts,

have cognizance of all pleas, afiizes, novel difand mort de aunceter", of all lands and tenements in the city and its county as well as thofe pleas that are triable before the juflices of both

to

feifm,

;

benches, juflices of

which

affize,

or juflices itenerant; all

be tried before the mayor and fheriffs, in the Guildhall. The deputy of the efcheator and fheriffs, who mufl be deputed under the city feal, is yearly to account with the exchequer for the profits, but fhall not be compelled to go out of the fhall

city therefore. The mayor, fheriffs, citizens, and commonalty, have full power and liberty to appropriate and make the bell of all gates, bridges, and wafle grounds, throughout the whole liberties, to enable them to repair the gates and walls. The mayor is to try all caufcs, where the flieriffs fhall D2 any * and

A writ,

which

lies

a ftranjer enterech

where a man's saceftor dicih upon them,

feizeij of

hms,

C

6S

I

T Y

O

F

any way be charged with doing wrong; and hath power to reheve the oppreJTed, by punifhing the according to the nature of the offence. The the time being, is always a juftice of the peace, by his office, and fliall yearly choofe four others to afTifl him, who fliall likewife be juftices and no juflice of tlie county of Norfolk, or any other juflice of peace whatever, fliall exercifc his office in the city or its county, either by land or water. The mavor is not to determine any cafe of felony, without the kings fpecial mandate. The flierifFs,

mayor,

for

;

citizens are to

have

all fines,

iffues,

forfeitures,

and

amerciaments, accruing bv virtue of the office of juflice of the peace. The mayor, flierifJs, Sec. are to have all viftuals forfeited by law, as bread, wine, ale, and all other things, not belonging to merchandife. The mayor, flierlffs, &:c. are to have the fword, which the king gave them, or fome other, in the carried before them, with the point cre61 prefence of all lords or nobles of the realm, wheour prether thcv be of the blood ro^al or not fence, and the prefence of our heirs, only excepted. The fergeants at mace, belonging to the mayor and flieriffs, are to carry gold or filver maces, gilt or ungilt, with the kings arms thereon, both in the king's prefence, as alfo in the prefence of the queen confort, or queen mother, in the city and its counNeither the ty, as their proper fergeants at arms, llewards, marfhal, nor the clerk of the market of ;

;

the king's houfliold,

fliall

ever exercife any jurifdic-

compel the any where out of their

tion in the city or county; or to

anfwer them,

citizens liberty.

No

purveyor, or provider of viduals, or other officer, fliall purvey or take any vi^luals belonging to the ciuzens, without their free will ; unlefs they be for the king s own ufe, taken at full price, and the

money paid on

delivery.

The

city coroners

arc to

exercife

NOR

\V

cxercife in the liberties, the

coroners, in the king

s

C

I

H.

69

fame privileges

as other

prelence, or abfence; as they

And, laftly, no by reafon of this change but the mayor, flierifis, citizens, and commonalty, hereby have, and may ufe and enjoy, all rights, privileges, and liberties, in the fame manner as the bailiffs, citizens, and commonalty, their predeceflbrs, had, uled, and enjoyed before this altetime immemorial have done.

for

damage

to

is

arlfc

the city

to

:

ration.

This charter was received with great demonftraand in purfuance thereof, the citizens, on May 1, 1403, elecled William Appelyerd their firft mayor. The bailiffs held their office 'till the Michaelmas following: when Robert Brafier and John Daniel, two ot them were chofen fherifi^s'". In 1404, at an affembly, held for fettling the method of electing fherifi^s, it ^vas ordered; that, tions of joy;

for the future, there fliould be eighty perfons elecled

yearly to attend at all common alfemblies, in a place by themfelves ; and that the majority of them ffiould

name

yearly for flieritfs and declare commons, who might refufe any of the three they pleafed: and if thev liked none of them, the eighty were to riominate tliree more and their

three perfons

names

;

to the

;

this *

When

the charter

ufed, and a

from

firft

his tomb,

the

:

in the

the feal of the bailiffs

midft

is

left

is a

globe, with the crofson

portal of a Gothic building, having over

France and England quartered

;

on his right hand

city arms, viz. a triple- tower'd caftle, and under

dant

;

and on his

left

hand, on another (hield,

of St. George, or the Englifh Sigilluvi officii

^he feal of the

office

flag.

The

was

dif-

our bleffed Saviour arifen

with a glory about his head; his right hand

towards heaven, and in his ftands in

came down,

new one made

is

is

it,

it

is

held up

its

tor

a ihielJ, with the

a plain crofs, the

majoratus Sivitatis Norwici. city

he

a lion pafTant-guar-

circumfcription is,

of mayoralty of the

:

the arms of

of Nsrivich,

arms

C

70 be done,

this to

I

'till

commons approved

T Y

they had of:

O

F

named

three

whom

the

and then the town-clerk,

and fome of the eighty, were to report the three approved of, lo the mayor and chief men, and the mayor was to name one of them for flierifF; and the chief m.cn another and this was the conftant form of eleciions for fome years.

perfons fo

:

In 1406, his majeRy honored the city widi a vifit.

city lent the king five hundred hundred of which were taken out of the common flock, and the remainder was raifed bj^ a public tax. This fum \vas afterwards repaid.

In

the

1409,

marks

;

three

In 1413,

Henry V.

1

fufion, occafioned

the city was in great conby the dilputes bctvveen the com-

mons, and the mayor and the

mode of

his council

electing mavors,

;

relatmg to

and other

fherihs,

of-

of the corporation, and the exercife of fome other powers, granted by the late charter. During

ficers

this

conteff,

which

and terrible fire broke out, and deflro'yed the wh.olc convent

a fudden

laid wafle

of the preaching friers'", with every thing belonging to them and did prodigious damage to that part of the city this misfortune, together with the exhauded flate of the city treafury, owing to the expen fes thefe contentions had occafioned, induced all ;

:

parties to

fected

by

wifli

which was efRobert Berney, Knt.

for a reconciliation

the good offices of

fir

;

John

Lancafter, Will; am Paflon,

final

agreement fealed by the mayor,

*

St.

Andrew's

hall

was the church of the

with the adjoining convent, (part of which ifcbuilt after this fire.

is

and others

friers

now

and a and commonalty, ;

fl^eriffs

preachers tlie

;

which,

workhoufc) was

NOR

\V

I

C H.

71

of Feb. an abftiacl: of tlie name of the TiinvIn which te, Fader, Sone and Hohgoft, three joerfons, and

commonaky, on

die

I4tli

here followcth.

'

'

'

'

*

'

*

'

'

'

'

*

* *

*

'

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one

God

and

fpeciall a\o\ve'"

of the Cite of Nonvlch, the whiche Cite be diffenfions, traverfes, variaunces and difcordes upon diverfe articles of long time hangying, hath been di\ided, difibyled and in point to ha be diflroved. Nowe at holi preyere and mediacion of Sevnt Va-

lentvn in ^vhos day the Cite choofee be love to make pees, unite and accord, poore and riclic, to

and charite nevermore ho be diffevered by the help and grace of the holi TiipAte her fpeciall a\o\\'e, but ilandvnge full unyted and accorded in the articles

be 0011

'

diis

'

principal

kyng Henry V. after the conqueft, in the time of John Biflieiee, Mayr, Henry Rahnan and Thomas Cok Shirreves, be affent of die good commonalte

'

'

in niageflc,

of Norvviche Cite and of all the commonautc, in the honour of whom, our moder chirche is founded and halw ed, on the day of Seynt Valentyn martir, \vhan creatures through love of kynde, as choffcn her mate, the fccound yeer of it is feid,

in hert,

tyme

forth

*

underwritten,

'

that

is

upon

the

fliall

Guildhall on 1.)

The

old?

;

the tenure that folwith hereftir,

for to feyne, in this

The mayor '{May

love

to

forme/ be always chofen in

hereafter

St. Philip and St. James's day mayor and twenty-four t are to be

and all the common-council and each of twenty-four abfenting himfelf forfeits two (hiland each of the common-council one fhillings The recorder, or his deputy, is to make a ling. prcfent,

;

the

;

fpeech, .

* Patron, •j-

or advocate.

Thefe were

the mayor's council, in

afterwards appointed.

They

whofe place the aldermen were

are fometimes called vensrabiles riri, bon-

gents, con-citizens, and probi homines.

C

72 fpcech,

I

T Y

O

F

explaining the caufe of their affembling*

and then

he, with the mayor and twenty-four, are withdraw into another room and the Ipeaker of the commons fliall then fay Sirres and friends, for the love of Jefu Chrift in proccedyng of this eleftion prcfent, behave vow and rewle vow, goodli and honeflii and levith not for love, haate, ne dread, that ye chefen and ncmeU^n two fufhciaunt perfones for the office of Pvleyr, fuch as ben honourable and profitable for the Cite of \a hiche iche * of hem hath ben Meyr or fhirreve of the Cite, * and of whiche nethir hath ben Meyr thre vers to

;

:

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;

'

'

'

;

*

atom.'

And

he that hath mofl; voices of the people in the be one and he that hath mod voices next, fliall be fecond. And the ipeaker, and fix of the common-council, fliall write down their names, and return them to the mayor, &:c. in the chamber; hall, fhall

alter

;

which

notification

council fhall deliver the

made, bill to

fix commoncommon clerk, and common Ipeak-

the

the

who, together with the recorder er, fliall keep it: and to thefe three perfons, the mayor, alone, fhall come in proper perfon, to a and to tiicm fhall fecretpart of the fame chamber ly name one of the two perfons, which of them he and then every will have for the ofhce of mayor one of the twenty-four fliall do the like and which ever of the two have the moll vdices, fliall be adaccomptyng the mitted for mayor the next year; Meyre's voyce for two voyces, if travers falle''.' And in like manner, if it fo happen in the hall, ;

;

;

'

'

common Ipeaker cannot rightly tell who has then he, and the common council, mofl voices fliall go and inform the mayor, who fliall call togethat the

;

ther * If the

\'Otes

be equal

:

in

rerfe or trial muft have enftiecl.

which cafe, but

for

this cxpedietic, a tra-

N O R

\V

C

I

H.

7s

common council, into a room by themand there fliall traverfe and try the variance, in the fame form as hath been, and is now ufcd in London, (S:c. And after the ele61ion, the mayor, fherifts, and t\ventv-lour, fliall come down to the commons in the hall and the mayor being feated, ther the felves

;

;

deputy,

the recorder,

or

chofen to the

commons

fent,

the

mayor

fliail

fliall

and

';

place

if

him

declare the

perlim

the perfon be preat hii right

hand.

The

flieriffs fliall be chofen on the day of the naof our Lady, (September the Sth) in the following manner the mayor, fheriffs, the twentyfour, and the fixty of the common-council, and all other citizens, fliall freely come, as to the eleflioa of the mayor; and then the mayor, and twcntv>four of his council, with the flierifis, fliall go into and by a majority choofe one fiierifF, the chamber fuche as thei will anlwer fore;' and the mayor to have a double \'oice as aforefaid. The recorder, or

tivity

:

;

*

deputy,

name

fliall

then declare

of the perfon elected

to ;

commons,

the

and the mayor

command them

the fliall

ti go and choofe a con-cetezvn dwellyng with in the Cite,' for the other fheiilf, fuche one for whom thei will anfwer, for the yere than next enfuyng ;' and the commons in the hall fliall immediately proceed to election, and \vhen they have cholen by majority, fliall, by their fpeakinform the mayor, flierifls, and twenty-four, er, whom they have chofen and if any variance fall among the commons, on their eleflion, it fliall be tried by the fixty common-council as in cafe of variance happening in the election of a mavor and he that has once ferved the ofhce of fheliff, fliaU never be eleded again. '

*

*

'

:

;

:

The

;

C

74

The

I

T Y

O

F

elcclion of the twentv-four con-citizens,

for

fame four clays, on which the common-council fliall be chofen in the different w ards, as follows the mayor fliall fay, Sires, ye hav be poynt of charter, that * ye fhull yerli chefe.n xxnii con-citezyns, for the^ Meris counfeyl and notwithilandin that it is acorded, and confentid, and be compoficon made, the names of the xxiiii fhall be nemelid to yow that is to feyn, vi fufficiaunt men for at this day * Conesford, if there ben fo many fufficiaunt in the * fame warde, to be of the nombre of the xxiiii * and if there be not fo many fufficiaunt in the fame warde, it fhall be lelful to the w^arde, to chefe the nombre that lakkith there, in other wardes atte the mayor's council,

fliall

yearly be on

the

:

'

*

;

'

-'

'

;

'

*•

*

large in

ward.

'

the Citee:'

And

and

fo

fix

performs

for

each

thes xxiiii thus chofen, fhull ftonde

*

perpctuelli in the Cite of Norw-ich, as thei

'

London be ordinaunce made

;'

don

in

except reafonablc

in which cafe the caufe in any year be affigned chaiige fuch perfon, or put it to the vote of the w-ard, w^iether the caufe of change be rea;

mayor may

and il Ibnable choofe another. \

*

when

*

them be not

be found

it

the xxiiii

'

And

if

it

io,

tly^n

feem

to

ben thus chofen,

fufficiaunt,

that then

ward to Mevr, that ony of

the

the

fliall

the

Meyr

ha\e chalenge, and reflreyne, as the Meyr of London lith, be ordinaunce in the Cite of London.' But thefe twenty-four can do nothing to bind or charge the city, without affent of the commonalty. No mayor, fheriff, or any of the twenty-four, fliall wear, or take clothing, or livery, of any lord, whil^ he be in office, on "^forfeiture of his freedom; or keep a common hoftrie, or common alehoufe. *

'

The common council fliall be eleiicd thus. On Monday next after Paifion Sunday, the freemen

the

and

;

N O R

\V

C H.

I

75

and houfclioklcrs in Conlsford ward, fliall meet ar and cboofe tweb/e common-council for that vcar viz. in Conisford fix, and in Berftretc

the Guildhall, ;

when

chofen, their names fhall be returned to the m.avor, by four perfons appointed bv the

fix

and,

:

whole ^vard fons

;

and then the mayor and charire them

fo chofen,

fliall

call the per-

and

o'ive o'ood

to

p'ue counfel, to the bell of their knowledge, for the

and to be conflant in appearing fuch counfel. On the Tuefday, fixtcen be chofen for Mancroft ward viz. feven in

profit of the city;

give

to

fliall

;

Peter's,

St.

five

On

in

St.

Stephen's,

and four

in

St.

Wednefday, twenty fhall be cho-* fen for VVymer ward viz. feven in St. Gregory's, feven in St. Andrew's, and fix in St. George's. And on the Thurfday, tweh'e for the ward beyond the water; fix for Coflanv, and fix for Fi bridge. But if Lady-day fall on tlie Monday after Paffion Sunday, then the firfl election to be on the ^vorking day next following. And thefe common-council fliall have the fame poorer with thofe of London. And the mayor fliall be fworn, at his enicrmg upon that Giles's.

the

;

to

office,

make

all

elections in

the fore^'oing

man-

All ordinances and conftitutions, which the mayor and twenty-four agree to, raufi be delivered

ner.

to the

and

valid er,

common-council by the

if ;

the

recorder, or deputy they pafs themx, they then become good and but if they aflv longer ad\'ice by their fpeak-

mayor

mull; grant

about them, and either fee

it

;

rejecl,

and they may confulc or pals them, as they

fit.

The mayor

is

to

hold a court once a week, and

oftener if he think needful

and to hear and determine all manner of injuries, or outrages, &c. done by any officers under himi and to have all pleas of apprentices and fervants, as the chief jullice of ;

;

peace

C

75

T Y

I

O

F

peace in the citv; pleas and ranTom of prifoners ; of debts letters of payments and all contrads made between merchant and merchant, or anypicas

;

;

other perfon beyond the feas

and

articles,

ty

faving the profit

;

which belong

;

and

all

other pleas,

to the office of

mayoral-

diat of right belongcth

to the

flierifF's office.

The

recorder

to

is

be fworn, before the mavor

and his council, in a common affembly, to give him good and true counfel; but fhall not be judge of the HierifTs court, in any thing that may be an hindrance to that of the mayor. Ail pleas of rents, lands, tenements, inrolmcnts, recognifances. fliall be before the mayor and flicriffs, in the mayor's court referving to the fhe-

and

;

rilfs

lolments, ^vc. fhall

of them

and the

for enay of the inmayors clerk. AlTav of bread, be made by the mayor and flierifFs, or one

their profits to

;

fees,

the

at leait

and the

;

fines fliall

be the

flieriffs.

The mayor, and twenty-four, are to be clodied according to their eftate and all that have been mayors, fliall wear their clothes furred, and lined, according to the feafon of the year and fliall attend the mayor on principal. days, in their befl ar;

;

ray,

to

church,

Chrifl

places in the city

;

and

have been mayors

if

alfemblics,

to

the

mayor

fliall ride,

the other peers, in livery of

and other

rideth,

all

in their cloaks

;

that

and

under the penalty of twenty pounds, and no bond-man fhall be mayor or

fuit,

fiieriff.

There

be a

fliall

Holy-crofs day, flialj

rume two

common

(May

the 3d]

affembly always on

when

the

now

perfons to bear the fword, of

ele6l

whom the

N O R the aiTemblv

fliali

lour pel Tons

for

\V

I

C

11.

77

to that office and and the aiTenibly fliall which fliall be officers for

clioofe

one

;

fergeants,

ehoofc two of them

all

;

a vear.

All the ordinances, for the time pafl,

fliall

be ex-

amined by the mayor, Ixieritts, twenty-four and fixand the good ones fhall be conlirmed, and the tv And the alfcmblv fliall then bad ones rejccled. choofe the recorder, bellman, and dikkeperet; and ihe mayor, and twenty-four, fliall choofe a common clerk :^, a coroner, twoclavers§, and eight conftaAnd the fixty common-council fliall choofe a bies. common Ipeaker, one coroner, two clavers, and ;

eight conflablc^s.

On

St. Matthew's day, (Sept. fi) an afTembly be annually held, vvlien the mayor, and t^ventv-' four, fliall chool'e one chamberlain, one treafurer, two auditors!!, that are not accountable of the common goods, and three commoners, to be of council and the fixty common-counwith the chamberlain cil fhall choofe one chamxberlain, one treafurer, one common fergeant, two auditors, not accountable of

ihali

;

the

common

goods, and three commoners, to be of and they are to de-

the chamberlains council alio; clare the city

money, debts, &c. before thev go off

their offices.

Each craft in the city and by themfelvcs, two

fliall

choofe yearly, freely

mailers,

and prefent them to

•f-

Keeper of

the city ditches.

J Town-clerk. § Perfoiis apppoiHted

to

keep

the

keys of the chefts, in which the ci:y

jnaney, feals, &c. are depouted. II

Whofe

bufinefs is, to infpeft

and pafs tie chamberlain's accounts.

G

78

T V

I

O

F

to the mayor; who, on the Monday next after the mayor's riding, fhall be charged to make fearch, for that year, of all defaults in their craft and pre-* ;

them

mayor; and upon convielion, half the fines fhall go to the flicriiTs, and half to their craft: and if the mayor find the mailers faultv, he may difcharge them; and if their craft negled to name two more within eight days, the mayor may appoint them. Such crafts, as have fearch in London, fliall have fearch in Norwich, in the fame

i'ent

manner

to

as

tlie

is

praclifed

London

in

;

except in the

and grants. And if there be fuch crafts in Norwich as are not in London, they fhall choofc two m,aflers and have the fame privileges and powers, as the other crafts in Norwich have. cafe of patents,

charters,

;

No

foreigners that

take any

dom

;

more

keep

apprentices,

fliop 'till

in

they

Norwich,

buy

fliall

their free-

except their ov/n or wife's children.

And no

freeman fliall take apprentices for lefs time than feven years, nor without enrolling them in the chamber, within a year and a day, before the mayor, on forfeiture of his freedom and every apprentice, when his time be expired, Oiall be free, paying to the chamber a noble, and to the fheriffs the fame fum. All that are now citizens fliall, within a year and a day, be inrolled in the craft he follows, on forfeiture of his freedom: and all, hereafter made free, fhall be inrolled under fome craft; and the :

maflers of that craft the chamber

fliall

more, according

and

exprefs their conient

;

and

their council.

The fen

to

fliall

have 20s. and the craft 4od. or agreement with the chambcriainj^

b)-

burgeflTcs to fer\e in

common

alfembly,

parliament

and

their

fliall

be cho-

names declared to

W

N O R to die '

mayor,

fliire,'

(lieriffs,

and

i

C H.

And

in the Guildhall.

79

their council,

in j^lcyn

'

there (hall be four

men chgfen in each ward, bv common alTemblv'; two of which are to alfeis, or lay the king's tax, and the other two to coiled it. This agreement, however full and plain, did not anfwer the end for which it -^vas intended for within a \ery fliort time, the commons exhibited articles to fir Thomas Erpingham, fleward -of the king's hoiifhold, againft the mavor, flicriffs, and twentyfour: which being laid before the king, he commanded, that the cit)^ fliould fend two perfons, one to be chofen by the mayor, flicriffs, and twentvibur, and the other by the commons ; with full powers to conclude and fettle all their differences^ agreeable to the determination of hirafclf and counMatters being thus accommodated, the king cil. granted them a ne^v cliarter, dated July 21^ in the fifth year of his reign; in which all former ones, and in particular his father's, are confirmed and reand the foUo-iving liberties added. cited at large ;

;

"Whereas, in form.er charters, there was no time. choofmg the mayoi: and fheriifs bv reafon whereof, great difputes had arifen ;' tlic king, '

* *

fixed for

;

by thefe prefents, empowers the and commonalty, to choofe twenty-four of

therefore,

lo^v'-citizens,

aldermen''''

j

citizens,

their fel-

wJiich twenty-four fhall be

aldermen * Aldermen are now only anbciaccs city, or

town corporate

•f the three degrees of

Lambard, in

his

:

to the

chief civil magiftiate of a

hut, with the Saxons,

riobiliiy,

and anfwered

aldeiman confiituted one

to cr^rl

amongft the Danes.

Archaionomia, fays, that the aldermen had the fame

dignity and power in cities, boroughs, walled

to\\

ns,

and

caftles,

under

the chief magiftrate, as the provofts of the hundreds, and wapentakes

had, in

all

England^ luider Uic earls or

lI'.erifF*

of the coymies

:

their office

C

8o

T Y

I

aldermen for life and common-council of the ;

O

F

ilxty oihcr citizens,

for

ilic

city.-

city,

may

mayor, which

fiiall

All citizens, dwelling in the

be prefent be held at the Guildhall, on May-day yearly and the major part of them fhali choofe two citizens, dwelling in the city, out of the twenty-four aldermen, both which have either been mayors before, provided three years have elapfed fince their lalt ferving; or have ferved the olhce of flieriff of the faid city of at the e]ec9:ion of the

;

;

which

major part of the aldermen prefent, fiiall choofe one for mayor, by vote and if there be equal votes for one pcrfon, then the mayor fiiall t\vo,

the

;

ha\"e the calling vote.

Two fiieriffs fliall be defied yearly. On the day of the nativity of die Virgin Mary one by the mayor and aldermen, and the other by the cominons which two, fo elcfted, fiiall continue in their ;

;

office,,

from the dav of St. Michael next fbllowin"for a whole year.

their eleftion,

Ihe fixty common-council flrall be yearly defied out of the four wards; viz. on the Monday in Eaficr week, twelve for Conisford ward; on the Tucf-> day, lixteen for Mancioft ward on the Wednefday, twenty for Wymer ward and, on the Thurfday^ twelve for the northern, or ward beyond the water. ;

;

All which

fiiall

be the common-council for the year enfuing,

fice ;ill

being to keep Inviolate

flie

laws, liberties, eights, king's peace, and

the juft, ancient, and approved

their

power

:

CuAoms of

and on any fuddcn emergency,

immediately rung,

to call

;

the realm, to the left of

order the mot-bell to be

together the folk-mote,

their p.irticular jurifdiflioti, to confult,

as might enftie

to

i.

e. the people of

and provide againft fuch damages

»nd to reprefs everything, any way tending to

(he pcjce of the king, or his kinj^doni.

difturlf

NORWICH.

Si

and have as great power and authcMity in common-council of tlie city of London have, and enjoy there. cnfuing,

the city, as the

Of

fof fl:iall be fix for ward; Conisford ward; fix for Mancroft wa-* beyond the fix ward ward for the and Wymer On the death of, or difplaclng any alderman ter.

aldermen,

the tvventy-fom-

fix

;

lor reafonable

ward

to

the

caufe, the

Guildhall,

out of the

room,

mod

mayor

fhall

lummon

the

choofe another in his

to

w^orthy and able citizens

dwelling- in the city.

anv laws, cuftoms, and ordinances, heretofore or ufed, be defe61;ive, or difficult' to be underilood; or if any matter arifc, not provided lot by the laws or ordinances in being the mayor and aldermen, or the major part of them, with the confent and approbation of the major part of the common-council, fliall have full power to apply any remedv, affrecable to confcience and reafon, for the common profit of the city, and of thofc who refort thither Avhich ordinances fo made, they may put If

made

;

;

in execution

by

themleives, or their officers.

A

charter was, at the fame time, granted to St. George's guild, or company by which their ridings ;

and grand This

proceflaons were regulated

and augment-

with the ancient crafts, or companies, of the city, made a very fplcndid appearance on all public occafions. The companies were then on the fame footing as thofc of the city of London now are but not being incorporated by charter, they have been declining ever fince the time of Henrv VIII. thoudi fome of the trades flill continue as a fraternity, and choofe wardens among themfelves tQ this day. ed.

guild,

;

F

It

C

82 It

i.vas

further

I

T Y

ordered,

O that

P the

chamberlain&

appoint the colour of the gowns, &c. each this formerly was under ct)mpany fhould appear the dire^lion of the particular wardens: and that all crafts, that will, be ckd in liveries, after the manand that the craft ner of the London companies or company of which the mayor is a member, follow immediately after the mayor, and every one oi

jQiould

m

;

;

them attend him to the cathedral on Hallowmas, Chriftmas and Iwelfth day and at other times at the mayors pleafure: and that every company hold ;

the affemblies of their crafts four times every year, ' and kcpe the worfliip of their avowe in due place, '

*

and ride on dieir principal avowe's day, and honourc.'

in li\'ery

Thus was the peace of the city fettled, on a touch better and more honourable foundation, than crer it had been before; and a charter obtained, granting the fame form of government and ordinances as the city of London poffefled: an obje^i which the citizens always had in view from their firft

incorporation.

The

charges

of

this

charter

were upwards of one hundred pounds, which \vas ordered to be taken out of the common flock. In 1417, the king, before his fctdng out for France, borro\ved a thouland marks of the city ; and pledged his coronet for the payment.

Henry VI. mayor and other

In 14^3, 2 to the

a commiffion was dire61ed juflices, affigned by the

king, to hold feffions of oyer and terminer, ajid general gaol delivery, for the ciiy and its county: thefc commilhons were ufually taken out when the gaols began to be full of prifoners, and were contiji^ucd "till the judges circuits were regularly fetdad. In.

.

N O R In the 6di year of

VV

I

tlic king-,

C H.

8^

a commiffion of this

kind was directed to the mayor, (herifFs, and four juflices of the peace to be nominated by the mayor and others before whom the two coroners for the together with the city were fummoned to appear the two conflafixteen conftables for the four wards ;

;

;

bles for the hberty of Holmeftrete that of Spytelond;

;

and the two

for

baihff of the priors Hber-

the

and alfo four men out of each thole parts ward, whofe office probably was to ferve on juries. At this time the liberty of the city, by water, ex-' tended as far as Braiden* ties in

;

In 1424, an indenture tripartite, made between the mavor, aldermen, and commons, containing conftitutions for the better governm.ent of the city, was ratified at

a

common

aflembly, in the Guildhall,

on

Lucy's day, the thirteenth of December; and aftenvards confirmed by Henry It fets forth, VII. under the broad feal, in 1492. hevyly voyfed for lak of good that the city was and vertuous govdrnaunco, with inn the fey'd citee had, to gret diflionour of the mair, aldermen, the Friday after

St.

'

'

'

and good commons of the fame.' To remedy which evil, the following ordinances were made. *

The aldermen

1

fliall always give good counf^l mayor, as the aldermen of London do.

to the

Thev

2.

fliall

come

fliall

keep

to the

mavor whenever they

are ^vanied.

They

3. till

by

fecret all matters treated of,

they be (hewed in the

tiiem,

common

mayor and aldermen, or

allembly, the

called

major part of

on pain of being dilplaced.

F

i?

4.

Ths

C

S4

1

T Y

O

F

4. The aldermen fliall fupport tlie mayor, and walk with him on principal days in proceffion ; er to anv lord, or lady, or perfon of worfliip into anie place in the cite;' or pay fix-pence for de'

'

'

fault.

No

alderman fliall quarrel with, or fue his fellows, before he hath complained, and lliewn his grievance, to the mayor, and aldermen his council, under twenty flrillings penalty* 5.

6. No 'alderman fliall be an arbitrator againfl any' other alderman, under the fame penalty.

be in clothing, as the 7. The aldermen fliall mayors fliall appoint, under twenty fhillings penalty; and being put out of the clothing, and council of the twenty-four aldermen. 8.

The aldermen

'

Thvs

'

men,

'

'

'

*

'

'

'

*

'

'

'

*

* '

* *

as

take the follo^ving oath, heir ye, fue mair, and all myn felas alder-

that her

longe

as I

ben

:

fliall

that

I,

from

this

tyme

forthe,

flonde in degre, and eftat of alder-

man, wythinne the citee of Norwych, to yow fire mair, and to vowr fuccefsoures maires of this'feyd. alie conllitucyons, and citee, xal ben obcdycnt ordinaunces, wytli here peynes and dependaunces, ;

comprehendit as well yow and your aldermen, er your fucceifoures, er be the more part of hem, for honour of the eflatis to ben mad, and in thifc prclent cndenturis as alle

cthir ordinaunces,

ordeyned, with

;

be

myn body and myn

good, xal hol-

den and fuUeyne and in ony office name of die lame citee to be Icyd, vern, be the councel and advys of aldermen of thys, fame citee, for the or be the advys of the more partye held me God at the holy doom." ;

upon me, I xal

me

in

go-

and tyme beyng, So of hem.

the mair

;

NOR

\V

I

C H.

85

It was now alfo ordered, that at the fwearing the new mayor, and at fuch other times as the mayor

fliould tiiink convenient, the following

proclamation

be made in different parts of the

viz.

'

'

*

'

'

'

The

IMevr of thys Cite,

city,

commaundyth on

th
kyngis behahe, that iche man kepe and that no man difturbe, this tyme forthwarde nc go armed wyth in pees, ne breke the forfeid peyn of prcfouninent, and the upon the Citee, and that alle maner of forfcture of all the armure the pees, fro

;

;

'

bakcris,

*

for

baken iiij lovys for a peny, and ij lo'/) s and that bred, a penv of bukell of reynes

'

and

all

'

be

* '

'

'

;

other bred, that the baxteris

\\ele fefondc,

and holden the

ful

bake,

ichall

weyghte,

af-

fourme of the' ftatute ther uppn made ; and upon pevn ther upon ordeyned wyth inne this And that no bakere, beye none qwete in Cite. and that allc the market befurn X of the clokke brcwfters and gaimokers", felle a gallon of ale of ter

the

;

*

'

'

'

'

and a galon apd other as it hath beforn tvme ben ufed, upon peyn that is ordeyned in the Cite and that all manner of taverners felle a gaIon of reduvne of Gafcoyne, of the befte, be mefure a feled for 6d. and a galon of qwite wyne of Gafcoyne of Rochelle for 4d. and all manner of wynes according, like as they ben of valew, upon pev^ that is ordeyned ther on in the Cite and that no bocher, ne fifbnian, bringe no manner the bell be mefure a felyd for id. ob.

of the next for

id.

;

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

of vetaile into the market to be

'

'

'

fold,

but yif

it

be

owyth for to be, upon forfeiture of the vetaile, and of other ponyOiement, be difcrccion of the Mejr of the Cite and that none cook, felle no vetaile, but it be well feoneft

and holfome,

as

it

;

F 3 * Alehoufe-keepers,

'

,

iondcj

C

86

O

F

no mete in peyne of and upon other peynes ordeyncd m the CItee and that thei felie good and reafonable pennevvorths and that thei bye no manner vctaile in market, before 8 of the clokke and that none bye ne felle no manner of vetaile in none inne, with inne howfes, but in the pleyn market, on peyne ther on ordeyned and that no manner man forflalle whcte ne make, ne non other corn in the Cite, ne non other vctaile coming tovvarde the Citec, be lond ne be water; ne non erneft geve, upon non vetaile, but in the pleyn market, upon peyne of forfeture of the vctayie, and upon other peynes ordeyned in the Citee; and that non alyon"'' walk in the Citee, in iomere, nor in wyntere after the corfu-bcilt be rongyn, ne non knyfe here with poynt, in peyn of prefonment and forfeture of his knyfe ne that and

that thei

^

fonde,

'

forfcture of the

*

T Y

I

rechafe

vetayle, ;

'

;

'

*

;

'

*

'

'

'

*

* '

*

*

'

*

;

;

*

there fchall

*

comyng

' '

*

*

*

non alyon

to the Citee,

herverwelj:

non other

upon peyn

ther on ordeyn-

al)on,

ed; and that no man with in the Citee, pleye attc ne coy ting, ne difes, ne non other difhoncft pleyes, upon peyn of prefonment, but ulen fchetyng§, and other oneft games, as the knygis commandment is and that alle conflables of the Citee, iche man in his warde, kepe tlie pees, and make watches, as it is ordeyned and anefle all

tenys,

;

'

'

'

'

'

;

manner of night walkers, and mifdoers, and bring hem to the kyngis prefon, upon peyn ther on orand that all manner deyncd, wyth inne the Cite ;

*

* Foreigner, or

^ From

ftranger.

the French couvre feu, tq cover the

Conqueror, that

at the

J Harbour

fire

;

it

being a law of the

ringing of the evening beli at eight o'clock, every

family fliouldiake up their

§T»rc

men

fires,

and

extinguifli their lights.

or entertain.

c.;?rcife of fliqoting at

marks.

;

N O R '

*

'

'

VV

I

G

H.

87

crafte, that ben foren or cflrangeres, that com)T:]g to the Citee, and ufcn her craftis the forefeid ther inne, theV fchall freely dwell or lofe of amercyment, Citee, vvyth owtyn any

men

of

vvel)-n

m

elmond and a day and over that, in 'goods, a fuch \yyfe as it haith ben ufcd beforn in old tymc.' About this lime, one hundred and twenty perlons ;

t-.>

'

were perfecuted in the diocele of Norwich, for lollardy*; and William White, a prieil, was burnt here in September, 1424. In 1426, the liber albus, or white book, a fair vellum manulcript, refpccling die alLiirs of this ciand all the material f,ity, was firft compiled; dences, and memorable occurrences, were therein entered^

by

Thomas Ingham,

the order of

then

mayor. In

1427,

Humrhrv duke

and and feveral

miner, Scz.

of Glonceflcr

arrived

m

a coramilTion of oyer and tercreneral !iaol dclivcrv, with the mavor,

here, being joined

felons were tried bclore him.

In 1429, an agreement was concluded between William Worfled, prior of Norwich, and his conby vent, and the mayor, flieriffs, and citizens which, the prior had confirmed to him all his exempt liberty, in Spytelond, Holmflrete, and Ratonrow and his tenants there were wholly excufed fiom ferving at the turns of the flieriffs of Norwich and permitted to buy and fell in the city toll-free ; and to have and enjoy the ferry over the river Wen:

;

F 4 ^

The

followeis of

ter Lollard, a

Wick liffe were

German, who

firft

fum, called Lollards

gave rife

to the

;

Wal-

either from

feft in

1315

;

or fron>

lolium, cockle or darnel, as being tares arrjongft the Lord's wheat.

They

were great reformers, and preached particularly againft the tr.onks, ether religious focicties of thofe time**

aiic^

C

SS

T Y

I

O

F

All Conisford ferry. belong to, and be in the jurifdiction of the convent; and the prior's right therein afcertained, of view of frank-pledge*, arrd court-baron t, waif J, Jlray§, forfeitures of felons and fugitives, liberty of outfangthef ||, infangthef'"-, toll, theaml'l}:, gallows, tumbrell |!|!, and confifcated sroods, and' all other liberties which former priors

now

fum,

Sandling's

called

meadows were adjudged

to

had A

*

land,

For the ancient cuftom of Eng-

pledge, or furety, for freemen.

prefervation of the public peace, was, that every free bora

for the

mail, at fourteen years of age, relisious perfons, clerks, knights, and their eldeft foHs excepted, fliould find fecurity for his fidelity to the king-, or elfe he kept in prifon

ber of neighbours

to

pledge forth coming

whence

:

be bound

times

at all

became cuftomary,

it

for

one another, or to

;

to fee

for a certain

anfwer the tranfgrefiion of any

This was called frank-pledge, and the

one abfenting himfelf. thereof decenna, becaufe

it

commonly

num-

each man of their

confifted of ten

circuit

houfliolds

;

and

every particular perfon, thys mutually bound, was called decennier.

This

was

c,uftom

fo ftriftly obferved, that the fheriffs, in every county,

did, from time to time, take the oaths of ysung people, as they grew

to

the age of fourteen years, and fee that they combined in one decennary or other

;

whereupon

this

branch of the

flieriff's

authority was called, li-

fus franciplegii, view of frank- plege.

A

\-

court, that every lord of a

own

lon) holdeth within his

J Goods <",very

found, of which no body claims the property; that of which

beaft, not wild, found

Privilege of reclaiming any

within any lordfliip, and not

man dwelling

** Privilege of tryinj any thief taken within

A

power of having fervants and

with theam,

j

1|

;

bondmen,

his

own

Or ducking-ftool

vomen.

:

and taken up

court.

All baronie?, enfeofTcd for

unto the poiTeflbrs

their children, goods, and chattels, did ap-

and that fo fully, that they could difpofe of them

^fld unquiet

owned by

his fee.

llaveJ.

were endewed with fuch power:

fhereof, all th^ir

pertain

in his fee,

any other place, and judging him in

for felony in

+"jl

a ba-

one waves the claim.

§ Any any one. y

manor (who was formerly called

precindts.

an engine, invented

for the

at pleafurc.

puniflimcnt of fcolds,

;

N O R

\V

I

C H.

89

had enjoyed in a!] the meado^^'s the tower called Their jurifdiclion was the dungeon on!v excepted. alfo allowed, in all the hamlets and towns of Brakendale, Lakenham, Eaton and Erlham, Erlham and from thence crofs, and Nether Erlhara-ftreet and horn Berftreet gates, by the to Heigham gates :

;

;

middle of the road, to, the crofs at the joining of and from thence to Trowfe m.ill bv and from t^ie mill to Trowfe bridge the foot-path and fo on by the norrh fide of the bank of Trowfe

the two wavs

;

;

Ee

to the

ter

there,

river Wenfum, including the Ee, or wa-^ belonging to the manors of LaJ;enham

and Newton

and free and a certain wharf in that river asrainft the ffannok and all the water, and fifiiery, from Trowfe bridge to the end of Eaton wood; and alfo libert\- of riding in the city, and its liberties, on the Fridav before fifljing in

;

and

all free

pafture there

the Ee, and in the river

;

Wenfum

;

;

to proclaim their fair kept on Tombland; which fair, with its liberdes, the citv fully dlfclaimed: and the prior was, moreover, to lia\'S the Hberty of pafling and repafhng the river Wen-

Witfuntide,

with boats and other velTels, tollmayor, &c. were to pav four fhillings e\ ery Michaelmas-day to the prior and convent, on confideratiion of their releafing to the city, thx^ tithes of tvvel\e acres and fixtcen feet of land, at the eaft end of the priory of Cafrovve and granting liberty to the mayor, coroners. Sec. of exercifmg their feveral

fum, free

at all times,

;

the

;

jurifdictions there;

they did not interfere or tenants nor hold any real or perlbnal pleas, by writ or otherwife nor an)' ilierilt's turn, in any of the aforefaid places or lands

with the convent,

fo

its

that

liberties,

;

;

In

1433, a great difturbance happened on the mayor; which ^vas not finallv compo-

election of a

icd

C



I

T Y

O

F

1436, when William de la Pole, earl of came hither and at an affemblv held on the Thurfday before Lady-day, at which 'were prefcnt the mayor, fhcriffs, Wetherby and Grey, who had occafioned the difpute, fixteen aldermen, and fed

'till

Suffolk,

thirty-fix

;

of the comimon-council, the whole matter

was fubmitted to the was as loUowcth,

laid earl,

whofe detcrminatioij

common fcal, which had been forciof the Guildhall, on May-day, 1433, by the commons, and by them kept, be placed in the old-accuilcmed place in the treafury and that four clavers be choien by the commons, as ufual, to keep it, under the fignet of the mayor, and four cf his fello;\.\s. That

1.

bly taken

the

orit

;

That

2.

any

fcal

all

writings,

fealed

therewith,

of office belonging to the

city,

or with aganrft

John Hauke, John Mey, Thomas Wetherbv, Tho. Fifiilak, John Beihagh, William Grey, John Qwerdand

ling,

be \-oid and all pcrfons rcflored from which they had been eicded in

others,

to their places,

;

H333. That neither W^ctherby, nor his party, any more vex the commons, nor alderman of their par-

ty

;

4.

nor they him, or his adherents.

That Wetherby be declared alderman of Coand Grey of Wymcr ward; and every one

nisford,

rcllored to his jufl rights.

In 1436, the city fent forty men, completely armed, to the dclence of Calais, againfl the duke of Burgundy who then bcfieged it. ;

In

NORWICH.

^i

In 1437, '"September 8, the city and its liberties were feized by the kin g"^ and John Welles, alderman of London, was appointed cullos, or warden. The mayor was difplaced 'till March 1, when he was reinflated in his office but fo as to 3.8: under On the j 5di of July, the fheri lis were the warden. remoyed; and two new ones appointed by the And kings writ, to continue during his pleafure. Noycmber 30, a proclamation \vas ilfiied out, com;

;

manding

all

perfons not to intermeddle in the dif-

putes between the court and commons; or to hold anv pri\ate meetings on either fide, on pajij of lifi?

and limb.

The

order to

in

citizens,

ingradate

themfehes

with the king, fent forty archers to afhft in raifing and advanced him one hunthe fiege of (jriifnes They likewife dlfdred pounds by way of loan. patchcd a letter to die kings council, (in which they were joined by their ^vorthy warden) praying a- refloration of their liberties but this they could not •

;

accomplifh 'till 1459; '»vhen, at the inftancc of Thomas, bifliop of Norwich, and William, billiop of Lincoln, they obtained letters patent lor thai puipofe.

In 1440,

Humphry, duke of

dutchefs, vifited forty marks. tirely

t,he city

The

citizens

regained the king

prince's interell

;

fe6lu»ally loft it:

;

s

Gloucefler, and his and were prelented Avith now hoped to haye en-

favour, through this great

but by an ill-judged Itep, they effor, on tlrj iSth of Odober, they

gave * This leizure was occafioned by the continual djfturbances and

between

the city, the prior

abbot of Wendling, refpeftirg

proved, that the city

aKc

to forfeI:ure,

It.id

fuiti,

and convent, the abbefs of Ckrrowe, and the

far

their feveral privileges

exceeded

their libcr'.ieSj

;

in

winch

it

uas

and made them

1;-

; ;

gave orders for a

OF

T Y

I

92

fuit

to

be commenced in

tlie

ex^

chequer, for the hundred pounds they had lent the king three years before a proceeding, which mufl :

necefiarily give the court juft caufe of offence.

In January ipllowing, alderman Thomas Welherwho mortally hated the commons, on account

by,

of their oppoung him in the the abbot of creeling their

St.

late contefls,

new

mills \ipon

the river

though they had already flood, there out being

iniligated

Bennet's to profecute the city, for

at all objected to.

The

tei?.

Wenfum

years, with-

abbot's plea was,

of Heigham, he and one hundred and fixty acres of land; and had free paffage on the river Wenfum, for boats and veffels, to and from his abbey of HohPx; and that thefe new mills not only hindered his fo pading, but, by flopping the current, caufed the -water to overflow its banks, and drown his lands, to his great damage. 'In anfwer to which, the city proved, that there were four ancient mills acrofs the flrcam ever fmce the conqueft two at Taverham, called Bumpdede's, or Appilyerd's mills and two within the city, called Calkc mills and that, whenever people went up the flream to Taverham, they were obliged to pull their boats upon and that the abbot's mills, land at old Calke mills at Heigham, being higher up the flream, than either the old or nev.- mills, the water wps flopped before it came to their mills: and as to the eredion of the the old mills having ncAV mills, it was of necefTity been decayed and ufelcfs for twelve years and befides all this, that out of the fee-farm of one hundred and twenty-pounds, thefe mills produced twenthat,

was

as lord of the

manor and

leic

feized of 'tvvo water mills,

;

;

;

;

;

ty-fix. clear.

Notu-iihflandinsc

W

N O R .

Notvvithftanding

all

I

C

II.

93

the foregoing, paiticulars were

judgment was given againfl the citv, and the profit of lire mills forcibly taken from them for fpme time when the affair was left to the determination of William de la Pole, earl of Suffolk: who ordered the city to pay one hundred pounds to the abbot, and fifty pounds to the prior of Norwich, for the damages they had luftained by means of thefe mills. This decifion fo enraged the common people, diat on January 25, they proceeded in a tumultuous manner, and in great numbers, to the Guildhall; from whence they carried away rhc common feal, that the award might not be fealcd. T hey went afterwards to the mxonaflery, which they threatened to fet on fire declaring their intenunlefs they tion of killing the prior and monks would deliver up the final agreement, concluded be-» tween them and the city, (fee p. 87 ;) which, to fave thev rhemfelves, thev Avere obliged to comply with likcwiie kept the city gates fliut, and for fome time fefuied entrance to the duke of Norfolk, the earl of although Oxford, and oiher of the king's minifters thev fliewed them the king's commiifion, to feize the rioters, and rcftore peace. This v/as called Gladmvai's infurrcclion, hom one John Gladman, a merTo anfwer thefe chant, who was veiy acHve in it. clcarlv proved, vet

;

;

;

;

;

Sjc. were commanded to appear before the council, on the octave of the purifi-

outrages, the mayor, cation

;

when

committed

the

to the

mavor was fleet;

fined fifty pounds,

where he lay

'till

and

the 26th

March

following. In the mean time, a comof oyer and terminer was iffued out, to fit, at Thetiord, where judgment being given againfl the

of

iniflTion

city, the liberties were Icized into the king s hands and on the iSth of March, 1442, fir John Clifton was appointed governor of the city. Wliilfi the mayor remained a prifoner In the ilcet, Wethcrby ;

took

;

CITY

04

common

O

^

out of the cheft, and, agreebond of one hunand one of fifdred pounds to the abbot of Hohn and another of fifty pounds t\' pounds to the prior; to the bifhop, tvho had now let up feme claims

took the sbie to

feal

the earl's award, lealcd a

;

and then

entirely deflroyed the

In 1447, at

'"^^ citizens

all

payment of a

mills.

obtained a privy-feal, dated 8 ; by which they were

November

AVeftminfler,

reflored to

new

their

liberties.

And

afterwards,

on

of one thoufand marks, they obtained a full rcftoration, and confirmation of ali thcit franchifes, under the broad feal, dated December 1, ill the 26th vear of the kin^. fine

In 144S, the king honoured the citv with his pre-fence: and in 1449, paid it a fecond vifit, on Saturday, Augufl 29, and Itaid "till the Monday night following; and was entertained at the

expcnce ot

and commons.

the biihop, the prior, the mayor,

In 1451, XValtcr Jeffery was profecUted, for executing the office of under-fnerifF of this city two years together, and fined two

being contrary to

hundred pounds,

it

flatute.

In 1452, it being rumour'd that Edward, earl of March, fon to the duke of York, was advancing towards London the cpecn, much terrified thereat, endeavoured to make what friends fhe could, and when, in ftill affor that purpofe came tn this city ati hunadvance to fembly, the commons refolved dred marks, as a loan to the king and the aldermen, at the fame time, prcfented the queen with to which the commons added forty iixTv marks, more fo that the king had pow two hundred marks of the city: the citizens judged this a proper oppor;

;

;

;

tunity

NORWICH.

93

.

a genaal pardon for all paft offences, together with the grant of a new charter; all which dicy obtained, on pacing a fine of twentyfolicit

tunltv 10

marks, and advancing to the queen the whole feefarm of the city, for the lafl; year, being 129!. lis. The charter is dated at Weflminller, March 4d. i-^th. and confented to in full Parliament: it cona general pardon tains a reflitution of all liberties a confirmation of former charters ; oi pall offences with a full power of ufing all liberties, ever granted ;

;

bv any foregoing qL

not heretofore

charter,

made

uie

time the contefls between th.j prior and which, after various expediafrefli city ents tried to conciliate all diflercnces, but without ctieft, ^vcre at lengih fettled by the good offices of

At

this

broke out

the bifliop ot

On

St.

;

Nonvich.

Jcroms

dav.

couit held their general

t!ic

commemoration, or anni\

ci

larv obit,

the

for

the deceafed benefaftor^ to the city, (whole

ijf

and

gifts

ioul5

names

were alwa\'s on that day read out ot a chapel of th^.

bead-roll kept for that purpofe) at the college of St.

Mary

The

in the Fields.

procelTion

was as follows: the mayor, Iheriiis, aldermen, common-council, the twenty-four conftables thither

of the

citv,

poor perlbns clothed

thirteen

who

alike,

and nine chaplains, to perform the exequies or lervice, each of which had 4d. At th.; lame time, 6d. was gi\ en in bread to the prifoners the fame fum to thofe in the calin iKe Guildhall

had

2d. each,

;

tle 1

;

2d,

lights

4d. to each houie of lepers a: for ;

ringing;

and i6d.

4d.

for

to

the

the

citv gates

bellman;

the herie".

I'his

4d.

;

for

commemoration



A

temporary moriumenc rsifed over a grave

which corpf^ arc drawa

to chc piace

of fepukuro.

;

alfo a

carri^si;^ in

C

9b J-ation

I

T V

O

F

was kept annually, though not always on the

at the fame place but moflly at this being the place where the grcateft part of the city bufulcls was at that time tranfadecl.

fame day, or chapel,

In

;

it

December

1456,

20,

a (lioek of

an earth-

quake was felt here; and in the year following, a French invafion being dreaded, the citv raifed two hundred men, which they lent for the defence of Yarmouth. In the year 1460, during the conteft between the houfes of York and Lancalter, the mayor and alder-

and the commons armed men elquire, William Rookwood, and appointed eighty with whom they agreed for fix weeks their captain pay; at fix-pence a day for eadh ioldier, and fent them to the afliRan.ce of the king who wrote them

men

raifed forty

;

;

;

;

;i

letter

of thanks, with a

recjueft,

that they

would

maintain them for one month longer; which was v ;(cadiiy complied with.

end of February, on account of it was refolved, that all the city gates fhould be kept locked, day and night, except fiye of them, which were to be conflantly guarded: and in this (late thecity continued, 'till they receiyed a letter from king Edward IV. acquainting them, that on the fourth day of March, he had taken upon him 'the goyernment of the realm, and commanding them to proclaim him by the name of king Edward and that all perfons of what degree focver, between fixteen and fixty years of age, fhould arm themfclyes, and haflen to

About

the latter

the diftra6led ftate of the nation,

;

all poffible fpced: upon this, they diredproclaimed him, and raifed a competent niunber The king foon afof foldiers to hipport his cauie.

him with ly

ter

NORWICH.

97

throne confirmed all the city's former charters, by infpeximus, wherein they are every one recited at large. ter his

acceffion to

tlie

of March, 1463, the cathedral received confiderable damage by fire: and this year the ftatute was made prohibiting the carrying any

On

the

firft

wool out of the kingdom; and corn, that a quarter of wheat was for sod. a

fo

plentiful

was

fold in Norfolk

quarter of malt for the fame price; and

a quarter of barley or oats at

1

2d.

1467, an aft pafTcd for the true making of worfteds in Norwich and Norfolk the worlled wea~ vers were by this aft authorifed to elcft every Whitmonday, four wardens of the fame craft, livjng in and the artificers in the county of Northe city

In

:

;

four wardens more, living in the county: all which were to be fwoni on the Monday next after Corpus Chtilli day, before the mayor of the city, folk,

and the fteward of the dutchy of Lancafier, if in and the faid wardens, or the the county and prefent major part of them, as well within the city, as without, had full power for a year following, to furvey all worfteds, and make fuch rules and ordinances, as they judged to be for the good of the craft. 1'hey were alfo empowered to fearch all worfteds in Norwich, Norfolk, Suftblk and Cambridgefhire, as well upon die loom as off; and to fummon all per;

fons who difobcyed this aft, or their ordinances, before the mayor or fteward, who might punifti them at difcretion and every man was obliged to put his proper mark to every piece, on pain of for:

wardens were to affign certain places in and appoint certain days in the city and county every week, when and where pieces were to be brought and fearched by them and if approved, feiture;

the

;

;

G

then

;

C

)S .hen to

fix their

reward: and ?ver the

md

all

I

T

token or mayors,

F

feal thereto, flierlffs

and

wardens required them, were

fupport them in their

iatute

O

Y

was extended

to the

without fee or bailiffs,

when-

to attend, aid,

f'earch. In 1468, county of Elfex.

this

at Norwich, and received and fumptuous manner.

In 1469. the king was in a very grand

In 1471, the commons granted thirty pounds yearly to the fheriffs, to enable them the better to pav the fee-farm rent of the city. fuppofed that in 1472, the dav of elefling the hrit of March, to and that hath continued to be the the hrft of May day of eledion ever hnce. It is

the

mavor was changed, from ;

In 1474, the king vifued the fented with a

lum

oi

city,

and was pre-

money by way of benevolence

notwithftand]ng which, the following year the citv was taxed at Sol. 6s. iid. for a whole tenth and fifteenth, raifed for the payment of the forces emploved in- France.

In 1477, the plague raged fo furioufly throughout Endarid, that, as HoUincfhed favs, thrice tlie number of- people died in four months, that had

been deflrovcd in the

lall

hfteen \ears of war.

In 14 7S, the latter end of Septemb'cr, another pcflilence broke out; and continued its ravages till

November 1479: vile's

in

which

Nenumber of

time, according to

account, there died an incredible

people in this city: in the following year, on the 28th day of December, a fevcre fliock of an earthquake was felt in Norwich and Norfolk, and almoft all

:

NORWICH. all

by

over England

;

many

99

buildings were overdirown

and confiderable damage

it,

.

done in

feveral

piacec.

In 14S2, the king granted to the mayor, flierifFs, and commonalty, two free marts or fairs, to be held the firfl:, •vvithin the city and county of the fame ten days before the third Sunday in Lent, and ten clays after; the fecond, upon the commemoration of St, Paul, (June 30) and twenty days after: with all liberties and cuftoms belonging to fuch marts or fairs. This grant was exemplified under the broad feal and the marts were at firfl very confiderable ; but are now reduced to one day fairs only themoft confiderable of which is that kept on Lammas;

;

:

day, near Hertford bridges.

In i486,

1

tagenet

;

Henry VII. on

who

bert Simnel,

cifiumed the

the rebellion of

name

Lam-

of Edw. Plan-

cxpeding an invaiion of the ea~ kingdom, made a progreis through

the king,

flern parts of the

Norfolk and Suffolk, to confirm the inhabitants in and fpent his Chriflmas at Norwich; when the city made him an handfome prefent from hence he went in pilgrimage to our Lady's chapel ai Walfingham, fo famous for its miracles; where he made his \'Ows and after he had refiored peace by a compleat victory, he fent his banner to be offered there, as an acknowledgment of his prayers being their loyalty

;

:

;

heard.

The kingdom was now vifitcd ^\ith a new kind of difeafe called the fweating ficknels, or dead fvveat it was fo contagious, that fcarce one in an hundred efcapedit; thofe to whom it proved fatal, died almoft as loon as taken and what made it more terrible, was, that the fame perfons were liable to it ;

G

2

feveral

: ;

C

100

T Y

I

O

F

it began September 21, and laflcd end of 061ober. A remedy was found out

feveial times: 'till

the

by

a

learned native of this city,

publiflied

it

who

generoufly

to all the world.

Soon after, the old fuit was revived between the and citv, with refpe^l: to their feveral liberties

prior

of the priory,

Holm-

Tombland, Raton-row, &c. were not

in the

the prior infiRing, that the flrete,

fite

This contefl lafled many years, and occaiioned a very large expence to both

jurifdi61ion of the city.

parties.

In 1487, an earthquake was felt here on St. Thomas's day. And this year, the convent of the Carmelites, or White Friers, acknowledged the mayor and commonalty as their perpetual founders

who on

make a folemn proceffion annually, Affumpdon of our Lady, which was their

agreed to the

foundation-day,

to the faid

convent.

148,9, it was enacled, that no butcher fliould any bead, within any city, borough, or walled town in England, or in the town of Cambridge under the penaltv of 1 2d. for every ox, and 8d. for e\ery other bead fo flain but the towns of Berwick and Carlifle were excepted.

In

flay

:

In

1490, the city fent the king a benevolence,

together with twelve horfemcn well armed, at an al-

lowance of 1 2d. a day each man, 'till they were taken into his majefty's fcrvice and the following year they fcnt twenty foot foldiers. ;

In 1492, the animofides between the

and

city,

prior,

monks, inccafmg daily the king, on a reprcfcntation of the whole aHair, direded the following

the

letter to the

;

mayor. '

By

W

N O R ^

By

the

I

C H.

KIN

101

G.

'TRUSTY

and vvellc belovyd, we grcte you and whereas we ben enfonned, that dyverfe and many old grete grugges and maters of \'ariaunce and debate, have been hangyng by many yeres paffed, betwixt the priour and churche of the cadiedral churche of our Cite of Norwych, and ther predeccflburls on the on partye, and you the mayor, tlie fliine\'es, and c,onnnynake of our faid Cite, and your and their prcdcccffours, on whcrin many comnmnications the othyr partye and trca;-,fe have ben made by diverfe notable perfons for th' appeyfing of die fame; but as wc ben enformed have taken none effect and thereby vvelle

:

;

;

grete inconvenicns be iykly to enfue. fore wole,

and

We

there-

ftraytly charge you, that all

man-

ner excufes ceafTyng, ye be and perfonallv appier afore us and our counfayll at Weftminftre, in the

xvma

of

St.

Mychell next

;

to th' entent that aftyr

by us and our counfayl

the feid matyr of variauns^

thorowlv herde, we may lette therin fuch direction, as fliall be confonant wydi our lawcs, reafon, and good concyens, lor the fynall appefyng of the fame hereafter; not fayling hereof on pevn of CCli. Latying you witc, that we bv oure other like letters have ye\-en in firayte commandment to the feyd priour arid hys breihren.

manor of Shene,

the

firft

Yeven day of JuynZ

at

our

In compliance with the king's command, the mayor, recorder, and alderman Gardiner, were nominated to appear on behalf of the city, at the day appointed when the principal matter in difpute being agreed on both fides, to be, whether the fite of ;

the priory, Tombland, Ratton-row and Holmftrete were in die hberty of the city, or not ? on trial had

G

3

thereon,

CITY OF

102

William Hufc and Roger Town' was given in favour of the city. But notwithftanding this folemn decifion, the mayor was again called up before the privy coupcil, and commanded to go down and move the affembly to confent, that the priory, and all its liberties, might

thereon, before

fir

iende, a verdi(S;

be formally exeniptcd out of the county of the city, on the prior's paying them five marks a year, or eighty pounds do^vn: this they v\ould by no means agree to, but flrenuoully infifled on the king's charter; the confequence of which was, that the affair, after various appearances before ihe king and council, remained undetermined; and was produdive of continual fuits and indichnents, during this whole reign.

In 1493,

"^'^^^^

was fold

in

London and Norwich

at fix-pence a bufliel.

In 1495, it was enabled, that no man fliould be a worfled fhearer in Norwich, unlefs he had ferved kvtn years as an apprentice, or was allowed of by the mayor, ajid maflers or wardens of the compa-

ny

;

worded fhearers in Norwich fliouid ordinances, but fucli as the mayor and althat no inhabitant in fliall think neceffary

that the

make no dermen

;

Norwich, not being a fhearman, fhould keep a flicarman in his houfe and that henceforward, the citizens of Norwich might take apprentices, notwithBut upon inforflanding the ilatute of 7th H. IV. that this ftatute was obmation to the parliament, ;

tained with a crafty defign of feparating the fliearers,

worded and

from the main body of Ihearmen,

making them a different craft or trade fo much of the ad as related to worded fliearing, was repealed j ;

iand the remainder of

it

confirmed.

The

;;;

N O R

\V

C H.

I

103

The fame

year an aft paffed, appointing particuamongfl which Norwich was one, for the keeping ftanclard weights and meafures, to leal others by; enading, that no perfon prefunie to-buy or fell, but by fuch fcalcd weights and meafures and empowering the officers of every city, burgh, or market town, twice in a year, to examnie all weights and meafures to deftroy fuch as be defective and to fine the party oflending, for the firft lar towns,

;

;

fault 6s. 8d. the

to '

fecond 13s. 4d. the diird 20s. and

him or her upon

fet

the

pillorv

:

and

further,

that there be but eight bufliejg raf^d or ilricken to

*

the

'

wool

quarter of corn; and

On

;

and twenty-fix flone

141b.

to

the ilone

of

to tlie fack.'

November died John Wellys, and Thomas Cans was elefted in his room but the corporation was obliged to procure a writ of dedimus poteftatem, to authorife them to fwear him their charters having given them no I'uch power, in the third of

ma)-or,

cafes of death.

In

1496, the city fent to the afiiRance of the the Cornifli rebels, twenty foldiers, well ecjuipped and armed v.ith brigandinesi, and king,

againlt

forty pounds to maintain them eleven were by the aldermen, and nine by the commons. :

raifcd

In Auguft, 1497, ^^^^ king, queen, and coimtefs of Derby, the king s mother, vifited the city and were received by the mayor with tlxe following fpeech. ;

Moft excellent, moft gracious, and mofl Xtien kyng, our naturall, our undoubted and rightful fovereyne leige lord. Here be vour true feithfuU '

'

'

*

f Coats of mail,

'plated

and jointed.

and

C

104

T Y

I

O

F

and mofl humble fubgietts, maifters, the Meire, and aldermen of this your citee of Norwich, whiche as wclc for themfclff, as in the name of "all the commonailte, and inhabitants of the fhiriffs

fame, thank your heighnefs, as humbely, as reverently,

and

hertyly,

as

their fovercigne lord;

as

may do

any fubgiets

for this,

that

hath lekid

it

you, of your moft fpeciall grace, to be perfonally prefent, and to fliew your mofl riall perfone here

among them

in

this

your

erthly joy and comforre.

citee,

And

to

for

oppen recognicion, that ye fovereigne welcome to them all, and that

tyly

your

feithfull

lovyng fubgiets

thcr gretteft

a pleyn and lord,

be herthey be

all

in worde, will

dede, according to ye duty of ther alligeans

;

and and

how be

it, that they ar more poore, and not of fuch ^velth as they have ben afor thefe dayes ; yet fovereigne lord, they offer, geve, and bring here

onto )'onr heighnefs a pr<;fcnt, that is to fay a cope (cup) with a hundred pounds of riall golde,- conteyned in the fume; heriily befeeching you fovereigne lord, of your mofl; habundaunte grace and goodnefs, yat it may be by your heigh comaundment benyngly fo admitted, accepted, and receyved; not for the quantite or value of it, but for that it is goven and prefentid, of very good and hertily affe6iion and moreover, thei fpecially be:

feech your heighnefs, fovereigne lord, to be to this your feyd citee, and of the liberties of the fame,

bounteowfc adjutor, and gracious fovercigne at all tymes and all thei daily, fhall prey almighty God hertily, for the profperous, good and gracious encrefle, conftrvacion, long contynuance, and magnificence, of your molt riall fpeciall protedor,

;

cflate

and perfone.

Amen.

In 1501, John Rightwife, mayor, began building the crofs in the market,

and

linifliied

it

in

1

J503

:

it

was

N O R

W

I

C H.

105

commodious and liandfome pile; but falling into decay, was fold in 1732, by the tonnage and city committees, for 125I. and foon after taken down. was a

mofi:

In i5o<5, the city obtained a new charter, dated Weftminfler, March 7, which contains by infpeximus, all former charters, with a full confirmation

at

of them.

In 1505, Robert Adams, clerk, was burnt here for herefy; and ihe fame year, great part of the city

was deftroyed by

fire.

In 1 "JO 7, one Thomas Norris ^vas condemned by Richard Rix, bifliop of Norwich, for the true profeffion of the gofpel, and burnt.

On

the C3th of April, a dreadful

fire

broke cut,

which raged with great violence for four days fucceffivclv: and on the fourth of June following, tliz again vifitcd v\ith the fame calamity, whicii by thefe two wafte for two days and a night laid leven hundred arid fires, from the beft accounts, and almcft the eneioihteen houfes were deftroved tire wards of Mancroft and Wymer, together Aviiii part of the ward beyond the water, converted into city vvas it

:

;

an heap of

rubbifli.

In 1509,

1

Henry VIII. we

find the city greatly

on account of the late fires it was a lonsr time before the ri\'er and flreets could be cleared of in the interim, to guard againfl future the rubbifh difafters of this kind, the court iffued an order, prohibiting anv new erected houfe, or other building to be covered with thatch. This year aifo, great part of the cathedral, with its veftry, all the ornaments diftreffed

:

:

thereof,

CITY OF

xo6

and books, were deflroyed bv a dreadful which broke out on St. Thomas's night.

thereof, fire,

In 1512,

mayor and

a

fuit

was commenced between the Norwich, and the mayor'and

citizens of

London, for a cuflom in London called it was determined that the citizens of Norwich were hable to no fuch cuftom wherecitizens of

when

balliage;

:

upon, all the liberties of the citizens of Norwich were allowed in the guildhall in London, and there entered.

In 1513, an a£l was made to prevent deceits in worfleds by which none were to be calandred wet, but by perfons who had ferved an apprenticelliip to ;

fuch craft, and whofe cunning and craft had been admitted by the mayor of Norwich, and two mailers of the craft, either in Nor\vich or Norfolk. This

was made perpetual in 1333; when it was alfo no dyer fhould be a calanderer, under the penalty of 40s. for every piece calandered, by, or for the ufe of the pcrfon who dyed it.

Z&.

further enabled, that

In 1315, the lady Mary, fifter to the king, and her confort the duke of Suffolk, vifited the city in their return from France ; and were noblv entertained.

On

the fecond of

came to Nonvich Wolfey vv'as here.

;

March, 1320, queen Catherine and at the fame time cardinal

In 1524, through the mediation of cardinal Wola compofition and final agreement was fealed between the prior and the city at the guildhall, on the fecond day of September by which the citv reCgned all jurifdidion within the walls of the priory; fey,

;

the

NORWICH.

107

fite thereof being hereby acknowledged to of the county of Norfolk, and in the hunbe part dred of Blofield and the church gave up all right of jurildidion in every place without their walls, and within the walls of the city fo that now Tombland, with the fairs kept thereon, and all things beHolmeftrcte, Spytelond; and longing to thofe fairs Raiton-row, with their letes, were adjudged to belong to the cit\', and to be part of the county thereof.

tlie

whole

:

;

;

The

city alfo

refigned

the church,

>to

right

all

and prefcription of commonage in Eaton and Lakenham, and on the prior's lands in either of thofe on the prior and convent's conveying to towns ''"'

;

the citizens in fee, eighty acres of pafture, parcel of

common, (now

the faid

called the

town

clofef)

and

of ground round the faid eighty acres to dig and granting them a liberty a ditch to inclofe them of paffing and repaffmg to and fiom the faid eighty acres, with all kind of beafts in the highway and fix feet

;

;

to to

and from Hertford-bridges, in water them there.

highway

the

;

and

In 1525, the king granted the city another charconfirmed by parliament ; in which the late

ter,

corapofitioa * Formerly the whole of the land, extending from St, Stephen's-gate

towards Lakenham, and from thence

common

ron, was

pafture, and

the

to

Hertford Bridges, and fo to Ea-

fee of

t^ie

prior

:

who by agreement

enterfd into with the ciiizens had granted them a right of commoning thereon for

;

on their paying

to the prior's

manors of Lakenham or Eaton,

every ox or cow feeding in either of thofe pariHies, id. or in both,

2d. a year

;

and alfo id

or 2d. for every five fheep, according as they

fed in one, or both of thofe places

;

the prior's tenants in

Eaton, had an unlimited right of commonage there

ed

to

;

Lakenham and

and the prior referv-

himfelf and fucceffors, the right of bruery, turbary, &c. and ^ inclofing and breaking up forty acres of the faid ground.

power of

f Now

converted into

fjipongft the

freemen.

s,

farm, the rent of which

is

annually diflribut^d

;

C

io8

T Y

I

O

F

compofition and agreement

between tlie ckv and and the following new privileges granted, viz. That if any mavor die in his office, or be lawfully removed, or difprior

is

fully recited

and

eflabliflied,

placed; that then the flierills, citizens, and common alt)', by alTembly in the guildhall, may choofe an alderman, that hath not been mayor for three jT-rve the offices of mayor and efcheator for the remainder of the year; who fliall be

years before, to

fworn immediately after his elc61ion, in like manner as other mayors are and the fame to be done in cafe of the death or removal of a fheriffi :

In 1527, corn was

fo very fcarce,

that

it

rofc to

the extravagant price of 26s. 8d. a quarter, and occafioned many infurreciions of the common people feveral of

whom were

exceffes their

executed, for the outrages and

contempt of the laws had led them

to

commit. In 1530, the king was declared fupreme head of and acknowledged fo by acl of parliathe church ;

ment

in 1535.

The

finding freeholders to ferve on juries, hav-

ing frequently been attended with great difficulty

was this year, 1331, enafled, that in all cities, boroughs, and towns corporate, felons might be tried by jurors not having freeholds, provided they be freemen, and worth forty pounds in goods, it

In 1534, an

aft paffed for re-edifying thofe parts

wafle by the late fires by which it was cna6led, that if the owners of fuch void grounds, ihould by the fpacc of two years after proclamation made by the mayor, for all perfbns to build or in-

of the

city laid

clofe their grounds^

;

neglcd

to rebuild

fuch ground, or

N O R

W

G

I

U.

log

or fufHciently enclofe the fame with walls of mortar that then it fliould be lawful for the

and ftonc

;

ma)'0r, See. to enter tipon fuch \'acant grounds,

and

hold,

retain

them

fors ufe for ever,

to their

own and

difcharged of

and

their fuccef-

all rents

and outgo-

ings whatfoevcr; provided that within two years af-

fuch entry made, they either rebuild, or enclofe aforefaid. In the fame year, the council at the Guildhall, and the pnfons underneath, were rebuilt at the expence of 20SI. 10s.

ter

them as chamber

In 1535, an a6l paffed for recontinulng libcrcic; crown, by which all cities, boroughs and towns corporate, had their liberties and privileoes in the

fullv^

confirmed.

Another

was made, by which

it was enbe made for the relief of the poor, and poor's boxes placed in every church and that no one fliould give anv money in alms, otherwife than to the common boxes, or gatherings but the ad was not to extend to the prejudice of friers mendicant, or to abbots, priors, Sec. who were bound to give alms in monev, victuals, lodging, clothing, Sec. by any good authority or ancient cuflom. The defign of this 3.8: feems to have been, to make way for the diifolution of abbeys, &c. for in the fame feffions, all monaftenes, not having lands of above 200I. a vear value, were given to the king, his heirs and al'hgns for ever,

acl;

alfo

zfied, that charitable collections fliould

;

:

to do and ufe therewith, his and their own wills. 'i Indeed it is enacled, that for the keeping up holpi'

taliiy,

all

pcrlons and bodies corporate, havin"- the fite

X By

this

aft near four

lue of whofe lands

ed

at ioo,oool.

fand.

hundred houfcs were diJTblved, the yearly va-

amounted

to

3;,ojol,

Their moveables were reckon-

and the number of religious perfons ejeiSed

a: ten thou-

;

C

116

and ddmefnc

fire

bound under

t Y

i

lands of

O

F

fuch lioufcs,

the penalty of 61. 13s. 4d. a

bc month,

fliall

to keep, or caufe to be kept, an honefl continual houfe and houfhold, in the fame fite or precinft and to occupy yearly, as much of the demefnes in * ploughing and tilling of hufbandry, &c.' as the abbots, or their farmers occupied for twenty years before this ad. but this part of it has been but lit*

*

;

*

:

tle

regarded.

In 1537, the commons rofe at Walfmgham, on account of the fuppreffion of pilgrimages to the image of the Virgin Mary there, but were foon quieted.

And

in the following year,

of lord Cromwell,

all

at the fpecial inflance

the remarkable images,

to

which particular pilgrimages and offerings had been made, together with the flirines of faints, were removed and all orders of friers and nuns totally fuppreffed. The images of our lady at Wallingham and Ipfwich, were carried to London, and with feveral others burnt at Chelfea: and on Trinity Sunday, the monks of the cathedral changed their monkifh apparel, for that of prebendaries, and fc-^ ;

cular canons. §

In 1538,

Thomas Cromwell,

king's vicegerent,

lord priN-y

fcal,

lent injunfdons to all bifliops

ih;!

and

that an Englifli be placed open in each church, for every one to have rccourfc to

curates, charging them, to take care, JBible, of the largeft parifii

fize,

and § The clergy were

at this

time divided into fecular and regular

:

un-

der the former clafs were reckoned reftors, vicirs, and curates; under the latter, abbots, prims,

monks,

friers,

&c.

as living,

der the rule of that order into which tiny iwd entered.

fub regula, un,

NORWICH. n-ncl at

tlie

fame time another

commanding

Ill

injun£i:ion

appeared,

the ufe of parifli rcgiflers.

Letters patent were paiTed, bearing date the 6th of April, 1 S39, and confirmed by audiority of par-

purporting,

liament,

patent, dated

May

that

whereas by other

letters

28, in the igth year of the prefent

the precincl within the priory, is exempted out of the jurifdidion of the city, and is conftituted part of the hundred of Blofield, in the county of Norfolk and alfo, that by other letters patent, the prior and convent are converted into a dean and and that now chapter, and made a body corporate

king,

;

;

die faid dean and chapter, being defirous to give up their letters patent incorporating their faid precin6l

with the county of Norfolk; the king therefore, with the confent and good liking of the faid dean and chapter, as well as of the mayor, aldermen, and common council of the city of Norwich doth herebv acknowledge his acceptance of the faid furrender, and ordain that, lor the time to come, the precin6l fhall be reckoned as part of the city and and that the city may ufe the countv of Norwich fiich libeities iii the precincl, as are not contradi6lorv to the ancient liberties formerly ufed there by the prior and convent; all which liberties are hereby refer\'ed and confirmed to the dean and chapter, in as ample a manner as they ever had been heretofore ufed and enjoyed by the faid prior and convent. In confequence of this grant, the following agreement was entered into between the city and the dean and ;

;

chapter, viz.

7

hat

if

any

affray, quarrel, or

mifdemeanor againft

ihe king's peace, happen in the precinft or clofe, in the

prefence of the mayor, or any other juftice of ; or any vagabond, or fturdy

the peace of the city

beggar

C

112

I

T Y

beggar come into

O

F

tlieir prefence in the precin^ or opprobrious, or contemptuous words be fpoken to the mayor, or juflices of the peace within the precintS;, the mayor, or jufticcs of the peace, may take up every fuch offender, and -carry him to the ;

if any

common

provided it be not the dean any of the prebendaries, or their officers, or fervants. And if any complaint or a61ion, real or perfonal, be commenced, levied, or entered in any court of the city, the procefs fliall be dire(^ed to the bailiff of the dean and chapter's libertv, there to be ferved and executed and every fuch mandate, procefs, Slc. fliall be delivered to the faid dean, or to one of the prebendaries there, and if they be all abfent, to one of the canons, or to the bailiff of the liberty, twenty-four hours at leaft before the refum of the fan^e and the officer that delivered it, fhall city gaol

;

himfelf, or

;

;

certify

upon

oath, in the Guildhall, the delivery thereof to fome one of the faid pcrfons ; before any procefs of non omittas, to enter into the faid libertv,

be awarded by the mayor, jufHces of the peace, or any of them. And neither the dean, prebendaries, nor canons, nor their fervants, inhabiting in the precin61: of the faid clofe, not being free of the city, fliall be called before the mavor, Sec. in any city court, to be fworn on any juries, inGucfts, kc. neither fliall they have any manner of cuftom, amerciaments, fines, nor pains, for any caufe or offente, committed or done within the precin6l, levied upon them, othcrwile than has been accuflomarily paid by the faid dean, prebendaries, canons, or their fervants and ofhcers. And no warrant is to be granted, by any perfons whatever belonging to the city, to be executed ni the clofe, or precinct, againlt any of the members of the cathedral, their ftiall

fheriffs,

fervants, or ofhcers, inhabiting in the faid precinfl, before that the laid mayor, or juflicc of the peace,

hath

N O R

W

C H.

I

115

hath informed the dean, or one of the prebendaries there refident, by whom or by what perfon any fuch requefl (for a warrant) is to them made.

Thus were peace and amity fettled between the church and city, on a much more Aable foundation than ever had been hitherto efFecled. In

the

thirtv-firft

year of the king, the general

diffolution of rehgious houl'es

was

e{fecl:ed

by an

a6l

then pafTed, by which thev all became \clled in the crown and the following year the privilege of ianctuary was taken from all places whatfoever, except parifli churches, church-yards, cathedrals, hofpitals, churches collegiate, and chapels dedicated and ufed as parifli churches, and the fanftuaries to them belonging ; and alio except fuch places as fiiall by this a6i; be appointed places of tuition and privilege; :

amongfl vvhich Norwich was conftituted a fanduary for life".

In 1541,

was

no one fhould buy Norwich or Norfolk, but only fuch weavers or other artificers as fliall work or weave it, or caufe it to be wroudit or woven, within the city of Norwich, or fome other market town in Norfolk; on 40s. forfeiture for every pound of yarn fo fought, and not wrought as aforefaid one half to the king, and the other to the informer; and that no yarn fliouid be carried out of the kingany

it

enabled, that

v;orfted yarn in

;

dom

11 All perfons who bad taken fanftuary

in

any church,

for aiiy

crime, ex-

cepting murdai-, rape, burglary, robbery on the highway, &c. might abjure to any the

lace privileged by 'his ftatute fo that it was not full, number thereby limited, which was twenty perfons who were ;

regiftered, and called over every

king

;

1

;

day by the

»nd the bounds and limits of

the k>rd chaHCcllor.

til

as to to

te

goverr.or, appointed by the

fuch places, were to be

fi.;ed

by

C

114

T Y

I

O

F'

unwrought, under the fame penalty: this a^ continue only 'till the lad day of the next parliament; but by the firfl of Edward VI. it was

dom

was

to

made

perpetual.

In 1543, a new crofs, with a crucifix carved on one fide, and the city arms on the other, was fet up at Plardley,

place where '

in the prefence of the fheriffs '

keoe a court,' and

liberty

on

Upon

in the

;

of Norwyche yerely do was the extent of the city

the Ihrevys this

Wenfum

the river

at that time.

goods Yarmouth, and there

a reprcfentatlon made, that divers

had been canied by water

to

and various things comby defeclive ing up in ordei: packed unlawfully herrings and meafures, exported contrary to law

;

coals. Sec. fold

as fait,

the river,

;

to prevent thefe abufes for the future, a water bailiflPwas appointed with an allowance of twenty (hillings a year from the comm.ons, and meat and drink from the flierifFs ; together with a moiety of all forfeited goods.

In 1544, kept at the which, with conveyed to

the mayor's feaft was, for the

new the

hall,

fite

or

friers

firll

preachers

time,

church,

of that convent, had been lately

the city.

In 1545, one Rogers of Norfolk was condemned fuffered martyrdom, for oppofing the fix arti-

and

cles'".

In • In 1539, an

aft paffed for abolidiing diverfity of opinions

articles concerning the Chriftian religion

by

the

name of

the Bloody Statute

;

;

it

is

in certain

more commonly known

and enaas the penalty of hanging or

burning againft thofe, I,

Who

by word or writing denied tranfubftantiation.



a.

Wh«

W

N O k

C H.

I

113

In 1546, on the twenty-eighth day of Januaiy, died king Henry the Mllth, whofc excouies were as appears by the celebrated here with great pomp following notes taken from the chamberlain's acImprimis, the charge of a dyryge"^', with count. ;

'

three maffes,

and an

hcrfe fet at Chryfl's

Henry

for the foul of king all

churchl"

Paid

the eighth.

for

and twenty hangyngs and a mor-

charges of a herfe with one hundred

and divers

lyghts

floryflies,

To the peynter for fix fcogeof wax, 405. ons§ of the kyng s arravs made with fine gold and Paid for bice 12s. and for fix other fcogeons 3s. tes:|:

makyng a traverfe about the come within it, and

fliou'd

that

about

fatte

man

no

rafyng an altar

Item, gave to diirteen poor

within the fame, 25s.

men,

that

herfe, for

the herfe

dyryge and

at

maffes within the traverfe, in the tyme of the ferFor fetchyng things borvyce in the quire, 2s.

rowed

as a here,

hangyngs,

fourms, a tabil for the baf\n.

croffe,

Sec.

gd.

the clerke of Chvyfle churchc for the herfe, hanging the altar,

altar,

black

Item, gafe to

many

ryngyng

pains about

the clocher|{

For cleaning a peice of black fre&c. is. fado that went about the traverfe which was lore

bells,

dropped with wax, 8d.

H 2.

Who

3.

Or, that

8cc.'

At

2

maintained that communion in both kinds was it

was lawful

vows of

4. Or, that

for priefts to

chaftity

may

neceffiarj'.

marry.

be broken.

5. Or, that private maffes are unprofitable. 6.

Or, that auricular confeflion

* Dirge: dyrke,

f The

folemn fervice ufed

a

cathedral, moft

X An image

commonly

of the deceafed.

§ Ekutcheons

Or

not neceflary to falvation, at

interment;

from the teutonic^

to praife or extol.

cated to the Holy Trinity.

II

is

flceple.

called Chrift's church, though dedi-

CITY OF

lib

time the proclamation for tlis free fair on Whereas our fovereign ran as follow. lord king Henry the Vlllth. by his letters patent, fealed with his great fcal, hath granted to the mayor, fherifls, citizens and commonalty of the city.

At

this

Tomb] and

'

Norwich, and to their fucceffors, that they,and fucceffors m.ay hold and kepe in the faid city of Norwich, one fayer yerely, to be holden from the rifing of the fun on the Saturday next before the feaft of Pentccoft, and to endure continually to the fall and going down of the fame, on the Monday next after tlie feaft of the Holy Trinity, by ten days, widi all rights and commodities to a fayer appertaining, as in the fame letters patent of our faid fovereign lord king Henry the Wherefore, Vlllth. more at large it doth appear. of

their heirs,

all

manner of

perfons, that

^vill

come

to the faid

with their merchandife, goods and chattels, fhall and may freely come, to and from the fame fayer, with their faid merchandife, good and chattels, without any toll, or other cuftom, to be taken of them, or any of them, for the fame, during the faid fair; and that all neat cattle and horfes be favre,

and fold in the caPde ditches and meadows bouoht O and all flieep cattle in die ftreets of the city, there and all other chaas they have been accuftomcd fery wares and merchandife at Tombland, and in the market of the faid city; and if any fliould happen to be wronged by any officer of the faid fair, that he come to Mr. Mayor of the faid city, declaring the fame, and thofc wrongs fliall be redreffed by the faid mayor, according to juflice; and alfo if any man will fue by plaint, according to the law, for any contrad or oHence, or other perlonal a^lion, that fliall happen to be done within the timjc of the laid fair, let him keep his day ;

;

at the

Guildhall of this city before the fieward of fair, and he fhall be heard.'

the faid

The

N O R

\V

I

C H.

117

The

parliament repealed the flatutc called the fix together with all a6ls or ftatutes, touching, articles mentioning, or in any wife concerning religious ;

opinions, or the ufe of the fcriptures in the Englifli

tongue.

On the laft dav of October, i^^S, died Edward "Wood, ma)-or; and on the hfdi of November, William Rogers v/as chofen by the fiieriffs and commons, exclufive of the aldermen, who fufPered him wifely conto be fworn peaceably the fame dav the blam.e oppofition, made any if they that cluding, of the approaching troubles, which they forefaw were readv to break out, and which did adually break out the following year, would be laid upon them. ;

Amongfl various caufes afTigned for the numbercomplaints and murmurings of the common

icfs

people, the principal feem.s to be the inclofmg the commons and v.aile lands, by which they forefaw that they were likelv to be reduced to great mifery.

The

prote<^or,

in order to redrels thefe grievances,

publifhed a proclamation,

who had made any new

commanding inclofures,

to

all

perfons

open them

again by a fixed time. But the common people, taking advantage of this difpofition in government to remedy the e^•ils under which they laboured, role in

many

parts in a tumultuous

the fences of the

new

manner, and levelled

inclofed lands, without wait-

fee, whether the owners of thofc lands would comply with the proclamation, or not. The moft dan""erous commotions were thole railed in Devonfliire and Norfolk, two very remote counties, but

ing to

^vhich feem to have adopted the fame plan of aclion. They openly declared their hatred of all gentle-

men

5

whom

they taxed wi;li covetoufnefs, pride,

H3

extortiori

G

iiS extortion

I

T Y

O

F

and oppreffion and In tlie whole of their avowed the principles of the ancient :

proceedings, levellers.

inhabitants of Attleburgh, Eccks, Wilby, and the neighbouring towns, began the difturbances thefe parts, by throwing down the fences which feparated the common belonging to the manor of

The

m

Wilby, from the adjoining ones of Attleburgh and Harpham. This being effe61ed, they continued quiet where collecting fair, July 'till VVymondham 7, themielves together, they committed many outrages

They here pitched upon in that neighbourhood. one Robert Kett, an inhabitant of Wymondham, a be their captain, with vvhom they joined in commiffion William Kett, his brother, a butcher of the fame place; a man re-

daring,

refolute

markable

fellow,

to

for his defperate hardinefs,

tion of their leaders

drew

to

The

reputa-

them a great number of

fo that now being, as profligate perlbns and equal to any lufhciendy ilrong, thought, thev enterprize, they marched forward, after having laid wafle Hetherfet, W)'mond[iam, and mofl of the ad-

idle

and

;

and on the 10th of July encamped Bowthorp, where they were joined by many diforderly people from the city.

jacent villages

;

at

Thomas Codde,

then mayor, with feveral of the

and piincipal inhabitants, w-ent to th^ camp of the rebels, and ufed every method to di(fuade them from their treafonable practices, and to but without efreturn quietly to their own homes if they contithat perceiving now they For fe(^. nued in fn^all bodies they might be eafdy cruflied, drew lopcther their Icattered parties, and proceeded havin one l^ody by Sprowflon to Moufhold heath Here ing been denied a paflage through the city. aldermen

;

;

they

NOR

VV

I

C H.

119

they fcized on the noble palace belonging to the carl of Surrey, built on the fite of the priory of St. Leonard, and, from its fituatlon on the brow of the This they converted into hill, called Mount Surrey. a prifon, after having deflroycd the whole of the furniture therein confining Sir Roger W'odehoufe, fergcants Catlyn and Ga\vdy, with many other gentlemen, whom they had apprehended in their progrefs. The citizens immediately dilpatched a mef;

fenger to

know

conjuncture;

the kings pleafure in

and

as

they could not

this

raife

critica.l

forces

without his majefly's exprefs command, they refolved to put the city into the bell pofture of defence they were able, and to keep conflant guard themfelves, for fear of furprizc. Behdes this great camp (as they called it) on Moufliold heath, the rebels had a Imaller one at Riling-chace, from which being foon drove, they came and joined their chief captain Kett

as did,

;

at

the fame time, a large

Suffolk, after having

upon

the

made an

body from

unfuccefsful attempt

town of Yarmouth.

to keep up fome flic^v of religion, divine was performed in the camp both morning and evening, bv Thomas Coniers, at that time cu-

In order

ferA'ice

rate of St. Martin's

at the

Palace

;

whom

thev obli-

ged conflantly to pray for fucccis to tlieir undertakings and to put fome glofs upon their caufe, they compelled the mayor, Thomas Aldrich of Mangreenhall, and Robert Watfon, an excellent preacher, whom they chofe to be their fpirltual advifer, to be prefent at all their confultations, and to undertake :

v:hh Kett the adminillration of their affairs and by prudent behaviour, the rebels were reilraincd :

their

from many exceffes, which to commit.

their

madnefs prompted

them

H

4

The

CITY OF

120

The

meeting with no oppolition, encouraged them for furnilhing the camp with We the king's provifions, in the following form friends and deputies, do grant licence to all men to provide and bring into the camp at Moufliold, all manner of cattle and provifion of vittcls, in to iffue out warrants

'

;

*

'

'

'

'

what place foe\'er they may find no violence or injiirie be done poore m.an

'

'



;

commanding

all

the fame, to

fo that

any honeft or

pcrfons,

as they ten-

honour and roiall majeRie, and the releef of the commonwelthe, to be obedient to us the governours, and to thofe whofe names enfue.' der the king's

Signed Robert Kett, &c.

A

now

court of juftice w^as

erected,

confifling of

and two alTiftants out of every hundred; which ufually fat on a large fpreading tree, floored and Kett,

from thence called the oak roofed for that purpofe From this court warrants were ifof reformation. fued for the apprehending of many of the principal gentlemen of the county and for throwing down ;

;

the fences

of comm.ons lately inclofed.

Their number was by teen thoufand, and their

this

time increafed to

fix-

camp

flrongly fortified

and and

ftored with arms

and ammunition of

with

fo

profufion of provifions, that a fat

flieep

was fold

In

great a

kinds

;

for a groat.

this diftrefied

with the

all

greaiefl:

fituation,

prudence and

the

behaved and amongfl

citizens

lo)^alty

;

Dr. Matthew Parker, afterwards archbifhop of Canterbury, eminently dillinguiflied himfelf for one day going into the camp, as he frequendy did, on purpofe, if opportunity offered, to remind them of their duty, and to perluade them to return to it,

the

refl,

:

he found Kett and his

aflbciates

Handing under the oak

1

Robert ICett^^^>z^^/2^j^^^ oak cf jlefohmatioi

NOR

W

C H.

I

121

oak of reformation, earneftly preffins; the mayor to up the kevs of the ciiv, and to refign the government thereof into his hands to which Coddc that he would give his blood and Iloutlv replied,

deliver

;

'

cut of his body, before he won'.d by ^'illainv

'

life

'

treacheroufly forfake the citv, or through fear or

cowardice wickedly caft off his allegiance to the The matter being debated with a good deal king.' of heat on the part of the rebels, the do£ior prudently retired; and the next morning, taking with him his brother, Thomas Parker, afterwards mayor, went early to the camp, hoping bv that time that: He arrived there their pafficns would be cooled * *

was reading the Liaud judging this a proper opportutiity for the purpofe, fteppcd up into the oak. and from thence preached an excellent fermon in \vhich he eamellIv exhorted them to ufe with moderation the provifion they had then in the camp, and not riotoully and laviflily watte and confume it he further advifed them, by no means to feek revenge of private difpleafures, nor to chain or keep in irons thofe they had taken prifoners, nor to deBle their hands with blood, in taking away any man s life wickedly and cruelly and in conclufion of the whole, wifhed them to have re2;ard to therafelves and the common wealth, and to leave off their rafh entcrprize to accept of the king s proffered mercy, and to (hew him fuch honour now in his tender years, as might give them an alfurance of enjoying him hereafter in his more ripe and flourifhing flate. The doclor had hardly finifhed his difcourfe, to which his audience had been very attentive, when a profligate fellow cried out, Hovv long fhall we (uffer this hireling doctor, who being waged by gentlemen, is come hither with his tongue, which is fold and tied to

whllfl Coalers, rhe\r chaplain,

tany

;

;

;

;

;

'

'

'

*

ferye their appetite? but for all his prating, let us '

bridle

C

12* ?

bridle them,

*

our

T Y

I

O

F

and bring tliem under the order of

lavv.'

A tumult hereupon enfued, and feveral airows and javehns were thrown at the preacher, who had mofl probably been facrificed to their ungovernable fury, had not their chaplain very prudentlv and feafonablv fet the Te Deum and by the affiilance of fome linging men then prefent, performed ir lo ;

elegantly,

had

that

the

rage,

as to give

the city.

The

taken with the mufick,

rebels

their attention fo

drawn from the

objecl of their

him an opportunity of efcaping next dav the dodor, at

St.

into

Clement's

church, took occafion, from one of the lelTons, to on the nature and confequences of thefe riotous proceedings, in the hearing of leveral of the expatiate

rebels, who fuhered him to conclude his dilcourfe without any interruption: however, on his coming out of the church, they took occafion to tell him, that they had been credibly informed, that he had three or four horfes very able to ferve the king, and therefore charged him to have them ready immedi-

ately

very

after

dinner,

for

;heir

ufc:

the do6[Or took

notice of what they faid to him, but

on home, ordered fome of his horfes flioes to taken off, and their hoofs pared to the quick ; and others to be da\vbed with ointment, as if ihey had been lamed with travelling the rebels finding thcnt in this condition, thought them not worth their medSoon after, the dodor perceiving that dling with. little

getting

:

he could prevail nothing with them, prudently withdrew from the city, and happily elcaped to Cambridge.

Numbers of gentlemen were daily brought to the camp and imprifoncd and large fums of money ;

extorted from the ciiy to favc

it

frorri

fire

and

piir-

lage,

N O R lage,

with which

which

it

had

dence and

it

^V

C

I

H.

123

w£S frequently threatened

;

and

certainlv undergone, but for the pra-.

aftivirv

of the mayor and principal inha-

An

accident happened, which, in appearance, gave fome fort of fanttion to the caufe of the

bitants.

and proved the means of deceiving many them over to their party: feveral commifhons diredcd to the gentlemen of the county. authoriHug them to ufe force for the rebels,

ignorant perfons, and dra\\-ing

reprcffing thefe commotions,

unfortunately

fell

into

hands from fome of them they erafed the names, and inferted their own in their rooms; from their

;

others ihev took the feais,

commifhons of put them- up

their

and

affixed

publick places

at

them

own drawing up :

to

wary and inconliderate to conclude, did was by the king's authority.

;

to

forged

and then

induce the that

un-.

what they

Their number being now encreafcd to upwards of twenty thoufand, thev grew fo diforderly that Kett found it extremely difficult to keep them within any whatever was brought ir.to the Ibrt of bounds: camp ^vas confumed in tlic moft walteiul and glutfor befides fwans, gecfe, hens, tonous m.annei ducks, and all kinds of fo-.vl without number, about three thoufand bullocks and twenty thoufand fhcep In e\ery part of the were deftroved in a few days. countv the parks were laid open, and what deer they could catch, they killed and brought to the camp and fo wanton w^ere they grown in inicmit)', that they would oftentimes bring the gentlemen out of prifon chained two and two together, to the tree of reformation, and demand of the people affembled who there, what fliould be done with the prifoners would cry out with one voice, hang them! hang them! though they could give no other rcafon for this rafli judgment, but that they were gentlemen, and therc;

:

;

f""-"

not -worthy to

li\-e.

Mr.

;

CITY

124

Mr. Leonard Soiherton,

who had

efcaped to

O a

London on

F

citizen

of Norvvicli,

his liic being threat-

ened by the rebels, attended on the king's council, and informed them of all their proceedings, their daily increafe, and the defirudion they denounced' againfl the city and all gentlemen they could meet with: informing them likev/ife, that he had great reafon to think, that many of them would willingly lay down' their arms and embrace the kings pardon, if offered. Upon this a herald was fent dire611y with Sotherton to Norwich who entering the camp declared, That the king had granted his free pardon to all that would depart to their homes and, ;

'

*

;

armour, give over their traiterous begun enterprife.' Hereupon ahnoft all the mtiltitude cried out, God fave the king's majefty: and at the repetition thereof, manv kneeled down, and with tears in their eves commended the king's meicy which they would have immediately embraced, Lad not Kett fiercely and lioutly anfvvered, That kings and princes were accuftomed to grant par* dons to fuch as are offenders, and not to others ; * and that he trufled he needed not any pardon, fith * he had done nothing but what belonged to the du' ty of a true fubje£f; and herewith he befought * them not to forfake him, but to remember his pro' mife, fth he was ready to fpend his life in the * quarrel.' The herald on hearing this called him *

la}'ing afidc their

*

;

'

*

and commanded John PetLibonne, the fword of Norwich, to ancfl him for treafon which occafoned fo great confufion, as to determine him to leave them, plainly forcfceing, diat they would accept of no pardon at -the fame time traitor,

bearer

;

crying out with a loud voice, *

king's friends

and

come away

leveral other gentlemen,

there, attended

'

All ye that be the

The mayor who had been confined

Avith me.'

him, and entered the city by Bilhopfgate,

NORWICH.

125

which was immediately fiiut, to prevent the them; this happened on the iwentyAs foon as poffible, orders were firfl day of July, and fetiffued for fliutting up the reft of the gates tlng at liberty thole gentlemen whom the rebels had imprifoned in the caftle, and other parts of the city.

gate,

rebels following

;

The

undertook

citizens likewife

gates, in hopes,

the

means of tranfporting

from that

fide

that

of the

up

Bifliopfgate

;

guard the walls rebels of

victuals

to

their

camp

they would be obliged The next ftep was to rara-

river,

to mo^•e their quarters.

pire

to

by depriving the

and

and

for their

further defence

ten of their largeft ordnance v/ere placed in the cafditches and the remaining city forces, not emploved in guarding the wails, Vv'ere appointed their {larticular rendezvous on any emergency, either in the market place, or crofs ftreets. Things being thus dilpofcd, a brifk catnionading began both from tle

;

the city tlieir

and camp

artillery

:

when

the rebels perceiving that

could have but

little

effe6l

whilft

it

remained on the top, removed it to the foot of the and from thence began to play againft the hill, to anfvver which the citizens removed theirs walls from the caltle ditches into the meadows, from ;

whence a continual

firing Vvas

part of the night.

But the chief

had

kept

up

the greateft

difiiculty the

ma-

encounter with, was to keep, the people, v/ho were principally inclined to

giitrates

common

to

favour Kett's caufe, from carrying

him

intelligence

concluded upon for the defence of it not being in the power of the magithe citv ftrates lb far to reftrain them, as to prevent their frequent palling to and from the camp, and carrving with them ammunition of various kinds, vrhicll they often took by foice from the inhabitants. of whatever vvas ;

The

;;

C

iiS

T Y

I

The communication

O

F

bcino; thus cut

oflF

with the

country on the other fide the river, the camp began upon to be much diftreiTed for want of provifions which Kett fent two of his company to demand a truce for a fevv days, with Hbcrty of bringing provifions to his camp through the city, threatening in cafe of rcfufal to lay it ^vafle, with fire and fword the mayor and alderrrien returned for anfwer, that they would not lufFer traitors to have arty paffage through their city this enraged the rebels to that degree, that rufhing violently down the hill, they made a mod defperate attack upon Bifliopfgate, but lome of their party 'till \verc as bravely repulfed within the cirv fpreading an alarm, as if the rebels ;

:

:

had entered on the other

fide,

fo

drew off

far

the:

of the citizens from that part v.here the attack firfl began, as to leave it almoft defencelcfs ; this the rebels perceived, and quickly turned to their attention

advantage, for part of them having fwam acrofs the beat off the guard from the gate, and opened

river,

The firfl thing they a paffage for their whole force. did was to convey all the ammunition and military whilft they {fores they found there to their camp were thus employed, the herald, who waited to fee whether they would fubmit to the kings mercy, the time fixed for their complying with the terms of it :

not being yet expired, proceeded directly with the mayor and principal citizens to the market place, and made them a fecond offer of free pardon, if they would lay down their arms, and depart cjuietly v/ithal alluring them, that to their fcveral homes all thofe \vho ncgle^icd this opportunity of mercy, fliould be puniflied with death. ;

Kett

a

crifis,

now

perceiving that matters were coming to on the mayor and many of the prin-

feized

cipal inhabitants,

and kept them

in

irons at Surrey

houfe

NOR

Vv

C

I

H.

i27

houfe; where feme of them remained in that fitua-^ tion 'till his troops were defeated, and he himfelf taken.

Codde was a man of remarkable integrity, and extremely beloved by the citizens who, fearing his life to be in danger from the frequent threats of the ;

and

rebels,

'

'

their often

jefling

upon

his

name, and

Let us come together fee a Codde's head fold in fhall for we to-morrow, applied themfelves to Thopenny for a the camp f

calling out

to

one another

'

mas Aldrich", a man of great authority amongft them, and through his influence fo far regained him his liberty,

that he

was permitted

to be

at large in

go into the city : but as he could not continue there, he appointed Auguflinc Steward his deputy, and committed to him the government and defence of it in his ab-

and even fometim.es

the camp,

to

fencCi

The

council finding on the return of the herald,

that nothing biit force

would

avail,

fent

down Wil-

liam Parr, marquis of Northampton, with fifteen h.undred horfe to relieve the city he was accompanied by the lords Sheffield and Wentworth, fir Anthony Denny, fir Henry Parker, fir Richard South:

John Clere, fir Ralph John Gates, fir Thomas fir Henry Bcdingfield, fir John Suliard, fir William Waldegiave, fir John Cutts, fir Thomas many efquires and genCornwaliis, &c. knights well,

Ralph

fir

Powlet, Pafton,

fir

Sadler,

Richard Lee,

fir

fzr

;

tlemen, *

A man,

who by his wifdom, gravity and modefty, had gained the men and gotten fuch an afc^ndancy, even over thefe proby which means wretches, that they feldom neglefled his advics

refpeft of all fligate

he was enabled

;

:

to

be of the utmoft fervice

them from many violences, which ing.

to

his country, in reftraining

his authoritj

kept them from committ-

CITY

123

O

F

tlemcn, and a fmall number of Italians under thd: command of MalateRa, an experienced foldier : diis die rebels taking advantage

of, filled the country with comnlaints that England was on the point of being conquered by, and fubje61ed to foreigners. The marquis being arrived within a mile of the city, fent to demand entrance, and to have the government of it put into his hands on which the deputy mayor, fherifFs, and principal citizens immediately waited upon his lordfliip, and delivered to :

him

the fvvord, declaring their readinefs to receive

him

into the city,

and

to

obey him

in all things,

as

The marquis entered the the king's reprcientatii-e. city by St. Stephen's gate, the fvvOrd being carried him by

Richard Southwell bare headed market place, gave the neceffary orders for putting ir into a proper pofturd The watch being fet, the market was of defence. appointed for the general rendezvous, and a large fire ordered to be kept there: about midnight the before

and marching

make

;

made

a

furious difcharge

whence

it

was concluded

rebels fi-om

fir

dire£lly to the

of their

artillery,

that they defigned to

orders were therefore given, on the oppofite fide of the city fiom the enemy, and the ruinous places in the walls fliould be rampired, to leffen the foldiers duty, and to keep together a larger body of them in cafe of neceflity. VVhilfl: thefe things were doing, the whole

a general attack

;

the gates

that all

force of the rebels

made

a defperate alTault

upon

which numbers of them entered, and a terrible engagement enfued in which the rebels, after having loll three himdred men, were forced to The next day, the firll of retire to their camp. the city,

;

Augufl, the rebels made a fecond irruption into the city,

by

Holme

the

hofpital

meadows, and marching up

or Bifhopfgate-flreet, attacked the marquis's

ordnance

at the

entrance of

St.

Maitin's plain

;

when

a fliarp

N O R

W

I

G H.

129

a fliarp {kirmlfli enfuecl, in \vhich of the rebels about one hundred and forty were killed, and of befides a the kind's and city's forces about fiftv the greatell great number wounded on both fides ^vas in the death of the lofs fuftained that day, much lamented lord Sheffield, who fighting bravely amidll the thickefl of the enemy, was thrown by his horfc falling into a trench at vmich inflant being furrouncled b\' numbers of the rebels, one of them, ;

:

;'

whofe name was Fulke, bafeh' murdered him \vitli although he had dii'covered himfclf, and a club had offered the villain a very large reward to fave his life with him fell many other worthy gentlemen and valiant foldiers, ^v•ho Avere that day buried in llic church of St. Martin at the palace, as appcareth by the following entry in the regifler of that pa;

:

1349, the lord Sheffield with thirty-five others, were here buried Auguft 1.' The rebels encouraged by the death of that noble lord, whom they greitly d leaded on account of his extraordinary reputaiioa for valour and [kill in Vv-ar, broke into the city oa

rifb,

'

c^•erv fide,

and bv

forces,

king;'s

the

immbers obliged

their

quis to rctne out of

Upon

it.

rebels fired the

citv in

mar-

the

the retreat

of the

different

whercbv HolmRrete, the hofpital of St. Giles, Bifhop's, Magdalen, Pockthorp and Berfireet gates. Vviih a prodigious number of houfes, and other places,

bm'ldings in \arious parts of

fumed

it

wef-! entirely

con-

and the uhole in all probability would have been in affi'cs, had not a great quantity of rain at that time providentially fallen. During this calamity,

;

the houfes of the wealihiefl citizens were flrip-

ped of every thing valuable, efpecially of thofc who had fled the rebels deeming fuch to be traitors, fcud enemies to their king and countiy. ;

I

Thefe

Thefe

tilings

OF

T Y

I

(^

lc:o

to the council, ordei's

being reported

^vcre immediately fent to

John Dudle)%

carl of

War-

wick, a general of undoubted courage, and extenfive experience, to march with the troops under his

command,

had been raifed

wliich

for

the Scottifh

war, to the relief of the unliappy citizens he was sccompanied by the marquis of Northampton, the lords Willoughby, Powis and Bray, Ambrofc Dud:

Icy his fon. afierwards earl of

Warwick, and Robert

his brother, afterwards earl of Lcicefler,

Dudley,

Thomas

Grefiiam,

Edmund

Knevet,

Marmaduke

fir

fir

Thomas

Flammock, WilHam Devereux,

Conflabie,

Palmer,

fir

fir fir

Andrew

fon to lord Ferrers

of Chcitfcv, Hen. Willoughby, efq. and many of the principal citizens of Norwich, who joined the general at Cambridge.

On on

the

2'?,d

of Augufl tht earl reflcd his troops

Norwich and Eaton wood, and

the plain between

Thomas Grelham's

at Intwood. he fent Norroy king at arms, to fumj-non the city; information whereof being brought to Kctt, he obliged Augulline Steward, the mayor's deputy, and Robert Rugge, who -was mayor the following year, to go and learn the carl's plcafurc: upon being told that unlels they immediately opened their gates, and ga^•e the king's army quiet admiruince, they would be deemed traitors,

lodged himfelf

While

the

army

and punifhcd '

'

'

*

*

'

*

*

at fir

laid here,

they anfwered,

that they be the moll miferablc of men, in that diey could not now fulfil their loyally which brought thcui under the unto their prince happy dilemma of either lofing their lives or their as

fuch

bclie\cd theiniches

;

'

to

;

good name; but hoped his majelly would pardon them as they had not confcnted to any thing of but with lofs of goods, and peril of this rebellion life, as far as it vvas in their power, had done dicir ;

utmoft

N O R *

'

'

'

'

'

'

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W

I

C H.

131

utmoft to keep the citizens in good order, and duobedience but that, whereas there were great

tiful

:

numbers of Kett's army poor and naked, without armour or weapon, who feemed as if they were weary of their doings, they humbly requefled that it might pleafe the earl once more to offer them the kings pardon, and they hoped it would be gladly accepted, and the further effufion of blood

The earl, fearing for thofe be thereby prevented/ gentlemen whom the rebels detained in prifon, fent Norroy with a trumpet, to offer them a general pardon on his coming to the top of the hill, he began with reminding them of the king's gracious good'

;

\\'ho had already feveral times offered them pardon, if they \vould return to their obedience of the mifery they had brought upon the commonwealth, the good of which they expreifed fo much veneration for of the many murders, conflagrationSj and other horrible crimes of ^vhich thev had been guilty of the abundant mifchiefs they had brought upon themfelves, and of what they muff expect from the wrath of God and the king s arrav, now ready to execute it; further affuring them, that if they now refufed to return to mercy and pardon, they muff expe<^ no further offers of that kind. Many of them hereupon feemed to be touched with remorfe, and inclinable to return to their duty and al-

nefs,

;

;

;

fome incendiaries, fearing a general began to crv out that this was not the king s herald, but fome impoffor dreffcd in a gay coat, made up of church vefhnents, fent on purpofe to deceive them with hopes of pardon, thereby the more eafily to get them under the power of their oppreffors who no doubt would amply revenge themfelves, when they had foolifhly parted with every means of defence this fpirit of diffenfion was further inflamed by the indifcreet zeal of one of the

legiance

;

'till

defeclion,

;

:

I 2

kino-'s

;

^5

C".

I

OF

T Y

by the indecent words and anions of a boy, who grofsly reproached both the king and his officer, fhot him through the bodv: the confufion confequent upon this rafh acfor the rebels cr)tion hindered any further parly in2; out that thev were betrayed, retreated to another king's friends, \vho being provoked

;

exclaiming againfl the treachery, as The of Norrov and his attendants. tari finding all hopes of accommodation cut off, mo^'ed forward to^vards the city and ordered pakt part of the

they termed

hill, it,

;

of his troops to force the poftern, called Brazendoor, which the rebels had blocked up with floncs

and earth another detachmciit entered at St. Stephen s gate, after ha\'ing nearly battered it down, and at feveral breaches in the wall, which they had made between that gate and St. Giles's. The main body, under the command of the earl himfelf, marched in at Wellwick or St. Bennet's gate, and pro:

to the market-place, where he fixed head cjuarters the inhabitants were commanded under pain of death to keep within doors, and to have their (hops and windows clofely fliut ; and two or three were hans;ed for dlfobevins; the oMer: bv this means the earl could know which of the citizens were concerned in the rebellion, whilfl it gave op-

tcedcd direclly his

:

who had precipitately joined in \vho of throwing themfclves on the earfs mercy freely j-ardoned them on their complying with the above command. The carriages belonging to the army were all this tim.e entering at St. Bennet's gate but throueh hurrv, no orders having been gi\'en to the dri\'crs \Ahcre to flop, feveral of them laden with guns, powder and other ammunition, were driportunity to fe\cral,

it,

;

ven through the city as far as Bifliopfgate, and there fcized by parties of the rebels, who had not already quitted it; but capt. Drury coming up very fortunately, retook the grcatcfl

part of Uiem,

as

they \vcrc

:

W

N O R ^verc conducling remained in the

the earl's troops

I

C

H.

133

camp. The rebels who yet had frequent fkirmifhes with

to their citv,

intelligence ^\•hereof being carried

;

marched

direflly by St. John's of Maddermarkct church, into VVymer or St. Andrew's ftreet, where the principal body of the rebels was the enemy ported, and immediately attacked them to

the earl, he

r

received

him with

Drurv with

his

terrible a volley

a cloud of arrows

arquebufTierb''''

plied

but capt.

;

them with

lo

of (hot, that they foon gave way,

leaving one hundred and thirty dead on the fpot, beiides feveral prifoners,

mediate execution to tiic

;

the great relief

who were

ordered

the reft fled to their

to^ im^-

camp, and

and jov of the inhabitants,

left

king's troops in full polfeffion of the citv.

A misfortune happened which had like to have been attended with fatal confequences to the citizens, and greatly raifed the drooping fpirits of tiic rebels the earl intending to march up the hill on th« morrow, and to attack the rebel camp, left his ordnance without Bifhopigate under the guard of a troop of Welfhmen; thefe being but few in number, the rebels concluded that they would not be able to refift a fudden onfet, and rufliing furioufly down

the hill, attacked them fo vigoroullv, that unable to (land the fhock, they were compelled to give

way, and leave the artillery in the enemy's polfeffion the king's mailer gunner w as Oiot through the ;

head

in

The

the Ikirmifh.

plied widi a

frefli

now

rebels being

flock of balls

fup-

and powder, began

a fevere cannonade upon the city in the courle of which the walls and buildings received a confiderable damage, but much lefs than they would ha\e done, had not their fkill in gunnery been ver)' con;

I * Scldiers

tempdble,

3

armed with arquebuffes

or

muftets^

C

134

I

T Y

O

F

After this lofs the earl ordered

temptibis,

all

the.

be well barricadoed, and White Friers bridge to be broken down and committed the defence of Bifliopfgate and that part of the city to lord VVilloughby thus providing againft any fudden affault from the enemy. The next day, being the twenty-fifth of Auguft, notwithflanding ihe foregoing precautions, a large body of the rebels croffed the rWer at Conisford, and fet fire to the houfes in feveral places, whereby an incredible quantity of corn and other merchandize, there laid up to be conveyed to Yarmouth, together with almoft two whole parities, and many buildings in the neighbouring ones were confumed. The view of the regates

to

;

;

was to divide the earfs would be fo fully employed in extinguinhng the fire, as to give them an opportunity of forcing fome other part of the city, but the earl forefeeing their drift, gave orders for his bels

in this

troops,

who

foldiers

to

conflagration,

they fuppofed

keep their feveral

flations,

leaving the

Hopping the further progrcfs of the fire tq the citizens themfelvcs. This however cafl a great damp upon the fpirits of fome of Warwick's oflBcers, who defpairing of fuccefs, would have perfuaded the earl to have abandoned the city, as not ]ia\ing men fuflBcicnt to guard it to which the earl floutly replied, Do your hearts fail you fo foon ? or are you fo mad to think, that fo long as life is care of

;

'

'

me

will confent to fuch dilhonour? fliouid I

*

in

*

leave the city, heaping

'

to you,

*

I

up

to myfelf,

and likewife

fuch fhame and reproof, as worthily might be imputed to us a fliame for ever? 1 will rather

whatever fire or fword can work againft me ;' then drawing his fword, the reft of the nobles doing the fame, he commanded them to kils each other s fwords, agreeable to ancient cuftom ufed in war, in times of extreme danger thereby binding *

fuflPer

j

ihemiclvcs

NORWICH.

135

folemn \o\v ric\'er to lca\c the cithey had either \'anqiuPiiccl the rebels, or

tliemfelvcs with a ty, until

died manfully in fight for the honour of their king

and country.

On

the tu-enty-fixth, being the day following, the

a very feafonable reinforcement, by who the arrival of fourteen hundred Swifs foldicrs were very kindly treated, and liberally entertained by received

carl

;

the

as

citizens,

The

been.

come

the reft of the

to a general

one another's

army had

hitherto

being pcrfuaded that they mull

rebels

engagement the next day, kept up by the credit they gave to, and

fpirits

t!ie

frccjuent repetition

and

fuperllitious veries

;

of certain vain prophecies, fuch as

The

country GiToffs, Hob, Dick and J^ick, clubbs and clouted Ihoon, Shall fill the vale, of Duffln's dale,

With

With

flaughtef d bodies loon.

And The

hecdlefs

men, within the

dale,

Shall there be llain, both great and fmail.

By

a

wrong application of

thcfe equivocating pro-

were induced to Cjuit an advantageous that bv its fituation had enabled them to do milchiefs they had already done, aaid rendered

phecies, they hill,

the'

the earfs

horfe

of but

little

fcrvice

:

being;

alfo

pinched with the want of provifions, which the earl s parties had rendered more difficult to come at, they marched for the adjacent valley called Dulfin'a dale, after having fet fire to their huts and tents, where they flrongly intrenched themlelves, and determined to hazard an engagement. The following day the earl marched towards the enemy, through I

4

St.

C

1^^

I

T Y

O

P

Oak gate but before he came within of them, fir Edmund Knevct and fir Thomas Palmer, knights, were fent to acquaint them, that Martin's at

St.

;

fight

unbounded was

the king's clemency, that if even they \vouId repent and lay down their arms, they fhould every one of thcni be pardoned, one or two only excepted. This offer being unanimoufly i'o

now

gave orders for the attack

refufcd,

the earl

as foori

as the rebels perceived,

they phiced

;

which all

the

gentlemen they had detained prifoncrs, in the front of t|ie battle chained together, to the intent they might fall by the fwords of their friends; but fo prudently was the attack led on by captain Drury, that mofl; of them efcaped. I'he' kings ftandaid bearer being killed by a cannon ball, fo afFcfled the

and exafperatcd his army, that he ordered a general difcharge of his artillery to be made amongft the rebels which feems to have fo far difconcerted carl

;

them, as

to

render them an eafy conquelt: for the

ccning up at the fame time, broke amongft them before they could recover themfelves, or clofe their ranks. The main body of the carl's liglit horfe

in

army being thus entirely broken, a' general cnfued, in which Robert Kett their principal comiTiander took the lead in the purfuit more than rebels flight

;

}:hree

led,

dioufand

five

hundred of

were

the rebels

kil-

and a great number VvOunded.

There remained ftili a party of refervc unattached who having barricadocd themfelves ftrongly with the carriages belonging to the arm\-, feemed determined to ftand it out to the lall extremity. In ;

their fituation the attacking

defperate,

and the forcing

them

their

'\vould have been intrcnchments mufl

have been attended with very great

lofs

:

the

earl,

avoid further cffufion of blood, once lucre offered them pardon, upon condition that they therefore

to

would

NOR

W

I

C

H.

V37

lay down dicir arms; which thcv faid thev were ready to do, if they could be afFured of their lives; but that they looked upon this mefTage onlv 3
them into his po^vr ujjOu this anfwer, or-

as a ilratagem of the carl's to get er,

and then hang them

ut)

:

ders Avere given for the attack; but before they were

put in execution, as a proof of a mod humane difpofition, the earl fent to kno^v whether, if he came liimfelf and affured tiiem of pardon, they would fubmit to which they immediately anfwered, tiiat they had fuch confidence in his honour, that if he would promife them the king s pardon, thev would inilantlv lay dqwn their arms, and rely on his and the kings mercv.' 7 he earl hereupon went to tliem, and on Norroy s reading the king's commiljion, the ^.vhoie company of the rebels crying out God fa\-e king Edward, thankfuhv embraced tlie After tlie battle the whole of the pluilterms of it. der v/as given to the loldiers, Avho openly fold it in the uiarket place. On the king s part many gentlemen of diifingiiiflied merit were llain, and amongfl: ihe reft Henrv VVilloughby, elcp fon of f:r Henry W^illqughby, of Wilioughbv in NorLhamptonfliire Throckmorton, Lucie, of NorthamptonIhire Giles ForRcr of Temple Balfal, Henrv Wilby of Middleton hall, Thomas Lvnfye of Charlcote, all in Warwickfliire, ef([uires, with many others ; the four lafi: v/ere buried in the chancel of St. Si'

:

'

'



'

;

;

mon s

church in one gia\e.

The next day, on intelligence being received that Robert Kett was apprehended in a barn at Swannington, the earl dilpatched tliither twenty horfemen, to conduft him to Norwich and the fame day nine of the principal ringleaders (the two Ketts excepted) ^vcre fentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered at the oak of reformation thii ty at the ;

;

iraiiows

CITY OF

19,8 3

gallows without Magdalen gate thole b)' the crofs in the market tliree

hundred

;

;

and' forty-nine at in the

whole about

Some gentlemen who had

fufFered.

been cruelly treated by the rebels, feemed to think that the earl had not made fufficient examples, and urged him. to further inllances of feverity upon There muft be meafurc which he nobly replied, kept in all things, and efpecially in punifliment with death we ought to beware that we do not excecd 1 know well Inch wicked doings deferAe no Imall revenge, and the offenders are worthy to be moft fliarply chaflifed but yet how far fliall we go ? fiiall we not at leafl fhew lome mercy ? is there no place for pardon? what fliall wc then do? fliall ivc hold the plough ourfclvcs ? and harrow our own lands ?' and to flicw the great regard he paid to his word, when Ibme of the bulieft of the rebels, w^ere brought before him, as perfons proper to make examples of, upon Nori^oy's telling him that thcv had lubmitted on offer of pardon, he declared that none iliouid fuffer Avho had accepted that ;

'

'

'

'

:

'

*

:

'

'

'

'

offer.

On

the day following, the

earl,

lords,

and gen-

tlemen, Avith the citizens, went to the church of St. Peter at Mancroft, and returned great deliverance

;

and

God

thanks for this

the tw'enty-feventh of Augufl,

rebels were defeated, was appointed by the corporation to be obfcrved as a day of thankfgiving forever: the entry of Avhich is as Be it remembered, that by the pourre of follows. Allmighlie God, and of cure fovercigne Lord the King's Majellie, K. E. VL in fending down the noble Erl of Warwyck, his graces l)'eutenant, with other nobills and men of worfliip, Aviih his majcf-. and by the 'tics pourre into his worOiipful cuie

the day on

which the

'

*

'

*

'

;

*

goodncfs of

God upon

the twenty fcventh day of

^uguff,

N O R *

*

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'

W

daunger, trouble and peril

'

been

*

*

'

H.

139

Augull, one thouiand five himdred and forty Dine, the faid Erie, kc. upon Mufliolde heath vanquyfii-. ed Robert Kette and all his ]iooI nomber of adherents of their moft wicked rebellion, and dcd fuppreffe them and delivered this cittee from the great

'

'

C

1

loft

it

for ever: vvhercfore

was in, like to have by the good adwce

of the Lord Thomas, now biOiop of Noruicl"!, with the affcnt of the ma^•or, fherreves, &c. it is ordeyncd and cnafted, that from hcncefordi for ever, upon the twenty feventh day of Auguft vere-

we obteyned by our dely\"emayor for the time being, ihall oflicers to g} ve warnvng to every

for the benefit that

*

ly,

'

ranee that day,

'

command

*

inhabitant in

to fper

'

ilioppes

woman and

'

pair to their parifh churches, after they have

'in, at '

'

'

*

'

'

*

;

tlie

his

their ward and bodi man,

the

and Ihut

in

child,

their to rc-

long houre of feven of the clokke in the

morning, there to remayn in fuppllcation and heryng divine ferxice, and to gyve humble thanks to God, and pray for the kyng hartcly, for that deb- very of this cittee, &:c. and the fer\ yce once doon, that every parifli ring a folempne peall with all their belles, to the laud and praife of God, and the great rejoicing of the peopuU for ever, and io to

depart every

And

to exprefs

man

to his occupation or bufvnefs.' gradtude to the earl, and the high fcnfe they had of his icrvices, they placed the ragged ftafl, the cognizance or badge of that earl over all the city gates, and the doors of their dwel-

'*

their

The two brothers Robert and William committed to the tov.-cr of London, and being fliortly after convI61ed of high treafon, on the twenty-ninth of November in tlie fame )-ear, were delivered to fir William Win.dham, high flicnff of Norfolk, and by him eonducled, the one to Wvmondham, and the other to Nor\vich. Robert bein ^

ling houfes. Kett,

vv-ere

:

C

140

T Y

I

O

F

to tlie foot of Norwich caflle flron2;Iv was drawn up by a rope fixed about his neck, to a gibbet creeled on its top, and there left hanging 'till his body was intirely wafted: William his brother had the like fentence executed upon him at Wymondham, and his body left to con fume on inff broucrlit

ironed,

the top of that fteeple.

This Kett, as Fuller obfcnrs, was more wcalthv than the generality of thofe of his bafmefs and as Stow fays, could fpend fifty pounds a vear in land, and was worth in goods above one thoufand marks his family was one of the moll antient and fiouriili;

mg

in

Wymondham,

Edward

for in the

twcntv-fecond of

Fomth, John Knyght, alias Ket, was a principal owner there after his conviction it was the

:

prefcnted

a court holden

at

Robert Knvght,

for

manor

the king's

who

hanged upon Nonvich caftle (or treafon, died feized of thirty r.cres of land held of the (aid manor, which eicheated to the king; who of his great clemency rcgrantcd them to William, fon and heir of the faid Robert, and his heirs tor ever, 1 he earl, on his there, that

leaving the

city,

;"

their

'till

a

new

;

the

city

former ones becoming

from

that

time,

bv

charter could be ^'oid

delivery of the Iword to the marquis of

ton

vvas

dircclcd the raagiftratcs to ac^

the king's comrnilfion,

obtained

alias Ket,

on the

Northamp-

being in the king's

liands.

In No^•ember following a new charter was errantdated the fourteenth of that month, in the third year of the king's reign in it every former charter is recited at length and confirmed, beginning with that of Henry the Second and all forfeitures of liberties, together with all fuits and demands which he, or Ilia lucccHbrs had, or might have, for any td,

:

;

thins:

W

N O R (.king

and

aSed

or

done by die

C

I

H.

citizens, are

i4.i

by

it

vclcafed

reniiiLcd.

Peace being

now

reflored,

die parliament paffed

remitting for three years to come, all fee farms paid by anv city, borou^^li, or town corporate, in England and Wales, provided that the faid fee

an

act,

farms were expended in repairing their walls, bridges, gates, ccc. and in letting the poor to work. 'I'he coin at this time became fo greatly diminiOied by clipping, that in 1530 a proclamation was ifFued, ordering, that the fliilling fliould go for no move dian /ix-pence, and the groat lor t\vo-pcncc only. In 1331, the prices of grain and provifions ^veve followeth of wheat 7s. a comb; malt 4s. 6d. mntton is. barley 4s. oats 3s. beef is. 6d. a flonc 3d. a quarter; butter cjd. a pint; and liard cheefe

as

;

;

2d. a

pound.

About

the middle of April, in the fame year, the

called

dilcale

Ephemera

Kriiannica,

fudor

A,ng"licu.s,

the EngliHi fwcat, or fweating ficknefs, broke out at

and Iprcading bv degrees all o\'cr the kingdom, ended its progrefs in the north, in the beShtewlbur\

,

ginning

(ydobcr.

Jn

ol

i,'.33,

kingdom, veilmcnts,

to

comnniflions were take

to

money and

the

feiit

king's, ufe

all

the

plate,

ornriments belonging to the

(everal churches therein;

lca\ing to each of

one cup onlv, and a cloth lor the

On

throughout the

the death of Ed\vard \'I.

communion

them table.

which happened

o;i

1333, the Lady Jane Grey, whom he had appointed his fucceiior, bv letters patent under the great feal, was proclaimed q^ueen but the prmceis the 6th of July,

:

CITY OF

142

Mary, the king s fifter, refolving to fupport her claim, fent a meifage from Kemiinghall in Norfolk, whither flie had retired on the news of her brother's death, commanding the lords of the council to notify her acceffioii to the throne which they

pvincefs

;

During her continiiance there, flie was joined by many of the nobility and principal gentlemen of Norfolk and Suffolk, as fir Ilenry Jerningham, lir Henr^- Bcdingfield, fir William Drury, fir John Shelton, fir John Mordaunt, fon to lord Mordaunt, fir Thomas Wharton, fon to lord Wharton, Mr. John Sulliard, Mr. Richard Frcfton, fergeant Morgan, Mr. Richard Heio-ham, the carls of Bath and Suifex, Mr. Henry Ratclifie/ abfolutely refufed to do.

&c.

See.

On ]iL-rc

iSth of Julv the princefs was proclaimed foldiers, raifed by the city

the

and one hundred

;

^vere fent to join her at Framlingwhither flie had retired as to a place of greater firength than Kenninghall, and more convenient! v fituatcd for her retreating into Flanders, in The earl of Warcafe fbe had failed of fuccefs. wick, lateh' created duke of Northumberland, marched againfl her as far as St. Edmund's Burv, from whence, being difappointed of the fuccours he had been made to expeft, he retired back to Cambridge, and there proclaimed the princcls Mary queen.

fur her fervice,

liam

caflle,

On

the

London

:

19th of Julv the lords proclaimed her in wheieupon, breaking up her camp at

Framlingham, jiicn,

fhc

let

tlicn

confifling of fourteen thoufand

for^vard for

Fondon, and

entercfl that

on the '.]d of Augufl and took poDeffion of a crown, lor v\ hich fhc flood principally indebted to the gentlemen of Norfolk and Suffolk.

Vit\-

;

The

N O R The

\V

I

C H.

145

from his Tower, the citizens, to exprefs regard thev had of him, prefcnted him at

ciukc of Norfolk being no\v rcleafed

imprifonment the great

his palace of

in the

Kenninghali

a hogfhead of white

\\ith

wine, one ditto of red, two ditto of claret, loaves,

wax

fugar

torches.

In 1555, wheat fold

and barley to

fix

weighing fixty potmds, and two dozen of

at 32s.

at

4ns. a quarter, oats 16s.

but the following year ^vheat

fell

barley to 4s. 4d. oats to as.

10s. 4d. a quarter,

4d. and rye to 2s; Sd.

During againlt

was raifed and tyranny

this reign a furious pcrfecution

who oppofcd

all

the fuperflitidn

of the church of Rome during which there perifhcd in the flames, according to the moft credible hiftorians, five bifhops, twenty-one divines, eight gentlemen, eighty-four artificers, one hundred hufband-men, fervants and labourers, twenty-fix \vives, twenty widows, nine ^ir2;:ns, t^vo bovs, and two infants, one of them fpringing out of its mother s womb ;

whiill

at the

fiakc.

Bcfides thefe foregoing, fixtv-

four pcrlons, of different ranks and flations, v/ere

of whom feven were whipped, fixtcen died in prilbn. and feveral laid under

prefented for their faith

;

fentence of condemnation, but were happily deli\"er-

cd by the death of this bigotted queen, which happened on the 7th of November, 133S.

Thofc \vho

iuffered

here,

in

the Lollards

pit

\vithout Bifhopfgate, as contumacious heretics,

William Carman,

of

Hingham

;

were Simon Miller, mer-

chant of Lynn Elizabeth Coo})cr, a pe^vtercrs wife of St. Andrews parifli Richard Crafhfield, of \Vymondham Cicely, the ^vi!e of Edmund Ormes, of the parilh of St. Lawrence, woriled weaver ^Vi'lliam ;

;

;

;

^

t44

^

O

Y

1

F

Seaman, hufbandman, of Mcndlefliam Thomas Carman Thomas Hudfon, of Aylfham, glovef and Richard Yeoman, a devout minifter, of feventy

Ham

;

;•

;

of age,

years

curate to

that

learned martyr Dr.

Rowland Taylor, re^or of Hadleigh

in Suffolk.

The

year 15 58 is memorable for a fevere mortaliwhich raged throughout the kingdom, attended with a great icarcity of corn and all other provi-

tv,

fions

:

Ten

in this citv died ten aldermen.

davs

after the

death of her

fiAer,

Elizabeth

was proclaimed queen of England, and crowned th6 13th of January following: on the 25th of which month the parhament met at Weflminfter, w^iich paffed an a^ for the uniformity of common prayer and fervice in the church, and adminidration of the and declared the queen the fupreme iacraments head of the church of England. ;

In 1560, the duke of Norfolk rcqucfLcd the city to afFift the town of Yarmouth in making their haven, on which thqy fent them two Imndred marks ; on this exprefs condition, that no impohtions or cu-

ftoms fhould be laid on the citizens of Norwich; but that they were to be left in full poffeffion of all fnch liberties as they had formerly enjoyed.

This vear the lington, the lords

carls

of Norihunii)eiland and

Thomas

Mun-

Ilo\vard and Willoughbv,

manv other nobles and kniglus, paid a vifit to duke of Norfolk, and were entertained with their

with the

rciinue at the duke's palace

:

during their

fiay,

diey

diverted thcmfclves with Ihooting and other martial The guild happencxercifes on Moufliold heath. ing at this time, William Mingay, eup then mayor, invited

them and

their

ladies

to

the fcad

;

John

Suckling

N O R

^V

I

C H.

r45

Thomas

Layer, and Cbriftopher and Lawrence Wood, fcrivener, At the entertainment being the four feall-makers. the duke and duchefs of Norfolk fat firft, then the three earls of Northumberland, Huntington and Surrey, lord Thomas Howard, lord Scroop and his h~ dy, lord and lady Bartlet, lord Abergavenny, with many other peers, knights and ladies, who all exSuckling, baker;

Layer, merchants

;

prefTed the greateft fiitisfaclion at their generous re-

The mayor's fliare of the expence was ception. one pound twelve fhiK^rigs and nine-pence, the feallmakers bearing the refl his bill was as follows. ;

£.

..

d.

Eight flonc of beef, at 8d. a (lone, and a firloin

Two

by

collars of

o

-

brawn

Four cheefes, at 4d. a cheefe Eight pints of butter A hinder quarter of veal

A A

leg of

mutton

fore quarter of veal

Loin of mutton and Oioulder of veal Breaft and coat of mutton Six pullets

-

-

-

Four couple of rabbits Four brace of partridges Two Guinea cocks

Two

couple of mallard Thirty-four eggs Bufliel of flower Peck of oatmeal Sixteen white bread loaves Eighteen loaves of white wheat bread Three loaves of meflin bread Nutmegs, mace, cinnamon and cloves 4lb.

Barbary fugar

K

Sixteeii

;;

NORWICH.

147

fomc from the perlccucion raifed againft them in the Netherlands by the duke of Alva, and fettled themfclves at London and Sandwho had grant\vich, under the queen's protection cafion

when

;

was refolved

it

who had

of the llrangers

to Invite hither

fled

;

ed them, a licence for the

making Flanders commo-

Upon

of wool in her majefty's dominions.

dities

the duke's application, and at his own charge, the; queen granted letters patent for the fixing here thirty

workmen, with ten fervants to each of them, whole three hundred and thirty Dutch and Walloons who immediately on their arrival fet up

rnafler

in the

;

manufaftures of bayes, fays, arras, mockades, Sec. and in a very fhort time their number increafed to The Dutch congrethree thoufand and upwards. preachers church the friers of choir gation had the

which

aiTigned

them

they

ftill

tiori,

at

enjov: the Walloon or French congregathe firft made ufe of the bifhop's chapel

for their

religious affcmblics,

but aftenvard had the church of St. Mary at Tombland affigned diem, which they alfo flill enjoy; tliough both congregations are now greatly reduced, and almoft decayed. Thefe letters patent were lent by the duke to Thomas Sotherton, then mayor, to be put in force but the commons difapproving the ;

fcheme, would not fuffer the feal of the city to be put to the admiflion of any ftranger; upon which the court agreed to fix the feal of mayoralty, to the In confequence admiflions of the thirty mailers. hereof, twenty-four maflers were admitted on the part of the Dutch, and fix on that of the Walloons

and divers rules and ordinances drawn up good government,

On

a return

made November

ig,

for their

1571,

it

was

found that there were in the city eight hundred and two hundred fixty-eight men of the Dutch nation j

K

2

and

14S

C

^

T Y

I

O

F

one thoufand one hundred and one thoufand fix hundred and eighty-one children, under fourteen in all three thoufand nine hundred vears of age

and

three

Walloons

fcvcntv-thrce

;

women

of both nations

;

;

and

twciity-hve.

1575, the Dutch elders prefented in court a called bombazines, praying to have the fearch and leal of them to their ufe, exclufive ol the Walloons, who inlifted that all white works bc]on2;cd to them; but the Dutch, as the firll invenIn

new work

tors,

had

their petition granted to

them.

In 15 82, on a fecond return made of the flrangcrs here, they were found to be eleven hundred

fettled

and twenty-eight men, thirteen hundred and fiftywomen, eight hundred and fifteen children flrangers born, thirteen hundred and feventy-eight in all four thoufand fix hunchildren Englifh born dred and fcventy-nine. eight

;

567, the feal of the city having on it a rcprefentation of the Trinity was difufed, and a new one The following year, engraved with the city arms.

In

1

the two tovv'crs at the weft end ,

of the Guildhall, ufcd as a treafury, and the other as a dungeon to, the gaol, fell down through decay, and the end ^vas rebuilt as it now remains. About

one of v/hich

vvas

horfes were firfl eftabliflied here, by agreement between the duke of Norfolk and the mayor, and three pofl mafters appointed; to each of \vhom was lent out of the city treafury, 3I. 13s. 4d. without intcrcfi, and a flipend of 4I. per annum paid by the OieriHs half of which was levied on this time pofl

;

and tiplers, and the other half on no perfon was to take any pofl the inhabitants horfes in the citv, unlefs by warrant Irom the queen, the inn-keepers

:

the

NOR W

C H.

I

149

the duke of Norfolk, the privy cGuncil, or the mayor; or to ufe anv one horfe above twelve or fourfor which was to be paid 2d. teen miles together ;

each mile outward, and 6d. to the guide for going, and bringing back the horfes the faid horfcs not to carry a cloak-bag of more than ten pounds weight. The hire of the hackney horfes was alfo fixed at is. for the firfl: day, and 8d. each day after, 'till their ;

re-delivery.

In 1570, the

by Anthony

art

of printing was introduced here,

Solen, one of the flrangers

;

for

which

he was prcfented with his freedom. In I'iyi, the poor being greatly oppreffed for want of regular relief, John Aldrich then mayor, and Thomas Greene his fucccflor, made many excellent orders and rules for their maintenance, and

much benefited the the Norman fpiira!.

city

by

creeling a bridewell at

On the 2d of June, 1572, the duke of Norfolk was beheaded on Tower hill, juftly lamented by the inhabitants of this friend,

city,

who

in

him loR

a fledfaft

and noble benefa6ior.

In 1373, died John Caius, do6tor in phyfic, whofe name was Keve, a native of this city, being born here in 1310, the 2d of Kenry VIII. true

The fame benevolence,

year,

the citizens collecT:ed

8-1. 12s. yd. towards

by way of

the repairing of

Yarmouth haven. In 1574, it appeared by the queen's mufters, that Norfolk had fix thoufand one hundred and fifty able men on the muller roll, of which three thou.fand K 3

C

150

I

T Y

O

F

hundred and diirty-two were armed; and Norwich two thoufand one hundred and twenty able men, of which four hundred were armfand

fix

the city of

ed.

In 1575, the

city

procured fundry

writs,

direcled

mayors of London, Lynn, and many other places, certifying them, that the citizens of Norwich were free from all toll, pontage. Sec. throughto the

out

all

England.

In this year, on the feventecnth of May, died Matthew Parker, archbifliop of Canterbury, fon of William Parker, citizen of Norwich, and Alice MonThis great man was born in the paings his wife. rifh

of

St.

Saviour in

and brought up tember

1,

at

the

this

Augufl

city,

grammar

6,

fchool here.

1504, Sep-

1520, he was admitted of Corpus Chrifti

or Bene't college in Cambridge, and on the fourth

of March following ele6led bible

and took being then 1538, fellow. In 1541, he was prebend of the fecond ftall in the church of Ely; in 1544, chofen warden or mafler of Bene't college; in 1545, eleded vice chancellor of the univerlity, and a fecond time in 1548; prefented by the college to the redory of Landbeach near Cambridge and made chaplain to clerk,

his do61ors degree in divinity in

;

king Edward VI. and by him preferred in 1532 to the deanry of Lincoln and prebend of Coldingham in that church: on queen Mary's acceflion to the crown he loft all his fpiritualities on account of his being married, and retired during her reign. Elizabeth on her coming to the dnonc noDr. Parker to the fee of Canterbury; and he was confecrated on the feventecnth of December, His death hap1359, in the chapel at Lambeth.

Queen

mi'.-.ated

pened

N O R

W

I

C

131

II.

Mav

17, 157^, and his reinains ^\-erc dcpochapel at Lambeth, where they refted in peace 'till the time of the ufurpation when the palace there being converted into lay habitations, one

pencd

flted in the

;

Hardyng, who occupied the chapel, brutally dug

up the archbiOiop's body, and threw the corps into an poultr)^:

the

tills

leaden coffin,

fold the

outhor.fe where he kept

being difcovered after the reflauration,

body was taken up, and buried again

in

the

chapel jufl above the litany defk, near the fleps aicending to the altar. He founded a grammar fchool at Rochdale in Lancafhire in 1564, and endowed it with 151. per annum for the mafler's falary, and 40s. for that of the ufher, to teach gratis

born in that Chrifli

or

parifli,

Benet

his

college

in

the

:

live

youth

Cambrid2;e he added

;

eight fcholarrhips

the

fociety of .Corpus

two from the increafcd own foundation, one bible

four fellowfhips

two of

To

rents,

clerk,

and and

of the fchclars to be elecled

from Norwich, one fiom Canterburv, one from Wv~ mondham, and one from Ayllham and befidcs gave to the mafter, fellows, and icholars of the faid ;

college, the advo-\vfon of St. Maiy Abchurch, in London, and procured them a charter of mortmain to purchafe 1 ocl. per annum he prefented them alfo with three hundred and nine ounces of filver plate, doubly gilt; the fum of lool. the interefl; whereof he appropriated to the finding a fire in the commxon hall, from All Saints to Candlemas and :

;

500I. to the increafing the

and

commons

of the fellows

Icholars and furrendered to them a leafe with improvement of 14I. 8s. yearly, for feventeen years: he granted to the regilter his whole commons, with one chamber, in that part of the college inhabited by the Norwich fcholais, and annexed to ;

the

To this city he one bafon and ewer of fihcr, doubly gilt, K. 4 weighing

his office that of fenior bible clerk. l^refented

C

132

I

T Y

O

F

weighing one hundred and feventy-five ounces, to be ufed at the mayors table; and to be deKvered

from mayor to mayor by indenture for ever they are adorned with his arms, and name in a cypher; ;

on

the bafon

Matthcsus

is

the following infcription

Parker,

et

anno confecrationis Jua

1

Jan. An: Dni: 1,

Can-

Archicpijcopus

JVorwiccnfis

tuar. dedit eidem civitali i.

;

/Etatis vero

i

569.

fua,

66.'"

In 1566, the archbifliop offered the citv 200I. if they would affure to the mafler and fellows of Bene't college in Cambridge, an annuity of lol. for

which was for ever to receive at the nomination of the mayor and major part of the aldermen of Norwich, for the time being, three fcholars out of the fchools, at or in the laid city of Norwiche, or AyleOiam In Norfolk,' each of them to receive that college

'

'

'

of the college

si.

13s.

yearly;

4d.

their

tuition,

chamber rent, waQring, barber, Sec, freely, without any thing being paid therefore: on the twentvfourth of June the indentures for that purpofe were fealed between the city and college, In which the city fettled an annuity of lol. per annum, iffuing out of the manor and farms of Hethel and Carleton in Norfolk, to be paid half yearly, the college to pay eight pounds thereof yearly, for the exhibitions

of the fcholars aforefaid. The mayor and the more part of his brethren the aldermen fliall appoint ibr fcholars, fuch as be, or fliall be born within the city, being betwixt the age of fourteen and twenty years, well inflrucled In the gramuKu able to Virite and fmg, and if it may be able to make a verfe, and fuch as fliall be of lioneit pa'

'

'

'

'

.;

'

'

'

*

Matthew Parker of

jr.aTe this to

tion,

the

cit>'

the faid city, Jan. i,

and 66th of his

.-.^c.

rents,

of Norwich, archbifliop of Canterbury,

1^69, in the

nth

yc;'r

of his confecri-

NOR

W

C

I

and brought up in

the

II.

irg

fear

of God, and

*

rents,

'

diipofed to enter by God's grace into the miniftry,

*

in

that

which

vocation to fere

God and

his church:'

fcholars, after three years continuance, if

found

to cUliike the fliidy of divintiy, are to be removed,

mayor and aldermen, by which cafe they are to

,upon notice given to the the maftcr

and

fellows

nominate others in

:

in

their ftead

dicir exhibiiions fix years

from

:

otherwife to enjov their admiffion.

the mayor, &c. fend any fcholar not ted,

the

college

fliall

If

be admits certify their refufal of him, fit

to

but muft ha^'e him firfh examined by the procl:ors, wlio mud alfo declare his unfitncfs and no fcliolarfhip fhall be longer vacant than fix weeks the ;

:

fellows to have two ;vccks to certify,

month

to eleei

:

is

to

city a

the pvofits in the vacancies to go to

the naperye of the college fcholar

and the

abfent himfelf

common table and no more than one raondi in :

a year, and that with the permiihon of the maftcr prefident. The remaining 405. to be paid to fuch preacher or preachers as fliall be yearly nominated by the college to preach and declare one fermon at the town of Theiford, and therefore to have yearly 6s. 8d. one other fermon.at Wymondham in the county of Norfolk, and therefore yearly to have 6s. 8d. one other fermon widiin the green \arde in the city of Norwich, and therefore yearly to have Gs. Sd. and one odier fermon in the parifli churche of St. Clement by Fybridge in Norwiche aforcfaid, and therefore yearly to have los.' the remaining 10s. to be diftributed as follows, to the mayor is. to the two fheriffs is. 4d. to the parfoa or curate 8d. to the town clerk 6d. to the fword

and

'

'

'

'

'

'

*

'

'

bearer 6d. to the four ferjeants at mace i6d. and to the clerk of the parifh of St. Gle«ient dd. provided

they be prefent at the fermon preached at St. Clement's church; to the clerk of that parifh yearly for ovcrleeini:

C

134 ovcrfeeirig the

I

T Y

O

F

tomb of William Parker and Alice and mother) i2d. to the prifon-

his wife (his father

poor of St. Clement's fuch perfons above mentioned, as fliall abfent themfelves from the fermon at St. Clement's, to be equally divided between ers in the city gaol sod. to the 52

and the portions of

od,

the faid poor,

all

and the prifoncrs in the

gaol.

In 1570, he fettled about ten acres of land in Eaftfield in Mattifliall,

on the inhabitants

there as

chargeable with an annuity of 50s. payable on the firfl day of May, for ever, to the vicar, feoffees,

church wardens, and overfecrs, who immediately fermon preached there on the Tuclday in rogation week, fliall pay to the preacher 6s. Sd. to after the

of the poorefl people in that parilh,

thirty

one Thomas SpaiTOAve, and

name and kindred or parifh

curate,

after clerk,

to

the

By

5s. and to the vicar, which ever of them IhaU

6s. 6d.

indenture, bearing date Auguft 6, for the

fum of

to

him,

undertake the teaching of children,

city,

is.

pooreft of his

1568, the

320I. advanced h\ the archbi-

fhop, granted to the college an annuity of i^l. per

annum, for the founding of two Norwich fellowand two additional Norwich fcholarlhips

fhips,

:

each of the faid fellows to receive a flipend of 61. a year, and to be excluded from any fiiare of fuch dividends as anciently belonged to the mafler and eight fellows of the firfl foundation but as to any future increafe, or augmentation of the fociety's revenues, they were to be equally benefited with the refl of the members*: the other 61. of the annuity was allotted for the flipend of the two new fcholarfliips, the fcholars to be nominated by the mayor, ;

and * Thefe

fcllowfliips are tenable with

under the value of

any penfion, canonry or prebend,

lol, a year in the king's books.

:

NORWICH.

155

major part of the aldermen of Norwich, in as the three Norwich fcholars are and if there fhould be none fit to be n.-^minated from the faid city, then to be chofen from the grammar fchool and in cafe of failure there, then at "Wymondham from that at Aylfiiam provided fuch fo nam.cd be born in the city, or in either of the towns aforefaid the two Norwich fellows always to be elected from

and

the

like

manner

;

;

;

*

'

'

* '

The

bound themfelves over and above the two forenamed Norwich fellows (if it male be) foure of their nombre of fcUowes out of the countie of Norfolk, born in any citie or town of the faid fhire, and in default of hable fcholars to be found within

fuch fcholars. evermore to

college further

electe.

them from tyme

tvme

*

the faid college, to elect

*

out of anie other college in the faid univerfitye,

to

He

founded exhibitions alfo for three fchobe called Canterbury fcholars the firfl to be fent from Canterbury fchool, the fecond Irom Aylfliam in Norfolk, and the third from Wymondham in the fame countv each fcholar to be a native of the town from which he is fent. '

&c.'

lars,

to

;

;

On the eighteenth day of September, 1 583, John Lewes was burnt here for blafphemy and in 1 587, Peter Cole, of Ipfwich, tanner; and on the four;

teenth of January,

of

W\mondham,

138S, Francis Knight, alias Ket, A. M. fuffered here for the fame

offence.

On Saturday

the fixteenth of Augufl, 1578,

Elizabeth arrived

queen

Braken-Afh, from whence after dinner, flie proceeded on her intended vifit to this city, and was met at Hertford bridges by the mayor and corporation, actended by the principal inhabitants. Here the mayor, after having addrefled her majefty in an handfome fpeech, prefented her with at

the

;

C

156

I

T Y

O

F

the citv fvvord, accompanied with a covered cup of The proceffion filver gih, containing lool. in gold. forward, the mayor carrying a mace or which he bore before the queen to the biDuring her ftay fiiop's palace, vvhere flie lodged. here, which continued 'till the Friday following, the time was paffed in feaftings and pageantries, many of them expreffive of the trade and manufacTtures of At her departure, her majefty knighted the city. Robei't Wood, efquire, then mayor; at the fame time gracioudy declaring, that flie had laid up iu her brcaft fuch good will, as that ihe would never and thanking him the mayor, alforget Norwich

then

fet

fceptre,

;

dermen, &c.

had met

for

the

duiitul

treatment fhe hcrfelf

with, and the kind regaid fliewn to everv

one of her

train.

This time of joy and feftivity was fucceeded by a mofl fevcre affliaion for, as the Norwich roll fiys, ;

'

'

The

traines of her majefly's carriage being

many

of them infeded, Icfte the plague behind them, which afterward fo increafed and contynued, as it

raged above a yer and three c]uarters after,' during time, two thoufand three hundred and ihirtyfive natives, and two thoufanfl four hundred and eighty-two alyan flrangers' died of it from Auguft *

.

which

'

the twentieth, 15 7 8, tq February the nineteenth, 1379: amongfl; the former were ten aldermen.

This year John Elwyn of Hcigham, of the

in the liber-

but without. the walls, being eleded flierih^, was rccjueRed to take a houfe within the city and dwell there during his continuing in that office and on his refufmg fo to do, it was unanimouily refolvcd, that if any perfon heieafter chofen ihcrifF fliall rcfufe to refide within the city, he fhall forfeit ties

city,

one hundred mai ks

:

whereupon

the faid

flieritt

ia

court

;

NORWICH.

157

cbun declared that he would pay the fine, if he did I'iOt comply with the order in a w'eek's time. In 15 So, on the ^Vedncfdav in Eafler week, towards die e\'ening, ^\•as felt a fliock of an earthcuake; which. Stow lays, was very violent in Kent, and many other places.

comeved from

In 15S2, the water was

the north fide of St. Peter's fteeple,

(ni

cxpence of

New-

the

Mills to the crofs in die market, and the dial

fet

up

towards the

^^•hich the court contributed.

In 1383, the plague broke out again, and eight nine hundred perfons died of it, the principal part of which were flrangers. George Shipdliani vvas executed in the town clofe, for the murder of

()r

hi? wife and children, and

hung on

a gibbet there

;

but in 13 84, Henry Shipdham, his brother, obtained a licence to take

him down.

In 153s, upon the news of the SpaniQi Invafion, citv gave lool. towards fortifying the town of

the

Yarmouth and on three hundred men

of Augulf fcnt In the fame vear the plague broke out here again, but did no: ;

the

tor

fifteenth

its

,

defence.

r^tgc violently.

In 1391, White-friars bridge, and (as fome accounts lay] Collany bridge were built of freedone, being of wood before and now the city was again :

with the plague, which carried off fix hundred and feventy-two perlons, in lefs than four months time. At a court held the ninth of June it was enabled, that henceforth the new elected m^ayor fliould be always chofen on May-day, and fworn vifitcd

'

into his office

on

the

Tuefday before Midfummerday

C

353

I

T Y

O

F

day except in the cafe of Midrummer-day failingon the Wednefday, then to be Iwoin on the Tuefday fe"nnight before that day. The city having- realized as much as their hcence of mortmain enabled them to do, by the purchafe they had lately made of Shropham farm, appropriation and advowfon, it was refolved to apply for another licence to amortize 20 ol. per annum; which palled the great feal iii ;

3594-

happened fo great a drought, fhat^ want of water but in the year following, from the twenty-firfl of June to the end of July, it fcarcely ceafed raining day or night. In 1593,

many

The

^^^^^^

cattle periflied for

;

charges of the mayoralty having of late

increafed, the city

added

mer allowance of

661.

now was

annum.

lool. per

33I. 6s.

13s.

8d

to

much

their for-

4d. (o that the

whole »

^^ ^595' provifions were fo fcarce, that wheat fold at 20s. a comb, rye at 13s. barley at 10s. oat-

meal flieep fat

bits

at 20s. at

beef

14s.

at three fliilhngs a flone the beft a piece; lambs at 5s. calves at 20s.. ;

fowls and capons at 3s. 4d. pidgeons at 3d. rabat 8d. and cheefe at 4d. a pound; prices at

thole times verv extravacrant.

In 1596^ the 3.S: pafTcd workhoufes for the poor.

In 1597, the office ot

it

for creeling hofpitals

was agreed, that no one

mayor

and

fliould fervc

a lecond time, unlefs at the dif-

tance of nine years from his

firfl

ferving

it.

In 1601, on Wednefday the 29th of April, about in the afternoon, there fell a fudden florm of hail and rain, attended with violent thimfive o'clock

dcr

N O R

W

I

C H.

159

and lightning: whereby the upper part of the had been lately repaired, was beaten down fell on the north roof of the it church, which it broke through, doing confiderable tier

cathedral fpire, which ;

damage

thereto, as well as to the wails of tlu choir:

on the fouth eaft fide from top to bottom, and more than twenty holes made therein large enough for a man to creep through no other part of the citv received any damage by this violent And on Chriftmas day at noon another lempeil. ihock of an earthquake was lek here. the fpire was fplit

;

King James

I.

on

granted to the mayor,

his

acceffion

flieriffs,

to

the

crown,

and commons of the

city,

a general pardon for all pafl offences

ever,

to the

whatfo-

twentieth day of March, in the fortieth

year of Elizabeth,

159S.

fir John Pettus, then mayor, built the bv Fvbridge, and the year following, the

In 1608, fifh flails

houfe o^er the fpring without Bifhopfgate. In the

fummcr of i6og,

the city was vilitcd

the plague, though but few died of

by

it.

On the eighteenth day of June, being guild dav, a fumptuous pageant was prepared at the new ma\-or s gate on Tombland, and fire works played oii in the evening as was cuftomarv; fome of which burfling, fo extremely frightened the people, that through their hurrying away in crowds for fear of being hurt, thirty-three perfons were trodden down and preffed to death on which account, at a court held on the twenty-fecond of March, it was ordered, that no fire works Hiould be plaved off on any feaff or guild day, on the pcnjiky of 20I. to be levied by diftrefs, on the goods of any pcrfon tranl:

grcfflng therein.

On

C

i66

I

T Y

O

F

On the lad day of March, 1625, Charles I. was' proclaimed here and on the thirteendi day of May following, Thomas, earl of Arundel and Surrey,^ earl marOial of England, was appointed lord lieu-tenant of the county of Norfolk, and of the city of iNorwich and county of the fame. ;

On the twelfth day of July, a eommifhon was iffued out directed to the mayor, Sec. authorifing them to levy a tax on all the inhabitants, to be applied towards fcouring the ditches, and the remcrval of all nuifances in and about the city the better to prevent the fpreading of the plague, which had latelv broke out at Yarmouth, and been communicated to the town by the arrival of lome infeded perfons from that place: thefe precautions not having the defired eiled,. the Black Tower on Butter hills was fitted up for the reception of the poor, labouring under that dreadful calamity. In September there died about forty in a week and when it raged moft violently, the number of burials amounted to ninetyone, of whom leventy-three died of the plague. In ;

;

May

1626

it

began

to

following totally ceafed. it

abate,

and

in the

December

The number who

was one thoufand four hundred and

died of

thirty- one.

Writs of quo warranto were brought againll the mayor, ^c. for refufmg to furnifli two fhips of war

demanded of them; who on

trial,

in 1629, obtain-

ed a verdici, having proved, that they neither ufed nor ufurped any privileges but what their charterswarranted. During this contcfl, the city raifed a

ium

money and

of

loan, as

fettled

prefented to

tlic

king, by

by the lord keeper, lord

way of

treaiurer,

comptroller and chancellor of the dutchy of Lancalter,

who came

hither for that purpofe,

In

:

N O R

W

I

C H.

161

In 1627, an order arri\'ed for the levying two hundred and fifty foot foldiers in the city of Norwich, and countv of Norfolk, of which number the but citizens were ordered to furnifli twenty-five tliey would raife no more than fcventeen, that being ;

their

The

proportion.

full

courts

on the

writs of

determination of the

quo warranto brought aganift

city, not being agreeable to the promoters of them, the following letter was fent to Alexander Anguifli, efquirc, mayor; John Thackcr, and^ViIliam ilie

Golllin, fhcriffs.

'

'

we have thought upon the delivery herring pies, which we lately

After our hearty commendations,

you underfland,

to let

fit

'

here at court of the

'

received from you,



tions to be

'

which we

we find divers very jufl exceptaken againfl the goodncfs of them ; mull require you to anlwer, and take

'

fuch order, that the lame

'

future time, as

'

the

'

tenure,

'

that

may

be amended for the

vou would avoid exceptions we take are thele.

Firfi:,

further trouble

you do not fend them according of the

firll

new

to voui"

herrings that arc taken.

Secondly, you do not caufe them to be well in good and ftrong paftye, as they ought to be, that they may endure the carriage the better. '



'

baked

Thirdly, whereas you fliould, by vour tenurf, in thefe paflies fix fcore herrings at leaft, being the great hundreth, which doth require five to be put into every pye at the leafl ; we find but four ^lerrings in divers of them, '

'

'

• '

bake



'

at

Fourthly, the number of pies which you fent this time we find to be fewer than have been

J

f'ent

'

CITY OF

02 heretofore,

and

divers of

them

alfo

much

bro*

ken.

'

And laRly, we underftand the bringer of them was conftrained to make three feveral journeys to you, before he could have them, whereas it feemeth he is bound to come but once. '

*

'

To every of which our exceptions, we mufl pray your particular anfvver for our better fatisfaction, that we mav ha\e no caufe to queilion it far•

'

'



ther

;

and

i'o

we

bid you heartily farewell '

'

'

Hampton court, 4th of Oa. 1629.

Upon more

Your loving

put-

»^^en^t»roke

;

friends

J^^^^^ Saville.

^^^^^ Manley."

the receipt hereof, the city promifcd to be

careful in the matter for the future.

This rent of herring pies

is the ancient fee-farm long before its incorporation, or the building of Yannouth, being at that time a very confiderable fifliing town, and is ftili paid by the fheriffs the manor of Carleton is held by the teIn 1673, nure of carrying the paflies to court. Thomas lord Richardfon, baron of Cramond, lord

of the

fettled

city,

:

of the

i'?.i(\

manor,

acknowledged the having

re-

ceived of the fneriifs of Norwich, by Richard Eden

one hundred herrings, by the great hun-

his tenant,

dred, \i7. of ihe hrfl city,

in t\\ent\-iour

Thefe

new

herrings that

pies or

palties,

came

well

to the

ieafoned.

and placed upon the England he happcrfons carrying them arc enti-

pics arc to be carried

king's table, in whatever part of

pens

and the an allowance of

to be

tled to

:

lix

white loves,

fix

difhes of

meat

W

N O R

C H.

I

163

ineat out of the king's kitchen, one flaggon of wine, one fiaggoii of beer, one trufs of hay, one bulhel of oats, one pricket of vvax-caiidlc, and fix tallou-

candles

they are

:

now

prefcnted by the fhenfis of

Norwich, the corporation being lords of the mauor of Carle ton.

In 1630, on the breaking out of the plague, the pate called Brazen-door, was appointed as a dwelling for the perlons employed in bur\ ing thofe who died of it, and a prilon lor fuch infecled poor as fix houfes vVould not properly confine themfelvcs were alfo creeled on Butler hills, near the great Black ;

Tmver, tious ino[,

and an acre of ground inthem with high boards thefe precau-

for peft houfes.

clofed about

had the delired

:

elfeft,

fo

that in

July follow-

the city being entirely clear of the diftemper,

the pcil houfes were ordered to be taken

down.

In 1(331, information being received that the plague had broke oat in London, and that even live perlons had died of it in this city, luch wife precautions were immediately taken as pat an effectual not more liop to the fpreading of the contagion than twenty or thinv perlons dying of it. ;

In 1634, the plague broke out again in St. Aubut never arrived to any confideraand the pinnacle of the cathedral, which ble height guftine's paridi, :

had been much damaged by

fire,

was now com-

pletely repaired.

In 1637, Mr, Thomas Atkyn, alderman of Norwich, was elefted Iheriff of London ; whereupon the city petitioned the lords of the council, but could get no redrefs: Mr. Atkyn then requefled leave it> reljgn his

gown, which was granted him,

L

9

^



CITY OF

]r>4

In 1641, the commons afiTerted tlieir right of choofing tlie mayor, the aldermen having for fomc yeats pafl fucceeded to that office by Icniority, and elecled alderman Thomas Carver.

In 1642, Jnly the 12th, the parliament voted and declared the necefhty of taking up arms and on :

the twenty-ninth day of the

fame month, captain Mofcs Trefwell was apprehended and delivered up to the parliament, for endeavouring to inlift men into the king's fer%ice, after having been forbid fo to do by the corporation. Soon after, the king ifi'ued two proclamations, requiring his fubjefts affiftancc againft the rebels^ but no regard was paid to either of them here. So far from it, the magiftrates ordered a general mufler of the trained bands and volunteers, and put the city into the bed flate of defence they were able, fearing an attack from thofe gentlemen of Norfolk and Suffolk who had declared for the king.

the

As a

farther proof of their zeal,

month of February

following,

they fent

in

fifty

dragoons for colonel Cromwell's regiment. As foon as thefe were marched, they came to a refolution of laifrng a hundred more and to mount them, gave orders for feizing the horfes of thofe citizens who favoured the king's cauic, and whom they diflinguifhed by the name of malignants. The mayor, on his refufal to confirm thefe orders, was arrefled by lord Grey, and carried prifoner to Cambridge, after lia\ing been obliged to appoint a deputy to a(5l On the twenty -fixth day of March, in his ablence. 1643, a hilndrcd men were ordered to be i-aifed and fcnt 10 Cambrldgo, to reinforce the allociatcd army. The weekly contribution laid by parliament on the county of Norfolk was 1250I. to be raifed in the in the county oj Norfolk following pro})nrtions ;

:

1129I. city of

Norwich and

liberty of the cathedral

35l.

NORWICH, 5^1.

Lynn

27I.

and Thetford

5I.

us. lod. YaimouLh 1

is.

gd.

165 34I.

iGs.

^d.

'

Alderman Thacker being elected mayor for the enfuing year, a letter was ient to lord Grev, to beg the enlargement of the then mayor, on account of the great

damage

his private affairs

had fuflained by

kmg imprifonment upon which his lordfhip difcharged him, time enough to be prefent at the transferring his office to the new eleft. At a court held on the twelfth day of Julv it was ordered, that captain LivewcU Sherwood fhall watch and guard the city, to-morrow the thirteenth inflarit, iri regard, that the vow and covenant is then to be taken, his

:

'

*

*

any ffir or turaults that may within the faid city :' and that the gates fliould be unflopped, upon the citizens promifmg to block them up again upon notice given. Augufl the if?th, '

for the app.cafmg of

'

arife

a meeting of the aflfociated counties was appointed, on account of the danger with which tiic citv was threatened on the approach of the enemy, and the caflle

ordered

to

be

November

fortified.

the

2d,

the excife office was opened at the houfe of alder-

man

Parmenter", for the payment of 6d. a barrel beer, and 2s. oji all beer above the v^lue

on fmall of

6s.

a barrel,

On the eighteenth day of December, the mavor held the fefhons, neither recorder nor fieward beins: prclcnt,

and delivered the charge

to the

grand jury.

On

the twenty-fourdi of January, 1644, the day was difcharged but the night watch was flill let, to ferve on which, all the citizens under the 4egree of aldermen were liable and the keys of

Vvatch

;

;

L

each

3

* Where Jarrat Dafliwood, efq,

lately dwelt.

C

i66

I

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O

F

each gate were delivered to the conftable of the ward, eveiy night at nine o'clock. order of court on the nintli of March, fcven popifli pictures taken from St. Swithen's church, the

By

angel and four evangelifts from St. Peter's, Mofes and Aaron, and the four evangelifts fiom the cathedral, together with fome other fuperllitious paintings, were pubhckly burnt in the market.

having been agreed between the Englifu and ioo,oool. fliould be im-

It

Scotifh commiflioners that

mediately advanced to the Scots, to enable them to put dieir army in march for England, an order was fent down here for the levying 6000I. part of the

lum

faid

in the following proportions

Yarmouth 1741. in Lynn 18s. gd. and the remainder

263I. in Q-\.

132I.

;

in

Norwich

in

Thetford

the reft of the

in

county of Norfolk. In 1644, Wcdnefday the twenty-feventh day of March, the day appointed for a folemn fail, being the coronation day, the obfervation of it was that the whole day fliould be fojcmnly obferved as a day of hvuniliation, as odicr alio

fettled as follows

fafi

the

;

days have been that the aldermen fliould attend to St. Andrew's church in the morning, ;

mayor

and

St. Peter's

in the afternoon

;

and

that at niglit,

duty of the day was finiilied, the cannons and every one fliould be fired and the bells rung after the

;

left at

proje£l

liberty to

was

let

make

bonfires at his pleafure.

on foot in the month

A

of Augufl, and

a petition thereon propofed to be prefented to parliament, for the uniting fmall parilhes, and the providing a proper maintenance for an able miniflry ; but the promoters of it difagreeing as to the method in which it fliould be conduced, the whole affair

was

laid afide.

In

NOR

W

I

C

167

II.

In 1645, the guild day was not obfeneJ wldi the ufual flate and parade, through fear of diflurbanccs, on account of the king's taking the town of Huntington,

and fpreading

the alarm into dicfe parts.

In 1646, the plague made its appearance in Norwich and Dereham, but its effc61s \vere very inconfiderable. On die fourteenth day of November a violent flood laid great part of the city under water.

On the eleventh of November, 1647, captain Blackweil, by order of parliament, Gripped the lead off the Bifhop's palace and chappel, and afterwards them out

Jet

to

poor people for dwcUing houfes.

In 1648, a petition was piefented

to

the m.ayor,

by about one hundred and fiftv perfons, begging a more fpeedy and efiedual reformation and complaining that their faithful minilters were difcouraged and (lighted, the ejefled miniflers countenanced and preferred, old ceremonies and the Icrvice book conflantly ufed, and the dircftory for ?cc.

fublcribed

;

;voi"fhip tliat

almofl totally neglected:

further praying,

the ordinances again (I fuperflition

might be put in

ftrid

execution.

The

and

idolatry

m.avor hav-

ing riiewn but little regaid to this pcciiion, upon complaint made againli him to the parliament, a

meffenger was difpatched to bring him. before that houfe, and the following order entered in their jour-

Die martis iS April, 1648, pofl raerid Ordered by the commons alTembled in parliament, that Mr. Chriftopher Baret, alderman of the city of Norwich, be appointed to execute the place of mayor of the city of Nonvich, in the place and flead of Mr. John Utting, now mayor of the laid city, in the abfence and reftraint of the faid Mr. The common people having a ftrong alUtting.' fedion L, 4

pal. '

'

*

'

'

'

\

:

'

;

C

i68

I

T Y

O

F

fe61ion for tlic mayor, began to affemble in great numbers, on the arrival ot the meffcnger threatening deflruclion to any one who fliould offer to carry the mayor away, and to prevent it, took poffeffion The of the gates and kept conftant guard there. next day being Monday, a very numerous body of them aiTembled in chappel field, from whence they proceeded to the King's Head in the market, where the meffenger then was, and who very narrowly The rioters then proefcaped out of town alive. ceeded to plunder the houfes of many perfons whom they fufpeded to be enemies to the mayor, or fa;

they afterward vourers of the parliament's caufe went to the committee houfc, vyhere the county arms were lodged, which they rifled; and arming them:

felves,

committed many outrages, before the arrival

of colonel Fleetwood's light troop then cpiartered in upon the troopers entering the city they the county immediately attacked and difpcrfed the rioters many of whom retiring to the commitiee houfe, were iniferably deflroyed by the explofion of more than ninety barrels of gunpowder, which by fome acci:

;

The damage done to the adjacent dent took fire. buildings by this moft terrible fhock, was very conabove one hundred perfons lofl; their lives, fiderable ;

or were miferably fall

wounded: many of them by

of timber and flones carried

to

the

a confiderablc

The day foldiilance by the force of the powder'". lowing the mayor voluntarily fct forward for London, and furrendered hirafelf to the parliament and was confined 'till July the ifl, when he was releafed, after a fine of loool. had been fet upon him and alderman John Tooly, payable to the corporation of

Norwich

;

which they

aftcrw'ard

compounded

for 400I.

A •

The committee

Joules on the eaft of

commiffion

houfe was fituated on the fpot where Bethel, and the it,

belonging to

Thomas

Starling, efq.

now

ftand.

N O R

\V

I

C H.

169

commlfiion of oyer and terminer, for the fpeeto juftice the late rioters, was opened bringing dv on ChriUnias clav and out oF one hundred and received >"is}it perfons profecuted diereupon, (even

A

;

fcntcnce of death,

and

AAere all cKccuted

on the

caf-

the fecond of January, together with two old women condemned Jor witchcraft. This year the guild day was not obferved publicly through

ile

ditches

on

iVar of riots.

of tlic fame month, 1649, king was beheaded at Whitehall, between the hours of one and two in the afternoon.

On

thirlieth

the

Cliarlcs

I.

In April, the cit>' petiuoned the parliament to be eafed in their taxes, by reafon of the great decay of and its trade, and the poverty of its inhabitants that proper meafures might be taken to open a fo;

And

rei"-n trade.

in

July following another pedtion

Avas prefented, praying, that the juftices

for the citv

might be empowered

Chrids church, and

cintt of

of peace

in the

pre-

to unite paridies,

and

to aft

provide for the miniflers thereof out of the re\enues

of the cathedral.

William Tooke, of Lakcnham, \vas and kept his fherifFalty at his houfe Tlie fame year, the pulpit was in Tooke's Vv'ood, biouLdit from the Green-yard adjoining to the cathedral, and placed in that belonging the n
1630,

elected

flieriff,

;

opcnrd.

December

iG,

iGjo^,

Oliver Crom.'.vcll was de-

clared lord proteclor of England, Scotlar.d, and Ireland, after having turned out the parliament, which

had

fat

more than twelve years and Avhich from was called the long parliament. ;

diat circumllance,

In

C

lyo

I

T Y

O

F

In 1654, June 24, the ovclinance was publlflied for the fix

months

airefTment,

for the

maintenance

oi

armies and fleets of the commonweaUh, after the rate of 120.000L a month for the firft three months, and 90,000!. a month for the latter; towards each monthly payment of die lafl lum, the citv and county of Norwich raifcd 240I. and the the

county of Norfolk 4660I,

On the death of OIi\er Cromwell, which happened September 3, 1638, the mavor recei\-ed letnotifying that event, ters from the privy council and the ele61ion of his fon Richard Cromwell to the and commanding him to prodignitv of prote^lor claim the faid Richard protc61or of die three kingdvQms which was accordingly done on the feventh The protestor's honours were of the fame month, ;

;

but of

fliort

continuance

;

for in the

month of April

1659, the army obi igcd him ment which he had convoked and loon sed hnn from the pioteciorihip.

to diifoive the parlia-

;

after

depo-

King Charles IT, was foiemnly proclaimed here, and on the thirteenth day of May, 1660; and the twentieth- of the fame month was obferved as a day of general thankfgiving for the rcflauration ot his nsajefly and the royal family, and the ancient conThe city havilitution, both of church and (late. mg in the year 1650 purchafed of the flate the fee iarm of the city, at that time of the value of 132I. iSs. ^d. now lealed an inftrumcut of relignation of the faid fee farm jelly

with

;

and m.oreoAei

loool. as

,

prefentcd his

a tcllimony of their duty

maand

lovalty.

In 1665, the plague broke out here and made the burials in the Ipace of twelve dreadful ravages :

months

.

N O R

W

I

C

H.

/

amounted to three thou rand and twelve, of two thou (and two hundred and fifty-one were

iiVontbs vvho'i).

Durinc^ its contitaken oh" bv th.at fatal difteraper. nuance. -at the infiunce of the jufiices for the countv of Norfolk, the market was appointed to be held The city was not quite cleared in the town clofe. of the infe(5lion 'till toward the latter end of the

vear 1667; when, on

its

entirely ccafing, the nine-

teenth day of September was ordered by the bifliop to

be obferved

Almighty God, to

its

as a

dav of general tliankfgivlng to mercy in piitting a flop

for his great

further progreis.

In i^ijo, the conteft which had a long time fubbetween the mavor and aldermen on the one part, and the fherilEs of Norwich on die otlicr part, concerning the payment of the fee farm rent, was determined in favour of the latter; aiid it was adjudged bv the barons of the exchequer, that the faid payment belonged to the mavor, :kc. and that But notthe flierilfs were entirely difcharged of it. withflanding this folemn decifton the mavor, &.c. by a})plication to the king and coiincil, obtained an order that the fee farm fliould be paid bv the nicriffs, on the court's continuing to them their uiual allowfiPted

ance.

Lord Ilenrv Ho'.wnd, ^vho on many occafions had fliewn a particular retiard for this citv, as a furtlicr mark of his efleem, prefented it with a very magnificent mace of hlver gilt, and a sown of crimfon velvet, to be worn by the m.ayor on any cKtraordinary occahon.

In 1671, the faid lord Henrv Howard, who the following was created earl of Norwich and duke of Noifolk, entertained the king and cjueen,

year

to2:cthcr

;

172

CI

T Y

O

F

together with the dukes of York, Monmouth, Bucknighani, ^c. at the duke's paLice, in a mofl fumptuous and magnificent manner. During his majefty's

honour of knighthood on that eminent phyfician, doclor Tliomas Browne, author of Reliaio Medici, and many other learned books; who was born in 1605, and died on the nineteenth day of 06lober 1682, in the 77th year of his age, and Ues interred in the church of St. flav here; he conferred the

Peter of Mancioft,

In 1673, fella ver)' deep fnow in the month of February, which laid upon the ground feven weeks on its thawing it occafioned fo great a flood, as to damage confiderably mod of the bridges in and near the city.

In 16S1, his royal highnefs James duke of York The ianie )'ear, after the king paid the city a vilit. containing his reafons for parliaments, which declaration, by his majeRy's order had been publilhed and read in the clmrches, the tide of loyalty ran fo very high, that addrefies were prcfcntcd to him horn eveiiad fet forth a declaration

diiTolving the

two

laft

ry part, approving his conducl in general: that from Norw-ich, which ran highefl for the prerogative, was prclented at the King s Bench as a public libel, by

but die court took no the grand jury of Middlefex And further to exprefs their zeal for notice of it. ;

government, at an affembly held the t^yenty-firft day of September, 1682, it was carried on a vote, forty againft twenty-two, for lurrendering the charter into and it was accordingly lurrenderthe king s hands ;

cd, notwithftanding

above nine hundred

the

flronged rcmonftranccs

citizens againft

of

it.

By

NORWICH.

17s

Bv the ne^v charter, Robert Pallon, earl of Yarmouth, lord lieutenant of Norfolk and Norwich, was appointed recorder; on his death, in '1683, he was fucceeded by his eldefl Ion William, eail of Yarmouth -who at an aflembly, held on the nineteenth day of Ju!v, produced letters patent under the great feal of England, impowering him to appoint a deputy recorder: and accordingly nominated John Wakehoufe, efcj. to that office. ;

On

July the 23th, i6Sg, the king commanded

the corporation to admit thirty quakers to the free-

dom

of the

city,

the oaths uiual

on

and

to

three

;

but this the corpo-

December Henry duke of Norfolk, at the head of hundred knights and gentlemen, proceeded into

ration refolutely refilled to

the

difpenfe ^vith their taking

that cccafion

comply with.

ift,

and openlv declared for a free the mayor and the reft of the body parliament corporate joined him there, and made the fame deA few days alter, the common people claration. pulled down the popifli chappel, and demoliiaed and burned all the furniture thereto belonging, and plundered feyernl houles inhabited by Papifts biK the market place, ;

:

commotions were foon put an end to, by the yirilance and relolution of the magiflrates.

tliele

In 1692, Mr. John Larwocd, one of the peopk being elcfted ilieriH, abfoluteiy refufed either to fcrve the office, or to pay a line no be excufed therefrom: upon which lie v\as lunimoned to appear before the priyy council, to give his reafons lor fuch refufal ; and upon his declaring called Independents,

he was not cjualified by law to ferve that office, he never had received, or would hereafter receive the facrament, according to the form made ufc of in the church bv law cffabUilied^ he was exthat

for that

culcd

;

C

i74

1

T Y

cufed therefrom; and a

O

F

mandamus

Vvas

thereupon

Iffued out for the eleciion of another {heriff.

Wafey and Pindar, (both were eleded flieriffs, but refuicd ferving for the fame reafons as before siven bv Larwood and two others were chofen in their Head. VVafev and Pindar however agreed afterward to pay a fine and Larwood, on a hearing of the cafe, was fined five marks by the judges and iubjedtd to be further fined bv the coiporation on any future relufal to In

the year following

diffenters)

*

;

;

ferve the ofnce.

About mills

the fame time the water works at the r»e\y were undertaken, and pcrfeclcd in about two

Vears.

In i6()8 the winter proved very long

and fevere enormous price of 445. a quantity of Inow fell on the third of

when wheat eomb.

A

rofe

to the

May. In the year 1700 the new hall in St. Andrew's as a public exchange, to be ufcd by the

was opened

merchants, Sec. for tranfading bufinefs ev^ry day, the aiternoon, from eleven in the forenoon to one holidays excepted, and thofe times when the corpoIt continued ration bnfinefs required the ufe of it. open about a year, and wai then (hut up.

m

In 1701, a printing oRice was opened

Francii

b\'

Kurgcis, and that noble art reviN'ed here, afier hav-

Hie ing been dilcontinued for a nunibcr of years. lame year an ad pafled for lighting the Itreets of Another a6l alio palled in die lame year, this city. lor ercding a court of confcience in this has been of great benefit to the pccrer ple both debtors and creditors.

city fort

;

which of peo-

On

NOR

\V

C

I

H.

i;-,

Oti the twenty-tlilrci day of May 1701, ine fnih year of queen Anne, war was proclaimed here againll: the French and Spaniards.

In 1703, Hardley the city's jurildicHon

crofs,

on

fituatcd at the extent

of

was repaired

at

the

ri\'er,

the expence of the city.

In 1704, happei:!ed a remarkable conteft on the an alderman for the great ward of Conisford, in the room of Auguftine Briggs, elq. On ca fling up the polls a majority appeared for Thomas Danch the mayor ho7/e^•er fwore Benjamin Auftin, who on complaint made was afterward difplaced, and Mr, Dunch (worn by mandamus. In the fame year, the candidates for members to ferve in parliament were Waller Bacon, John Chambers, Thomas e!e(^Hon of

;

Biofield

and Thomas Palgrave,

efquires

;

the

two'

former had a majority, but not being freemen, the but after a full hearflierifls made a double return ing in the houlc the gentlemen who had the majority were declared duly elected: the objection that the word cives, or citizens, muff mean freemen, befor whether it did or not the cafeing overruled would not be thereb)' affefcecl. for that the citizens William Blvth, by elcding them made them fuch. elq. niavor, was bv order of parliament, committed into the cuftodv of a fergeant at arms for irregular and undue proceedings at the laid cleaion. :

;

In 1705, the weavers hall was broke open and books deftrovcd, fnicc which time the cuilom of difufcd. fealina: 'a of Huffs has been

tlic

In 1706, a great part of the city was laid under water by two violent floods, both of which happeued in the month of November. In

CI

176 In

O

F

709, wheat was fbiJ here at 40s. a comb..

]

In

T Y

from YarIts pafltige Norwich, was ovcrfet on Bravdon, in the

1711, the wherry, in

mouth

to

night of the

fifth

of October, by which accident

twcnt\- perfons lofl their hvcs.

The fame houlcs,

\'ear

&c. iu

work

the acl paffed for erefting

this city,

bv which

it is

eiiaded

;

" That from and ailer the firfl day of May, one thouland feven hundred and tweh^e, liiere fliali be a corporation, to continue for ever, within the faid city of Nonvich and county ot the lame, anci the liberties thereof, confiiling of the mavor, recorder

and fteward, juflices of the peace, flicrifls, and aldermen of the faid city, for the time being and of ;

of the mofl hor.cft, dilcrect, and charitable inhabitants of the laid city and. county, in the four great wards in the faid city, and the towns and out-parifiies in the county of the faid citv (that is to fay) eight out of txcYv of the faid great wards and of fuch other charitable perlons as fhall be elefted and confiituted guarcUans of the poor of the faid city, in fuch manner as is herein after exprcffed; and the faid firfl thirty-two perfons ihall be eieded on the third day of Ivlay next eniuing, or, within three days after, at an aifembly of the faid city for that purpofe to be held, by the votes of the mayor, flieriffs, citizens and conunonthivt\-two other perfons,

;

;

ilty in

pare of

And

common

council allcuibled, or of the nrajor

them then prefenu the

faid

diirty-two perfons, aforcHiid,

fliali

ccntimie in their office until others fhall be elected and in cafe any of the perfons fo in their rooms cleclcd, ot any other pcrfcn to be at any time after ;

elcclcd

W

N O R tleflcd

tKeir

in

room,

happen

elections,

ma)or of days next

tlie

C H.

I

fliall,

after

their

177 rcfpe£live

or be removed, then the faid city, or his deputv, within ten to die,

death or removal of fuch perhold an affemblv, to elecl and choole out of the ward or wards, where the jjerfon or perfons fo dying or removed did belong;, other or others in his or their place or places; which fon's,

fliall

after die

fummon and

iaid aflembly the faid mayor, or his deputy, are au-

thorized

and

required

to

hold,

and give

notice

thereof two davs at the leafl before the holdino; the

lame, by lummoning the feveral jufticcs, flieriffs, aldermen, and common council men of the faid ci* ty, to apjjtaf at fuch eIe6lion which faid mayor^ recorder, and fteward, juRices of the peace, nierilFs, and aldermen, and thirty-two perfons fo elecled, and hereafter to be ele61ed, together with fuch other charitable perfons to be elected, as is herein after provided, Ihall be, and be called, Guardiana of th^ Poor of the City and Comity of jVonvich, and LibertifJ ;

fame; and the faid guardians, or the major fit perfon to be and attend as clerk at fuch reipective courts. the

of

part of them, fhalt appoint a

In 1713, on the eleventh day of May, peace was proclaimed between Great Britain and France. In the fame year the duke of Ormond was appointed lord lieutenant of Norfolk and Norwich, in the room of lord Townfheiid.

On

the eighth day of

March peace was

proclaini-

€d with Spain.

In 1715, on the feventeenth day of December, firft of George I. Mr. Thomas Half late of London, merchant, fon of John Hall, efq. formerly mayor of this city, and lieutenant colonel of the tHe

M

militiss.

C

lyS militia regiment,

I

was

T Y

O

F

interred in the

church of

St.

The body was

preceeded by thirty-four boys, clothed at the expence of his executors, being the number of the years of his age, and by the greater part of the city clergy the pall was lupported by fix batchelors, and the artillery compiinv in black cloaks, with white gloves and

George

at Colgate.

;

{ilk

knots, clofcd the procelTion.

He

left

the inte-

of 200I. yearly, for a monthly facramental lecture to be preached in fome of the churches of this

lefl

citv'";

to Bethel hofpital 200I. to the charity fchools

in the city of Norwich, of the ellablifhed church, 50I. and the like fum to thofe of the Proteflant dif-

lenters

;

and

lool.

for

the

purchaling of

a

gold

chain to be worn by the mayors fucceffively, whicli weighs tuentv-three ounces fix penny-weights. Mr. Augulline Metcalf was the firfl mayor who wore it. In January following died fir Peter Seaman, knt. who made provifion by his will, for the binding out two poor lads yearly for ever out of the feveral parifhes of Ealt Wvmer ward, of which he was alderman bv rotation the firll to be taken out of the parifli, ;

of

St.

Gregory, where he was buried.

In 1717 died two mayors,

ij:

In 1720, on die twentieth of September, a dangerous riot happened, under pretence ol dcflioying callicocs, wliitli arofe to luch an height as to obligc thc llKviiis to call in the aid of the artillery

compa-

ny, at whole approach the rabble inflantly difperfcd

thcnilches.

In •

Thpy

are

now preached

Mancroft, St. Andrew,

St.

in the

following churches

]ohn of Timbcrhill, and

St.

;

St.

Peter of

George of Col-

gate alternately.

X Richard Lubbock,

July

vrkofe death Anth. Parmentcr

26, and



Thomas Bubbin,

tleflcd.

OiSober 30

j

oti'

N O R In 1722, an

\V

I

C IL

a£l pafTed for the better

179 qualifying

and yarn, in the citv of of magidracy in the faid

tne manufailurers of fluffs

Nonvich,

to

bear offices

and for regulating the elections of fuch officers which took place on Midfummer-day 1 7 23, and by which all manufacturers, or makers of any fort of fluffs made of wool, or wherein there is any mixture of wool and all makers of wool into yarn, who are not journeymen or fer\'ants for hire, mafler tveavers, and m.affer wool-combers, and perfons dealing or trading as fuch, or employing fervants or journeymen in ftny fuch manufactures, or having any intereff, flock, fliare, or parcDerOiip in any fuch city,

;

;

manufadures, inhabiting, or living within the faid of Norwich or county of the fame, are obliged to be made free of the faid city, and admitted free-

city

men thereof. All perfons then in trade to be admitted to their freedom, ort their rcqueiling the fame, and paying 1

723



and

the all

fum of il. is. on or before June 24, future manufacturers, being foreigners,

on payment of any fum not exceeding

5I. and taking Every pcrfon exercifmg anv of tlic faid raanuiaClures, and refufmg to take up his freedom as aforefaid, upon a profecution, to be commenced within fix months after fuch facl com-

the uiual

mitted,

he

fliall

oaths.

fliall

forfeit lol,

for every kalender

month,

ufe the faid manufaClures, contrary to this

ail.

It \>'as alfo enabled, that if any perfoti eleClcd to be fhcrifr, at any court of mayoralty between the 24th of June and 10th of Augufl following, fhall within fourteen days after notice in writing given to him of fuch eleClion, make oath, or, being a Quaker, folemnly affirm, that he is not at that time worth 2000I. liis debts being paid, every fuch perfon fliall, for that turn, be excufed ferving the laid

M

3

office

;

CITY OF

150 ofBce of

manner

flieriff

gratis

;

and each pcrfon, worth 3000I.

in

likd

bd paying a fine of 50L and no greater fine to be paid by ^ny perfon of a larger ellaic. But no perfon worth above 2000I. (hall be difcharged from ferving the faid office for more than one ycat, without the confent of the niaNor, ffieriffs, citizens, and commonalty, in com-fvvcaring hirnfelf not

excufcd Icrving the

mon

office,

fliall

oti

council aflcmblcd.

In 1724, the flatue of juRice was placed on the hall in the market place,

and the

flierifFs

office re-

built.

On

Moriday October the 24th, 1725, the ne\\'' was opened as an exchange, to be ufed for that pufpofc, from eleven to one every day, Saturdays and Sundays excepted.

hall

The fame the

year an aft paffed, Avhich took place

May, 1726, by which the following tolls welc laid upon all goods or merchandife the river higher than Thorpe hall, in 11])

of

firil

or duties brouglit

Thorpe, wheat,

on every chaldron of

viz.

rye,

weigh of

lalt

;

coals,

laft

ol

every other grain every three hogflicads of fugar, to^

barley,

malt,

or

;

or hogffieads packed with dry goods; every three puncheons of liquor; every four hogffieads, or two pipes of wine, fpirits or other evcrv eight barrels of foap, raifins, oil, liquors every pitch, tar, or packed with other dry goods every two pipes of Smyrna raifins butt of currants every fixty bars of every twenty-four bags of nails ffiort broads ; fifty every of iron called pieces ijon every eight pigs, or fodder of lead every Peak milevery forty firftone, or pair of Clogne milflones kins of butler, or arthcl; every iwenty-two hundred

bacco,

moiafles,

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

NORWICH.

iSi

twenty fquare feet of flone evcrv chaldron of grindftonc ; every eighty fmgle, or forty double deals every fifty fquare feet of timber; every two bags ol hops e\ery eight horfc -packs of any fort of goods

dred of cheefe

every tlioufand

evei-y

;

;

pantiles

;

;

;

and

ton of

ever)' '

of 4d.

all

other kinds of goods, the fiun

The mayor,

Sec.

flicriffs,

are

appoint

to

and the duties to be applied towards rebuilding and repairing the walls and bridges, gates, Every one gi^'ing a falfe acwafles, ftaithes. Sec. count of his lading, to the amount of more than collectors,

An

three tons, to forfeit 20s.

ofiicc

to

b\;

eiec9.ed

between Thorpe hall and St. Ann's ftaithe, for reand attendance given there, ceiving the faid duties from five in the morning until eight at night, from and die tenth of March to the tenth of September ;

;



from feven during the

common

in the

'till fi^•e

in the afternoon,

The

city

under

their

may borro\v money, and

afTign

o\'er

of the year.

refl

feal

morning

the faid cufloms

for

repayment, Avidi legal

This ad is not to lefTen or take au-ay any which were before payable to the ma\or, their

common,

or other flaiihcs in the city

:

intereit,

duties, Sec.

at

the city

county of Noramending and rebuilding Trowfe, Herford, Cringleford and Earlham bridges, \vhich bridges are therefore deemed to belong to the county of Norfolk, in the fame manner as Thi§ ad to be the other public county bridges do. \v-ithout fpecially all courts, pubnc ad in as a taken \o

pay yearly

to the treafurer of the

folk 30I. towards repairing,

pleading the fame.

In

J

7

26, Berllrc^t gate

and Brazen doors were

re-

new paved, and

tli?

built.

In 1727, the fifh-maiket was ercded, >I 3

flails

^^

C

i82

T Y

I

O F

In l;2g, the third of George

IT.

an

a6l

paffcd

for the better regulating elcflions in the city of

Nor-

wich, which took place April the 25th, 1730; by which it was enabled, that at cveiy election for burgelTes in parliament, each voter muil fwear, that he hath been admitted. to his heedom twelve calender months before that election, and that he hath not

been polled before for

tions

mayor

or

at that election. flieriff,

And

each pcrfon

in all elec-

fliall

fwear,

that he hath not only been a freeman as aforefaid, but that for fix calendar months lall paft he hath been an inhabitant within the liberties of the city. And in all ele£lions for aldermen or common council men, each man fliall fwear, that for fix calendar months laft paft he hath been an inhabitant within And all the ward for which the eledion is made. perfons in work-houfes, holpitals, or prifons, are to

ward in which they inhabited the laft lix calendar months before their entering fuch places. And if any one lefufe to take the niual oaths, to be

poll in that

adminiftered by the mayor, his deputy, or fuch fworn clerks at he or his deputy fhall appoint, then In all elections fuch perfon s vote is to be reje6led. be admitted to the clerk, fliall and fworn check a common gaol to take the votes of thofe confined there

;

and

the fheriffs, or gaoler are to admit

tlieii^

And at for that purpofe under the penalty of 50I. all ele61ions every perfon, if required by any one of the checks at any poll, muft firft take the oaths appointed by the a6l of the firft of Geo.ge I. or his and the prefiding officer or vote to be difiillowed fworn clerks refufing to adminifter fuch oaths, fljall And if any perforfeit 50 1, befides cofts of fuit. oaths a6i, wilfully, the appointed that by take fon lalfly, and corruptly, on convidion thereof by information, or indictment, fuch perfon fhall incur all ;

the penalties which perfons convided of wilful and corrupt

N O R

\V

C

I

jS*^

II.

corrupt perjur)' are liable to by common la^\^ No more than three common council men for each great ward are to be yearly eleded by the freemen, upon the days appointed

by

the charters;

and the three

each great ward, or the major part of them, fliall within forty-eight hours after their election, or within fix davs after any fcrutinv demanded fliall be finifhed, upon notice thereof from the mayor, or his deputy, ele^l and fill up the remaining number of common council men, dire£led to be elecied by the charters for each great ward, under 50I. penalty; and all fuch fo named fliall be as effectually common council men, as if elected by all the freemen: and if any perfon, ele^ced bv the common council as aforefaid, fhall refufe to ferve, or fo ele6icd for

^chance to die, the three

common

council

tered in the affembly-book for that Avard

men

en-

where fuch

vacancy happens, fliall in forty-eight hours after notice from the mayor, &;c. fill up fuch vacancy-. The mayor, or his deputy, or in cafe of the mavor 8 death, the furviving juflice of

ferved the office of mayor,

tire

fliall

peace prefide

who at

lalt

every

eleftion of mayor, flierilfs, aldermen, or common council men, and at fuch fcrutinies as fliall be de^ manded thereuppn. No perfon fliall be fubjecl to

be ele61ed into the office of fiieiili oi the city of Norwich, who is not tin inhabitant thereof at the time of fuch eleftiori. No ad:, order, or ordinance whatfoever, from and afier the i-th of April, 1730, fliall be made or paffed in the afTembly of the r-cprefentative body of the faid city, without the aflent of the mayor, flierifl's, and aldermen then prefenr, or the major part of them nor without the affent of the commons then affembled, or the major part of them. The mayor eled, and the mayor for the time being, may nominate and appoint, for the time of his mayoralty, a fword bearer, two ward officers, ;

;

C

i$4

I

T Y

O

F

as hath been cuRo-' ihcm to nominate and cle^i:. The rna\or fhall fuminon the flierilfs, aldermen, and common coimcil men, to meet at the quarterly affemblies acand each perfon abfenting himcording to cuRom fclf fhail forfeit 5s. and every one who Ihali depart from any alfembly without confent of the mayor, fliall tind fucli oiher inferior officers

marv

for

;

to be paid to the chamberlain of the ciover and above fuch profecutions as they may, All penalties in either cafe, be fubje6l to by law. (except the aforefaid ones of 5s. and 10s.) fliall be recovered by a61ion of debt, in any of his majcRys courts of record at WeRminRer, in the name of the and when recovered be applied for chamberlain llie benefit of the city: but the penalties of 5s. and forfeit los. tv,

;

ics. maybe recovered by diRrefs aud oRenders goods.

the right honourable lord

In 1730,

lieutenant of Norfolk fions

for the

officers

and Norwich, of the artillery

which I'imodiy BalderRone,

efcjuire,

fale

of the

Lynn, lord commif-

fent

company

;

of

was ap})ointed

captain.

In

1

731, the market was

new paved.

At the quarterly aflembly held this year on St. Matthias's day, one hundred and Rxty-one freemen were admitted and fworn and at the fame time it ;

Vv-as

reported

by

the committee, appointed for that

purpofe, that they had treated with St. George's company, who had agreed to refign up their books, charters and records, into the hands of the cit\which was accordingly done, and that company's

ufurped powder put a hereof,

final

Rop

the following proceffion

to.

was

In confequencc fettled for

the

guild day, inflead of that formerly ufed by the faid

company.

At nine

in the

morning the

flieriffs,

jufliccs

;

NOR

W

I

C

H.

183

and aidcrmen are to attend the new elefl, at and wiili him ^\•ait on the mayor, an. I go ihcnce to the sruild hall, where the common council are to be ready in their black gowns, whence they liccs

his houic,

arc

to

proceed to the cathedral

in the

follovvin;? or-

a flandard bearer, two blue coat officers with Haves, the common council men elected for the four great wauls, two abreafl, the

der:

t^vo

trumpeters,

fpeaker of the

commons

the

alone, a flandard,

city

nmfic, the city officers, the mayor and mavor dc6t, the recorder and fleward, the juilices, flv-riffs, and aldermen, in their ufual habits; the whole to be clofed by four flieriffs officers: after divine (crvice

they are to proceed from ihe cathedral in like manner, (the orator and fpeech boys following the court) to the guildhall, and afcer the mayor be there fworn, they arc to go in manner aforefaid to the new hall where before dinner, if there be time, the orator and fpeech boys are each to make their fpeech and afthe juftices, flieriffs, aidcrmen, and ter the feait, common council men (following then the aldermen) :

are

firft

to

It

the

attend

the old mayor,

to their

new mayor, and

afterward

refpcctive houfes.

was further ordered, that

for the future,

everv

mavor be excufed making a guild breakfaft, or and ];olding anv ma\ or s feaUs An May or Auguft feafl on a mayor make (liiit in lieu thereof, the new hall, and the {worn at new on ^vhich he is the day ;

there entertain the recorder, fleward, fheriffs, juitices,

aldermen, and their ladies, and the nicn

;

and

e\

cry

common

council

mayor v.ho makes Inch a

feaft,

or in cale of his death, his executors or adminiftralors fliall

be intitled

to the

fum of

lool. to be paid

bv the chamberlain, immediately after making the faid feaft; and that the further fum of ^ol. be paid to fuch perfon, as fhali be mayor on Chriftmas day jicxt enfuiner the faid feafl.

C

iS6

I

T Y

O

F

This year the fum of 48 7I. 5s. 4d, was collected in the city, for the fuifercis by fire, at Blandford, Tiverton, and Ramfey. 732, Sherer's commonly called Charing crofs,f a neat, antient, flone pillar was taken down, and the fame year the rparket crofs underwent the lame

In

1

m

fate.

A

new

damafk gown was bought by the corworn by the ipeaker of the com-

fiik

poration, to be

mons, on

all

public occafions.

In 1733, July the nth, the right honourable fir Robert VValpole was, in perfon, fworn a freeman of this corporation, and prelented by the mayor with a copy of his freedom, in a gold bo>;.

Tombland was

pavec|,

and the

front of St. Ste-

phen's gate beautified.

In 1734, fir Robert Walpole prcfentcd the city with a gilt mace, bearttifully enchafed, weighing on the crip one hundred and fixty-eight ounces part are fir Robert's arms and thofe of the cit)'. ;

On

the 3

that has

In

1

1

ft

of

happened

December was

the greatefl flooc|

fince 1696.

736, Hog-hill was paved.

In 1737, October 4, a great part of the

cit)-

\vp

flooded. In,

f Thus

denominated from the flieermen or clota cutters, wlio princiThe corner houfe in the reiga o£

pally dwelt in thii part of the city.

Idward

II.

belonged

to

Chriftophcr Sh«rehill, or at Sherer's hiU.

N O R

VV

I

C H.

187

738, the ditches on the fouth part of the cafwere levelled, and e^er fince the cattle market has been kept there.

In

]

tle hill

In

ij^C),

on

the

Ring's birth'dav, ^\ar

The

two

30th of 0(^lober, being the was proclaimed againli Spain.

appeared, for the Hrft time,

fhcriffs

at this

given by Mr. Thomas Emerfon of London, a native of this citv, to be worn bv the flieriffs of Norwich for the time folemniiv with

being.

They

their

coll

gold chains,

one hundred guineas each.

The winter proved remarkably fevere a deep fnow fell about Chrillmas, and remained upon the ground 'till March, when on the breaking up of the frofl, a prodigious flood enfued. The cold was more intenfe than in the winters of 1 708 and 1713, and continued fo long, that had not the diRrelles of tiie poor been gencroullv relieved by the inhabitants, numbers mufl have perifhed. The feafon held io fharp, that on the 5th of May, 1740. a fnow fell, which at ten in the morning hung on the cathedral fpire, from its top to the fecond window. ;

On

account of the great fcarcity and dcarnefs of

provifions, riots were very frequent in

feveral parts

of the kingdom, and in mod of the principal towns ot the county of Norfolk. The magillrates of this city were obliged to call in the military power to their aid:

rioters

and

iix

could he

or feven lives w-ere loll before the

Cjuellcd.

At an aCTembly held on the diird day of May, 1741, it was ordered, that no perion for the future, being a foreigner, be permitted to exercife any trade in the city for longer time dian fix months, without

taking

up

his freedom,

C

j88

On

T Y

I

O

F

eleventh day of April,

the

1744, war \vai

declared againfl. trance.

In September, into this

1745, an aflociation was entered by the magiflrates and principal inhabitants of city,

fupport of his majefly's government,

in

and

in defence of the ci\il

his

fubje^ls.

company was

and religious liberties of fame time the artillery under the command of the

About

the

raifed,

right honourable the lord Hobart, lord lieutenant of

Norfolk and Norwich. They made their firft appearance under arms, on the twentieth dav of January, being the birth-day of his roval highnefs Frederick prince of Wales, and performed every part of their exercife with great eii.aclaels and regularity,

About one

o'clock in the afternoon

eth day of September,

on the

thirti-

746, a fuddcn and terrible fire broke out in the fliire-houfe on the caille hill,

which

in a

1

few hours entirely confuaied the

v\

hole

building

On

Thurfday

tlie

ninth day of Oflober, being

the day appointed as a general thankfgiving for our

happy deliverance from ral

rebellion,

the late horrid and unnatu-

the fame was obfervcd here with

demorillrations of joy and loyaky

place a magnificent

;

in

all

the market

triumphal aich was ereded in deliverer William duke of

honour of our illuftrious Cumberland, which, with

the

whole

city,

was Iplcn-

didly illuminated in the evening.

In the year 1747, an

fummer

and

a6l

paffed for holding the

of the peace for the and county of Norwich, untill a new fhire-houfe could be built for the aiCzes,

county of Norfolk,

feffions

in.

the city

faid

;

NOR

W

and

coimty of Norfolk;

faid

ibire-houfe on the caftle

C

I

hill in

H.

for

i8g

building a

new

fame county, the bv a general rate on

ihc

cxpence of which to be raifed the county of Norfolk-

Early on Tuefday morning, 06lober the 2 2d, 17.51, a fire broke out at a vvarehoufe in Bridewell

which proved the had been known in

alley,

that

moR

terri!)le

this city for

and

deftrucli\'C

manv

years

:

it

could be a;ot under, notwithftanding the unwearied efforts of the inhabitants, who remarkably expofed themfelves in endeavouring to flop its fury the flames in a fliort time extended themfelves to the city Bridewell, \\'hich, with feveral hoti'es dicreto adjoining, -was At the time of the fire, there entirely confumed. was a man of about foriy years of age confined in Bridewell, who had been taken up as a flroller about t\vo months before he had remarkable wildand whr.c nefs in his look, and a \-ery long beard is moft aftoniOiing, he was lo far from endeavouring an cfcape, although the whole building was in flames, that it required force to remove him. On. any queftion being afked, he would anfwer by a. confufed inarticulate noife, nor could it ever be made out from whence he came, 'till the following advertifcment appeared in the London Evening Pofi in conlcquence of which he was removed as thereiu raa:ed for near fix hours,

before

it

:

;

;

direcSted,

LoPt or flrayed away, from Broad wav in the paof Northchurch, near Berkhamflead in the countv of Hertford, about three months a?o, Pe'

*

*

'

*"

rifii

ler the

Wild Youth,

man, about five he cannot fpeak to be unbut make sa kind of humming noife,

feet eight inches

a black hairy

high

;

*

derflood,

*

and anfwers ia that manner

to the

name

of Peter.

''Whoever

CITY OF

Kjo '

\Vhoever will bring him

'

the

'

charges,

phice

abovcfaid,

to

Mr. Thomas

fhall

and a handfome

recci\-e

P'efins,

at

rca(onabl6

all '''

gratuity.'

In * Extraft from in

1726.

pamphlet relative

a

—'Tis undeniable,

woods of Hamelin,

in the

town

(a

human

Har.orei, a creature of

twelve or thirteen

ye.irs old.

wild and favage as

to fliun all

naked and wild, being boy

k'fid,

Wiien he was

to

(as he really

About twelve or

as follows.

well known there were in

Germany whole fummer, were pretty much in whofe infants might probably be fo be quite

loft

by

And

vage creature. her

mother, and fo

its

ci:bs, finding

it is

who keep

man kind where

;

'tis

during the

one of

;

wo*ds,

t(>

a-.

be nourilTtcd by forae living fa-

left to

full

fome

deprived

Ihe bear,

*>f'

of a fuckling, nurfing, ten-

and fuckled

And

it.

well

it is

known

bears tame, that they are very fond of the hu-

they uatuially take.

by which time, being inured

a facility of eating

ed

years ago,

who

woods of Hamelirt

thofe

and hcinz to,

thirteen

laid afide in thofe vaft

that this creature having thus taken to iifelf

in thofe

probable account that

a fet of people,

not improbable that

this. infant,

der temper, laid herfelf down to thofe pcrfons

nioft

frf

the trees

;

was) the

a about

difccvered, he was

iirft

human kind, and couid climb up be conceived but how he cculd fubfift

with an agility fcarce

is

Chnftmas, 1725, there was found

Germany) twenty-eight miles from

in

woods, and be wild, can be thought of

to Putc-r the Vv'iUl YautJi, publifheit

that about

Ir it,

may

be rcafonably fuppofed,

nourifhed

ts cold

could

it 'till it

and hardihip,

what food the woi^ds afforded.

He

fhjft iot

alfo contract-

it

now brought.

is

over into England, and by the king's order delivered to proper perfoni to Itarn

him

would be

to

fpeak.

His being dumb

fo were they never to hear

is

no wonder, becaufe

all

He

is

ftraight

brown

hair,

is

of a meriy-

upright, not hairy, has a bufliy head of dark

He

and a

is

pockets, ai\d

He

if

is

he finds

green, faced with red.

though

at

firft it

fpeak fo foon

ters

of the mind like us,

who keeps him in awe by ftriking his legs with much for putting his hands into any om.-s nuts or fruit is.eytrtnicly rejoiced. He now eats very

fame food as we do, but feems mo;l fond of vcretables.

natural tendency to run

to

all the pafltons

afraid of his tutor,

leather ftrap.

the

has

and

and a very

difpofition, has very ftrong teeth, graceful co-.nely features,

roving look with his eyes.

children

any one fpeak.

He

if not

as

was expefted

difficult

fy liable, fuch

held by his coat, which

is

He

has a

of a foreit

noxv takes tolerably well to being clothed,

was very aukward

proving very

words of oue

away,

to

is

him.

to

him.

Whether he

a qiieftion

;

will be brought

the pronunciation of let-

Yet he can pronounce

as pray^

after his tutoi

how, do^ and the like,

NVhot h« kas

NOR

W

I

C

igi

IT.

In the twenty-fifth of, George II. an d.f\ paffcd, extremely beneficial to the trade of this citv, to open the port of Great Yarmouth for the importation of wool, and woollen yam from Ireland: by

which it is ena<^ed, that from and after the firft day of May, 1752, it ihall and may be lawful for any perion or perfons, to import into the port of Great Yarmouth, in the county of Norfolk, any wool, woollen or bay yarn, wool fells, fliorthngs, mortlings, wool flocks, and vrorflcd yarn from IrePioyided ah\a)S, kc. that all fuch importaland. tions of wool, and woollen or bay yarn, &c. from Ireland into the faid port of Great Yarmouth, fliall be made from (uch ports only,'^ and under the fame reftrietions and regulations in all refpects, as wool, or woollen yarn, is now by law permitted to be imported into the feveral ports of Biddcford, Barnftapie, Minehead, Bridgewater, Briflol, Milford Hayen^ Chefler, and Liyerpoole, or any of them.

1752, a parochial lift was taken of tl»c of houfes and inliabitants within the city of

In July,

number

Norwich, prccind of the

clofe,

and

the hamlcis or

luburbai lias Kitlierto

and carry

;

learned

is

Co at his

by

rore, as

any dumb creature

coming towards perfons,

his

is

tutor,

taught to fctcli

who

him

calls

make a bow, upon which he kifles his finger, and makes he now goes upright, which is attributed in great nieareadily

Peter, bids him flne

very

:

fare to his cloches,

which renders crawling more troublefome than walk-

ing.

The king was

would

oat ar.d

behave !iimfe!f

diilies

whit

liked beft, fuch as afparagus, or other garden things

after a liule

Jie

pleafed to have him at his

time he was ordered

ing, indecent

behawour.

He

without difiiniiion of perfons titiijig

§

;

own

table, to fee

how h&

where he greedily fnatched out of the

;

to

readily fets hirafelf in

:

but

be taken away by reafon of his daub-

down

which pofture he was

before any one,

at firft

difcovered,

in a hallow tree, cracking nuts.

The

ported,

ports in Ireland from

arii

whence wool, &c,

arc .allowed to be ex-

Dublin, V/aterfiDrd, Youghall, Kinfaic, Cork, and Dru5h.;da,

c

192

fuburbs belonging

i

Or

T Y

to the faid

cit}-,

as follov/cth.

By

which with the account of the inhabitants taken in 1603, infcited in the third column,

comparing

we lias

{b.all

oi

fee

how

greatly the

been increalcd in the

number of

coiiile

of

ing to the prodigious extenfion of that period.

the

people

fixLy years, its

trade

ow-

during

N

R

"A^

I

C H.

195

No. of

Auguflinc George of Colgate

St.

St. St.

Clement

St.

Edmund

St.

Saviour

St.

Paul

James Pockthorpe

St.

-

Helgham Lakenhairi

Eaton

Earlham Hellefdon

Thorpe in Norwich

tlie

liberty of

and Trowfe, Carrovve, Bracondale Precind of the Clofe Total

On

the 31ft of May, 1733, the corpoattended by a large body of the principal inhabitants, and preceeded by the citv mufiC; went the bounds of the city and county of Norwich.

Thurfday

ration,

On Saturday the sSth day of July, between the hours of eight and nine in the evening, a fudden lire

was difcovered in the flax room of the citv bridewhich deftroyed the greateft part of the build-

well,

mg

before

it

could be extinguifhed.

In March, 1754, the

mance

in fpinning ever

mod

extraordinary perfor-

known, was produced here ^ N by

C

194

T Y

I

O

F

by Mr. John Aggs, of Mattlfliall, being twelve dozen and fix fkains of curioas, hard, even fpun crape yarn, reads by a woman of Eaft-Derchara, Vvliich weighed only fixteen ounces and nearly two drams.

\\

In 1755, the foHo\ving table was fettled, fliew'ing worn b)^ the right worfiiipful

hat habits are to be

Tvlr.

mayor,

on

(Sec.

days, and

feflival

at

publick

meetings.

Mr. mavor in on lucli days

Sundavs.

black, except

the aldermen ia

fcarlet,

as other habits

are ap-

pointed. Chriflmns let,

Day.

Mr. mayor and aldermen in

fcar-

the Iherifts in violet.

Stephens Day,

Si. fcarlet,

the

.Kno-Yca)- s-Day, xohen Sunday.

aldermen

in icarlct,

the

flierilfs

in fcarlet,

the

flieriiis

flieriffs in

in

black.

Mr. Mayor and

in violet.

Mr. m.ayor and

Epipkany, vihcn Sunday.

men

Mr. Mavor

ivhcn Sunday.

the aldermen in violet,

alder-

in violet.

The 9,0/// of Ja-iuan, and all other fpe.eial fafts. Mr. mayor, aldermen and QieriHs, in black. St..

Matthias, xvhai Sunday.

dermen

Mr. ma)-or and

al-

in fcarlet, the IhcrilTs in violet.

Palm Sunday. Mr. mayor and aldermen in

fcarlet,

the fherlifs in violet. Eajier Day.

the Oicriifs

iri

Mr. mayor and aldermen

in

fcarlet,

violet.

Eajler

.

NORWICH.

195

Eajler Wednefday, fermon at the hofpUal church in the

Mr. mayor and aldermen

aflerncon.

in fcarlet, the

fhcriffs in violet.

May-Day. Mr. mayor and the aldermen abo\'e the chair in fcarlet, the aldermen below the chair in violet, the fheriffs in black.

May fills

king Charles the Second's birth and re-

the 2gth,

Mr. mayor and aldermen

turn.

in (car-

Mr. Mayor and al4ermen

in fcar-

the fheriffs in violet.

Mr. mayor and aldermen

Triiiity -Sunday. let,

(he-

the (herihs in violet.

Vvhit-Sunday. let,

the:

Mr. mayor and aldermen

AJcerJion-Day. let,

in Icarlet,

in violet.

the

flicrifls

Guild-Day.

in fcar-

in violet.

Mr. Mayor and aldermen in

fcarlet,

the fheriffs in violet.

Sunday

i7i

ajfuie

week, atid attendance on the Judges.

Mr. mayor and aldermen in

fcarlet,

the

flieriffs

in

violet,

Midfummer-Day, when Sunday. aldermen in fcarlet, the flierilfs in

Mr. mayor and violet.

Lajl Tuefday in Augi/Jl, the cleBion cf a Jl^^^iff. Af in fcarlet, the aldermen in violet, the fheriffs '

mayor

in black.

Michaelmas-Day. fcarlet,

Mr. mayor and aldermen in

the fheriffs in violet.

N

2

ffohmdi,

.

C

195

T Y

I

O

HolrivaA-Da)\ when Sunday.

dermen

iij.

flierilfs

the

JVovemher

flieriffs

the

Kfh,

[pedal thankfgivings. fcarlet,

the

al-

In fcarlet,

in violet.

The Kings Birlh-day. in fcarlet,

Mr. mayor and in violet.

Mr. mayor and aldermen

Inauguration. tlie fherifFs

the

Icarlct,

F

flieriffs

Mr. ma)'or and aldermen

in violet.

Powder Plot, and on all other Mr. mayor and aldermen in

in violet.

COMMEMORATION SERMONS. Alderman Henry Fawcett's, at St. Michael's Cofon new-year's day in the afternoon.

iany,

Alderman Thomas Angui(li's, day in the afternoon.

at St.

Edmmid's, on

twelfth

Alderman Bernard Church's, at St. John Sepulchre, on the 17th day of May, once in two years, preached in

1

7 / 7

Archbifliop Parkers, at ternoon on Afcenfion-day. Sir St,

John

Pettus's,

St.

the hrfl

Clement's, in the afT

Sunday

in Augufl:, at

Simon's and Jude's, in the aficrnoon.

Sir Jofeph Payne's, at St. Gregor)''s, on the 1 gth of Augufl; in the afternoon, once in fcven years, preached in 1 773.

Mr. Nicholas

Salter's, at St.

Michael's at Plea, Qu the

;

the

1

W

O R

IS!

I

C H.

197

day of Anguft, once in fevcn years, preach-

ft

ed in 177S.

Alderman Thomas Maltby's,

at

Ivlary's,

St.

on

the 28th of Odober, in the afternoon.

Lady Suckhng's at St. Andrew's, the Friday after and Sir John Sucklings the Simon and Jude Sunday after; both in the afternoon.

St.

;

Alderman Thomas Codd's, Mountergatc, the Sunday before

Peters

at

St.

St.

Thomas,

in

per tlie

afternoon.

which commemoradon fermons, the the aldermen in violet, and flierifFs in black, unlefs they fall on fuch days as other ha-

N. B. At

mavor

all

in fcarlet,

bits are

appointed.

Mr. mayor

Court Days. in violet,

Al

(lieriffs in

Affemllie^.

in \iolet,

At

and

and

Sejfions.

Mr. mayor fiieriifs

in fcarlet, the

aldermen

black. in fcarlet, the

aldermen

in black.

Mr. mayor and the aldermen above

the chair in fcarlet, the

flieriffs

in violet.

Late Sheriffs. When iVlr. mayor and the aldermen fcarlet, fuch as have been fheriffs wear violet but when the aldermen wear violet, then black.

wear

Recorder and S^eicard.

When

in proceffion

with

Mr. ma\or and the court of aldermen, to ^^'ear the tufted gown, except in the alhze week, and at fcl(;ans, *

Mrmorandum

C

I9S

T

I

Y

O

F

Memorandum. What habits arc worn in the fore-? noon on any day vvhatloever, are not to be altered in the afternoon.

When

to

wear

the Furr.

Mr. mayor

in fcarlet

faced v/ith farr, the aldermen above the chair in viofaced with furr, from

let

When

the

Cloaks,

Holymas

of Jujlice are

to

May-day.

to

he

On

worn.

Chriftmas-day, Eafter-day, and Whitfunday, in the on the Guild-day, and by Mr. mayor at afternoon the fermon in the afhze week. ;

On

Friday the 14th day of February, 1736, one of the four fpires of the cathedral tower was blovv4 down by a violent florm of wipd.

On Wedncfdav

the

26th day of

May, war

tvas

declared here againU Fiance -with the ufual folcmnities.

a

Early in the morning of Monday, Jan. 10, 1757, of an earthquake was felt, preceeded

ilight fliock

by a llrange rumbling noife in the was nearly due eafl; and well:.

air

;

it^

direftion

At an afTembly held on the 3d of May,

it

was

thanks of the corporation be returned to Mr. Matthew Gofs, for his prefent of a gold chain and medal, to be worn by the prefent and future mayors of this city''" ; and alfo, that the i;iid ^Ix. Gofs be preicnted with the freedom of this

ordered,

that the

city.

On * The chain formerly worn by the mayor, the

gentleman who fcrved

is

now

ufed

th^t office the prececding year.

by

;

W

N O R On

C H.

I

199

account of the very high price of wheat, and

the great fcarcity of work, the JiftrelTes of the poor niuft have been infupportable, but for the generous

fubfcription of the inhabitants for their rehef; by which about twelve thoufand perfons were fupphed with good houfliold bread, at half price, for a coiifiderablc time.

'

The carl of Orford being appointed lord lieutenant of Norfolk and Norwich, in the room of tlie carl of Buckinghamfhire, deccafed, his lordfhip arrived here on Tuefday, July 12, and put the act, lately paffed, for the better regulating the militia of The number of men this kingdom, in execution. to be railed in this city

is,

by

the faid aft, fixed at

who were

fvvorn in and one hundred and fifty-one, November. of iih the inroUed on Friday i

On

Tuefday, Jan. 31,

lately erected in this cu\-,

of

''

The

On noon,

Way

17.38,

the cleg:ant theatre,

was opened with the play '

of the VVorld.

the

siflday of Januarv-,

fell

the moft violent ilorm of hail ever

17,-39,

in the

after-

known

memory of man fome of the: more properly fpeaking, pieces of One was taken up, ice) were prodigiouUy large. in length, and inches than two mcafured uiore which an inch and half in breadth it ^vcighed tiircc cjuarters of an ounce, and was extremely jagged. in this citv in the

hail-ftoncs

;

(or,

;

On

W'ednefday and Tliuriday, the 4th and 5 th the Norfolk regiment of militia marched

of Julv,

from

this

city

f )r Portlraouth.

The

firft

battalion

marched iu two divilions by Newmarket, Cambridge, Ware and Barnet and die fccond battalion, in two divifions likewifc. by Colcheftcr, Witham and Rum;

lord

G

200

I

OF

T Y

ford; the whole regiment joined near London, ^tid paffed in review before his majefty through the palace yard at Kenfington, on Tuefday the 17th, who expreffed great iatisfadion at their regular difciplinc

and

military appearance.

Thurfday, 0(5lobcr 30. 1760, his majefty king George III. was proclaimed here, amidft the repeated and unanimous acclamations of the inhabitanLS.

On Monday

January

11, 1762,

war was declared

againft Spain.

At the affembly held on determined

St.

Matthks's day,

to profecute all perfons

who

it

was

fhall pre-

fum.e (not being free) to fell anv kind of goods or merchandife, by retale, in their fliops or warehoufes, contrary to the ancient cuftoms of this city, and the privileges granted to the citizens thereof, by Icveral royal charters.

At an affemblv held the 3d of T^iay, a ccimmiLtec was appointed to enquire into the abufes committed in the mcafurement of coals from on board fliips, and to confidcr of proper "means to prevent luch abufes for the future: the committee accordingly nominated twelve perfons to be fworn as meters, who arc to have 3d. per chaJdron for their trouble, and hkewife drew up a to be paid by the buyer fet of rules and orders for their better regulation; a copy of which is to be delivered to each meter, and another hung up in the public olfice ol the coi;

le^lor of the tonaiie duties.

Early on Wedncfday morning, Oclober 27, the -inhabitants of this city were furprized with a iudden inundation of \vater, which entirely overflowed the iowcv

NOR

\V

C

I

2ot

IT.

lower parts of this city, and laid under ^vatcr between t^vo and three thoui'and houios, witii eight parifh churclics

but began

all Wednefday, on Thurfdav mornin.g: it was

the flood coniinuLxl

:

to abate

inches higher than

fifteen

that

called

St.

Faith's

but not fo high as the great flood in 1646 by eight inches or St. Andrew's flood in 1614

flood in

ifiiji

;

;

bv

The damage done bv

thirteen inches.

houfcs, wares, &:c.

is

iuppofed

to

amount

it

to the

to lc\eral

ihoufand pounds.

On

Monday, Jan.

3,

1763, died

John

Spurrcl,

alderman of South Conisford ward, who bv his will left the fam of 13 13!. to be paid to the mayor, flierifis, citizens, and commonalty of Norwich, efq.

\vithln fixtecn

months

after his deceafe,

they to give

fecurity for the fame, with a yearly intcrcfl of 54I. 4s.

which pofcs pital,

by

;

be applied to the following purpoor in tlie great hofto be paid to die mailer of the laid hofpital, interelt

4SI.

foin-

to

is

for the ufe of the

who

poor',

who fliall pay and fame amongil all and c\eiy the be in and belonging to the fa.'d

quarterly payments,

ecjually di\ idc the fliall

great holpital, at the time of his receiving fach pav-

be paid in June yearly to the laid the lit day of Auguft in every year, lliall diftribute '• one penny to each of the poor, " for a pint of flrong beer; and the remainder of " die faid 4I. fliall be expended for veal, at the belt nients

;

mailer,

4I.

to

who on

" hand, to be that day roailcd and boiled, for the *' dinner of the laid poor, and for a proper qtian" tity of butter to be eaten therewith :" but when the firft of Auguft fliall fall on a Sunday, then fuch veal dinner to be on the Monday: 40s. to be paid to the churchwardens and overfeers of St. John Sepulchre, 10s. whereof to be paid to the mlnilter of the laid parifh, lor a fermou +-

O

to

be preached there

on

C

202

on

tlie

I

T Y

O

F

thivd Snr.day in June, carlv in the afternoon,

and {wearing, and the remaining ^os. to be expended in bread, to be diflributed among Inch poor as fliall attend the lervice on that day, and fuc'h other poor as may be preHe alio requires that vented attending by ncknefs. the corporation fhall order a fermon, on death and judgment, to be preached bv the miniitcrof the great hofpital church on the Wcdncfday in Whltfun week And that all the charitable donations and yearly. beQuefis, in and by his will given and bequeathed, be fairlv engrolTed upon parchment, and yearly read in the faid hofpital church, between the prayers and lerm on iafl; mentioned the minilfer to have 4s. the againfl prophane curfmg

;

remainder of the faid fum of 54I. 4s. for reading the faid donations, and preaching the fermon: The corporation refufmg or neglefting, at any time, to comply with the diretlions of his will, in fuch cafe the 1355I. to devolve to his executor, &c.

On

Wednelday, April

13, peace

was proclaimed

here.

On Tuefdav, 061. 18, his royal highnefs William duke of Cumberland palfed through this city. And on die 2 2d of the fame month die reigning prince of Anhalt-Deffau, attended by the barons Erdmanfdoili, NeutOiitz, and Feltheim, arrived here, who after ^iew^ing the curlofities and manufactures of the town, let forward for Yarmouth. On

the 3d of May, 1765, it was ordered, that and fix Ipades be bought and depofited pickaxes fix in the engine-houfe; and that keys of the enginehoufe be left with the gaoler, the bridewell keeper,

and

and that boards, with infcriptions fame, be put over the door of every

the engineer

fignlfying

the

;

houie

W

N O R

I

C H.

Q03

houfc where the keys arc kept, and another upon the en<^ine-houfe deer, to denote where the faid keys are depofited.

On

id of September an order of afTcmbly marthe coUedor of the upper market, and the ket, weigher of the hay, be eleclcd by the affembly at huge, and not by the market committee, as had the

2

that for the future the clerk of the

was made,

been ufualiy done. February 24,

1766,

it

was ordered,

future all

com

money be

not received in lieu thereof.

rents

that for the

be referved in kind, and that

This vear, on account of the great fcarcity and advanced price of all kinds of provifions, feveral dangerous riots were raifed in various parts of the kingdom. At Norwich a mifchievous and licentious rabble collefted themfelves together on Saturday, Sept. 27, about noon, who, in the courfe of that and the following day, committed numerous outrages; fuch as greatly dam^aging the houfes, and totally defiroying the furniture of feveral bakers, pulling down part of the nev/ mills, and deftroying a large quan-

and burning to the ground a large Every lenient malt-houfe without Conisford gate. mcafure \vas made ufe of by the magiftrates to quiet

tity of flour there,

the minds of thefe poor deluded wretches, but to cffed.

The

magiftrates

therefore,

came

to the fpirited refolution

no

force

by

force

;

in

and principal

inhabitants",

of repelhng

confequence of which, on Sunday

afternoon, about five o'clock, they attacked the rioters,

whilfl;

they

\\-cre

demolifhing a houfe on

and

Tomb-

and fo effectually difperfed them, that they never more got to any head. About thirty of the ringleaders were

land, with fuch vigour

refolution,

taken,

C

204

T Y

I

O

F

whom received fen fence of death, held by fpecial commilhon on the ift of December, and the following days ; but two only received the jufi; defert of their enormous crimes, who v/ere executed on the loth of January, 1767. taken,

eiglit

of

at the aflizes

In the night of December 25, 1766, a fudden fire broke out at the dwellingj-houie of a butcher in Ber-ftreet, which in a very fliort fpace of time entirelv confumed the fame, together with Mr. Ward's wife, mother, two children, a grand-child, and a maid fervant Mr. Ward himfelf, and two fons, narrowly efcaping.

and terrible Mr. Ward,

;

In January,

1767, happened the greatefl faH of in the memory of man. It laid near a month upon the ground, and was fo general as greatly to obIliu6l the commerce of the whole

fnow ever known

kingdom.

On the 23d of Marcli the bill for making a turnpike from the end of the Town-clofe to Thetfoid, received the royal affent. At an affembly held

May

the market for corn, grain,

3,

it

and

was ordered, feeds,

that

be held for

the future near the hay-houfc.

On

Friday, July 3, the feigned iffue between the

mayor and corporation of this city, and Mr. Jeremiah Berry, an attorney of the honourable court of Common-Pleas, was argued in the court of King'sBench. The queftion was, " Whether the privilege of an attorney exempted him from lerving the office of Iheriff:^" when all the judges were clcarlv of opiiiion, that fucli pri\ilege not only exculed him from ferving that office, but even offices of a iuperior nature to that of

(lieritf

of a corporation.

NORWICH.

20

On

\Vednefclay Feb. 3, 17GS, a fire broke out morning, in the work-rooms of McfT. Ward and Co. wool-llaplcrs, in St. George's at Colgate, v.hich confumed the fame, with a large at three in the

quantity of wool,

Sec. to

a confiderable amount.

On Thurfday x\ugufl 11, in the fame year, at two in tlie afternoon, a moft terrible thunder Aorra. happened in this city one clap was \ crv tremendous, and greatly terrified the inhabitants at the :

;

inftant of time the

lightning

fell

on one of the

city

towers between Brazen-doois and Berfircet-gates, inhabited by John Ward it entered the houfe at a :

low room on the eaft, and fliivercd the ports of a bed which was in the room it then paffed into the next apartment, where his daughter and four of her children were at dinner, who were all fmote to the i;TOund and a boy of feven years old was killed on the fpot, the other remained ipeechlefs for fome time it paffed from thence up-ftairs, and after tearing a beam into many fhivers, and fliattering the windows, forced its way through the roof, and threw ;

;

;

down

a part of the battlements of the tower.

On Wcdnefday Ocl. 5, fame year, near ten yards of the city wall, between Magdalen-gates and St. AuguUine's, fell down, in its fall it beat down the gable end of a new erccled houfe the labourers who were at work narrowly efcaped with their lives. ;

Sunday, Jan.

7,

1769, the church belonging to

Dutch congregation was opened for the ufe of (he numerous poor belonging to the city workthe fervice was performed for the firft time houfe by the Rev. Mr. Humphrey, of Thorpe, an^. is the

;

now

continued regularly once every Sunday, by the

Rev, Mr. Nichols, of

this

P

citv.

Tuefdav,

CITY OF

2o6

Tuefclay, June 13, an uncommon florm of hail and rain fell in ihe parifhes of St. Aiigulfine, St. Paul, and St. Saviour, with part of Magdalen-ilrcet where the fall of water was lb great as to render thethe hail floncs were channels and flreet impailable remarkably large, and what made it more allonifiiing was, that no hail fell in many contiguous pa;

;

nor in

riflies,

many

other parts of the

city.

On Friday, March 16, 1770, at about noon, one of the new erefted houfes between Brazen-doors and Berflreet-gates, was crufhed down by the fall luckily no lives were of a part of the city wall ;

loft.

Same

year a

new turnpike road was made from to the end of Trowfe town,

Stephen's gates

St.

^vhere the roads di\'ide

to

Kirbv and Bixley.

By

impro\'ed alteration, Bracondale is now become a dcfirable fpot, it being ornamented with many neat and elegant buildings, {landing on a fine rifing tin's

hill, commanding a very pifturefque and extenfive view of the meadows, the navigable river, the delightful villages of Thorpe, Witlingham, Bixley, Sec. become the admiration of ftrangers this view is

who

vifit this city.

November

In

the rains were fo

inceffant as

to

caufc a great flood, which laid a part of the city under water ; it was faid to be four inches higher

than the fiood in 1762: tion

was ma'Je

in the

on

feveral

this

calamity a collec-

parts of the

city,

to

the great relief of the fuffercrs, in money, coals and bread.

On

Wednefday, Dec.

ig,

the

inhabitants were

greatly terrified at a violent ftorm of

wind and rain, which

N O R

^V

hours

;

H.

morning and

tvhich began at one in ihe nil

C

I

207 laflcd feve-

during which time great damage was

and neighbourhood, fcveral city in this churches had their window's (battered to pieces, and chimneys blown down, roofs flripped of their lead houfes untiled, trees torn up by their roots, &:c. fuch a gale had not been remembered fmce the done

;

year 1741.

On

26, 1771, the long dependbetween the commifhoners of Trowfe turnpike near Norwich, and John Drinkwater. efqj relative to a piece of land taken from the faid Mr.

ing

Saturday, Jan,

caufe

Drinkwater's eflate, for the ufe of the road, \vas finally determined before lord Mansfield, in favour of" the truitces.

On

ift of March, at an afTcmbly held was then ordered, that boards be painted and fi.::cd up at the corners and entrances of the flrcets and highways of this city, denoiing the names of luch (Ireets, Sec.

Friday the

at Guildhall,

Monday,

it

April

13,

at

1772,

the corporation of this citv,

it

a

full

alFembly of

was unanimoufly or-

dered, that their thanks fliould be tranfmitted to

fir

Harbord Harbord, bart. and Edward Bacon, ef([. for their care and attention in Parliament, in the fcveral bills wherein the citizens of Norwich \\cre

much

On

interefled.

Tuefday, June

2,

between

we had

fi\-c

and

fix

o'clock

very frnart terapefl a cloud uncxpcfledly burit from the fouth-eafi:, with an explolicn the mofl extenfive, loud and awful, that had been heard in this city in ihc memory of man the firif difcharge of its explofion fell on (he in

the

afternoon,

a

;

:

P

2

White

C

20.^

T Y

I

White Horfc alchoufe

down

the chimney,

O

F

Betliel-llrect

in

which

it

;

part

went

broke, and flruck dead

a dog laving between the landlady and another perthe remainder was fpent on fon by the hre fide ;

and fhattered the windows At three or four hunthe diretiion of N. N. W.

the Iront of the building, in

a mofl; terrible manner.

dred

varcls diflance,

in

anothei- colle£lion of the ele^lric

fluid,

or lightning

broke upon die houfe of Mr. Wright, in St. Lawpart defcending through rence, a boarding-fchool a bed poll fplintered in the upper flory ; roof, the rod in the chamfi om tlicnce defcended by an iron ber clofet, and fell upon a time-piece in the fchoolroora, beneath the glafs, the frame of which it fl^attercd to pieces, without doing any further mifchief ;

A porthan fplitting the chimney and partidons. body of fire went down the chimney in a room contiguous, and flruck out a piece of a pavement betw-een Mrs. Wright and her filler, who The effeds of this amazing Tvcre fitting there, tion of that

fhock was violently particularly

mayor

;

at

the

felt

in other

parts of the city,

houfe of Knipe Gobbett,

a looking-glals

wiih the (juick-lilver

fide

elq.

upon a table, upwards, was daflied in

which

laid

pieces.

On

firfl; annlvcrfary fermon, Norfolk and Norwich Hofpital, ^vas preached at the cathedral, by the right reverend This mofl benevolent die lord bifliop of Nor^vich. and cxtenfive charity (which reflc6ls great honor on this countv) was opened on the 23d of Augufl. 1770. and is flili continued with the grcateft libera]itv in many contriburions and donations in this "From a view of this edifice, the city and county. annexed plate, accurately drawn on the Ipot, the reader raay form a juft idea of the building. Ik

Fndav, Aug.

for tlve benefit of the

28, the

N O R

W

I

C

H.

209

In the month of September, the corporation being at a great expence m fetting down Hrc-plags in cverv proper part of the city, ordered their hremen to examine arid prove them, which was done, and y-'tis found to anfvver every intention defircd.

Thurfday, April 29, 177^^, fir Armine Wodeat a meeting of the truflees of ^Vatton turnpike, voluntarily prefentcd a fei of mile-flones, from this city to die town of \V>tton, at his own

On

houfe, bart.

(Cxpcnce.

In the month of June, there grew in the garden of Mr. Brvant, in Magdalen-Areet in this city, the remarkable plant the Rheum Pahnatinn, or Turkey j-heubard

This plant put up two flowering ftems

:

the radical lefs than a month Jt circumference of feven yards continued upon flicw fome time, and was much ad* piired by the botanifls, and lovers of that fcicnce.

ten

feet

high, in

;

leaves {pread a

On

:

Friday, the 13th of Augufi, about feven in

the e\enin[r,

a

dreadful thuridcr-ftorm beG:an

:

at

midnight the fcene was ver)^ av\ful, the lightning running on the tops of the houfcs, as well as on the ground this was followed by a very loud cracly of thunder, the jnofl tr^me^idous that had been for feverai years this tcmpeft continued till ten the next morning notividiftanding its violence, did but little damage to this city but the efFe^ls of this florm was dreadful ip many part^ of die cpunty. :

:

;

;

In January 1774, the foclety for the relief of perfons imprifoned for ima,ll debts was efiabliilied. In the fame year the focicty for the encourage^ was cflabliflied. AlfQ F 3

jncnt of agriculture in Norfolk

C

210

I

T Y

O

F

Alfo the fociety for the recovery of perfons apparently

drowned.

Thurfday, February 24, at a quarterly meeting, Eliflia De Hague was chofen town-clerk, in the room of the late Mr. Francis Wright at the fame time the common-council voted him an addrels of thanks, for the afTiduity and care, with which he had diltinguiflied himfelf for twenty years after which Mr. Elias Norgate was elc61cd fpeaker, in his room. The bufinefs of the day being fininied, the mayor, aldermen, flierifFs and common council, proceeded in their formalities to the afferably-room, where a mofl elegant and fplendid entertainment was given by fir Harbord Harbord, bart. on his being ele^lcd an alderman of this corporation.

Mr.

;

;

The fame

year, Friday,

June

17,

at

four in the

morning, was a very violent thunder-florm confiderable damage was done to the church of St. Peter Southgate in this city by the lightning. ;

On

Saturday, July 23, Mr. Charles Codd, lately elcfled one of the aldermen, in the room of John Pattefon, efq. deceafed, appesrcd at court purfuant to a

him

fummons, and declared that

office

;

in

his refufal to take ujjon

confe.juence of which,

at

an

afiembly held the Monday after, a fine of 200I. was fet upon him, agreeable to a power vefted in theui

by

charter,

which

fine w^as

paid the day following.

The fame day, at two in the afternoon, a fire broke out in the tan-yard of Mr. John linckler in Hcigham, which raged with great violence for three hours, and di.' confiderauie damage but bv the ^•igilance of die firemen was happily prevented from fl'teading any farther. ;

Saturday,

NOR

W

C

I

211

H.

Saturday, July 29, Mr. Charles Codcl uvs again alderman of this city, in the room of Richard Matthews, efq. dcceafcd on Saturday, Oft. 1, he appeared in court, and declared his refufal of elected an

:

ferving that ofEce

quence of

and the corporation

;

this declaration,

fined

him

ten

in confe-

marks

for

his default.

In this year, the hall in St. Andrew's underwent a thorough alteration feveral houfes, the old gateway, and wall next Bridge-flreet, was taken down, and a part of the green-yard taken in the whole being now laid open. The city library, a neat Go:

;

thic ftrudure,

was new

built

over the

2;ate into

the

and an obelifk erefted in the middle of the new opening, which gives this improved alteration a genteel appearance. entrance of the hall

November

;

much

lamented, John Langand alderman of Eerflreet ward. The Monday follov.ing his remains pafTed through this city, to be interr>;d in the family ley Watts,

10, died

cfq.

mayor of

this city,

Honied in Norfolk on which folemn occafion the great bell in every parifli in the citv tolled two hours. The fame day James Crowe, efq. w:is vault at

fwom

in

;

mayor

in his room,

for the

remaining part

of the year.

On

Wednefday, June 21, 1775, was performed Mancroft church, a grand Te Deum and Jubilitate, and the Coronation Anthem, by a band confiAing of thirty gentlemen, accompanied by the voices of the cathedral choir, to a genteel and numerous audience, who e.Kpreifed the highcfl at

St. Peter's

fatisfaftion

at

the

performance

;

immediately

after

the mulic, the grand peal of twelve bells was opened by the ringers of the Itceple, which for iweetncfs of

P 4

tone,

:

C

«i2

I

T Y

O

F

and melody of concert, has anfwcred tlie exof the numerous and vvarmcft promoters of the fubfcription, and given the greatefl delight and entertainment to all judges and admirers of ringing. And on Wednefday, Nov. 22, in the fame year, was rung ai St. Peter's Mancroft by thofc fa,tone,

pcflations

mous

ringers, a compleat peal of Grandfire Cinques, containing five thoufand one hundred and leventy changes, and in the courfc of the pf al not one bell

was out of its courfc performed in four it was hours and one nimute, to the furprize of all judges, jt being the firfl attempt of the kind, :

many

parts of

kingdom the effecls of it were not more any where than in this city,

fevcrely

In the fcic

On

this

year the influenza raged in ;

Saturday, June 22,

and tcrSamuel Cooper,

1776, a fudden

teble fire broke out at the houfe of

St. Martin's at Palace in this city foon communicated to the roof of William Wood's houfe, at the fouth-cafl corner of White Friars bridge, and in lefs than an hour the above two houfes were burnt down, together with two adJoining. The poor fuliercrs b\' the above unfortu-

cabinet-maker, in

the fiames

nate cataftrophe were reduced to the greatefl didrcfs.

On

Chriflmas eve following,- the mutabilitv of was very lurprizing, it often changing weather the and between five from temperate to extreme cold and fix of the evening of the lame day, there was rain, attended with thun9. fharp florm of hail and der and lifrhtnins:, a circumfiance not remembered by the oldeft pcrfon then living two perfons were ftruck down by the lightning on Life's Green near liie cathedral, but received no damage. ;

:

On

1

NOR

W

C

I

H,

213

On Wednefdav, March

19, 1777, John Rye, for murder of Jofeph SnellinGT, at Litde Franfliam, was executed on the Caftle-hill, unpiticd by an innumerable concourfe of fpc^lators ; the body was afterwards conveyed to the Norfolk, and Norwich Hofpital, for diffeiftion, this being hap-

the cruel and barbarous

the

pily

inftance of

firfl

murder, either

in this

a criminal executed for county, fmce the a6l

city or

pafTed in 1752 for execution of murderers the dayafter lentencc,

Tuefday, corporation

dom

of

24, 1778, at an afTembly of the was unanimoafly agreed, that the free-

Feb.. it

this city

a peculiar

be prefented to lord Cornwallis, as

mark of efleem and

for his lordfliip's public

refpe6l that

body had

conduft and private virtues,

which freedom his lordQiip was plcafed to accept, by a genteel letter fent to the mayor and corporation.

Thurfday the

26th,

at

about twelve o'clock at

night, a terrible fire broke out in the baking-office

belonging to Mr. Smith, near the common pump, Conisford it was occafioned by fome bakers coals being put under a flair-cafe, which catching fire, foon put the lioufc in a blaze, and communicating itl'ejf to fome thatched houfes backward, they were icon burnt down, to the incxprcflible lofs of the poor fufferers. :

On Monday, March

16, the harmonious p.cal Oxford Treble Bob Maximus, was rung at St. Peter's Mancroft in this city it confifted of fix thoufand two hundred and forty changes corapleat, not one bell out of courfe during the whole time. -This extraordinary peal was rung in five hours and twenty-two minutes^ and excelled every attempt of the kind upon twelve bells in any part of England.

called

:

On

C

ffi4

T Y

I

O

F

On Saturday, A.pril 25, the following moft extraordinary anecdote appeared in the Norfolk Chronicle.

" In Green's-Iane, in the parifh of St. George this cit\', lives Michael Crotch, a houfecarpenter, who fome time fince built a fmall chamber organ for' his own amufement, which is reckoned pretty well tuned. He has three children, the voungell of whom, William, but two years and three quarters old, is flill fucking, and who, fi'Om being firft able to diflinguifh founds, difcovered a fondnefs for mufic. About fix months ago, while his father was at work above flaits, he heard fomebody playing the tune of " God fave the King" with toleColgate in

.

Running down

rable exadnefs.

flairs

who

to fee

it

was, he found his youngeil fon playing the organ, and his brother, thirteen years of age, blowing. By the end of the week he could play the whole tune,

ufmg both hands. Since that time has learned feveral tunes, ^vhich he can plav with great exaflnefs. Sometimes he runs out of bafc and tenor, lie

one tune into another, but

is

always in harmony,

and plays muhc. "

The

Ambition

firll

fire

time

I

heard him, he played, " Let I" After he had played it

thy .Mind

over feveral times, his father endeavoured to entice off, by finging another he played a few notes, as if to pleafe his father, but flill returned to his favourite tune. SomiCtimes he plays wild, or rather, as it "were, compolcs extempore it cannot be referred to any known mufic, vet it is raviQiing harmo-

him

;

:

ny.

1

have

i'ccn

him

with one hand, and in the

fuck,

am

fame pollure, and

ing his eye

upon

and play

in this

manner

told he Ibmctimes ules two, v»iih the

the bicafl.

like effect,

His ear

is

keep-

fo exquifite,

that

:

N O R

W

I

G

H.

215

any perfon ftrikes a note, while he is plavinc^, he drives away the hand, and correcls it A very good judge of mufic was prefent inftanilv. the lafl time I heard him, and whifpered at a diftance from him, that one of the pipes was out of ver\- foon after, upon ftriking the key belongtune ing to it, he left off, faying, the organ founds dou-

iliat if

in difcord,

;

ble;'

Since the publication of the above, the editors of have received the following account of

this hiflory

the progrefs of the child, from undoubted authority

" William Crotch was born July 5, 1775; his genius for mufic may be reafonably fuppofed to have "commenced with his exiftence, as we do not remember any period fmce his birth in Avhich he did not fliew the greatell propenfity to an organ, for

feems to have the indeed he has a penchant for attachment evcrv other mufical inflrument (particularly a violoncello) was he but capable of managing them. \vhich inflruraent at prefent he greatcfl.

;

" As foon as he could walk alone, which was at

beginning of his fecond year, he would freto hear a tune on the organ, and vvlien he wanted any particular tune, he would put his finger upon that key on which the tune began and as' it lometimes happened that more than one tune began on the fame key, he w^ould, (after lie was a year and half old) flrike two or three of the firft or leading notes of the tune he chofe to have played. Before he was two years and a quarter old, he played " God fave the King'' with both hands at two years and a half, he had piayed to the

quently quit the breaft

;

;

fevcral ladies ?iOti«jcd in the

and gentlemen, and was prefently after at two and three quarpublic prints :

ters,

C

2]5

T Y

I

O

F

was firfl difcovercd that he could dlAinguiili^ and call it by its proper name, though he and likewifc that his memory did not fee it (Iruck w;;s fo retentive, that a gentleman only playing to him the minuet in Rodelinda two or three times in the evening, (at his own requeft) was aftoniflicd to hear him perform it the next morning, as loon ^s Jie went to the organ. ters,

any

it

note,

;

Before he was three years of age, he played at Beccles, Ipfv/icb, ^c. and afterwards vifited feveral *'

other towns in Norfolk and Suffolk, as Lynn, Bury, Sec.

and

went

in 0(51ober 1778,

November was nominated

to the

to

Cambridge

irj

;

degree of batcheior

from with a fmall annuity annexed to it December, he went to London, and after performing before the foreign ambalfadors, maids of honor, &:c. on the 22d of January, 1779, he wa$ of

arts,

:

thence, in

introduced into the royaj prefence, to whom be gave the greateft fatisfa<^ion, as he does in general to the nobility and gentry in and about London,

but particularly to the greateft muficians, to any of he will perform a bafs off hand, to any treand it is thought by ble they fhall chufe tp. play fome, that his tafte for drawing is equal to his geHis education will mofl probably nius for mufic. \)t at Cambridge, or London, and not at Italy."

whom

;

In the month of May, 1778, Roger Kerrifon, was appointed treafurer to the corporation of" guardians for the poor in this city, for whofe maintenance near i2,oool. is expended annually. cfq.

On oralty,

was

Saturday, Augufl the Rev.

elected

Samuel

1

,

at

a

full

Parr, A.

mailer of the free

M.

court of mayof Colchefler,

grammar

fchool

m

thi^

;

NOR

W

C

i

H.

217

this city, on the foundation of king Fdvvard VI. vacant on the rcfignation of the Rev. Mr. Leman»

And

in

the

month of November

following, at a

meeting of the truflees, John Thurlow, efq. was unanimoufly elected treafurer of the charity fchools in this ciiy, in the room of Andrew Chamber, cfq, deccafed. «

In 1779, the new year was ufliered in with one of the moft terrible ftorms florms of wind, attended Incredible damage was with thunder and Hghtning.

done in divers parts of this city the dreadful effects of it was moft fe\'erely felt on St. Andrew's church, which was greatly damaged, with divers other cliurches, houfes, kc. cLc. Such a ftorm had not happened in the memor^^ of man it was not confined to this city, but extended to the county and kingdom in general, dreadful accounts having been recei\'ed of great damage done to the fhipping, many bams blown down, trees torn up by the roots, inundations at Yarmouth, Sec. Sec, :

;

In February 1779, the corporation, confifling of flicriffs, recorder, fteward, aldermen and common-council, with their officers, Hood as follows

the mayor,

The

right worfhipful

Roger Kerrison,

defied alderman 06lober ward.

4,

1774,

mayor, Mancrofc

efq.

for

Thomas Primrose and Richard Clarke,

cfqrs.

(lieriffs.

Edward Bacon, Charles Buckle,

efq. recorder. efq. fteward.

Aide- men.

C

siS

T Y

I

Aldermen paji

Nathaniel Roe,

efq.

O

F

the chair.

deputy mayor, elc61cd Jiilv 27,

1774, for South Conisford ward. John Gay, efq. November i, 1732, Wymer ward.

Jeremiah

Ives,

efq.

December

Middle

for

6,

1752, for Fye-

4,

1753, for Fye-

bridge ward.

Robert Rogers,

efq.

September

bridge ward. Sir

Thomas Churchman, St.

James Poole,

Wymer Thomas

knt.

May

1759, for

25,

Stephen's ward. efq.

September 28,

1763,

Eafl

for

ward.

Starling,

December

efq.

6,

1764, for

St.

Giles's ward.

Jeremiah Ives, jun. efq. July 1, 1766, for South Conisford ward. Robert Harvey, efq. January 5, 1767, for Coflany ward. Knipe Gobbet, efq. Auguft 17, 1768, for St. Giles's ward. Charles Weflon, efq. 06lober 28, 1768, for phen's ward.

John Addey,

Wymer James Crowe,

efq.

December

14,

1770,

for

St. Ste--

Middle

ward. efq.

July

18, 1772^ for

North Conis-

ford ward.

Richard Peetc, efq. February 13, 1773, for Weft Wymer ward. Francis Colombine, efq. April 26, 1774, for Colgate ward. Aldermen Sir

heloio the chair.

Harbord Harbord, bart. November Ealt Wv mer ward.

2,

1773,

for

John

W

N O R John Thurlovv,

efq.

G

I

December

H.

2i§

1775, for Colgate

5,

ward.

Benjamin Day,

John Morfe,

efq.

cfq.

ward. Starhng; Dav,

June

July

1,

1777, for Coflany ward. 1777, ^^^ Norih Conisfbrd

6,

September

efq.

1777, for Weft

23,

Wvmt^r ward. Jeremiah Ives Harvey, efq. January 6, Conisford ward. Robert Partrid^je, efq. 06lober 6, 1778,

1778, for lor

Conis-

ford ward. Elias Norgate,

February 13, 1779, for

efq.

Mane reft

ward. of the court.

Officers

Elifha

De Hague,

gent, town-clerk.

Tercmiah Ives Har\cv, -n \f J hom-as Marks, gent.

eKj. )

'.

]

} 3

r^

«^oroner3.

Mr. Wilham Dewing, chamberlain.

Mr. Samuel Mottram, chief conftable. Mr. George Wymer, under fheriiT. Mr. Charles Lay, fword bearer. Mr. Robert Cubit, under chamberlain. Mr. Robert Harmer, clerk of the market. Mr. Charles Lay, ^vater bailiff.

COMMON

C O U N C

I L.*

Mr. Samufx Harmer, Speaker. Conisford Ward.

Mr. Ifaac Jackfon Thomas Emerfon Thomas Nalmith James Chafe James Page '

^Villiam Herring^

iVIr.

Thomas Dove James Poftons, jun. John Marks Hewett Rand, jun. Robert Hou2;hton Stephen Dancer Warner

CITY

22)

O

t

Wymer Ward. Mr. William Chafe William Weatheiill

Mr. John Hilvard John White

Hewet Rand

Thomas Marks

Charles Fcarraan John Aldred John Bringloc

Robert Priefl John Loder Richard Hutclnnfo*

James Hardy

James Derfley John Wright

Richard Day-

Thomas Day

Edward Leeds

James Smyd:*

William Wilcock* Mancroft ward.

IMr.

Samuel Harmer Charles Reynolds Robert

Jollins

Thomas Black Peter

Amyott

Stephen Wea^^r Gilb. Brownfmidi

Edward Rudge

Ward IMr,

Mr. John Aldhanv Thomas Back James Hudfon William Bcloc John Harper John Croulc Richard Bcatniffc John Marks, jun.

heyond the water.

Thomas Troughton Mr. Edward William Cutting William Powell

Thomas John

Bafeley

Callle

James Beevor

Marfli

Sam. Frcmoult, jun,

Edmund

Partridge

Samuel Cubit Benjamin Bartram

Thomas

Scott

The mayor is eleficd by the freemen, on the firO: day of May, and fworn into his office on the guildday, which is always the Tuefday before Midfumnier-day, except when Midfummer-day falls on a Wednefday, and then the guild is kept on the Tuefdriy

W

N O R

• I

C

H.

!21

day fc'nnight before Midfummer-dav. He is elected from among the aldermen, is juflice of the quorum during his mavoralty, and afterwards juflice of the peace during life, unlefs lawfully removed from his office of

alderman.

The mayor, with

the fheriffs, hold courts everv Saturday, to hear complaints, and to do everv other a£l tending to the peaceable government of the city.

Wednefday and

One of the nierififs is chofen by the court of aldermen, the other by the freemen, on the laft Tuefday in Auguft, and are fworn into their office on Michaelmas-day. They hold courts for the trial of a61ions of debt and trefpafs.

The recorder, who muff be a barriffer, affiffs In the mayor's court as chief judge, is always juffice of the quorum, and the other council

for the city.

The twenty-four aldermen are chofen for the twelve fmaller wards, two for each ward, whofe office it is to keep the peace in their feveral divifions.

When

any one of diem dies, or be difplaced, the freemen of that great ward, in which the leffer ward is included, for which he is to ferve, muff elect another in his room, within five days after the djsath of his predeceflbr.

The common

council-men are ele£lcd by the freeeach of the four great wards, fefor Conisford great ward on tjie Monday, parately Mancroft on the Tuefday, Wymer on the Wednef-

men, dwelling

in

;

day, and the

day

in Paffion

ward beyond

the water on the Thurfweek, thence called cleanfing week.

O

The^

CITY OF

2<2 2

Thev

clioofe a fpeaker yearly,

who

called fpeakcf

is

of the commons.

The

prefcnt repiefeiitatives in parliament for

are

tiiv,

fir

Haibord Harbord,

Edward Bacon, There city

;

and many

and

it

is

ilii*

alderman, and

efq. recorder.

are thirty-five

cathedral,

bare,

parifh churches, befides the diifenting

meetings,

in

thi,%

faid there are fixteen public clocks,

ivhofc dial-plates equally front the cardinal points ; four eaftvvard, four weft, four north, and foui ?. e. fouth.

The

Spring Gardens are delightfully fituated by and a handlome rotunda, called the Pan-

the river,

ereQed by Mr. Bunn, was opened in die fummer of 1777. The Rural Garden, without St.

theon,

Stephen's gate,

is

alio

much

rcforted

to.

Exclufive of the four hofpitals already mentioned, is at this time a moll (lately edifice (out of Si.

there

Stephen's

the Norfolk and Norwich moll liberally fu2^portcd bv volun-

called

gate)

Hofpital, which

is

tary contribution. at Norwich is jufily efiecmed one oP England it is held twice a week, Wed-

The market the fined in

;

nefday and Saturday, at both of which, particularly on the Saturday, prodigious quantities of all kinds of provifions are brought.

There

arc alfo at this

time three coffee houfes, a

aflembly rooms, concert room, bowling greens, and every other fpccies of rational amufetheatic-royal,

raeni.

The

N O R The

poft-office

EHfija

De Hague

Buder

his clerk.

is

is

^V

C

I

H.

52

C^

Mr. and Collins John

kept in the market-place poft-mafler,

2

;

The poft goes out from Norwich for Lonclofl and Caxton, c\ery Sunday, Monday. Tuefday, Wednefday and Thuifday, at eleven o'clock at night, and every Saturday at four in the afternoon. Comes in from London e\'ery morning except Tuclday, and hom Caxton every morning except Monday and Tuefday.

The Yarmouth

poft

goes out every dav except

Sunday, from Michaelmas and from Lady at noon,

Lady at twelve o'clock Michaelmas at one o'clock in the afternoon, and returns at fix in the evening, except Saturday, when it fets out at ten in the morning, and returns at three in die afterto

to

noon.

The

letters for

Cley, Holt,

all

Lynn, Houghton, Eurnham, Wells, go round by Thelford

;

thofe

lof

Aylfham on Monday, Thuriday and Saturday,

in

the morning.

By

the alteration in the price of poflage,

gle letters lent

from T'hetford

to

Brand, Stoke, Attleburgh, Harling, Bury, are charged one penny each

from Norwich and Avlfliam.

to

all fm-»

Watton, SwalFham,

Wymondham,

Dereham ;

and.

and the fame

.Attleburgh, Acle

From Thetford to Newmarket, Fakcnham, Walfmgham, Wells, Holt, Cley, Lynn and Downham, fingle letters two-penes each and the fame from Norwick Q 2 ;

CITY OF

2^4

Nonvlch

to Hailing,

Thetford, Yarmouth and Cto-

mer.

On Saturday, April 3, 1779, ^^'^ malefa61ors were executed, on the Cafile-hill, purfuant to their fentence at Thetford a{fizes, viz. Thomas Bell, for fliootiiig and maiming lord Walpole's game-keeper ; Thomas Boddv, Zorobabel Partridge, Miles Bridges, and John Griffin, for feveral burglaries and highway robberies they all behaved with fortitude, and During the execution many a becoming decency. pockets were picked ; one perfon loft his watch and ibmc filver. The number of people aflaxibled were fuppofed to be near twenty thoufand. :

Of

SouthWi: srFro srn c i of jjji, Catiildiial

N

Of

the

W

R

g

I

H.

225

CATHEDRAL CHURCH

THE

prcfcnt cathedral

flone

building, in

flate

bcncfa^lors.

a fine Gothic,

is

it

of

now its

free-

that magnificent

iDiought to

\vhic)i

bounty and induitry

and

Precincl.

its

appears by the great

numerous and worthy

Bifliop Herbert,

its

founder, hiid the

which the blefred Virgin of Pity was afterward bin'It, and eredcd an aliar there in honor of our blelfed Sa\iour. The ceremoiiy of laying the foundation flone was performed in the prclcnce of Roger Bigot, and mofl of the nobility and barons of the diocefe who each of them laid their fevcral flones, and contrifirit

flone in 1096, in the fpot on

;

buted

largely

church, as

to

by

the

undertaking.

The

original

con filled of the vyhole choir, to\ver, and the two tranfepts, with the north and foudi alles of the choir beyond the tranfepts, and extended to the divifion between the na\-c and anti-choir, and no farther die lower part of left

bifliop Heibert,

;

^vhich,

now

remaining,

is

die original building

;

but fome of the ornaments between the arches, and the entire roofs and upper parts, are of a later date. After the building was compleated, it was dedicated to the honor of the Holy Trinity, on the 24th of September, on which day the dedication feafl was annually celebrated. Bifhop Ebora^d, w^ho fncceeded Herbert, built the whole nave, or bodv of the church, and its two ailes, from the anti-chojr or rgod-loft door, to the well end and the prel'cnt ;

Q

3

building,

C

fi25

I

T Y

O

F

building, except the roof of the nave

end,

is

and weflem

of his foundation.

This was the

ftate

of the church

till

1171,

whea

damage by an accidental fire which Vvas fully repaired by Johr* of Oxford, the fourth biOiop, about the year 1197, who compleatly fitted up and ornamented the church, and prefcnted it with a new fet of veflments, Sec. received confiderable

it

;

The

next addition to this pile was the noble chaof the Virgin Marv, or St. Mary the Great, built bv Walter de Suffield, the tenth biOiop a perfon fo remarkable for fandity and goodnefs, that his flirine was vifited by pilgrims from various parts, and numerous miracles were faid to be wrought at pel

;

This wonderworking power received a confirmation from the miraculous cfcapc of this chapel (as they then termed it) from the rage and his

tomb.

full

of tke citizens in 1272; when the whole church, tower, and adjacent buildings, were totally defaced by fire, in an infurreclion of the citizens, occafioned by a violent difpute they were then engaged in with the monks a full account of \vhich fury

;

may

This afiliir cofl the city be found in page 30. thi-ee thoufand marks, which, with the liberal donations of the king, queen, bifhop, and nobility, fo fully repaned and compleated the church, that on Advent Sunday, 127S, king Edward I. and Eleanor his queen, the bifhops of London, Hereford, and VVatcriord, and feveral of the nobility, were prcfent at its re-dedication by William de MiddleAt the fame ton, then endironed bifliop of the lee. time, John de Chifil, bifhop of London, dedicated the altar where the body of St. William was buried, Thoto the honour of our Saviour and All Saints mas de Canteloupe, bifliop of Hereford, dedicated ;

the

i

NOR of" tiie

C

I

227

H.

the choir door, ro the honor bleffcd Virgin.' St. John the Baptlft, St. Giies

oppofite altar,

iTie

VV

the Abbot, and

all

by

holy Vir;^ins

;

bl-

and Stephen

the altar, at

fhop of Waterford in Ireland, dedicated the facrift's chamber-door, to St. Peter and Paul, and all the- Saints. But it loon after appearing, that the old tower was much weakened by its bcin-g fet on fire in the late infurreclion. a new one was ere61ed by bifhop Ralph dc Walpole, and entirely finifhed at his fole expcnce. This bountiful prelate, in 1297, undertook the building of that part of the cloifter ivin"" on the fouth fide of the church, and the old chapter-houfe which he finiflied, togerher of with fo much the cloifier as extends from the /

1

;

.grand

entrance

into the

church, called the prior's

work, to the pafTagc leading to the chapter-houfe, now to Life's Green, near to which he caufed a ftone to be placed, with

entrance, Avith

thib infcription

*'

all

its

curious

:

Dominus Radulfus Waipole Norwicenfis " copus

me

Richard de Uppehall, ed

whom

in directing thefe works,

the bifliop employadded three more of the

arches on that fide of the cloiller arches,

and

epif-

pofuit^."

;

the

other 'nvc

the fouth fide of the cloifier reaching to

arch over Avhich the efpoufals, or facramcnt of marriage, are carved, were built by bifhop Salmon and his friends and by the profits arifmg from the

the

;

ofiice of pittancer,

work.

which the convent expended on

The

north fide, adjoining to the church, was erefted by Henry de Well, who expended thereupon the fum of two hundred and ten marks, over

this

and above

20I.

given by John de Hancock, and a portion 4

Q

* Ralph de Waipole, bifhop of Norwich,

bailc

me.

C

22S

portion of the pittance

The

pofe.

wcfl

O

T Y

I

fide,

money

F

allotted for that

beginning

aforefaid, together with the

at

pur-

efpoufals

fumptuous carved en-

common

trance near the refecfiory or

the

eating hall, the

and the door entering into the ftrangers hall, were built by Jeffrey Siraonds, retlor of St. Mary in the Marfh, at the expence of lool. and lavatories,

,

the part ranging from the Grangers hall door, to the entrance into the church, together with that en-

by the executors of

trance,

biftiop

Wakeryng.

In 1382, Walter de Berney, citizen of Norwich, gave lool. towards the iron work and glazing of the which work was perfe61ed at the cloifler windows charge of the fevcral families of Morley, Shelton, Scales, Erpingham, Gournay, Mowbray, Thorpe, Savage, 8cc. whofe ar s were to be feen in the windows of the cloiller, above the bars, before the glaThis famous and elegant zing was deniolifhed. cloifler was hnifhed in 1430, in the hundred and thirtv-third year from its being firft undertaken. ;

In 1361, on the 15th of January, the fleeple of

was blown down, by which accident damage to repair which, bifliop Percy gave 40 ol. and obtained an the caLhedrai

the choir received confiderable

aid of gd.

the

in

pound from

;

his

clergy

for

the

and from thefe funds the prcfcnt fame purpofe tower was built, and the fpire erc£lcd. :

fliaft, or fpire, commonly called the pinnaa very handfome, well-proportioned fabrick, and the higlicft in England, that of Salifbury exIn 1629, the upper part of it was blown cepted. and in 1 633, an order was made, at a gcdown

The

cle,

is

;

7jcral chapter,

for

its

reparation.

and Hve )ards and two

feet

It is

one hundred from the pave;Bent

in height,

N O R

W

G

I

H.

229

pavement of the choir to the top of the pinnacle ; and built (Irongly of freeflone on the oiufidc, and The upper window is the higheft of brick within.

The top flone of the fpire is not but conlifls of a half globe, with a channel round it from whence extend eight leaves of flone, fpreading outwards, under which begin the eight rows of crockets, continued down the fpire, at the diflance of five feet from each other. alcent inwardly.

flat,

;

1463, the church was confiderably damaged which in effeci proved of great adlightning

In

by

;

vantage to it, as it was the means of its receiving for it w^as very large improvements and additions at this lime, that the noble roof, covering the nave of the church, and carved with mofl of the principal (lories of the Old Teflament, and the upper part of the nave itfelf, were begun and finifhed, at the expence of bifliop Lyhert and his friends ; ^vhofe unbounded generofity not only enabled to perfect this noble work, but alfo to pave the cathedral, to build the llone rood-loft now remaining, :

and

to

ereft a

tomb over

the

founder, which was

and that the medeflroyed in the great rebellion might be tranfworthy benefaftors morial of luch ;

to poflerity, the windows of the nave were adorned with the arms of England, Edward the ConfefTor, Bohun, Valence, Brotherton, E. Warren, John of Gaunt, Cornwall, Beauchamp, the Eall Angles, the See, Albany, Lacy, Danby, the Emiiiitted

pire,

Plantagenet,

Uffoid,

Bardolf,

Huntingfield,

Norwich, Charles earl of Richmond, Lyhert, HeBacon, therfet, Mortimer of Attleburgh, Inghai^i, Kerdeflon, Morley, Scales, Sec. After Lyhert's ^cflbr,

beautified

death, bifhop the

tower

Goldwelj, his fuc-

and the roof of the choir,

CITY OF

9?;0

fame kind of work with which his fitted up the had adorned the nave choir itfelf, and chapels around it, in the form they and covered remained in till the late alterations

choir, with the

predecefior

;

;

He the vaulted, or arched flone work, with lead. placed or) be the walls, and in to caufed likewife the windows of the choir, the arms of thole worthy who had

benefadors

his undertaking, obliterated.

cur,

arc

fo

bountifully affifted

the greateft part of

which

him are

in

now

The arms which moft frequently ocfir Thomas Erpingham and his fir Thomas Windham and his two wives,

thofe of

two wives, from whence and fir William Boleyn and his wife it may be reafonably inferred, that they were the moft confiderable benefaftors to this pious work. ;

Nix repaired the tranfept ailes of which had been much damaged by a late fire, and covered them with a flone roof, in Thus like manner with the body of the church. the church remained till the diffolution, when by an jnjundion from the bifliop, direded to the dean and prebends, the crucifixes, images and piftures, were removed, and the niches, where the images flood, No other alteration filled up and whitened over. when i6oi, part of the fpire was happened till damage was foon but lightning the down by ftruck In

1

^og, bifliop

the church,

;

after

repaired.

It

continued in

ftate till

this

outragious dcvafiation committed in

it

in

the

the year

1643.

At

the Reflauration,

the church

was

fitted

up

and in the fame place former manner where the old organ had flood, which was entirely demolifhed by the rebels, was the prefent one ere61cd by dean Crofts and the chai)tcr, and afterward

again in

its

;

beautified

NORWICH.

2

n-l

and painted by dean Aflley. At the fame was given by Philip -Harbord, efq. then high QierifF of Norfolk and the city, as fomc amends for the late fpoil and abufe of beautified

the prefent cope

lime,

:

the church, gave life

of the

From

lool.

purchafe plate, for the

to

altar.

about the year 1740, the remuch neglected, when dean Bullock and the chapter caufed it to be thoroughly cleaned and white-wafhed, the windows repaired, the nave and ailes new paved, and the defective part of the flone work within the that time,

till

pairs and decorations of the church were

body of

the church, and, in great meafure, of that of the tower on the outfide, efFe6lualiy mended fo tliat it ^vas exceeded by veiy few of the cathedral ;

in neatnels

and decency.

But the

greateft

and

mofl:

elegant improvements which the church has received for

feveral

-the

order,

centuries,

the prefent dean

l.lo)d,

come one of i\hole

thofe

are

and under the ;

lately

direction

by which

finiflied,

of Dr. the choir

by

Philip is

be-

the mofi complete and beautiful in the

kingdom.

The elegance of this choir is confiderably heightened by two mofl beautiful windo\vs of painted glafs, placed over the altar, the whole being collected and put together with the greateff judgment by the Isidy of the prefent dean.

and

in

the prefent age

is

It is

much

admired,

faid to be the finell piece

of workmanfliip in the kingdom. Tlie Icngdi of the whole building, from the wefl to the ruinated entrance of the chapel of St.

door

Mary

which flood at the eaft end, is four and the extent of the tranfept or crofs from north to fouth, one hundred and eightv. the Great,

Jumdrcd ailes,

feet

;

The

;

C

252

T Y

I

The Chapel of

St.

O F

Mary

the Great.

At the caft end of the cathedral flood the chapel of the BleiTcd Virgin, commonly called St. Mary'? the Great, and frequently St. Walter's chapel, fronn Walter de Sufheld, or Cahhorpe, its original founder,

who was buried here. Daily lervice was performed here for the founder's foul in particular, his friends, and the dead

relations, benefaclors,

in general.

This

chapel was about feventy feet long, and thirty broad, and had an handfomc entrance to it from the church, to which it joined; being fallen into decay, it vva.» demoliflied in the time of dean Gardiner; and its fcite is now ^ ^^rden belonging to the late Mr. Francis Frank,

The Chapel of This chapel

is

fituated

the cathedral, and

Herbert.

is

Luke on the

the Evangehft. foudi-eall corner of

the original building of bifliop

was made ule of as on the eafl lidc of the

It

before that

and

St,

the prior's chapel, cloifter

was

built

time extended no farther than where die prcfent pulpit flaqds but being now ufed inRead of the dcmolifhed parifli church of St. Mary in the at that

;

!Marfh, as a place of divine worlhip for

all

the inha-

bitants within die Clofe or Precin61, all that part of

from the eafl end to the eighteenth fouth hath been taken into it. The ancient guild of the pewtcrers, brafiers, Sec called St. Luke's guild,

the

ailc,

pillar,

was formerly kept at the altar in this chapel, on the fccond Sunday after Trinity. The font is a very ancient one, and was removed hither from the church of

St.

Mary

<;oratGd

in the Marfli at its demolition; it is dewith carvings, reprefenting the feven facran:icnt£.

;

NORWICH.

233

four evangellAs, and divers figures of Over this chapel is popes, confelfors, &:c. The right of the treafurv of the dean and chapter. nomination to the curacy is in the dean and chapter,

TTcnts, tlie faints,

and

the prefent curate

The Chapel

is

the

Rev. Mr. James Willins.

called Jefus Chapel.

This chapel was fituated on the north-eaft cornei* the church, and had bifhop Herbert for its foun-^ der. It was ufed by the biOiops as their private chaIts pel, before there was one created at the palace. dedication was to the Holy Name, and the mafs of Jefus was faid daily at the altar there. <^f

In the middle of ent,

of

and

fir

jflately

this

chapel

monument,

is

a very fair, anci-

memory who lie bu-

erefted to the

Thomas Windham and

his lady,

and in this chapel likewife are ic~ and infcriptions to the memories of the families of Mr. and Mrs. Frank, Dr. Gallv, ^c. who ried in this place; veral flones

lie

buried here.

In the fame

an arched fage

aile

we

from the choir

formerly very dark. feflion,

find the ancient confcffionary

flonc vault, through

which

lays the paf-

to the chapel of Jefus,

Here

the fituation of the

and was

the people flood at conpriefl

being within the

between the eighteenth and nineteenth north pillars the voice palfed through a hollow made in the wall for that purpofe. Since queen Elizabeth's time it has been commonly called her feat, becaufe that queen fat there when flic attended dialtar rails,

:

vine fervice, on her

vifit to

the city.

On

CITY OF

231

On

the north fide of this aile \veie two chapels,

both non'

demohihcd

probability that of St-

;

the moft eaftcrly

was

in

aU

chapel of St, Stephen, and the other Faffing over from hence to the Sidles. tlfc

fouth fide of the choir, we come to the confiflory, or chapel of Our Lady the Lefs, or Beauchamp's chapel ; which was dedicated to our Lady and all the Saints,

by William de Bello Campo, or Beauchamp,

founder,

its

who

lived

in

the reigns of the fecond

Edwards, and lies interred in a beautiful The altar flood in arched vault under the chapel. the middle of the eafl wall, and there flill remains an elegant carved niche in that wall towards its north end, where the image of the Virgin Maiy formerly flood; and oppofite to it a cornifli, on which were placed a group of figures reprefencing all the faints. On the fouth fide of the aile is a clock, and two fmall figures of men, which turn thcmfelves, and 3.nd third

flrike the quarters,

In the north aile of the nave, between the fixtli pillars from the weft end, was formerly

and feventh

the entrance into the preaching place, called the Green Yard, now a part of the palace yard. Before the grand rebellion, the combination fermons were alwavs preached at the crofs eroded here, before the their wives and ofwere featcd in a gallery raifcd againft the wall of the bifliop's palace, covered widi lead; other galleries of the fame kind ^vcre erccfted againft the

mayor and aldermen, who, with ficers,

.

north fide of the church, in which the deans, prebends, gentlemen, 8cc. fat; the reft of the audience either flood, or fat upon long forms, paying for their feats a penny or halfpenny each, as they did at St. The bilhop and chancelPaul's crofs in London.

heard the fermons from the windows of the bi1 he pulpit had a capacious covering (hop's palace. of lor

NORWICH.

235

with a crofs fixed upon It, and was afcendOn the church's ed Lo bv eight or ten ilone fleps. beuig fequeflered, and the fervice difcontinued, durino- the time of the ufurpation, this pulpit was removed to the new hall yard, and the public fermons This continued till the heirs were preached there. of thofe gentlemen, who had contributed to the payment of the preachers, refufed to advance their wonted flipulations, on account of any fermon preached in any other place than the Green Yard: and after a full hearing, it was adjudged, that for the future ihefe fermons fliall be always preached in the cathe-

t)f lead,

and that the every Sunday in the morning preachers fhall be appointed by the bifhop every half year, viz. from amongft the Norfolk clergy during the winter, and from the Suffolk clergy during the dral,

;

appointed Tnall receive be paid him by the mayor, and be entertained at the expence of the cor-

fummer: and each minifter a guinea

for

his

fermon,

fo

to

poration.

Adjoining to the confiftory, on formerly a chapel,

now

its

weft

fide,

totally demoliilied,

was

called

Heydon's chapel, built in the year 1479 by John Heydon, of Baconfthorpe, eiq. a great favourite of He ched in 1480, and lies buried king Henry VI. here, as doth alfo fir Henry Heydon, knt. his heir, who built the church at Salthoufe, and ereded the caufeway between Thursford and Walfingham, at his

own

expence.

Between the ninth and tenth north pillars was formerly a chapel incloled, belonging to the Hobarc family, under which lies interred fir James Hobart, a native of Monks-Ely in Suffolk, a particular friend and intimate acquaintance of biftiop Goldweli's,

whom

he bountifully

affifted in

building and adorning

CITY OF

s\5 'O

He was a man of great learning and found judgment in 1477, he was appointed reader of Lincoln's-Inn, and a governor of that fociety in 3ng the choir.

;

November 2, i486, made attornev-general Henry VII. fworn a privy-cdunfellor, and knighted at the creation of Henry prince of Wales. From him defcended fir Henry Hobart, bart. attorney-ge^ ncral to king James I. afterward lord chief jurticc from Avhorn the pfefent noof the Common-Pleas of Bhckling, carls of BuckHobarts the ble family of 148':^:

to

;

inghamfhire, derives

On into

iilelf.

the north fide of the entrance, from the nave,

the

anti-choir or chapel of our

Ladv

of Pity,

William's akar, and on the fouth that of the precentor, dedicated to St. Mary.

was placed

St.

fidfe

The anti-choir was originally the chapel of St. Mary of Pity, fituated under that noble rood-loft, erefted bv bifhop Hart, at prefent the organ-loft

which was

on

;

ere^ied the principal rood, or crofs, with

the effigies of our Saviour in full proportion

;

toge-

ther with the capital image or reprcfeiitation of the

Holy

which the church was dedicated, and of fuch were of particular eflimruion.

Trinity, to

thofe of the Virgin Mary, St. John,

other faints as

The

feftival

ciiflinguifhed

word

of the Crofs wa^, and even how is, the name of Holy-rood-day ; the

by

.

rode, in the

Saxon language,

Thefe holy-roods flood the people,

who

fignifyiug a crofs.

in very high eflimation with

implicitly believed in the

numerous

miracles reported to be wrought before them,

till

iht

Reformation unveiled the impofiiion, and convinced

them of

their falfity.

The

W

N O R The

images on our

I

C

H.

ro*od-l(5ft .were,

237

bevond

all

doubt, %ery richly ornamented; and the rcprefentaIn 1499, tion of the Holy Trinity was fuperblv gilt. Margaret, late wife of fir Ral;)h Shelton, knt. prefented this image, with a golden chain weighing nearly eight ounces, one large jewel, with a red rofe

enamelled in gold hanging thereto, and four fmallcr In 1443, Robert Norvvych. efq. gave to the great image of the Trinity his fdver collar, given him

jewels.

1 his reprefcntation of the Trinity emperor. was, in the then too ufual but propliane manner, an image of the Almighty Father, blafphemoully hgured bv a weak old man, w-ith the Bleffed Redeemer on the crofs between his knees, and the Eternal SpiThis rit, under the form of a dove, on his breaft. place was the grand repofitory for the holy relicks ; amongfl which was a portion of the blood of the

b)' the

numbers came

bleffed Virgin

Mary,

to \vhich

grimage, and

made name

their offerings.

went by the

It

in pil-

fomctirnes

of Holy-rood chapel, and

had

On the riglu. once a week. hand of the choir door v.'as St, Thomas's altar, and on the left that of the Virgin of Pity.*

Jefus's mafs fung- in

it

The biiliop's throne, afcended to by three fleps, was originally placed at the eaft end of the church behind the altar, and railed fo high, that before the partition was made between the altar and the entrance to Our Lady's chapel, or the prelent rood-loft was built, (the former one being placed very high) the biffiop could fee diredly in a line thrgugh the whole church, up to Tombland.

R

»

* The image of of Jefus in

Underneath

the Virgin of Pity reprefented the mother

tears, fixed In a

moft melancholy pofturc, and view-

ing the Wounds and dead body of our blelTed Savicur,

;

CITY OF

238

Underneath the altar, on the fouth fide, was biiTir William Bolcyn, knt. great grandfather to queen EHzabeth. He died Oflobcr 10, 1305.

jried

The

fpace between the feventecnth and eigliteenth on the fouth fide of the church, formerly

pillars,

Wakeryngs,

conflituted a

chapel,

George's

that oppofite to

and

;

called

another called Bcrney's or St

Between the

fixteenth

or

on the north

it,

St.

fide,

Ann s.

and feventcenth

pillars

was

James's. The flails are fituated on each fide, and at the wefl end of the choir, and are fixty-two in number, according to the old foundation, which confided of a prithe chapel of bifhop Goldwell, or

St,

and fixty monks they are, agreeably of diofe times, adorned with odd fculptures, alluding to the animolities fubfihing between or,

fub-prior,

to the

;

mode

and

the regular

fecular clergy,

Between the fixteenth and feventeenth pillars, on famous knight fir to whom, Thomas Erpingham and his two wives in 1417, king Henry V. lor his faithful ferviccs, granted an annuity for life of fifty marks, ilfuing out of the alien priory of St. Faith, at Newingtonthe north fide, were buried that

;

and in him lord and patron of die manor and He died in advowfon of Toft-Monks in Norfolk. 1428, and gave by his will to the high altar ten

Longueville in the county of Buckingham

1427 we

to every monk fix (hillings and eight-pence Erpingham and Litcham churches forty fliillings

marks to

;

find

each

;

which

;

to

the altar at St. Martin at the Palace, in

parifli his

eight-pence

;

to

houfe flood, twenty-fix fhillings and

Normans

prifoners in die caflle

to the marks and to thofe in the fame fum, Sec.

fpittal ten

;

forty fliillings,

the guildhall (then the city gaol]

Before

N O R Before his

cleaLh,

W

C

I

H.

259

he gave three hundred marks to

the prior and conAxnt of Norwich, to found a c1;auntry for s

monk

to

fmg dailv mafs

mily

for e\er,

their

martyrology, and to recite

for

him and

his fa-

holv crofs in tlie cathedral, and to keep his anniverlary: with this fum fcveral houfes were purchafed on Tombland, and fettled to the foregoing ufe. The prior and conVent likewife obliged thcmfelves to enter his name ia at the altar

of

tlie

it,

par;icularly

on

His porwhole chapter. trait, with thofe of his two wi\es, were painted iii the window of the north aile, and in feveral places of the nave. He was knight of the garter in the reign of Henry IV. and a lord warden of the Cinque Ports in that of Henry V. and founder of the Black his anni\'erfary, before the

Piiar's church, now the new hall in St. Andrew's. Several of his family are buried at Erpingham, from

whence they

deii\ecl their

Befidcs

offerings

name. from the

chaaccounted yearly for the compofition fees for burying in the church, for the offerings at the altar of the three pels,

8cc.

the

arifing

before-mentioned,

kings, at St. Egidius's,

George's guild, guild kept here

at

the 'dyers ;

for the

the

the

lication of the indulgence,

great guild called St.

guild,

money

and the weavers pub-

collected at the

called the angels or perke

indulgence, on the vigil of afcenfion tions

the

at the altars

Red

;

of the Black Crofs,

Crofs, and

altar,

facrifi

for the collec-

Stump

Crofs,

of St. Appollonia, St. Gazian, St. John of Bridlington, St. Catherine, St. Petronell or Parnell, St. Ipolitus, St. Leodegar or Leiger, St. Anthony, St. Theobald, the St.

Nicholas's

;

at thofe

Saints. A fufficient proof of the number of altars, images, croffes, and pi6lures, with which in thofe davs churches were crouded. A \vax taper was conftantly kept burning

Charnel Crofs, and All

this

R

2

at

CITY OF

1240

our Lord's fepulclire, a rcprcfcntation of which, was placed in every church, geneGreat pomp rallv in the north \yd]\ of the chanceL and pac!;cantry were difplaved at this fepulchre on

at

in popifii times',

Eaftcr-day,

when

the crucifix

and

pix,

which had

been folcmnly depofited here on Good Friday, were taken from hence, at repeating thofe words of the ufcd on the occafion;

fcrvicc

He

is

rifcn,

He

is

Surrexit, iion

ejl

hie;

not here.

There were certain annual fums paid to the boyand his clerks, on St. Nicholas's dav, by all This boy-bifhop, or the officers of the church. bifliop chofen chorifter was a chorijlarum, epifropHS who, day Nicholas's on St. children fellow bv his Friand Wednefday every fafted fays, legend his as day whilil: in his cradle, and undcrflood the fcriptures from a child: for which rcafon he is efteemed the patron of children, and the obje61 of their worbifiiop

;

From this in preference to all other faints. day, until Innocents-day at night, the epifcopus piierorum, or boy-bifliop, took the name and held the flatc of a bifliop, was habited anivverably thereto, and carried a croficr, or paltoral ilaft, in his hand, fliip,

and wore

on monks,

a mitre

reprefeuiing

his

head

Sec.

chorifler bifliop went, in

;

On

the rcil of his fellows

Innocents-day, this

folemn proceflion

\vith his

high altar of the Holy Trinity, dreffed in their copes, and bearing lighted tapers in their hands, and there pcriormed the fcrvice of the holy

fellou'S,

to the

Innocents, defignedly reprefented by thefe children, and which fcems to have been die principal caufe of

No one, upon pain of excommuinterrupt, or prefs upon them dudared to nication, ring the proceflion, or any part of the fcrvice: and if the chorifler biihop died within a month of his elcdion, hii exequies were folemnized with a pomp this inllitution.

aufwerat>lc

h

I^OltSWI^nH 'CATinLlDlLO..

<:)('

mr

,^tn//i/,'Pitt''. 'f.M./;/ .^

//i< i/,r ./,,

liirouo-ii

ElSPEYGHl^M GaI

1/(1/,/ ,/]/,,//r//

./„t.i,

,\',-"i;jjlM

y/l..,,r/,

r/

,

h^///'/r/.

N

W

R

anfuerable to

H.

241

as all other bi-

were, was buiicd in his pojUificalibus.\

llioj>i

There were formerly

now

and he,

dignitv,

liis

C

I

but

in the i.ovycr eight bells,

five only.

7iotcd Mcnuments in Church of Norwich.

Account cf the mofl

In the fouth

from

pillar

upon

aile,

the lleps

Cathedral

the

the fouth fide of the

at the weflern door,

is

fixtl^

a very

monument for Henry Fairdean of Norwich, who died May 10, 1702,

neat and curious marble fax,

aged 68, and die

aile.

^vas

buried not

Many

words

the

biiliop

offence to

far

n the mid-

diftmr,

the infcription gave great

in

and chapter, clpecially the wliich by thejr order was

\\'or4s jYafehMfii ar:d Pit,

eroded,

as they

remain

to this day.

At the foot of the oppofite pillar flands the monument of Miles Spencer, i;vlio was made chancellor of Norwich in 1337, and died about the year 1.570, He was re
dinghall, archdeacon of Sudbury, dean of college,

field

now

called Chapple-field Houfe,

manor of Bowthorpe and Colney. The covered with a kind of touch-flone, which is broken and Iplit: much notice was taken of thi$ flone, becaufe men ufed to try their money upon it, lord of the

tomb

^nd

is

the chapter

had

certain rents paid

R

on

it.

Next,

3

f There is a monument erefled to the memory of one thefe boy-billiops, in the cathedral atSalilbury, on which he

of is

reprefented as Handing on a beaft with a lion's head, ann the tongue and tail of a dragon; in allufion to that expreflion of the Pfalmilt,

^read

on

" Conculcabis leonem

the lion

and

the dragon.

ct

draconem

;''

Thou

Ihalt

CITY OF

24«

Next, bchveen the pillars, flancis the monument of Richard Nix, wliich, by rcalon of his having been blind many years before he died, is called the monument of the blind billiop. 1 he arch above it is very beautiful, tlie tomb is low and broad, and faid that there

'tib

cadcrn bell

pillar,

vv:;s

and

hung mav

an altar

yet be Icen on

bottom of work on which

at the

that the iron

ilie fide

the the

of the wellcra

lie either built, or repaired the fouth crols-

pillar.

where the clock flands, as alfo the north crofs-» Upon the aile which leads to the bifliop's palace. outlide of the end of this aile, over the door, is the ftatue of an old perfon, faid to be the ftatue of this He built a crofs in the middle of the marbifhop. ket-place in Nor\vich, which was begun in 1501 in aile

the mavorality of

John

Rightwife, finil'hed in 1503,

ne\v poliflied in 1640, repaired in i/og, and taken ciown in 1732: it was of hee-ftone, very lofty, and as beauteous and comEngland. A few days beon d^aih, 'which was January 14, 1,536, he fore liis appointed two fuihagan biiliops, one at Ipfwich, the odier at Thetford, who were boih confecrated by the While he was archbiihop, March ig following. bifliop, falling under the dilplcafure of king Henry \'11I. to purchafe his peace with him, he Avas forced to cxcha,nge above thirty good manors belonging to after the

manner of

modious

as

a piazza,

any almoil

in

the bifliopri'.k for the abbey of St. Bcnnet's in the Holme and an 3.R of parliament was made, that the ;

Norwich fliould be always abbot of St. Bcnnet's in the Holme, and die abbot of St. Bcnnet's in th? Holme be bifhop of Norwich.

bifliop of

Between the

pillars

monument

of the

the

Parkhurft, tion

ou

ilic

let

up

next above biOiop Nix, Aands

much cUcemed

eallcrn

piliai-.

bifhop,

John

an infcripHis image, engraved oii

by. dean Gardiner,

vyith

brafs.

N O R was taken away

brafs,

He

died l-ebruary

Between the the beautiful

2,

\V

I

C

H.

243

the time of the civil wars.

in

1574.

pillars

next bifliop Parkhnrft, flood

monument

of bifhop

Edward Scambler,

of Canterbury, was above a it aged 85 1394, yard and half hi;2,h, with his effigies in alabafkr lying upon it, and inclofed with an high iron grate; but in the time of the civil wars the grate was taken a\vav, the Itatue broken, and the free-flone pulled down as far as the inward brick-work, \vhich, being

houOiold chaplain

who

May

died

7,

:

was afterwards cleared

unfightly,

between the

About

to the archbifliop

pillars

left

forty years after

void,

its

as

off, it

and the fpace

now

remains.

ruination, in i6gi,

James

Scambler, of Wokerton in Norfolk, efcp great grandfon to this bifliop, ereclcd on the eaft pillar a handfome monument to his memory, with a new inicription

upon

it.

Near to bifliop Nix, under a broad white flonc, William Bentham, redor of lafburgh, and min fter of St. Giles and St. Gregory's in Norwich. He died Feb. 27, 1730, aged 37. The epitaph on the Hone \vas made by the dean of Litchfield. lies

Over-againft bifliop Parkhurft ^\'as buried George who was born at Berwick, and educated at Cambridge; made firft a minor canon, fecondly a

Gardiner,

prebendary, thirdly archdeacon of Norwich at length chaplain to queen Elizabeth,- and dean of this church, where he prelidcd iixteen years, as appears bv the ;

put over his grave in the arch of the inflituted fuccefil^-eIv into the churches of Helicfdrn, VVefliow, Blofield, Forncet and Afhill, infcription

wall.

He was

and died

hi

1585.

R

4

On

:

CITY OF

244

On tion,

wall in rbe next arch, towards ti}C partimonument of the learned Dr. 'ICdmund

the is

the

Hevingham, and prebendary of this he was chaplain to the lord keeper Covenuy, and died 0£lober 5, 1670, Porter, re6lor of

church forty-three years:

Againft the wall under the window next the door of the partition, is the figure of a fl;elcton, witj^ thefe old Englifli diimes upon his breafl: All you that do

this place

pajs

by.

Remember Death, for yuu mujl As you are jww, cenjo was I, And as I am, Jo JJiall you be.

Under

the feet

Thomas Gooding

is

die;

this

here doth flay,

Waiting for God's Jiidgtiient day.

Near nvith

clerk,

under a narrow white flone, lies Cornehus Manly, laywho died Leb. 25, 1718, aged 31: and by to the fkeleton,

a hand upon

it,

the north fide of this flone

a large black flone,

is

under which lies Richard YIevvard, organifl, who was born at Winchefler, apd died Ofiober 15, betweei:^ Upon it were thefe very the years 1660 and 1670. remarkable vcrfes, which are now in a manner quitq j^'orn

out:

Hen

lies

Of faith,

a perfect harmony

and

truth,

and

loyalty,

And whatfoever virtues can Be reckon d up, was in this man: His facred

ajlies

here abide,

W/io in God's fervice liv

But

d and dyd;

noiu by death advanced higher,

Toferve in

the Cclejiial Choir.

God

fave the King,

:

:

N O R Upon tition, J

\V

I

C

IT,

245

the pillar between the two doors of the parthe form of a monument, eredecl June 15,

is

622, to the memory of William Inglott, ojganift, buried December 31, 1621. At the bot-

who was

tom is depided his effigies, laid at full length, with two of the choir over it, each with a wreath of bay jn one hand, and in the other hand, the one a fmging-book, and the other an hour glafs and on the top is Fame blowing her trumpet, with thcfe verfes ;

jjuder her

Here William Wlwfe For Defcant

Inglott,

art in mujick,

organijl, this

d-oth rejl^

cathedral blejsd.

for Voluntary, all;

moji,

He pajl on organ, [ong, and Virginal. He left this life at the age oj fixty-feven. And now 'mongji angels all Jings St, in Heavens His fame Jlies Jar, his nayne Jhall never die. So art and age here In the north fleps

to the

upon

the weflern door,

at

with the

aile,

croiun his jnemoryj

the fifth pillar from the is

a battered

monument,

of one playing on the harp, erefted of Ofbert Parlley, finging-man, 15S5,

effigies

memory

ypon which

are thefe verfes

Here lies the man, whoje name infpite of death Renowned lives, by hlafl of golden fame; Whofe harmony furvives his vital breath,

f

Whofefliill no pride did pot, nor }Vhofe low eflate

was

blefi

no blame:

life

with quiet mi?id.

As our fweet cords with difcord mixed be; life, in feventy and four years entwind,

\Vhofe

Asfalleth mellowed apples from the tree: JVhofe deeds luere rules,

Who

whofe words were verity,

here a finging-ma?i did Jpeiid his days,

full fifty years, in our church melody,

HU

memory fliinci

bright,

whom

iktis

we praife.

.

In

C

^45

In the middle

T Y

I

O F

on the north

aile,

over-agalnft Prideaux, ^vho

fide,

Humphrey

chancellor Spencer, hes

He was born at Padftovv in died Nov. i, 1724. Cornwall, May 3, 1648; was thircffon to Edmund was vicar of TrowJe Prideaux, efq. of the faid place and dean of Norwich a pcrfon very much afflidcd, and in the time of his illncfs wrote the Connection of the Old and New Tcftament, a book very much ;

;

approved

of.

A little

Nix^

higher fouthward, ovcr-againfl bifhop

under a very large fione that had formerly a large brafs plate upon it, was buried fir Francis Southwell, defcended from thofe of great nam.e and e(late in Norfolk, who formerly poffcffed W'oodrifing, where Some of the brafs they had a fine park for deer. flone. upon fccn the nails may yet be In the niche oppofite to bifiiop

under a black marble

Thomas

Dalton,

flone,

gent.

monument,

Ni:;'s

Hes buried the body of

\vho died Dec. 26,

17^7,

aged 29 years,

On

the fouth fide of this inclofure lies dean Her-

bert Aftlev, rector of

FouUham and Thimblcthorpe,

and died June 8, 16S1, aged 63. He was fon of Herbert APilcv, of Plymouth in Devonfliire, and upon his accidental coming into Norfolk, was taken into the patronage of hr

who him

looking upon

Jacob and

him

fir

Ifaac Adley,

as their kinfman,

to feveral livings in this county,

preferred

and marrying

with a Hobart, he was by the endeavours of that family made fnfl a prebend, and then dean he painted and beautifully adorned the organ at his own charge. :

Upon door,

is

the partition wall, on the nordi fide of the a neat

monument

for Barbarv,

widow

ol

dean

ARley;

N O R

\V

C

I

H.

247

March 20, iC')2, a^^ed 54, was die John Hobart, of Wcybread in Suirolk. efq. She repaired and adorned the well front of die church, which had been much damaged by the mjury of time and men.

Aillcv;

file

died

ilaugliter oi

Under

the large ftonc

door of the partition

at the

was buried Walter Hart, chaplain to William Pole, eail of Suffolk, and made billiop in the reign of The king had before nominated king Ilenrv VI. John Stanbury, provofl of Eton college, to the bifhoprick, but the earl beguiled him of it, by procuring the pope to bellow it on his chaplain. He built the over-thwarc flone partition, or rood-loft, on which great crucifix w-as

the

placed

;

beautiiied the roof,

and paved the body of the church.

Over

the door

carved a bull, which was his coat of arms, and in the fouth corner is a hart in water, as a rebus of his name, Walter Hart, and upon the door was a plate ot brafs, wiih in the north corner of the wall,

Latin verfes infcribed,

which was

May

Between the fide,

17,

thorpe,

who

wife of

fir

On

and

the choir,

monument of dame

on the north Elizabeth Cal-

She was firft: the died Dec. 24, 1582. Francis Calthorpe, and afterwards wife of

John Culpepper,

ed a

fhewing the time he died,

1472.

partition

ftands the

is

efq.

the fame fide,

monument

for

upon

the partition wall,

is

erect-

W^illiam Burleigh, efq. born at

Liccham in Norfolk: he died April 14, 16S3, aged 53 and by hmi, under a flat flone with three birds ;

upon

it,

lies las

wife,

who

died Sept. 3, 1679. the cloiltcr next

his beneficence, that fide of

By trie

church was handiomely paved, the former pavement having been broken, and die (tones taken awav. Oil

C

«4S

On

T Y

I

O

F

behind the dean's flail, h*es dean of Norwich af-^ of king Charles reftoration II. the He died July ter Henry lit Ion of was Crofts, of Peding1670; 27, the other fide,

John C roils, who was

the hrft

ton in BedfordfhirG, and to the lord \Villiam Crofts. prefcnt organ was fet up by this dean and chapter in 1664, in the fame place where the former or-

The

gan flood, which was pulled down, broken, jind pelade

away with

fold,

in 164^.

In the fouth aiie, between the door of the partition, and the uppermpft door of the cloifter, under ^ flone with a r^-ven upon it, lies Thamafine, the daughter of Clement Corbet, chancelW of Norwich,

She was (as the infcriptiorj denotes) religious, pious, prudent and beneficent, a faithful -daughter of the church of England, and kept laer virginity tp the day of her death, which was July 5, l66_5. At the entrance into the cloiPier by the door aforefaid, was an handfume monument for one of the Bi-r gots, which was pulled down in the time of the civil wars,

and a place

left

void, as

it

flill

remains, in

Upon the flone here, were the wall over the door. \he figures of two perfons on their knees at praver.

He

either built,

or beautified the arch

by

it,

which

Jeads into the church.

of the choir, upon the cafl fide bifliop has a feat, is a monuof the pillar ment to the memory of Stephen Knight, an EfTej^ gentleman, ere6led by his daughter Mary Knight, a

In the fouth

fide

where the

woman

of fingular qualifications, and mofl exemplary He was of the privy-

pietv towards her parents.

chaoiber to Chailcs I. and principal regifier to three bilhops of Noiwich, died April 17, 1O64, aged 73, and lies under a flat ilone in the foudi aide below the fleps.

;

O R

1st

W

1

C

H.

249

Mr. Knight, is a died who Moore, Jan. 8, 1725, monument for John principal Moore, bifliop to fon He was •aged 46. under hkewiCe a flat lies and bifliop, the rcgiflcr to fteps. the below aiJe, fame the in ftone

On

the oppofite pillar fronting

On the north fide of this pillar, is a monument of black and white marble for Robert Pepper, chancellor of Norwich, who died Nov. 5, 1700, aged 69. He had two wives; the firft was Mary, daughter of WiUiam Brook, of Norwich, merchant, by whom he had two Ions and four daughters fhe died ;

27, 1676, aged 34, and was buried under a His fecond wife was Eleflone below the fleps.

April flat

anor, daughter of

Lumley Dean, of

in Herefordfhire, efq.

who

Upton monument to

Bifliop's

creeled this

memory.

his

Between tar,

this pillar

(lands the

and the

next, towards the alof bifhop James Goldwell,

monument

Edward IV. his efagies are in ftone, with a lion at his feet, \vhich was his arms, as apHe repaired the pears on his coat above the tom.b. did many good works call end of the church lived in great eftcem, and died much lamented, Fe-

iecretarv to king

;

bruary 1498.

Next above

bifliop Goldwell,

•where the iron grate Hands,

between the

was buried

pillars

bifliop John

a perion Wakering, lord keeper of the great feal endowed with many good qualities, and had the epithets of pious, modeft, chaftc, liberal and kind, juftHe built the cloifter in the ly beftowed upon him. bifliop's palace, which before the late civil wars was covered with a handforac roof: he built alfo the chapter-houfe, which being ruinous v/as taken down and built anew: he gave many ornaments to the ;

.

monaftery;

C

l5tj

T Y

I

O

F

governed his diocefe with much phimonaflery lived in great reputation, and died at his dence manor in Thorpe, April g, 1423. ;

;

On

the foiith fide of the chapel adjoining to

vSt.

Luke's, in a gilded vault, under a gilded arch in the xvall, was buried William Bcaucharap, who buik it

honour of the blelTed Virgin Mary and All-Saints, by an old Latin infcription upon a flone in the outfide of the wall under the window, which

in

as appears

now

The

roof of this chapel Is kept the confiftory, or biThe founder hereof might be defcendfliop's court. ed from Guy Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, in 1297,

is

quite obliterated.

richly gilded,

and

who by marrying came

pofleffed of

in

it is

into the family of the Tonies,

many

be-*

lands and manors In Norfolk,

and, as feems probable, was William Beauchamp lord Abergavenny, who was patrom of Bergh cum Apton, within five miles of Norwich, out of Berflrcet

gates,

and preiented

clerks to that living

lit

1406, afterwards.

Upon the wall, on the weft fide of this chapel, is a curious monument for Thomas Batchelor, who died July 28, 1729, aged 65. In

St.

Luke's chapel, which

jchurch, at the entrance

monument belonging the Bofvvells in Kent morien's,

thou wilt die,

Next

to

on the

Is

left

now

hand,

upon

It

are thefe words, morieris.

morieris,

thou wilt die,

prior Bofvvell

is

an arched

a relation of

to prior Bofvvell, ;

the parifliIs

the

Richard Browne, cfq. on which of broom, with golden flowers.

i.

e.

thou wilt die.

monument of one

is his

arms, a bunch

On

:

NORWICH. Under

msy

53!

a large ftone over-againft the font,

\'inn,

Norwich

his wife.

efq.

in 1677,

Mayor

Sec.

He was

in i6go,

lies

Jer-

flitri-T

and died

of

in 1703,

aged 73.

On

the fouth fide, among the feats, were of late {landing crofs-wife, which belonged to tombs two two priors of this conA'cnt they were very ancient, and of fubftantial marble, and u-ere taken away to make the feats more commodious. ;

On

north fide of the church, in the north a ftone in the wall towards the go-

the

upon

crofs ailc,

ing out,

Hen To At

infcription

is this

lies

thf.

joy,

Corps, the Ghojl

the

lengilt it

:

whidi

is

gone

fought^ found hy Chrift alone: iji life is

See lohat advantaze death has brou^hl.

George March, verger of

ihis

church,

1G40.

At the back of the

feats, near to the door, lies daughter of Anthony Loveday, of Chcfton in Suffolk, gent. She died Ocl. 23, 1639, and upon a black ftone laid over her is this

Mary Loveday,

HaJIe reader, ajid away, for fear^ Left thou doft turn idolater;

For

here love, virtue, grace

In a true virgin-knot were

and

wit.

knit.

The

beginnings of the verfes are a little legible, but the endings are almofl quite obliterated.

In the north fide of the choir, upon the fouth fide of the pillar on the left hand fide of the fteps, is the monument of Thomas Little, prebendary of this church,

C

2^2

I

T Y

O F

church, chaplain to the lord keeper Wright, and who died April 21, 1731, a^ed 66.

miniftcr of Lvnn,

Upon

the next pillar

is

a brafs plate, Tvith a Latin

memory of Edward Hall, youngs Hall, who died on Chriftmas-evc,

to the

infcription,

fon to biOiop 1642, aged 23.

eft

In the crofs palTage from

Mary, the

fir

Thomas Erpingham

of John Hobart, of Weybread in Sufiblk, efq. and daughter of fir Hen. Fenton, of Playford in Suffolk, knight of the Bath. She died Oa. 1, 16S5, aged 78. lies

8,

reli£l

Alfo John Spendlove, prebendary, 1666, as likewife his wife, over

infcription all in capitals

Dea7i Sucklings

For a far

better

who

died July

whom

is

this

;

prshend Spendlove

daiig/itcr,

chaugd

s

wife^

this prefent life.

March

the sift,

1656.

Alfo Edward Suckling, dean he was reflor of and Hellefden, and died in 1628. Upon his ftone was a brafs infcription, which is torn oft^. :

Blofield

Lower down

lies Vincent Pearce, profeffor of dichaplain to three kings, and prebendary of this cathedral, who died April 4, 1673.

vinity,

Near is

upon a flat ftone, a Latin infcription, which Anne, the mojt beloved ivife of Fiilk

the fteps towards die altar,

m

a brais plate widi

Englifh Robarts,

IS

thus

:

prebendary of

this

church,

and daughter of

Richard Skinner, gent, father of one and dren

,

by his beloved wife

Ami: ; died March

twetity chilsr^, '

1627.

The

;

N O R W 7bc

faid Fnlk.

and

St.

C H.

I

253

Robarts tvas minifter of St. Saviour's Clement's, and vicar of Trowfe, died April 8, 16^50, aged 71, and was buried in the fouih crofs aile, near the clock. In the north

aile,

[as chapel, lies

near the door that leads to Je-

William Denny, who died March

fir

and Frances his wife, w'ho died Feb, 12, he was recorder of Norwich, and 1631, aged 63 one of the counfellors at law to king Charles I. 26, 1642,

:

In Jcfus'

Ciiapel

a large tomb, that

flands

formerly a brafs infcription about

it,

faid to

had have

been removed hither out of our Lady's chapel ; when it was taken down, old Mr. Spendlove, who was a prebendary fifty years, and Mr. Sandlin, who lived eighty-nine years, and was fmging-man in the time of queen Elizabeth, ufed to fay it was the tomb-flone of the to

fir

Windhams, which

in all likelihood bclono-ed

Thomas Windham, one

counfellors,

lince

it is

of king

manifeft,

that

Henry VIII. 's on a tomb in

church there has been a Latin infcription, in Fn^lifh thus this

Pray for the foul of Thomas Windham, Knight, of Eleanor and the lady Elizabeth, his wives, ^c. which Jame Thomas was one of King Henry the Sth's Counfellors,

And

and one of

his

guard;

as there are three perfons

fcription,

fo

there

are the

alfo vice-admiral.

mentioned in the in-

figures of three perfons

upon

the tomb; they were engraven on brafs, w^hich, with the infcription, were taken away in the time of the civil wars.

On the north wall of this chapel is a brafs plate, with Latin verfes of which the iaft hne c;ids with S

Pater

C

254

I

T Y

O F

Paler Mjler, infcribed to the memory of Ralph Palvenoft, Ciifios CarcJiellce, who lived in the time ot' iing Henry VII. Above was his coat of arms, viz, fix ears of wheat, vAih. a bordure of cinque-foils, "vvhich v/ere wafiied

out

when

the wall was whitened.

In the north lies

alfo

ai!e, beneath the fleps next the altar, Mrs. Mary Echard, who died July 15, 1714; Mrs. Ann Echard, who died Nov. 6, 1710,

and upon the pillar over ment to their memory.

the fleps

is

a neat

monu

In the choir, near the high altar, flands the monument of bifhop William Herbert de Lozin^a, which js commonly known by the name of the Founder's tomb it is inclofcd with a high iron grate; ;

round

it

are the

arms of the

prebendaries, and

upon

it

is

the dean and fix a long infcription to

fee,

memory. He was born in Normandy, and was Fefchamp in that province; was in high favour wiih king William Rufus, with whom he came over into England in 1087, and was in the fame year made abbot of Ramfey in Huntingdonfhire. In 1091 he was made bifhop of Thciford, from whence he tranllated the fee to Norwich, April g, 1 094. He w as lord high chancellor of England in the time of Hen. J. and went, on two embaffies to the Under both kings he was a very wife counpope. his

prior ol

and a holy bifhop, always mindful of his and what wealth he obtained by the king's favour he expended here among his flock in promoting piety he founded hofpitals and monallcries he built in manv places of Norfolk and Suffolk the church of St. Nicholas at Yarmouth, St. Margaret at Lynn, St. Mary at Elraham, and many moreover, he built this cathedral, of which others he fcllor,

dioccfe

;

:

;

:





NORWICH. he himfelf laid the

firfl

(lone,

in 1096,

infcrlption thereon, \vhich in Englifh

Lord Herbert Father,

of

laid the Jirft Jlojie

the Son,

and of

;

is

255

with a Latin thus

:

name of

in the

the

Holy Ghofl, Amen.

the

This church he dedicated to the Holy Trinity, and by papal and regal authority confirmed it the mother church of Norfolk and Suffolk. On the fouth fide hereof he erected a monaitery for fixty the order of St. Benedict, to celebrate di-

monks of

and on the north fide he and his fucceffors. He 1119, and was buried in this cathe-

vine fervicc in the church built

;

for himfelf

a palace

died July 22, dral.

Next to bifliop Herbert, on the north fide, is a very large flone with this infcription onlv, viz.



Depofitum Montacutii,

He

Montague.

Next

bifliop

all in

tion,

Henry

Bejl,

jXorwich,

1629.

;

i.

Here

e.

lies

bifhop

Gent,

is

viz.

a flone with this infcrip.

Here

lyeth the body

principal regifler to the

died the



day of

,

of Mr.

hijliop

if

Anno Domini

_,^^-

My God

On

Montague

capitals,

who

Epifcopi

died in April 1641.

time is fliort, the longer calls

is

my

refl,

them foonefi ivhc?n he loves

the fouth fide of bifhop Herbert

fhop John Overal,

who was

clecled

bcfl.

was buried biby the dean

May 21, 1618, and died May 12, 1615. without an infcription to his memorv, till Dr. Cofin, bifhop of Durham, who had formerly been his chaplain, in 1669, ereded a monument for him upon the next pillar at the altar. and chapter

He

laid

S 2

Near

CITY OF

S36

Near the above place died July 28,

Near

to

lies

biiliop

Corbet,

who

1635.

bifhop Herbert was buried William Turb, who was chofcn biiliop by his

prior of Norwich,

fellow

monks

:

he died January i 7, 1 1 74. In his was by^ome accident almoft

time, 1171, the church

burnt down.

Near to blfliop Herbert was likewife buried the learned bifliop John of Oxford, who was highly in favour with Henry II. He writ the Britifh Hiflory, and continued it to his own time he rebuilt this cathedral, which had been lately burnt, and added to it divers ornaments, which before fcemed wanting alio he built alms-honfes for poor, fick and he founded the church of Holy impotent perfons Trinitv at Ipfwich, and repaired divers houfss there which had been deftroycd by fire. He died June 2, and in the fame year this cathedral v.as 3 200 ;

;

:

;

again burnt.

Not warlike

far

from

and While he was a

bifiiop Herbert

was

Henry Spencer, who of

bilhop,

fat

in

bifliop,

this

fee

alfo

buried the

a foldier v/as

made

thirty-feven years.

he overcame the rebellious

of John Liller, a dyer of Norwich, and led an army into Flanders on behalf of Urbane VI. againd the ?.ntl-pope Clement. He died Augaft 23,

forces

3406, and had a large commendatory epitaph let oa tomb, in brafs, wherein he was filled a beloved ioldier, a holy bilhop, and champion of the church. liii.

In the middle of the choir was buried biiliop William Rugg, born at North Repps, who was obliged by Henry VIII. to exchange all the manors of the fee, lor the revenues of hii abbey of St. Bennet .

I

W

N O R Iknnet

in

tlie

I

C

25J

Holm, under pretence of

poiTeiflons of the bifhoprick.

the

H.

January 1349, and died

m

He

encreafiiig

religned iu

September 1550.

this church was buried, but vvhcreaboitts there no hillory or traditic^.n to inform us, birhop Everard, who was depofcd for his crueky in 1143, and

In

is

Bifliop Goodwin fays, he died October 15, 1150. but did nothing memorable while he was bifhop ;

he founded an hcipical, Paul, at Norwich, to which dedicated it to St. and Henry I. feveral bifhops and others, were benefactors. It was founded and endowed for the foul of the

Monaflicon

tells us,

that

bifhop Herbert, and the fapport of poor people.

church was buried Thomas Percy, broearl of Northumberland, who was made bifhop when he was but 21 ycais of age, by the In

this

ther to the

authority of the pope, at the requelt of Henry of Lancafler, againli the will of the monks,

duke

who

In h's time could not be perfuaded to chufe him. the fleeple and belfry were blown down, to repair which he gave four hundred marks out of his own treafury, and the clergy of the diocefe contributed nine pence in the pound. He died at Blofield, Aug. and in his will, gave the lands about 8, 1369, Carleton, Kiraberlev and Wicklewood, unto a chauntry or chapel, which he founded to fay mafs for his io\x\

'

continually.

Alfo in this church was buried Anthony Beck,

who was

clerk in the

court of

Rome, and made

bi-

he was a perfon of an fhop by the pope's mandate unquiet fpirit, very much hater!, and, being poifoned by his own fervants, died Dec. 19, 1343. :

S 3

Alfo

258

C

'

Alfo in

this

T y

I

church

O F

u'as buried

biOiop

Thomas

Brown, a ftrenuous alTerter of the rights of the chuich againft the citizens who, in his time, not having forgot the havock made upon them by the monks, with one confent contrived to deprive the He died in church of all its liberties and privileges. poor fchoto money of large fum and left a 1445, ;

]ars

of

this

diocefe,

who were

fludents

in either of

the univerfities.

church was buried bifhop John Hopyouth was a Black Friar ot the orHe died in 135S, through der of St. Dominick. grief, as it is thought, for the lofs of queen Mary, whofc chapl;ain he was, and as fuch was by her noIn his will he gave part of his minated to this fee. books to the Black Friars of Norwich, if they were ever rellored to their convent again, and another Alfo in

ton,

who

this

in his

part to the cathedral for a library.

William Redman, who died in his palace, 1602, had his funeral honorably folemnized in this cathedral on the 2d of Deccember folHe gave one hundred marks to Trinity lowing. College in Cambridge, to line and adorn the walls Bifliop

Sept. 25,

of the library with boards, well joined together.

Bifhop John Grey, king John's beloved favorite, lord chief juftice of England and deputy of Ireland, a perfon of great reputation, who being lent ambafiador to the pope, died on his return, at Poidou, 1214, was brought into England and baIn 1210, he built a palace iled in this cathedral. at Gaywood near Lynn, for himielf and his luccel-.

0£L

24,

fors in this bifhoprick.

N O R

W

C H.

I

259

Bifhop John Salmon, lord chancellor of England, being fent on an embaffv to France, returned

who

at Folkllone, near Dover in Kent, 1325, was likevvife buried in this church.

and died

lick,

July

6,

He built the great hall in the bifliop's palace, alfo the long chapel on the eaft fide of the palace, which was demoliflied

in the time of the civil wars, and the lead that covered it taken away and fold: he

likewife built the chapel of St.

W'hich

is

now

the free-fchool,

John

the Evangelift,

and endowed

the re61orv of Weft-hall in Suffolk,

for the

it with mainte-

nance of four priefts, to be appointed by the piiQr and convent, to pray for his foul, his father Solomon's foul, and the foul of his mother Amicia, as alfo for the fouls of all his predeceffors and fucceffors in the biflioprick of Norwich. He gave twelve pieces of land in CrcflTingham to the chamberlain's office, for the better fupply of the monks cloathing, and the chuich with

furniflied

manv

precious vcfim-cnts

and ornaments. In this church was alfo buried bifhop William Ayermine, who was Lord Keeper of the Rolls, Lord Chancellor and Lord Treafurcrr he died Mar. 2", 1336, at Sheering near London, and ga^'e 200I. to the mo«ks of this church to buy lands, and pav falaries to two of their body, the cellerer and u,ndci cellerer,

In Jan,

to fay maffes gaily for his foul.

this

who

abbey

church was alfo buried bifhop Thomas died in September, 1500, at^ Folkflone

in Kent.

in our Lady's chapel, or the chapel of the Viro^in

Mary, which flood at the eafl end of the church, but being old and ruinous was demolifhed in the time aldean Gaidiner, was buried bidiop Walter Suffield, S 4 by

CITY OF

25o

by •whom

was

it

and wrought

at his

hofpital,

now

pious perfon,

He was a very and many miracles were

built.

tomb. called

He St.

cliaritatle faid to

be

likewife built St. Giles's

Helen's,

in

Bidiopfgate-

about the year 1248, and endowed it w'ah feveral farms, for the maintenance of a mailer, fix. priefls, and certain poor people, and the entertainbut ment of pilgrims and flrangers in their travels fireet,

;

what deferves the highefl. commendation is, that when corn was dear, he fold all his plate, and gave the money to the poor, that they might have wherewithal He was chofen bifhop of Norto buy them bread. wich by the monks In 1243, was confccrated at Carrowe abbey, without Conisford gates, in 1^44, and died

at

Colcheftcr

May

iS, 1237.

chapel was likewife buried billiop Simon in 1266, was laid He v/as chaplain Suffield. his bifhop predeceffor by to king Henry III. and one of the judges or juiUces

In

this

Wanton, or Walton, who dying

of the kingdom. In this chapel was alfo buried bifliop Roger Skerwing, who died at his manor of South Elmhara Jan. In his time the church was fired, the 50, 127S. city rifled, and many flain in a quarrel between the

monks and

citizens.

this chapel alfo, at the head of bifliop Suffield, buried bilhop William Middlcton, who died ac was He his manor of Tarling in Effex, Sept. i, 1288. repaired this cathedral, which was burnt in the time of bifliop Skerwing, and confecrated it in the pre-

In

fence of king

Edward

I.

and many

biiliops

and no-

blemen.

la

;

W

N O R

C

I

H.

261

In this chapel likewife, at the feet of bifhop Suff.eld, was buried bilhop Alexander Tottington, who died in 14.13: he repaired tlje palace and manorhoufes,

which were

alrRoit fallen

down when he came

to the fee.

Rifhop Edward ReynoldvS. who died July '29, 1676, aged 76, was laid in a vault at the fourh end of the communion-table, in the New Biiiiop's chapel, which he built by himielf, where he bar; a monument, He was chaplain vvirh his efSgy, to his memory. Charles II. and the firft biihop after the Renotwithflanding he had takeu\hc covenaiu. aiid was one of the affembly of diviucs. f

'

kino;

fioration,

Bifhop Anthony Sparrow, who died May 19, 16S5, aged 74, was buried in the fame chapel on the other fide the communion table, where he has He was a roylikewife a monunicnt to his memory. ahlt, very zealoas

and gave 400I. church, after tireadful

fire

it

of

for

our

ecclefiailical conftitution,

Paufs had been mifcrably defaced by d^e tou'ards

London

the re-buiiding St.

in i566.

In the chapel called Our Lady the Lef% or Beanchamp's chapel, the place where the bifhop's Cnnfiflory-courL is held, is an elegant monument cre6icd' to tl;e memory oi Thomas Batchelor, L. L. B. he died June 28, 1729, aged 6^. In the fame chapel, under a bkick marble ftone. buried Robert Nafh, L.L.D. and chancellor of this diocefe: he died in 1752, aged 62.

lies

On

Luke's buried Eullock, twenty-cue years dean of this

the north fide of this church, near

chapel, under a large black marble flone,

Dr.

Thomas

St.

lies

cathedral

C

262

I

T Y

O F

cathedral: he died May 30, 1760, aged G7 and underneaih the fame ftone lies buried Sarah Bullock, his wife, who died April 21, 1775, aged S^. ;

Near the above ftone lies buried Mrs, Willins, late wife 10 the Rev. Mr. Willins, facrift of this cathcdral:

flie

On

died Sept.

1

1773,

6,

'^o^*^

37-

Luke's chapel, a. very the meinorv of Sufanna, the wife of John Addey, efq. alderman of flie died May 24, 1765, aged 30. this city: the

neat mural

Near the neat

fouth fide of

St.

monument

ere6led to

wood,

window,

eaft

monument

is

in

creeled 10 the

years

thirty-two

the

fame chapel,

is

a

memorv

curate of

of John Harhe this chapel :

died Jan. 21, 1691, aged 65.

In the fouth tranfcept is an elegant monument to memory of William Rolfe, elq. who left looi. to the clergymens widov/s, and other generous benefa61ions to the poor: he died April 12, 1754, aged llie

84

years.

On

the

north

fide,

Edmund Hubbard,

A.

dral: he died Dec. 23,

In the north tranfept

near the akar,

M. prebendary 1

lies

interred

of this cathe-

741, aged 47.

is

a fmall, but elegantly neat

mural monument to the memory of John Prefs, efq. who was mayor of this city in the year 1753, and died 0<^ober 1773, aged 76.

Towards

the fouth, leading to St. Luke's chapel, an handfome monument to the memory of Mrs. Freeman, daughter of Stephen Gardiner, efq. flie died Sept. 20, 1763, aged 49. In is

;

NORWICH.

263

the roiuh alle, leading to St. Luke's chapel, the remains of feveral refpedable perdepofitcd are fons, who have lately died, and are buried under

In

black marble mentioned

flones,

pardcularly thofe as under-

:

John Marcon, Efq. John Miller, Elq. and his wife. Mr. Thomas Woodyer. Mr. Abraham Clarke. Mr. llaac Chambers. Mr. Smith, late of Yarmouth. Mr, Charles Catton. The Rev. Lynn Smean, "^^ r Canons r, 1T-i T tox, V The Rev. John 1

r

,1

ot ,



this

o

Ga-

,

,

^^'''^^^'•

The Rev. Wm.

Smith, ^ Mr. Wm. Smith, many \ears trcafurer Dean and Chapter, Sec. Sec.

Of The

cloifler,

church,

is

England

;

to the

the Cloifter. on the fouth fide of the quadrangle of the kind in are not exadly equal in their di-

fituated

the largefl the fides

menfions: the length of that next the church, or the north fide, being one hundred and feventy-three feet five inches, and the breadth, meafuring on the pavement, thirteen feet nine inches ; the fouth fide, one hundred and feventy-two feet four inches, by twelve feet two inches ; the ealt fide one hundred and feventy-five feet, by twelve feet three inches and the weft fide, one hundred and feventy-five feet there are alfo by twelve feet two inches two ranges of benches, or feats, round the whole, except on the north fide, where there is only one,

fix i^jches,

fjjch

:

of the breadth of eighteen inches



the heighth

C

204

is fifteen feet fix

I

T Y

inches.

The

O F flone roof

is

adorned

with various fcripture pieces in fculpture, and many in particular, the Vifions of the legendary ones Revelations, the Lafl. Judgment, the Iegcn4s of St. Chriflopher, St. Laurence, &c. remain very perfect'. ;

At

the grand entrance, at the fouth-weO; corner, carved in flone, the Efpoufals, or facrament of marriage it having formerly been the cuflom to place the couple v/ho came to be married at the church door, where the prieft joined their hands, and performed the greateft part of the matrimonial office are,

;

;

and

was here that the hufband endowed

it

his

i.viie

with the portion, or dowry contracted for, thence called, Dos ad ojliura EccUJue, or the dowry at the

church door. as vou enter the cloifter from hence, on hand, are the two lavatories, where the monks ufed to v.-afh their hands before they went Over one of them is into the common eating hall. carved a fox in a pulpit, in the habit of a fecular

As foon

the

left

This holding up a goofe to his auditory. many others of the like kind, intended as a reflection on the fecular clergy, or parifii priefis, to whom the monks, or regulars, bore an inveterate

prieft,

was, as were

hatred.

The pavement of the north fide of the cloiRer was torn up in the great rebellion, and re-laid by In this alley queen ElizaVViiliiim Burleigh, efq. beth dined in public, when flie vifitcd Norwich in 1578.

In

memory

whereof,

her majefty's

arms,

of the nobility who attended her, were painted on the wall of the chuich, bat arc now cn-

and

thofe

lirelv efiaced.

In

O R

I^

\V

I

C H.

25-

In the fouth wall remain the niches, wherein the towels and other linen were depofited for the daily

common

hall, to which the butteries, celand oLher oifices joined. The dormitory, or dorter, and the infirmary, hater or firrha' ry, were alfo on this fouth fide.

ufe of the lars,

kitchens,

The

long inclofed gallery, where the fick monks flill remains entire, as the priors lodge beyond which were the gradoth, now the deanry naries and other buildings, extending down the lower ufed to walk,

;

Clofe,

The

now

converted into dwelling-houfes.

ftone buildings on the right

hand of

entrance, were the flrangers lodgings, the

the faid

moh

fouihern chamber of which is now the library and chapler-houfc: upon the north end of thefe lodgings, the flrangers

liall

abutted,

and extended

itfelf

againft

part of the well fide of the cloiflcr, behind the

which v\'as the entrance into of that fide, and the other parts of the

tories, reft

near

to

were divided into

On

It;

la-s

a-

tlie

cloiiler,

cells.

the eafl fide, adjoining to the paffage leading

to Life's Green,

flood the prioi's chapel, dedicated it was entirely demoliflied at the Reformation, and the (cite of it is at prefent a yard Before the foundation of to the adjoining houfe. to St.

Edmund

this chapel,

On

;

the priors always uf2d that of

St.

Luke.

of the quadrangle are the dean and chapters offices, and on the north fide of the entrance to Life's Green, the gaol or dungeon. The this

paffag<;,

fide

called the dark entry, formerly led to the

dormitory, infirmary, kitchen, and odier offices.

Of

;

C

266

Of On

I

T Y

O F

the Bifhop's Palace.

the north fide of the church ftands the Liriiop's

palace, to

which there was anciently a pafTagc

hom

the door of the north tranfcept, arched over with From this ftone, in like manner with the cloiflers.

palTage you entered the palace at the great or

mon

com-

on part of whofe fcite the prefent chapel The palace, though it (lands in part upon is built. the fame fpot, is not the original one built by the founder of the church, but the work of bifliop Salmon, who entirely pulled down the old one, and hall,

creeled another

upon a much

larger plan.

In 1333, bifliop Nix, juft before

his death,

with

the confent of the prior and chapter, granted a leafe for eighty-nine years to the mayor, fherifiFs, and ci-

Norwich, impowering them, for the honour St. George, to hold the guild and feall St. George in the palace, and to ufe the buttery, pantry, and kitchen, at the north end thereof, at

tizens of

of of

God and

fo held, for the fpace of fourteen days provided neverthelefs, that neither the king, queen, nor any of the nobility were at the palace at that

every feaft

time.

This hall was demolifhed in the grand rebellion, and the lead fold; but this mull have happened after the year 1636, as at that time it was ufed as a public meeting houfc. Since the Refloratlon the palace has received conand moie efpecially in the

fiderable improvements,

prefent century. tation,

It is

now

and the gardens

a very

commodious habi-

are eleganilv laid out.

Of

NORWICH. Of

26-

Jefus Chapel.

Jefus chapel, (ituated on the north fide of the great of the cathedral, the pa{ra,s;e to which laid thro'

altar

the ConfefConary,

^vas originally the

bifhop's

pri-

but that being found inconvenient, on account of its diflance, bifliop Salmon, about the year 1300, agreed with the prior and chapter for a piece of land, lying between the church and the palace, on the eaft fide of the way leading from the church to the palace, upon which he built a chapel to the honour of the Virgin Marv''' it ftood about ten or twelve yards to the fouth of the prefent chapel, and vvas an hundred and thirty feet long, and thirty broad: at the Restoration it was in fo ruinous a condition:|:, that bilhop Reynolds found it incapavate chapel

;

;

ble * In bifhop

this

chapel was a chauntry of three priefts, founded

Ay rem ine

about the year I33r,

who

by

purchafed the ad-

vowfon of Thurveton, or Thurlton, and appropriated it to the hofpital of St. Giles, the mafter of which houfe was to pay out of the annual profits of tliat reftory, fix marks a year, to each officiating chaplain^

who were

to be collated

by the bifhop, and

to have apartments in the palace, and to be found meat, drink,

and lodging

there, at the bithop's coft

they were to pray daily

;

for the foul of the founder and his family, for the king his progenitors, fee,

and and for the welfare of the prefent bifhop of the

and the fouls of

all

In T368 they were

his predecefTors.

reduced to two, on pretence that the profits of the reftory would not pay the ftipends for the whole number, according to the In 1448, bifhop Walter Kart discharged the hoffrom finding any chaplain, from which time the chauntry

foundation. pital

wholly ceafed. t Bifhop Hall, in his

Hard Meafure,

and alderman Lindfey, attended with

fays,

many

"

Sheriff Tofts,

zealous followers, can:ie

CITY OF

268

ble of rcpairation

;

whereupon

lie

pulled

do\vn, and built the prefent chapel.

it

entirely

The

ancient

garden belongin^j^ to the palace, on the eaft fide of it, and the ftables, Sec. join, as they ahvays did, to the rreat entrance.

Mary

St.

in the Marfh.

The meadow, on

part of which this church was was anciently called Cow-Holme, that is, the marili where the cows fed; and that part of the city now called Conisford, ^v•as originally named Couelford, or Cowsford, from the lord or paiTage crofs the river to come at this holm or marfo, the whole of which belonged formerly to the parifli of Thorpe, and devolved with that manor to bifliop Herbeit ; built,

before c:?me into

my

chapel to look for fuperftitious pi61i>res, and re-

and fent for me, to

liques of idolatry,

thofe

windows

full

muft be demoliihed.

mc know

them thev were the

I told

ancient |^and \vorthy bifl:ops, as It

let

they found

of images, which were verv oficnlive, and

St.

picliires

Ambrofe,

St.

of feme

Auftin, &c.

was anfwered me, that they were fo many popes

;

and one

younger man amongft the

reft,

[Townfliend as

terwards] would take v.pon

him

to defend, that every diocefan

bifnop was a pope. tained leave that

I

I

I

perceived af-

anfwered him with fome fcorn, and ob-

might, with the

ieaft lofs,

and defacing of

the windows, give ord,er for taking ojF that offence did, I

by caufmg

knew

the heads of

tlic

;

which

I

pictures to be takea off, lince

the bodies could not offend."

This will in good mea-

manv

cf thefe figures in win-

fure account for our feeding fo

dows without their place.

faces, a piece of white glafs generally fupplying

But thefe furious Reformers did not long keep

their temper, for foon after

th.ej'

not only broke the windows

to pieces, but tore the lead off the roof, totally dernolifhed the building.

and fold

it,

ai;d alraoft

NORWICH.

i269

inhabitants received tne faand till the crament, and were buried at Thorpe before vvhofe time

all its

:

Reformation, all the clergy who poffelTed reftories in Blofield deanry, came in annual procedion to this church, on Whit-Monday, as being within the liBefore bifhop Herbert's time, mits of that deanry. here was a chapel dependant upon the mother church at Thorpe, which that bifhop pulled down and rebuilt,

and gave

it

and convent, who

The

re^lory

with all Cowholm to the prior ever after continued its patrons.

was valued

at 3I. lod.

but paid no

not being taxed: its tenths were 10s. id. fvnodals 1 2d. and procurations 1 3d. it was afterwaid difcharged of tenths, being fworn of no value.

firft fruits,

In 149^,

all

lands and gardens within the

cin6t paid their tithes as

being,

church

and

offerings to

this

from bifhop Herberts time,

pre-

church

the

;

parifti

of the precin£l.

In 1564, John Parkhurft, bifhop of Norwich,

John Tollar, reclor of this parifh, and John Salifburv, dean, together with the chapter, patrons of St. Peter Permountergate, St. Mary in the Marfli, and St. Vedafl, commonly called St. Vaft's or Faith's, agreed to confolidate the faid parifhes

;

at

which

time, all St. Mary's tithes lying in the precinft, and all penfions, and all tithes of the gardens lying oud

of the precinft, on the north fide of St. Vedaft's lane, as inclofed with a wall or pale down to the river, were referved to the re6lor of the new founded redlory of Jefus chapel in the cathedral, now affigned to the pariftiioners of St. Mary dwelling withia the precinct, for a parith church ; and the ornaments, plate, ^c. belonging to St. Mary's, were in

«)nfequence thereof removed thither.

T

Cn

CITY OF

270

On

the Tirfl of June following, by virtue of the of the 37th of Henry VIII. that part of the rectory and panonage of St. Mary aforefaid lying withaft

in the precincl, with all its rights confolidated to the chapel of St. in the (outh aiie of the cathedral

ward

and members, was John the Baptift, ;

from thence

to be called the parifh church of St.

for-

Mary and

lead, bells and buildings of Mary, with the church-yard, and ground on the north and fouth fides thereof, were referved to the ufe of the dean and chapter, and the plate, jewels, books, and other ornaments, removed

John.

St.

The

the church of

John s

to St

fcite,

St.

chapel, for the ufe of the parifliioners.

Mary's church, after remaining fome time and being flripped of Its lead, was converted into a dwclling-houfe, and fo continued till very St.

ufelefs,

It

lately.

hand going

flands in

down

the lower Clofe,

on

the right

to the ferry.

Not long after the confolidation, the dean and chapter defirous of having the fouth aile open and unincumbered, afligncd to the parifliioners the chaSt. Luke for their parifh church ; and the between that chapel and the fouth tranfept, was at the fame time ailoted them for a burial-place for their principal inhabitants, and thus it has continued

pel of aile

ever imce.

The from

The

laft inftitutlon to this

that time

it

prefent curate

The

chapel of

reftory

was

in

1579;

has been held by fequeftrationo is

St,

the Rev.

Mr. James Willins.

Luke has been

thrice

augment-

ed by lou St*

NORWICH. St. Ethelbert's,

271

or St. Albert's,

Parochial thapei, was founded before tlie cathedral, as die utuatioii of its parifli evidendy proves, part of it lying within and part without the limits of The chapel, which flood on the left the precind. hand as you go out of the monaftery gate, at the fouth end of citizeris in

parifh

Tombland, was burnt down by and

the grand infurreiftion in 1272

thereupon

the Marfli

:

when

;

the the

united to that ^of St. Mary in it was agreed that all the parilbion-

dwelling within the precinft fliould pay their dthes and oblations to the re£i:or there, and thofe without the precincl to the redor of St. Cuthbert. ers

After the infurrecftion was appeafed the cidzens, as fome fort of recompence for the injury done to the

convent, built the prefent handfome gate, nith a large chapel over it, dedicated to St. Ethelbert or Albert, now ufed. as part of the biQiop's office. There were four other gates leading into the pretinft,

one of which, now demoliflied, opened into

St; Vedail's lane

another, called the hofpital gate, a third

;

leading to St. Giles's or the great hofpital

opens on

St.

Martin's Plain, and

is

;

called

the bi-

Erpingham's or the lower gate, opens againR the weR end of the cathedral, built as a penance, on a fufpicion of LoUardy, bv fir Thomas Erpingham. The eaftern. part of the precinct is bounded by the river, over which there is, and imraemorially hath been a ferry, the keeper whereof is appointed by patent from the dean and chapter it is called Sandlin's Ferry, from fnop's great gate

;

and the

fourth, called

'

:

Near this one of that name who formerly kept it. ferry was anciently a large canal, communicating with the river, by which all goods, Sec. brought by water, were conveyed into the lower Clofe, and the

T

2

fifh-ponds

C

272

T Y

I

fiih-ponds belonging to

O

F

convent fupplicd with

the

water.

The

Charnel-houfe,

Now the frce-fchool, is fituated between the weflend of the church and Erpingham's gate, opening on to Tomb! and, and had bifhop Salmon for its founder, who died in 1325 the porch was added by bifhop Kart. The upper charnel houfe, now the fchool-room, was dedicated to St. John the under it was a lower charnel chapel, Evangelifl. dedicated to the fame faint, and the charnel-houfe itfelf; the whole of which is now ufed as a vault or ;

;

The

cellar.

was ufed

charnel-houfe,

by

leave of the facrift,

bones of all perfons provided they were dry and

as a depofitory for the

burled in Norwich, clean from

fleQi.

There belonged to nominated by

priefts,

thefe chapels four officiating

the prior in full chapter,

and

They

liad

in cafe of vacancy of

the

fub-prior.

apartments near the charnel-houfe, (now converted into a dwelling for the fchool-mafler) and kept a

common

The

table.

arched vault

is

fupported by two rows of

fourteen feet high

at the entrance, on the was a holy water flone, and on the other a nich, where formerly an image flood.

pillars,

;

right hand, fide

The foundation deed bears date the 4th of 0£l. 1316, by which it appears, that the founder had puTchafed the advowfon of Wefthali St. Andrew in Suffolk, and appropriated it to the prior and convent, who were to receive all the tithe-corn of the parifli,

and pay yearly

to

the principal officiating

chaplain

NORWICH.

27s

fix marks, and to each of die other three marks and a half: the fmall tithes were referved to the vicar, who was then prefented by the prior and convent, as he now is by the dean and chapter. Befides thefe four chaplains, there were two others appointed by the founder himfelf, whofe ftipends

chaplain five^

were paid bv the cellercr of the monaflery, out of certain lands lying in Creffingham, Hopton, and Afhill. purchafed of fir Walter de Norwich, knt. and fettled on the prior and convent for that purpofe.

This lued at

religious houfe, igl. a

year

although not taxed, was va-

at its di^Tolution.

in

1548

;

when

Edwart \Varner, knt. and Richard Catlyn, gent, obtained a grant of it to them and their heirs, by the

name of

the chapel called the charnel-houfe, within

the precinft of the cathedral of the Holy Trinity at Norwich to hold the fite thereof, w^ith all its ap;

purtenances, of the king, as of his manor of Drayton in Norfolk, by fealty only, in free foccage, and This grant bears date the ifl of July, not in cainte. in the

2d year of Edward VI.

In the following year they fold it to Thomas goldfmith ; he foon after conveyed it to Robert Jermy, who on the 4th of Oft. Bere, of Norwich,

fold it to the m.ayor, fherifFs and commonalty 1 349, of Norwich, who bought it in part of the 200I. per annum which they had a licence to purchafc in mortmain as an addition to the revenues of the hofThe dean and chapter had pital in Holme-ftreet. always difputed the validity of the grant, and to

hinder its taking place, leafed the faid charnel-houfc by indenture bearing date the 5th of February, 1578, to queen Elizabeth and her afiTigns, for a hundred years,

to

commence

at

Lady-day

T3

1.579, at the yt^rly

rent

;

C

274

I

T Y

O

F

The queen affigned her term Coningrby and Nich. Brook-, efqrs. and they to John Bate, gent, who conveyed his right to the dean and chapter.

rent of ten {liillings. to Richard

done with a view of thcv were fo far diffatisfied with it, as to enter into an agreement with the city, to leave the whole matter to the final determination of Pjchard Davy and Richard Godfrey, efqrs. each

But notwithflanding

all this,

flren2:thenin2; their title,

party binding thcrafelves in the penalty of five hunUpon dred marks to abide by their arbitration. Bearins: the evidence, the arbitrators, on the i ith of Janviarv, 1582, determined in favour of the city,

whofe

right

to the premiffes

was

fully afcertained;

they paying, however, to the dean and chapter the fum of three fhillings and four-pence yearly at Eafter, for a parcel of land lying within their precinft.

They

foon after acknowledged the right of the

city to the houfes built

upon

the precin^l wall, at the

north-weft corner of it, and granted a licence to make a door-way through, and to place windows in their wall,

and

fchool-mafter

them 4d.

s

to

open another door-way

into the

garden, on the corporation's paying

a year, as an

acknowledgment of

their right

in the faid wall. the ho fpital charter, dated May 7, 1547, the of Edward VI. the corporation is obhged to apifl point a fchool-mafter and ufher, and to pay their ilipends out of the revenues aftigned by that charter to the mafter lol. a year, and to the ufher 61. 13s. The mayor, and the major part of the alder4d. men for the time being, have the nomination of them, and are to provide them with convenient
By

y

I

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275

Thev are both removeable, for any great pends. crime by them, or either of them committed, or for being neghgent or difobedient, in performing * and doing thofe good and reafonable ordinances and commands, which fliall be afiigncd or ordered * to them, or any one of them hereafter.' '

*

*

*

Before this grant, the corporation had opened a fchool in the Infirmary, belonging to the diflclved convent of Black Friars, in performance of their

promife to the king, when he gave them that monailery: but after the dean and chapter had given

up

all

pretenfions to the charnel-houfe, they affigned

the chaplains

houfes

there

fchool-room, as

The

now

a dwelling

for the

for

a

continues.

mader

prefent

mafter has

it lliil

for

up the upper chapel

fchool-mafter, and fitted

is

the Rev.

Mr. Parr.

The

a falary of 50I. a year, and a dwel-

and the uQier (VViUiam Beloe, B. A.) but no houfe.

Jing-houfe, ^ol.

Of

the

Deanry of the City of Norwich.

The whole

of the city belonging to the dean and chapter) was anciently in the dean of the deanry of the city of Norwich, who was collated by the bifhop, and had power of granting probates of wills of all perfons dying in his deanry, except of clerks, and gentlemen at arms, (all fuch belonging to the ecclefiaftical jurifdi6lion

(except the feveral peculiars

bifhop only) and except of thofe who poffeifed any goods out of the jurifdiftion of the deanry ; theirs being proveable in the archdeacon's office.

In 1297,

Thomas

Silveflre held the

Norwich and Taverham,

T

togrether

4"

deanries of with the churches of

'

G

^70 of

St.

and

T Y

I

Simon and Jude,

St.

O

F

Swithin.

and

Croltvvcyt>

were ail united, and appendant to his deanry but as he was not able to produce any inflrument of union, at his death in 1329 bifliop William united the two deanries, but at the fame time feparated them from the churches. In this Hate they continued till the Reformation, when thefe, with the other rural deanries, were abolinied, and their whole jurifdidion transferred to the archdeacon. infifled that they ;

Conisford Great Ward, Is

compofed of

three fmall wards of South

the

Conisford, North Conisford, and Berftreet.

South Conisford Ward, Contains, without the walls, that part of Trowfe

on

this fide the

river,

called

Trowfe

Millgate, from

the water-mills there, and the priory or parifli of and within the walls, the St. James at Carrowe ;

prefeni pariOics of St. Peter Southgate, St.Etheldred,

and

St.

Juhan.

St.

Peter Southgate.

The fouthern gate, as it was anciently called, now very near Conisford gate, is fituated in this parifh river Wenfum the between runs it, on the weft, fide of which (lands on eaft the that in two towers :

;

the river formerly dwelt the keeper of the old

boom,

or beam, which went acrofs the river at this place. This boom ferved to ftop all (ulpefted perfons coming up the river, as well as to hinder veffels going

out without paying the city

toll.

Entering

NORWICH.

r

Entering the city

this gate,

at

(though

on

now

the

277 right

hand

upon) of St. Olave's chapel, a parochial chapel long before the Conquell, united to the rectory of St Peter Southgate in the reign of Edward III. and ihc chapel itfeif demoliflied before 1345. It was fubjcft to the archdeacon of Norwich, and paid 3d. fyno-

lieth the ancient

fcite

built

dals.

This flreet,

thofe

parifh,

with

conflltuted

on the weft

all

thofe

Lower

fide

did

on the

eafl fide of the

or Nether Conisford,

as

Over or Upper Conisford,

now

and being

fituated near the ciiy gate

St, Peter

Southgate, and anciently

is

called

St. Peter

de Either.

A

re^ory originally in the patronage of the abbey St. Benedii^ at Holme, but lince the Diffolution in that of the bifliop of Norwich, in right of that houfe. who pays the fequeftrator a yearly ftipend pf 5I. the voluntary contributions in

and convent of

dean Prideaux's time amounted to 5I. more; and it hath been augmented by lot with 200I. of queen Anne's bounty: fo that the whole amounts to about It hath been held by fequeftration for 14I. a year. near a hundred years, at the nomination of the bifhop, is difcharged of firfl: fruits and tenths, and hath fervdce once a fortnight.

The Rev.

Dr.

John Brooks

is

the

prefent fe-

queftrator.

The fleepie is fquare, and hath three bells; the nave, fouth porch, and chancel are tiled. The guild of St. Peter, commonly called the fifhermens guild, was held

here.

CITY OF

syS

To

the fouth

and

vvefl

of this church

the hills

lie

called Butter-hills, but corruptly, the true

name

be-

ing Boteler's or Butler s hills on whofe fummit Hands the Black, or Governor's Tower, which commands the city and river to a great diftance. It was ufed in the time of the plague as a peft-houfe.

Thefe hills formerly belonged to the priorefs and convent of Carrowe, and were frequently ihe fubjeil of difpute between them and the mayor and commonalty of Norwich, who claimed a right there: to put a flop to all further difputes coticerning them, in 1521 the priorefs leafed them to the city for ever, at a rent of 10s. a year, with power of entry for jion -payment.

Near

the lime-kilns without Conisford gates, flood

formerly a row of houfes belonging to the corporation, confifting of fourteen fmall tenements, called Beggar's Row, lett at about 4I. per ann. now totally demoiifhed.

Tile religious concerned in this parifh were the abbot of Holme, who was taxed for his temporals The next i6d. and the priorefs of Carrowe 2s. 6d. parifh was

St.

Edward's.

The

church flood on the wefl fide of Conisfordits church-yard abutted upon the north its eafl fide of the fcite of St. Hiidebrond's hofpital Etheldred's of St. end ranged even with the weft end church, from which, at its fouth-weft corner, it was It was an not diftant more than a hundred yards. ancient re6lory, in the patronage of the priorefs of flreet,

and

:

Carrowe, valued

at 40s.

and paid 3d. fynodals. About

;

NOR About

W

I

C

H.

279

end of the 13th century it was united to St. Julians; for in 1305, we find that Hugh de Crevte wj'as inftituted to the annexed churches of St. Edward and St. JuHan, on the prefen ation of the priorefs of Carrowe, and ever iince they have continued as one parifli. the

Adjoining

to the wcfl

end of

church ftood a bv Hildaily fei vice 10 be performthis

chapel, called Hildebrond's chapel, founded

dcbrond the mercer, for ed there for the ufe of his hofpital. In 1540,

at the dilTolution oi the

aforefaid hof-

with that of the hofpital, paffed to the mayor and commonalty, of whom it is now held by leafe. The advowlon was united to, and continued with thofe of St. Julian and St. Clement. The three parifhes, after their union, were valued at 3L 6s. 2d. in the king's books, paid I2d. fynodals, and

.pital,

',

its fcite,

lod. procurations.

K

The common ftaithe, or key, called the new common key in the time of Henry VI. lies in this parifh,

and belongs

time

81.

to the city

lis. lod.

It

;

the annual rent at that

was heretofore called Calves

ftaithe.

The

religious concerned here

were the abbot of

Ramfey, ^vho was taxed for his temporals the abbot of Langlev at 2s.

On

the fouth fide of this church-yard

at 5s.

and

was

fitu-

ated

Hildebrond's

CITY OF

2»0

Hildebrond's Hofpital, Or

Hildebrond's Spitai, called Ivy-hall, or

St.

Mary's

Hofpital,

Founded about tbe year 1216, by Hildebrond the mercer, and Maud his wife, who put it under the It was dedicated to the patronage of the bifhop. BitiTcd Virgin, and confifled of a common hall and chamber over it, for the ufe of the cuftos, or keeper, wiih feveral other, both upper and lower, rooms, appropriated for lodgings for fuch poor peolarge

ple as wanted houfes, who,

befides

their lodging,

The chapel, for the fervice allowed them. of the hofpital, joined to the weft end of St. EdThe mafterfliip was valued at 5I, ward's church. a year, and the other revenues at 14s. 3d. At ihe difloluLion it was granted to the city, with all its revenues, and a croft called Hildebrond's fpital croft.

had

fire

St.

Etheldred's Church,

Is a fmall building, with a round fteeple, having one fmall bell the nave and fouth porch are coverIt was a reced with reed, and the chancel is tiled. ;

tory

till

the year 1272, in the

prefentation of

when

prior and convent of Norwich,

propriated

it

to the office

the

the bifhop ap-

of cellerer or keeper of the

refe£lory there, to find cloths, napkins, glaffcs, fpoons

and '

pots,

fe6lory

or

for the ufe of the

common

monks

table

The

eating hall.

in

the re-

profits

were

taken by that officer, who ferved the cure by a ftipendiary prieft till the diCTolution from which time ;

till

March

tinued

ill

10,

1550. the

the dean

4tli

of

and chapter,

Edward VI. it conwhen they granted

NORWICH.

281

the church, church-yard, walls, bells, fieeple, kc. to the mavor and citizens for five hundred years, at 4d. per

ann. rent, as part of the

revenues of

St.

Norwich. On this grant, the Giles's right of nomination to the cure devolved to th'^ mavor and aldermen, who pay the curate a flipend of 5I. a year, as the convent had formerly done. hofpital in

There

are

pieces of arable

divers

and meadowLakenham,

lying in Trovvfe, Brakcndale,

land, Sec.

and Carrovve, which pay tithes to this church, as do part of Boteler's hills, and other lands and gardens within the walls all which are cxadly dcfcribed ;

in the fixth regiller of the cathedral, fo. b2.

The and

is

chancel was always repaired by the convent, It was valued at the corporation.

now by

and paid 3d. fynodals. been augmented by queen Anne's bounty bv

40s. taxed at 20s.

hath

It

lot,

and

the arbitrarv contributions, according to Dr. Prideaux, Service is performed in arc valued at 61. per ann. it

once a fortnight.

The Rev.

The

Dr. John Brooks

capital meffuage,

is

the prefent curate.

commonly

called the

Mu-

was anciently the dwelling-houfe of Mofes the Jew; a man of great wealth, power, and influeuLC, in the time of William Rufus: from his grand-

fick-houfe,

fon Ifaac, his death

Henry

it it

III.

obtained the

name

of Ifaac's hall

;

after

efcheated to king John, whofe fucceffor,

gave

it

to hr

William de Valeres,

knt.

In 1290, it was owned by Alan de Freeflone, archdeacon of Norfolk, who had a chapel there, but foon after difufed, as prejudicing the revenues of the church of St. Etheldred. In

CITY OF

fiS2

In 1626. It was the eftate of John Paflon, efq. and ill 1633, the city houie of Lord Chief Juftice Coke.

North of flaithe,

the Mufick-houfe lies

commonly

called the

town

the old flaithe,

common

in the dil-

folved parifh of

St.

Clement

in Conisford,

Commonly called St. Clement at common w-ell or ciftern fituated

the Well, from

near it. This church was a very antient one, and built long beThe advowfon was in William fore the conquelf. de Wendling in king John's time, and from him defcended to his fon William, who gave it to the abbey of his foundation at Wendling in Norfolk ; a

together with

the houfes

{landing near the church,

which he purchafed in 1266, of Henry fon of Richand the key or flaithe, now the old ard de Witton common flaithe, which he bought at the fame time ;

of the

city.

In 1436, Edmund abbot of Wendling, anc* his convent, relcafed all their right in the advowfon, flaithe and houfes, to the corporation for one hun-

dred marks, to be paid them in five years, by twenThe advowfon alfo of the cha]:)el ty marks a year. of St. Anne, which flood near St. Anne's flaithe, but then demolifhed and united to St. Clement's, was particularly conveyed with it. In 1458 it was declared a common flaithe, when a crane, &c. were tre£led there at the expence of the city. In 1482 it Was perpetually united to the re£lory of St. Julian ; before which time it ufed to pay fixpence yearly for fynodals.

In

NORWICH.

2S3

In 1559, tlie corporation fold the church and church-yard to Thomas Keteringham, and his heirs for ever, fmce which time it has continued, and flill continues private property. The rehgious concerned here were the priorefs oi Carrowe, the abbots of Langley and Wendhng, the dean of the Chapel in the Fields, and the prior of Norwich.

In this parifh was Thorp's Place, firft the city houfe of fir William de Rochyng, knt. fheriff of Norfolk in 1284, and afterward of Williara de Surlingham.

St. Julian's

Churchy

Was

founded before the Conqueft, and given to nuns of Carrowe by king Stephen, their founthe der. It hath a round fleeple, and but one bell north porch and nave are tiled, and the chancel Dr. Pridcaux fays, that it had 7I. per thatched. ann. certain endowment, and that the arbitrary conIt was fvvorn of theclcar tributions were about SI. yearly value of 19I. 13s. id. and confequently is The religious concerned capable of augmentation. here were the abbot of Warbone, whole temporals were taxed at 8s. 4d. the priorefs of ^arrowe, the prior of Norwich, and the dean of the Chapel in the

;

the Fields.

In 1737, St.

St.

Julian, with the annexed parifhes of St. Cleracni:, and the chapel of. St,

Edward and

Anne, were confolidated to the parifli of All Saints The' fervice here is once a fortnight, and the prefent re£lor die Rev. Mr. Richard Brooke.

in Berflreet.

On

the eaO; fide of the church-yard flood an an-

chorage,

inhabited

by an anchorefs

or recluTe-

till

the

CITY OF

284

Thefe auchorets, or anchorefies, the uifToluiion. were a fort of monks, properly called anachorites, from a Greek word figniiving to retire thev obtained a!fo the name of reclules, or inclufes, from their ;

being fhut up in their cells or anchorages of thefe there were two forts, the eremite or hermit, fo called ;

from the Greek word meaning a wildernefs,

the place of their habitation, therein following the example of Elias and St. John the Baptift and the reclufe or anchorcfs, who pretended to follow the :

example of Judith.

On

the fouth fide of this church-yard, abutting

eaftward upon the

ftreet,

flood a houfe of

the order of our Lady, called Fratres de

friars,

of

Domina, a

of begging friars, who obferved the rule of St« their proper drefs was a white coat, over Auflin which they wore a black cloak, and a friar's cowl of the fame colour their order took its rife about the year 1288, and in the year 1290 was introduced They continued in this houfe till the reign here. of Edward III. when the brethren all dying in the

lort

;

:

great

and

in 1348, their habitation became, remains private property.

peflilence

flill

in the time of Henry a capital mefluage in this parifh, which for

Robert Rufus, or the Red, II. built

a long time was known by the name of the Stonehoufe it afterwards belonged to William de Donewico, or Donwich, who gave it to St. Giles's hof:

pital.

In 1296, the lady Cecily de Howe, priorefs of Carrowe, built a houfe here for the prioreffes to refide at whenever they pleafed, which afterward coming into the pcfTeflion of the Bardolfs, was called Bardolf 's Place.

The

NOR

W

C

I

H.

2S5

The

capital mefTungc called Goumay's Place, wzs 155S the city houfe of T!i()mas Gawdv. efq. and aflerward belonged 10 the Paflons, from -^vhom it paffed to the familv^ of the Cookes. Adjoining to the north fide of this houfe was the key anciently called Kyrmer-hoppe, with a meffuage belonging to in

the Berneys. knt.

laid

71ie melTuage of

fir JVliles

Stapleton,

on the north of the former and joined to

Edward Grey, efq. north of that the houfe of fir VVilliani Boicyn, knt. afterward of the lady Anna Boleyn, aRervvard the propertv of

it,

and

to the

Midday's Inn took its name from Roger Middav, in the beginning of the reign of Ed\vard III. puvchafed it of the abbot and canons of Waborne : it defcended afterward to the Cookes, and is now a •,\"ho

public houfe, the fign of the Three Jolly

Whcrry-

mcn.

Upper or North Conisford. St,

Michael's

Church

in

Coniiford,

Was a re£lory, valued at twenty fliillings, and paid three-pence fynodals. In 1360 it was fold to the Auflin Friars, who bound thcmfelves and fucfor the

ceffors

penny a year

payment of

the

fynodals,

and one

high altar of the cathedral, to%vards a proceffion to be made on the o£iaves of the Trinity.

to the

Soon

after

they had

intercfl:

fufficient to

united to the parilh of St. Peter Permountergate, when they pulled down the church, and upon

get

it

the

fite

thereof,

and of the church-yard, built

their

cloifler.

Almofl oppofite of the

ftreet,

to this church, on the weft fide flood Ihorp's Place, to which the ad-

U

vowfon

C

2S6

I

T Y

O F

and to the norih fide ; of that builduTg joined the melTuage of Thomas Coddc, now belonging to the hofpital of St. Giles.

vowfon was long appendant

The rcligior.s concerned here, were the prior of Norwich, the priorcfs of Carrowc, and the abbot of Lan^icv,

The whole flreet

was

of this parlfh on the eaft fide of the

poireffcd

by the

Auguftine or Auftin Friars, or Auguflinian Eremites or Hermits: One

of the fonr principal orders of friars, though Their firfl arrival in in point of time. F.ngland was in the year 1252, when they fettled in

the

latefl

Broad-fireet,

London

;

but

i'oon difperfed themfelves

being

begging

friars,

into the principal places

1 hey came to this city in the beginning of the reign of Edward I. and fetded themfelves in a meiTuage given them by one Roger Minwho upon that account was cfteemed their iiiot, in England.

founder.

In fion

1360, having before gotten into their poffefthe whole of St. Michael's parifh

on

the

eaft:

of the flreet, except the church and churchyard, they purchafed them alfo, and on their fite, and that of their former dwelling, built a noble fide

and conventual church, one hundred and fifty yards long and thirty wide, with a fecond cloifthe whole was incloled by a ter on its fouth fide In 1429, they high wall, and finiflied in 1368. cloifter

:

obtained a charter of confirmation of their loundalion and revenues, with licenfe to inclofe another

common

NORWICH. common their

In

lane

wltlu'n

their

fitc

;

287

by which rneans

conveuL was rendered perfeilly commodious. this

(late

continued

it

when Henry Vill.

till

the

diTTohition,

own hands, and at his death left it to his fon and fuccefior, Edward \I. who in 1547, made a grant to fir 1 homas He-

neage, knt.

took

it

into his

and Catherine

wife, and VVilHain and precinct of the Norwich, and all that piece of

lord Willoughby, of

all

his

the

fite

Augulline Friars in ground, as it was inclofed with high flone walls, called Conisford Place, with all the orchards, gardens, and two acres of land thereto adjoining, and

of fiQiing thereto belonging, in the tenure or occupation of fir John Godfalve, knt. to be held of the king, as of the honor of Bolingbroke in Linright

by fealty only, in free foccage, witho\it any payment whatever, who the fame vear iold it colnniire,

to the laid

In 1594

who

fold

it

fir

it

John Godfalve. was

in

was once in the

who converted

It

has been laid that

it

of the duke of Norfolk, into a garden, from which report,

poflTeffion

it

whether true or not, Lord's Garden.

The

the family of the Blundevilles,

to the Paftons.

it flill

retains the

church was dedicated

to St.

name of

Mary

My

the Virgin,

Auguftine, and had three guilds held in it, viz. of St. Augufline, or the Ihoe-makers guild of and of St. Margaret the Holy Crofs but the place of the greatefl profit to the convent was the chapel of our Lady, called Scala Coeli, to which pilgrims were continually reforting, and making

and

St.

;

:

;

on account of the indulgences granted bv the pope this being the only chapel ^except

their offerings at th': altar there,

many pardons and to

this

place

:

U

2

tluit

C

2SS

I

T Y

fame name

chat of the

O F and

at VVeflininrter.

anotlicr

o£ our Lady in St. Boiolph's church at BoUon) which enjoyed equally cxtcnfivc privileges and indulgences with the chapel of Scala-coeli at Rome.

On

weft fide of

the

but a

tlic flreet,

little

move

Hands the church of

to the north,

Peter Permountergate.

St.

So called from a cate formerly fituatcd near the It church-yard, at the foot of the mount, or hill. was originally a re6lory, in the patronage of Roger

by

Bigot,

whom

it

was given

to

the cathedral church in Norwich,

the monaftery of

and

at their requcft

appropriated to the infirmarv there, whofe keeper received the profits, and paid a flipendiary chaplain for ferving the cure, who had a dwelling in the It pays church-yard, originally the redory houfe. I2d. fynodals, but that

favs,

it

has

is

not taxed.

endowments

to

Dean Prideaux the value of lol.

per ann, and that the voluntary annual contributions is a

amount to lol. more. The prcfent building very handfome fabrick, creded in i486. the eaft end of the chancel ftands

At tower

and

a chapel,

now

ufed as a veflry. The a fine fquare building, and hath a clock

dedicated to is

St. I^Iary,

The nave, fouth porch, and veflry and the chancel is tiled. The windows chancel are adorned with the images of the bells.

five

are leaded,

of this following

faints,

viz.

St.

Catherine,

St.

Margaret,

Barbara, St. Edward, St. John, St. Wulftan, St. Theobald, emblems of the four evangelifts, Sec. and St.

round to the

it

flails, formerly belonging chauntry and foul priefts, who lived

ftand twenty-four

feveral

in

NORWICH.

2Sg

in the college, at ihe norrh-eaO: corner of the

yard, belonghig to the Pied Friars, fo

church-

called

from'

outward garment, which was black and whi^, When they Quitted it, upon their like a magpye. being obliged to join one of the four principal ortheir

ders,

devolved

it

to the hofpital

of Bck,

at

liilJing-

and was .made ufe of by the mafler hofpital as his citv-hruife, where he received

ford in Norfolk,

of that fucli

all

chauntry or foul

priells,

or fecular

chap-

had ferved in this church, or any where Here they lived quite in a co41egiate manner, elfe. pa\-ing for their commons, and continued to do lo lains,

as

the dillolution.

till

Prom a table of bcnefaclions hung up near the north door, it appears, that " Thomas Codde, elq. gave lol. per ann. to the curate, to the poor los. per ann. and four nobles lor knights meat." by his lad will, devifed and commonalty of Norwich, after the deceafe of Joan his wife, his paled clofe in Conisford, which lie bought of Thomas King, upon This worthy

to the

mayor,

magiflrate,

fherilf?,

this exprefs condition,

of

St.

Giles's holpitak

fhall receive

that the receivers of the rents

commonly

called God's houfe,

the profits of the faid clofe,

and yearly

aldermen of the ward of North Conisford, and the churchwardens of this parifh for the time being, towards the difcharge of the queen's tax within the faid ward, whenever it fl:iall be granted, and the citizens meat"^", during the continuance of any parliament, as hath heretofore beer) paid.

pay

26s. Sd.

to the

U

He

3

* Citizens or knights meat, was

the daily allowance to the

burgeffcs or knights of (hires, during (heir atctndance in parlia-

ment, paid them by

their conltituents,

;

CITY OF

SCO

He lief

fuiiher devifed to the corporation, for the reof the poor the faid hofpiral, all thofe his

m

meadows, edifices, gardens and orchards, which he bought of Thomas King, and alfo his gardens ai:id tenements in St. Benedi6l's, with a tenement which he held under Icafe from the dean and chapter of Norwich in the faid parifli, &:c.

Ey

he ordered an obit to church, with a d'rge on obit, and mafs F^nd requiem to be lowing, at which they were to pray his ^vi]l

ly in this

wife's,

father's,

and mothers

further ordered the

fum of

2

at his obit,

in the following

6d. each;

to

be obferved yearthe

fol-

for his foul,

his

fouls, s.

eve of every

fung the day Sec.

And

he

Sd. to be diftributed

manner;

to four

priefts

four clerks 3d. each; to the paiifli piiefts 8d. to twelve beadlmen attending there 2d. each; to the parifh clerk for ringing the bells and fetting

3s. 4d. for lights round the herfe pour people (landing about it 6s. 8d. being the rehdue, to the poor oi North Co-

the

hcrfe

for ten

IS.

and

1

OS.

nisford.

The heads of his will, bearing date 0<^ober 12, 1338, are annually read at his commemoration fermon, preached iicre before the court of mayoralty on the Sunday preceding the feafl of St. Thomas and the fum of 2I. is. 8d. is generally allowed towards the charge of the commemoration fermon, ;

and

for

payments made

at

it

to the feveral perfons at-

tending there. In the middle alley of this church, about

from the

font,

was mayor of

this

feet

terred.

On

this

eight

refpe6lable magiflrate,

city in

Kelt's

the flone covering

rebellion,

him

is

who

lies in-

the following

jnfcription

M.

S.

N O R W

C H.

I

291

M.

S per annos Jacuit, quod mortale

Hie

jacet,

CXV.

et

luic,

Scd non quod reliquum

fiit,

Viri iftius boni ct btPicfiji

THOM/E CODD, Scnioris,

Oppoituni,

et flrenui,

fidelis,

NOR\\'iC],

Civitatis hujus

Ne

quondam

KETTO

et rcbcllariii

majnris.

ignorarent poPieii, cui

Parochia,

Tantum

imo

debent, iiOium

Pie voluit,

omnium

li;.ec

NOR\V\

civi:as

effe

qui bene

Fecerunt, gratiffius Cukor.

This parifh St.

John

ed

St.

is

compofed of

the Evangelilt,

Faith,

and part of

St.

united paiiiljcs of

tlie

St. \'edafi,

Albert, near the

that of St.

Marv

in

commonlv call-_ mora ft cry gates,

the

Marfh

:

Ibrae

baihwick or jutiIdi(5iion of die caflle. The religious concerned hcie were the priorefs of Carrovve, the priors of Cokesford and Norwich, and the dean of the Chapel in the fields. portion of

it

laid in the

Abutting north on the church-vard flood a houfe belonging to the Berney family, called Berney's Inn, and to the fouth of that the city houle of the KeyThe corner houfc on the north fide of Toftdons. lane belonged, in 1315, to Adam de Toft, from whom the lane took its name ; and that on the weft fide of the llreet oppofite to the Rofe-lane, in 1370, to fir Thomas Erpingham, knt. and the adjoining one, more vveftcrly. in 1371, to lir John Reppes, It is a perpetual curacy, and the Rev. Air. knt.

Walker

is

the prefent curate.

U

4

The

C

292

The

I

T Y

John the Evangehft

Parifh of St. ^.

Was

:_.ti

O F

a rectory A'alucd at 26s. Sd.

to the priory of

was annexed

in

gate, or Conisford,

About

Norwich.

and appropriated the year 1300,

to the patifh of St. Peter

it

Permounter-

The

church ftood at the north corner of the its union was purchafed by the Grev Friars, who pulled it down, and laid the fcite of it into their monalleiy. gate.

Rofe-lane, and after

Cooke's Hofpital, In the Rofc-Ianc. was founded and endowed by Robert and Thomas Cooke, efcjrs. brothers, aldernicn of Berftreet ward, and mayors of this city, for the habitations of ten poor women, either maids or fuch widows, being fixty years of age or upwards as have inhabited in the city for ten years before their nomination, " been of good report, and be'* Laved foberly and honeilly." The prefent endowment is ^ih a year, chargeable on the eflates of the late Thomas Cooke, efq. in the parifli of St. out of which each poor woPeter Pcrmountergate rnan receives 15s. a quarter, amounting in the whole, for the year, to 26I. the remaining 3I. to be ;

:

annuailv laid out in repairing the houfes of the faid the overplus, if there hofpital if they require it be any, (after allowing the city chamberlain 10s. a year for looking after the repairs, and paying the poor women their refpeflive (juarterage) to be applied towards clothing the cldelt or mofl indigent of ;

the

women

inhabiting

owner or owners,

for

the the

laid

rooms

:

And

the

time being, of the mef-

fuagcs, houfes, orchards, 8cc. part of the eflate tied iox

N O R W

C

I

H.

2(}9,

payment of the fald 31I. which melTaa^^es, were purchafed by Thomas Cooke, e'q. of Mrs. W'hall and lier daughters, fhall from time to for the

8:c.

time

fill

up any vacancies

that

may happen

the

in

faid hofpitah*

On the eaft end of this hofpiial abuts the churchyard of St. Vedafl:, commonly called St. Faith the church was founded before the time of the Confeffor. About the year 1190, it was appropriated to the office of Almoner of the cathedral, who ferved the cure by a ftipendiary prieft.t In 1540 it was pulled :

down, and

1562 the parifh confolidated to St. The church-yard is leafed out by the dean and chapter. in

Peter's Permountergate.

Skipwitivs Place, in this parifli, fo called from William Skipwith, efq. the owner in the time of Henry VI. and Edward IV. was for fome time the city houfe of the duke of Exeter, then of fir William Elmham, knt. fir John Carbone, knt. of the Morle)'s, and of the lord Bardolf. It now belongs to St. Giles's hofpital.

In this parifli lies the Ifland called the Swan Bank, and feveral pieces of land obtained out of the river,

which pay fmall

rents to the city.

The * Mrs. Elizabeth Ives

t

In the time of Richard

40s. a year

;

paid iikewife cel,

the prefent oivner.

is

&c.

9s. 8d. for

all

a

II.

the

almoner allowed the curate

gown, and

1

3s.

4d. for robes

;

and

expences incurred by the repairs of the chan-

T Y

O F

The Grey

Friars,

C

294

I

or Friars Minors,

took their origin Affifium, or Affifc, a city of the of from St. Francis duichy of Spolcto in Italy, fo named from its proxThis feraphical father as he imity to mount Afli. is called, was born of wealthy parents, in the year 1182, arid brought up to merchandife till he was at which time he abanf.veniy-two years of age doned the world, renounced all claim to his father's inheritance, caft off his flioes, and threw away his money and contenting himfelf with one defpicablc coat, and a mantle or cloak, fuch as is ufually worn by the fliepherds in Italy, he girded himfelf with a knotted cord or rope, and applied himfelf to the drawing up a fet oi rules, containing not only the Francifcan,

;

;

three

vows of obechcnce,

chaftity,

icntial to all religious orders,

but

and poverty,

ef-

many

other laws, themfelvcs to

difciples folemnly bound fuch as, to live without property in houfe, place, or thing, as pilgrims and ftrangers in this world, and to be obedient to their fuperiors in all things not contrary to their conlcience, or to the The name he rules which he had prcfcribed them. fixed upon for his fraternity was that of Minors ; not only becaufe they utterly renounced all temporal intereft, but from tliat humility and lowlinefs of mind which their profeflion obliged them to cultiThey arc fonietimes called Mendicants, from vate. their fubfifting chiefly on alms which they begged, from thence called begging Friars. as all friars did Their habit confifled of a loofe grey garment, reaching down to their heels, girded about the loins with

which

follow

his



;

and from the colour of this garname of Grey Friars. He eflabhHied the rides of his order in 1290, and became a cord, or rope

ment they got

;

the

himlclf

•NORWICH. liimrcif ihc

general of

firfl

of pope Innocent

111.

it,

295

bv the approbation

conErincd

in

Lateran

the

council 1215.

The

full;

general chapter, or congrcg'ation

of his

year 1217, from which he fcnt out feveral niiffionarics to preach the gofpel amnn2;fl different nations, wlio met with fuchafto-

was held

order,

in

the

nifliing fuccels, that at his ieconcl general chapter, held in 1219, in a little church near Affife, which had been given to him by the Benedictine IMonks, and was the firit church and convent of the order, he found five thoufand friars, who had prefcribed to

his rules, attending

him

xefolved to extend his

in the fields.

He

hereupon whole

miffion throughout the

world, as well Pagan as Chriflian, hoping to bring the one to the faith of Chrift, and reduce the other to the primitive piety of the firll: profeifors of thac faith. With this view, he ordered nine of his friars to fet out for England, four clerks and five lay brothers,

and placed over them brother Agnellus de

Pifa,

as

The

firft

firfl

minifler provincial of his order there.

place of their fettlcment was at Canterbury, ^vl^ere, upon their receiving a frefh fupply, they

fome proceeding to London, Oxford and Cambridge, and others in 1226 to this city, being the year in which St. Francis, Here they firfl fixed themtheir founder, died. felves in a houie given them by John de Haflingford, fituated in Conisford, between the churches of St. Vedall and St. Cuthbert, and continued there fome time. divided

themfelves,

others to

In 1284, they obtained a licence from king Ed-

ward lane

;

I.

to inclofe

and

and take

into their

in 128S, procured a

foundation, and the liberty of

fite

a

common

confirmauon of

their

making purchafes

to

inlarec

CITY OF

2g6^

their precintls, which they were well enabled to do from the large and numerous benefaftions they had received. Soon after this they laid the foundation of a noble church, the length of whofe nave, from the weft window to the folding doors at

inlarge

the tower or fleeple, was a hundred and fifty feet ; from thence to the folding doors entering the choir,

being the interfpace for the belfry or fteeple, fifty feet the breadth of the nave and ailes w^ere about eighty feet ; the length one hundred and fifty feet The cloifter, on the nearly, and the breadth hhy. iouth fide, was a quadrangle, its fide equal to the length of the nave. The church was finiflied in the Ipace of a few years, and dedicated to St. Fran;

cis.

This convent was a place of very great refort, and the chapter-houle a noble room about one hundred and thirty feet long, fituated on the eaft fide of the cloifter, frequently ufed on public bufmefs : the great difpute between the citv and convent of the Holy Trinity, was heard and fettled here in 1492. and foon In 1537, the lord Surrey lodged here after the convent was diffolved, and the fite, church, kc. granted to Thomas duke of Norfolk, earl marihal of England, and his heirs, to be held in free burgage by fealtv only. In this noble family it continued only till the year 1544, when it was feized by the king, and a grant paffed of part of the meffuages, Sec. to Paul Grefham and Francis Boldethat part of the fite not 10, gents, and their heirs hereby vefted, reverted to the Norfolk family on queen Mary's reverfing the attainder; and continued in it till 1559, when the duke fold it to the corporation for 200I. who on the 17th of February, 1688, fold part of the faid fite to alderman Robert Cooke, and his heirs for ever. ;

;

One

N O R

W

C H.

I

297

convent was called on account of the indulgences granted by the pope to all fuch perfons as fliould be a matter which produced many advanburied there

One

of the cloirters of this

Pardon-Cloifler,

;

tages to the brethren.

A

hrile

of die

more towards the

flreet,

Church of Now

north,

on the fame

fide

flood the

totally

St.

Cuthbert.

demolifhed.

The

houfe, inhabited

Vere, efq. ftands in the church-yard, which

by John abutted on the weft upon the flreet leading to TombIt was a re6lory, valued at 6s. 8d. about the land.

year 1492, perpetually united to the church of St. Mary the Lefs at the monaflery gates, and demolifhThat divifion of the parifh lying on ed in 1530. the eafl fide of the

ftreet,

was partly

in the

fee

of

the prior of Norwich, and partly in that of the caftle,

exclufive of the city.

The

fuffragan's tenements,

were built by John Underwood, fufFragan to bifliop Nix, and by him given The houfe late alderman Arnam's, to the city. now in the occupation of Mr. Hewet Rand, was built {landing

on

upon

the caftle

fee,

dieir fcite.

was burnt down in the great 1530 the void grounds were purchafed by alderman Augudine Steward, Nicholas Hare, and Leonard Spencer, gents, of Lancelot Wharton, prior of St. Faith's, the piiorefs of Bungay, and others, and conveyed by them to the ufc This whole

fire

in 1507,

of the

flreet

and

in

citv.

Sl

C

298

St.

This

T Y

I

C F

Michaels Chapel on Tombland. Avas

one of the mofl ancient religious bui^!-

ings in this

city,

if

not the

fitaated near the

fiiil,

middle of Tombland, fo called from the number oi its tombs, it being the mofl extenfn-e burial place in this city. It was founded by an cai4 of the Eaft Angles long before the time of the ConfelTor, and die building of the cathedral ferved as a chapel for the ufe of their palace, which flood facing the fouth fide of the chapel yard, and took up the whole fouth end of Tombland, from the inonaflery

prior to

which ground was at It afterward was known by the name of Ratton-Row, and confifled gate to the caftle ditch;

all

that time in the fee of the caflle.

of four capital meffuages

;

that next the monaftcry

gate belonged to the parifli of St. Mary in the Marfli, and was called the Stoiic-houfc the other three were ;

in the parifli of

St.

Marv

the Lefs

the fecond from

;

the gate appertained to the prior and convent and the other two, about the year 1330, were the property of Roger Popinjay, in whole family they con;

till his grandlon Roger converted the corner houfe into an inn, and in allufion to his name put up the fign of the Poppingjay. It is now become a private houfe again, and inhabited by John Sla-

tinued

ney, efq.

The Church Commonly

of

St.

called Little

at the monaflery gates,

Mary St.

the Lefs.

Mary's, or

St.

Mary

and now die French church,

was a rc61ory valued at 6s. 8d. not taxed, appropriated by the prior and convent, its patrons, to the keeper of the infirmary in

that

monaflery,

who ferved

N O R fcrved

it

bv one of

witli St. Cuthbcrt's,

W

C 'H.

I

monks. and together

their

It

209

paid fynorlals

^\^th that

parifli,

confohdated 10 St. George at Tombland. This church continued in ufe till the diiTolution, after which, in 1544, ]une 16, the dean and chapter granted a leafe to the citv, on their paying in 1542,

them,

^vas

down 20L

for

500

years,

at

the rent of 4d. a

vcar. /

The fleeple is fquare, but lias no bell in it; the church and chancel are tiled, and the foutli porch leaded. The tenement adjoining north to the churchyard was called the Star, and formerly belonged to tlie aldermen and brethren of St. George's guild ; the next houfe to that was called the Lamb, and ufed as a place of meeting for the faid com.pany till 1550, when the fraternity of St. George granted, " All the tenement and grounds, called the Lam.b, •' the Stere, the two acres of ground in the feylde " without St. Gyles's gates, and the cufloms or " ferme of Fybryg-fladies, to the houfe of the poor " peopull called Goddcs Houfe,

(or St. Giles's hof-

be employed to the ufe of the poor peo" pull, in the fame kept and raaintevned, forever." *'

pital)

to

Berllreet St.

Ward.

Martin in Balliva,

In the baily, or bailiwick of the caflie, which extended into this parifli, for which reafon the church

was

from all epifcopal and archidicoand all perfons dying in the caPde

totally e.Kcmpt

nal jurifdidion,

were buried here, (the royal chapel in the callje having been confecrated to all other eccleCaftical offices, except that of burial only) and the confLable of

C

300 of the

caftle,

T Y

I

O F

and the chaplain of the chapel

there,

exercifed all fpnitual jurifdiilion ^vi}atever in the parifh,

and were accountable

to die

king only.

This church was often called by the name of St. Martin at the caflie gate, fiiper nioniem, or of Timbcrhill, of Bcrftrect, and of St. Martin's priory, becaufe there was an ancient

Priory, or Fraternity oF Friars, Dwelling in a honfe fituated in this church-yard, they were obliged to join one of the four princi-

till

pal orders,

when

they united themfelves to the White The church flood on the tri-

Friars, or Carmelites.

angular piece of ground lying on the right hand of the entrance into the Golden-Ball lane; at the north end of which Hood the gate of the caflie entcrinothe outer vallum or trench, the principal entrance into the Barbican.

This church, together with that of St. Michael at Thorn, are of very ancient foundation, and originally belonged to the caflie: they were given by the Conqueror to Ralph Fitz-Waltcr, of whom we find fome account in Doomfday; in whofc family they continued

till

the

time of

Henry

I.

when Robert

Fitz-Walter, .founder of the monaflery of

Horfham, gave them were both appropriated.

at

They

folution as lingle pariflies, rituals) at

St.

Faith

to that priory, to "which they

fubfiiled to the dif-

(though united as to fpi-

which time the church of

St.

Martin was

united to that of St. Michael. A crofs, called St. Martin s crofs, flood on the fouth fide of the churchyard.

The two

20S. the cure

pariflies

were valued together at

was ferved by a ftipendiary

priefl, at

the

I

NO

R

W

C

I

A

nomination of the convent. here in honour of St. Anne. tlie

301

II.

guild was held

School, Scolds, or St. Martin's Green, as it was anciently called, horn its proximity to this church, the pretook its name from the fchool kept there fent name being only a corruption of Scholars Gieen, ;

from the

fcholars playing

upon

it.

At the diffolution it came to the crown, ml in 549 the reftory and advowfon of the vicarage were .granted to Ralph Sadler and Lawrence Wynyngton it continued in ufc till 1562, when it was fold to 1

:

the queen.

At a court held the 7 th of Elizabeth, the follow" I letter from the Lord Treafurer was read comende me hartely to you, and forafmoche as the olde church of St. Martin at the Baly in Norwich, whereof that church and the church yard is fold, and the bells and leed refervyd lor the queen, which I have willed my frende Gollyn to take down with vour overfyght, and to fee the bells and the leed wayed, and we and other the queen's majeflies officers certefyed under your hands, and then leave the leed and the bells with Mr. Gollyn, and if yourfelf may not attend yt, I pray you appoint fome other alderman that he may fupply your place and lyne the byll, that you fhoud lyne, thus fare you well, this 8th day of December, 1564.

ing

" " " " " •' •' *' *' '*

*' *' *'

*'

:

"

Your Frlende, ••

It

was thereupon

ccrufied,

WINCHESTER.' that there

tells weighing four hundred, valued

X

at

were

61.

a

txvo

hundrcd,

CITY OF

<30J died, and

tliat

woidi

70I.

Tvas

the lead

weighed feven fodders, and

The church was

then totally demo-'

liflied.

The rals

in

prior of St. Faidi's this

priorefs of

was taxed

fc>r

Carrowe, the

cellerer

his -tempo-

and the and alnioner of the

parifh at fixiy-two fhillings



monaliery, poITeffed fevefal rents here.

The

C

A

S

T L

E.

it never belonged to the city, but always tvas, anid Soon afis, a part of the county of Norfolk.

now

573 it was made a place of defence by king Uffa, and became a royal caftle in 642. It is jiiolt probable that Alfred the Great, about the year ter the year

872, creeled the firft building of brick or flone, Tvhich was deftroyed in 1004 by Swain the Dane, and rebuilt by his fon Canute in 10 iS, or there-

This was in all likelihood pulled down„ and the prefent flone building ere£led on its fcite by Roger Bigot, and afterward repaired and beautified by Thomas de Brotherton in the reign of Edward ij. Before the year 1135 it was appointed a place of abouts.

confinement for the king's prifoners.

In 1189, Richard

I.

made Roger, fon of Hugh who was diveftcd of

Bigot, confUble of this caflle,

on his joining the rebeUious barans in 1212 againft their fovereign, but reinflated on his

that office

fubmitting to the king, and died conflable

In

1

240 the cuflody of the

to the flierjff.

caflle

m

1220.

was committed

NOR

W

C

I

H.

503

Thomas de Brodicrton was who adorned and fitted up die battlements as it now appears. In 131

2,

coniiable,

appointerl callle vviih

In 132^, the general feflions of the peace for the countv of Norfolk were ordered to be iield in the Shire-houfe, erefted within the hmits and fee of the caftie.

In 1339, lic

it

was granted

to the fherifFs for a

gaol for the faid county, as

it

llill

pub-

remains. This

grant produced an enquiry to afcertain the property when it appeared to be the

"of the fee of the cafllc,

who in 1344 gave the whole of it to the city except the then Shire-houfe, and the fcite of the caflle, as far as to the outward bank of the ditch next king's,

to the faid cafile.

In 13S1, the cuRody of die cafile or king's gaol was granted to John de Grey for life, with the annual ilipcnd of twenty pounds payable at the Ex<;hequer, being the allowance formerly m.ade to the conflable of the faid cafile, and aftenvards flieriff

to

ihh

of Norfolk.

In 1396, the city granted on building leafes divers parcels of the calUe meadow abutting on the and in 1415 it appeared -ftreet leading to Conisford that the cafile ditches, both wafle and built upon, extended into the feveral parifhes of St. Martin in the Baily, St. Peter Mancroft, St. Andrei^', St. Mi^. chael at Plea^, St. Cuthbert, St. Peter Permounter;

gate,

and

St.

to the city

John 1 'imberhill, and

an annual rent

oi

In 1509, the city pa d to the Vent and leet the fum of 54s. 4d.

X

2

that they yielded

sgl.

kiiig

as'

a referved

Anciently

C

504 Anciciulv

ward money

all

1

I

Y

OF

the fees of the king

for guarding the

and the earl paid which is now

caflle,

The abbot of St. Edmund ufed forpav caflle guard for forty fees, the whole of which king Stephen remitted, on condition that Hugh Bigot, earl of Norfolk, fliould pay caftle guard here for all the fees which he held of the abbey of The bifliop of Norwich, before the exchange Bury. entirely loR.

merly

to

of his old revenues and barony, paid 17I. 2s. per ann. for caftle guard and wait-fee, and 16s. quit rent for the town of Lynn and hundred of Hoxne.

was defended by a wall furrounding it, built on the brow of the hill on which it ftands, and by three ditches the outermoft of which reach-

This

caftle

;

ed on the weft to the edge of the prefcnt marketplace, on the north to london-lane, which it took in, on the caft nearly to Conisford-ftreet, and on the the poftern or back fouth to the Golden-Ball lane entrance into the works, was on the north-eail, by which a communication was had with the earl's palace, then occupying the whole fpace between the The grand entrance outer ditch and Tombland. :

from which you pafled three bridges the firft hath been immemoin going of the fecond remained ruins the deftroyed rially up and levelled about tilled were ditches till the the third ftill continues, and conforty years fince fifts of one whole arch, exceeded but by very few The caftle is fquare, and has within in England. its court a chapel dedicated to St. Nicholas, which being a royal free chapel was exempt from all epil-

was on

the fouth,

to the caftle

;

;

;

copal jurildi£lion.

In 1221, the dean of Norwich was obliged to fupplicate for pardon for pretending to any jurifdiction within the caftle or its limits, or over any c|" the

NOR

W

C

I

the tenants dwelling; in the caflle fee inquifition

taken

H.

and upon an

:

to the right

relative

fpiritual jurifdie^ion in die fee

of the

305

of exercifing

caflle,

the fol-

lowing; return was made.

" In the caflle of Norvvlch is a chapel, called " the king's free chapel, becaufe the chaplain there " daily fings, as he is obliged, for the fouls all

of

*'

and fmce

the kings before

the conqueft

" faid chapel hath the following •'

liberties,

;

and the and had

England be intcr" dieted, but the king's chapel, the chaplain here " can fmg his mafs by note in the faid chapel and " neither the archbifliops, bifhops, nor any of their " officers, have or ought to have any vifiiation or '• corredion in the fee of the caftlc, by reafon of " the franchife of the faid chapel; but the chaplain *' of the faid chapel hath the fole fpiritual jurifdic" tion or correcfUon of all the tenants of the caftie " fee, in fuch manner that no official, whether the " dean of Norwich city, or any other in the town, " hath to do with it. The chapel aforefaid hath no •• right of burial, and for that reafon the tenants " of the caftlc fee have anciently ufed their feveral " parifli churches for that purpofe, and paid their *' tithes and offerings, and received the rites of holy *' church in their life, and at their death. But all " thofe who die in the caftie, as well prifoners as " others, muft be buried in the church-yard of St. " Martin in the Baililxwick." before the conqueft, that if

all

:

In confequence hereof, the wills of all dving in the fee, were proved before the conftable of the caftie, and afterward before the fherifF of the county

and the chaplain, aud probate as to xefped

the former having the jurifdidion

and the latter with appears by wilb relating

all real eftates,

to perfonals

:

for

X

it

3

to

C

o5

.>

I

T Y

O

F

to pcrfonals only, that ihcv are proved folely bcfcfre

'die chaplain, '

ed

to

by his

fcal of office

being alone

affix.-

dicm.

The

prior of

Norwich paid an annual penfion of

,20S. to .the chaplain, and ufually preientcd the ihe-

with 40s. at Chrillmas.

riir

The by

chaplain,

fmce the

diflblution,

Is

appointed and has

the jullices of the peace for the county,

The Rev. Mr. a falary of 30I. a year. llns is the prefent chaplain.

James Wil-

The

old Shite-houfe flood in the parifli of St. Jolm Timberhiil, a little on the left of the ^rand entrance to the caflle; here all country bufniels was till 1t79, when the Shirc-houie, which about thirty years ago, was ereflcd down burnt was on the north fide of the caitle, in the room of which

tranfa^led

prefent commodious one was built by the late Mr. Brettingham, having two courts of juftice, a large grand jurv chamber, and other conveniencics At a little dillance for an edifice of that natitre.

'the

from the caillc, at the fouth-eaft edge of the a dwelling-houle appropriated for the gaoler.

hill,

is

In the year 1774, the caRle-hill and ditches were thoroughly repaired and beautified, at a vaft expencc

The hill, by this much imcounty at large. proved alteration, is greatly admired, and is much

to the

leforted to

by

the inhabitants in general.

The

;

NORWICH. The Church of

John

St.

307

Baptifl,

of

Timberhill, Stands at the norih end of Rerfireet or Burgh* anciently fo called, becaufe it led to the burgli mentioned in old evidences by the or caftle it is following names, as flrft, St. John ad Montem, or flrcet,

:

at the hill

;

afterward limber-hill, becaafe the timkept at the joining of the crofs

ber market was

church-yard; St. John at the caRic and St. John by the fwine-market, formerly kept upon All-Saints green.

{Ireets before the

gate,

The church

call ends,

at their

hath five

On

confifls

of a nave thatched, a chantwo ailcs, with chapels

a louth porch and

cel tiled,

leaded

the tower

:

and

is

ft^uare

is

our Lady's

bells.

the north fide

of the chancel

which now forms the veftry, at the entrance whereof flood a box for receiving offerings it was founded in 1494, by John le Grice, gent, who died in 1500, and lies interred there. It is a perpetual curacy in the nomination of the dean and chapter, the impropriators hath been augmented by the queen's bounty, but has no other certain endcv.''ment. Dean Prideaux makes the arbitrary conchapel, part of

;

tributions in his time

prefent curate

is

The hog-market green, called the

dences this

;

amount to about Mr, Walker.

20I.

The

the Rev.

v.as anciently kept on All-Saints old fwine-market in all old evi-

from thence it was removed to Hog-hill in which received its name on that acand fmce to the caflle ditches. The old

parilh,

iount

;

X

4

fliirc-

-CITY OF

3o3 fliire-houfe

in

bounds of

this

the outeimofl

the

ditches

caflle

parifl-i.

and

ditch of the

flood within

in the time- of

county

(the

the

Edward

citv at

I.,

that

time not being proprietors of tlie caiUe ditches) ran pretty near to this church-yard. The parifliioners

have a right to place one girl in the girl's hofpital, on the donation of Robert Rode, gent, who ffave certain meffuages for that purpofe.

The

concerned here were the prior of of Carrowe, the maftcr of St. Giles's hofpital, and the abbot of Holme. religious

St. Faith, the priorefs

The Church A

of All Saints.

reflory in the patronage of the

crown

till

the

reign of king Stephen, .who on his founding the ab-

bey of Carrowe, gave it to that houfe, hath ever fmce been conftantly annexed.

to

which

it

The parfonage {lands on the eaft fide of the church-yard, let at about 5I. a year the glebe, lying near St. Giles's gate, confifts of five acres and ;

one rood, called Aldery-holland clofe, let at about 1 2I. a year the herbage and voluntary contributions amount to about 61. more. Dr. Prideaux fays that the endowment in his time was fifteen pounds a year, and the contributions eight. It pays neither firft fruits nor tenths, and its fervice is performed once a fortnight. ;

We rames

under the following dilFerent by Timber-hill ; the old fwine-market, from the green

find this parifh in

evidences,

All Saints in

All Saints

lying fouth of the church, green,

or All Saints

now

green,

called Aldery-holland

being the

firft

fwine-

market

N O R market

In the city

Saints in

I

C

H.

309

bv Berflreet, and All and frequently All-hallo\\-s. or I'he Rev. Mr. Stephen Backle is All Saints

;

Nedham

Aldcrv-hallows.

VV

;

the prelent re£lor.

Tlie nave

is

thatched, the chancel thatched,

and

the iouih porch leaded.

A the

girl

girls'

taken out of this holpital,

on

parifli

Is

maintair.'^d in

the giit of Robert RofTe, gent.

In queen Elizabeth's time, the mayor and court notvvith (landing the Itatutc,

licenced the burchcrs,

to kill cattle within the city walls,

agreeably to the

them of fo doing by the privy council, but however confined them to Berflreet and All Saints green, on which at that tiaie was a common well, and a pit called Jack's pit, at the iouih crid of the green, now filled up, and pardy built upon. authority gi%'en

St.

Michael's at Thorn.

Michael in Berflreet, and ad fplnas, or of which a very large one flill remains in the moft ancient deeds it is in the church-yard Ailed St. Michael fuper montera, or St. Michael on It was anciently a recthe hill, from its fituation. tory, appendant to the caflle, till the Conqueror gave it to Fitz-Waker, together with the church of St. Martin at Bale, with which church one of his defcendants gave it to the priory of St. Faith in The fleeplc was built in 1430, at which Horfliam. flood there an image of our Lady on the north time Called

St.

at the thorns,

:

fide

of the church.

There were two guilds held here, the one of St. AuRin, and the other of St. William. It is now a donative,

CITY OF

310

donative, tn tlie gift of the Right Hon, the carl of Buckii-ighamdiire, and has fervice once a fortnight. The Rev. Mr. Daniel Fromantie is the prefent curate.



The

fteeple

Is fqiiare,

and hath

three bells

;

the

nave, chancel, north vellry, and fouth porch arc all Over againft the church flood the city houfe tiled. of fir Nicholas Bacon, to which there joined a large

Bifhop Reygarden, containing three or four acres. nolds inhabited it whiUt he was repairing the pait was a very noble houfe, but now converted lace into fmall tenements. :

St.

Bartholomew's Church in Berftreet;

Sometimes called St. Bartholomew Permounter^ cate, was a re^lory, valued in the king s books at 2I. ics. 4d. tliie patronage was in the prior of Wyjiiondhara.

In 1549, on the diffolution of Wymondham abbey, the reftory, advowfon, and church, were granted by king Edward VI. to Ralph Sadler and Lawrence Wyrmington, and the heirs of the faid Ralph, 10 be

by

held in free foccage of

fealty only

;

and the

E

parifli

Greenwich manor was confolidatcd to The church yard was

that of St. John's Sepulchre. very extenfive, but now in great part built upon. The church was on the call lide of Berflreet, and Between Skeygate lane, fouih of Skeygate lane. Conisford, on the fouth leading from Berftreet to the prior of church-yard, fide of St. Bartholomew's

The old church, great a mclTaage. and the fite of the remains, now which of part church-vard, beloni,ed to the late alderman Spurrel.

Buckcnham had

The

NORWICH. The Church of the

St.

John the

Holy Sepulchre

311

Baptifl:

and

in Eerllreet,

Was built in the ConfcITors time, but after tbc furvey taken by that king, about the year 1 1 36, Eboiard bifliop of Norwich purchafed the advowion, together with that of St. Nicholas at Ikakcndale, of king Stephen, and appropriated both of them to the monks of the Holy Triiiiry, for the ufe the keeper of which reci^ived all and out of then repaired the chancel,

of the infirmary the profits,

;

The and he paid the curate. houfe, and orchard, adjoining to

glebe, tl:e

of the church-yard, formcrlv belon:;id

him

to

the parifh

fome time after but are now leafed out by the dcaij

chaplain, and were held by die diflblution,

parfona:ge-

fouth eaR part

till

and chapter.

The

curate receives out of Bokenham's houfe in

ten fhillino;s a vear, and the rents of fome tenements in the parifh of St. James, ol about die yearly value of fix or feven pounds, given by Thomas Doughty, gent. " for the better mayntenancc of

Berflreet,

a weekly, and every week preaching minifler, in " the pariQi of St. John Sepulchre in Berflreet, and *'

attending fuch minifler.

<'

of the

*'

for the default of fuch

parifli clerk

And,

preaching minifler, for the

" benefit of the poor of the

faid pariQi."

Dean Prideaux made the endowment in his time amount to 4I. and the contributions 16I. the whole is

now

eftimated at 30I.

It is

a perpetual curacy,

nomination of the dean and cliapter, who are The impropriators, and have the queen's bounty. Kev. Mr. Ephraim Megoe, one of the minor canons, in the

U>

curate,

The

;

C

312

The

I

T Y

O

F

religious concerned here were the priorefs of

Haliuelle, the prior of Cokeslord, the prior of St. Faith, the prior of Norwich, and the priorefs of

Carrowe.

The church bells

;

clock, and five and two tranfverfe chapels

hath a fquare tower

the porch, nave,

are leaded,

and the chancel

call part of the

On

is tiled.

the fouth

church-yard ftands

Berllrcet Gate In ancient times the moft frequented of the whole in this it being the grand paCTage to the caftle ftreet was a common well and pit, always repaired by the city, till the year 1779, when it was put by, city,

:

and a which

common pump alteration this

fectly clean

and

fubflituted in

fpacious flreet

is

its

place

;

by

rendered per-

pleafant.

The Rectory of

St.

Winewaloy, or

St*

Catharine, in Newgate. Originally dedicated to St. Winewaloi or Winewaloy, commonly called Winal, bifliop and confeffor, whofe commemoration-day was obferved on the By Norwich Doomfday it appears to ^d of March. iiave been dedicated to St. Catherine, valued at 6s. 8d. but not taxed, although it paid firfl fruits, and 6d. fynodals.

It

was given by king Stephen

to his

nuns

at

Car-

1349, when the depopulated by the great parifli was almoft whole pcflilence, and afterwards fo far reduced that there rowe,

who

prefented the reclors

was only one houfe

left

till

Handing within

its

bounda0'-

N

R

,0

\V

I

C

H.

313

The

tithes and glebe, which were very confiand the whole profits \A^re appropriated to Carrowe, and the church difufed us to parochial icrTV.

dcrable,

vice,

and converted

into a chapel.

it was gianted to fir John Shelto the city for the ufe conveyed in 1^67 of St. Giles's hofpital, as part of the two hundred pounds per annum which Edward VI. enabled them In the conveyance it is to purchafe in mortmain. called St. Catherine's chapel yard, containing one

At the ton, and

difTolution,

becaufe the half acre lying weft of the chapel St. Catherine's clofc, on which the parThe chipcl fonage flood, was now added to it.

acre,

yard, called

flood in the midfl ot the triangular half acre, oppofite to the broad tower, at the joining of the way under the walls leading from Brazen-door to BcrIlrect, with that coming from Great Newgate in St. Stephen's to Berllreet likewife, which paffage was called Little Newgate, or St, Catherine's flreet.

The

reft

of the clofes extending

to the vray v.^hicli

leads to Brazen-door, on the weft, contain fix

acre.s,

and had formerly a barn and dove-houle, fituated on The a hill on the weft part, both now dem.olifhed. city clofe, containing four acres, on the north fide of

St.

Catherine's

ftreet,

or Little Newgate, u'ith le-

near thereto,

veral clofes

and

otheis

without the

were titheable here. Thefe doles are now leafed out by the city, and form a part of the hofwalls,

pital revenues.

The

parifh

The way

is

united to

dividing

rine's parifhes,

as

St.

St.

Stephen's.

Stephen's

you go by Jack's

Green, leads to the gate

now

and

St.

Cathe-

Pit to Ail Saints

called

Brazen

;

C

314

I

T Y

O F

Brazen-Door. wuh a poflern of brafs, from look ii5 name. This poflern was afterward of iron, ihence called the iron door: after that it became a paffagc lor horfes, and thence acquired the name of Newgate, from which the neighbouring Orlginriliy a tOwcr,

\vliich

it

took their names. It was alfo called Swinegate, from its leading to the fwine market, formerly kept on All Saints Green. Ic is now a

llreets

market

public paifage f6r carriages.

The Great Ward of

Mancroffc.

Containetli the parifhes of St. Peter of Mancroft, St. Giles

fraali

and

St.

Stephen

;

each of which forms a

ward.

St.

Stephen the Proto-Martyr,

This church was founded before the conqucfl:, and church tor all the fick and needy from which cirbelonging to the fee of the caflle cumftance that part of the city, now St. Stephen's parifh, was called Nedham, as appeareth by all the It was anciently a reclory, given hj .old evidences. Henry 1, to the convent,, and confirmed to them by Henry II.. at the farne time that he bellowed on them the patronage of Eaton and Trowfe Newton. lifed as a parochial

;

It continued a reclory Grey, bifhop of Norwich, of the chamberlain of the ing clothes for the monks, penfion of 30s. per'ann.

till

i2or^,

when John de

appropriated

it

to the ufe

monallery, towards find-

only referving thereout a payable to the ccUerer but .

NOR

W

C

1

H.

515

but all pontifical and parochial jurifdiciion, of what for which nature Ibever, were referved to the bifhop reafon, though the advowfon belongs to the ricr^a ;

chapter, yet it is not in their exempt jurifdictici:, but fubject, as other pariOies are, to epifcopal and Service is performed here archidiaconal vifitation.

and

twice every Sunday, viz. prayers in the morning, and fermon in the afternoon.

The church ..with

lead,

chancel ailc,

.'

is

a neat regular buildine, covered

confilling of

there

is

a nave, iwo

ailes, and a end of the fouth

a veftry at the eaft

and a fmall chapel againli the north towards

to which,

the

w^eft

end,

aile,

next

ftands a fquare

which ferves as a porch: there is befides a porch on the weft fide, and a kind of ftone-work lanthorn, in which the faints bell hangeth, on the* the fteeple is roof of the weft end of the nave tower,

:

The

and contains five bells. the Rev. Mr. Cavrin^on.

fquare, is

The

eaft part of the fouth chancel

4ifed as a chapel, len,

to

whom,

and dedicated

jointly withSt.

the altar there was confccratcd.

chapel

The

is

to St:

John

prefent vicur

xras fcrraeri<»-

Mary Magda-

the Evangelift,

'Ihe cicUng of die

vcrv handfomely hetted.

on

the north fide of the chanchauntry or chapel, and before it obtained that name, the chapel of our Ladv the Virgin, in which the chauntry or guild of St, Mary, valued at the diffolution at 5I. 6s. per ann. cel,

oppofite aile

was called

Brafier's

image erf the holy \'irgin. This chapel and guild were of very ancient foundation. TJie eaft window was a very beautiful one, contain^\as kept before the

iing the entire hiftory

labels

and

of the Virgin's

infcriptions iliuing

life,

with

many

from the mouths of the

C

3i6

T Y

I

O

F

the pcrfons therein reprefented, asfalve regina, mater vnjencordue, avt regina acloriim, ave domina.

Againft tlva aile flands a fmall chapel, now converted into a pew, for the ufe of the family rcfiding at Chapcl-field houfe. It was dedicated to St. Anne,

whofe image was placed over the chancellors,

who

generally lived

altar.

in

Here

the

Chapel-field-

houfe, ufcd frequently to hold their courts, as did iikcwife the archdeacons of Norfolk, whofe ofRcc

was

kept,

till

about the beginning of the prefent

century, in a houfe oppofite to the north fide of the

church -yard. Its foundrefs was Lettice, the wife of William Paine of Norwich, who in the year 1313 obtained a licence in mortmain from Edward II. to ereil chauntries in the parifli churches of St. Stephen and St. Pcier JMancroft in the city of Norwich, and lottle on them in mortmain, one mefluage, and annual rents amounting to the fum of 61. 6s. 8d. payable at the four quarter days in the year, by equal payments, out of divers houfes in Cotelcr-Row, Lower or Nether Newport-ftreet, Sadlers-Row, Cordwaincr-Row, the fifh-market, Shere-gatc in St. Gre* gory's,

and

Potter's gate.

At the diflblution

Edward Warner,

its

revenues were granted to

knt. Silvefler Leigh

fir

and Leonaid

Bate, gents.

In this parifh flands one of the principal city gates, called

Nedham, or

St, Stephen's

Gate.

The room over which was formerly an hermitage. In the time of Henry VII. the toll at thefe gates was

let at

2:2s.

8d.

In

NORWICH.

317

In the reign of Henry VI. an order of court was made, tliat every mayor fhall ha\e his riding about ihe city walls within one month after his charge, in which all the walls, ditches, gates and towers, fliall be examined, and orders given for their repair where needful, and care taken that the pomarium, or fpace round the walls, both within and without, be kept clean, and cleared of every thing that may incommode the paflage; for formerly no buildings were fuffered to be ereded thereon.

A

horfe-market was formerly kept in this parifh,

in the flreet where

Rampant

On

now

ftands

the

inn called the

Horfe.

the out fide of St. Stephen

s

gate flood a leper-

houfe, called

St. Stephen's Hofpital.

Formerly inhabited by perfons.

Of

lepers,

lazars,

thefe houfes there were five,

five of the principal city gates, viz.

Nedham's, Weflwick,

St. Giles's

St.

or Newport,

Auguftine's, and

St.

St.

St.

and lame placed at

Stephen's or BenediL^'s or

Mary Magdalen's,

Each of them was governed by a mafter, cuflos or guardian, who before the diflblution was always a perfon in orders, and officiated daily in the chapel belonging to his houfe. Every one of thefe houfes had a perfon called a fore-goer, Vvho ufcd to beg dailv for them and anciently, befides thefe leper-houfes, there were cells in all the gatts inhabited by hermits. Fyebridgc, or Fivebridge gate.

;

The at

leper or lazar-houfes

feme fmall

were

commonly placed

diftance from aim oft every great toun,

y

oftentimes

C

5i8

T Y

I

O F

;Oftentimes in lonely places, near

fomc public paflage

over a river, Sec. for the conveniency of begging. Few of thefe houfes had any fettled revenue, yet had a commcn feal, and afled as incorporated bodies the greater part of them were under the diredlion of the bifliop, v>bo appointed the mafter or cuflos, and fome depended on abbies or rehgious :

houfes, as this in particular did, which the

fee,

and had

was

built

on

mafter always nominated by the

its

prior of St. Faith's at

Horfham.

None of thefe five houfes were diflblved, but con* tinucd as hofpitals for fome time after the dilfoludon: however the feal of this houfe was then altered, and from that dmc the kin^ prefented the mafters, and cither the bifhop or

mayor admitted them.

In ]6g8, the city leafed the tenements, formerly one large houfe, to John Dunch for nine hundred years, at two (hillings per year, payable to the city,

and

fix fhillings a

By

the a£l

De

year to his majefty's

bailiff.

Leprojo Amovendo, the parifh

was

obliged to remove all lepers to fome folitary place, to prevent found perfons from convcrfmg with them, and expofing themfelves to the hazard of catching

And

the infe£lion.

adjoining to ried

fo

exaft were our anceftors in had a burial-place

that every lazar-houfe

this refpeft,

its

chapel, wherein the lepers were bu-

by themfelves.

On the north fide of Great Newgate-flreet flands Surry-houfe, fo called from the earls of Surry, whofe In the reign of Edward palace it formerly was. it was either fold or given by the duke of Norfolk

VL

to his great

who

ufed

it

favourite

fir

Roger Wodehoufe,

as his city houie.

knt,

The Wodehoufe* fold

W

N O R fold

it

Crowe,

to die Rants, efq.

and now

C

I

it

H.

belongs

5^9 to

James

aldcrmari of this city*

In this pariOi was fituated the

College of

St.

Mary

in the Fields.

Originally called the Chapel in the Fields, arid

now commonly

Ghapel-field-houfe, it being at its foundation a chapel of the blcded Viigin Mary. The fields near it are flill called Chapel-helds, are the property of the corporation, and leafed out by them.

was founded before the veaf 1250, in the fields on by John le Brun of Norwich, pricfl, as an hofpical, by which name lis bcnefaclors were fo nuit is frequently called, merous and mutiificent, that in a very fliort lime it became a noble college, confiRing of a dean, (die It

the fouth-wefl part of the city,

founder being the Hrh) chancellor, precentor, treafix chaplains, furer, and feveii other prebendaries conducts or chauntry priefls, were afterwards added befides all thefe, there were feto the foundation ;

;

who had a common tabic, and lived in a collegiate manner. The dean was collated by the bifliop in right of the The comfee, or bv the king during a vacancy. mon feal had the following legend, De campis nomcn. veral guild chaplains, foul priefls, &:c.

virgo dedit, addat et omen, encompaffing a cognizance of the bleffed Virgin.

iillv,

the

Miles Spencer. L. L. D. the lafl dean, perfuadcd the college lo rclign their revenues for fmall penfions, after he had obtained a grant of the whole to himfelf and heirs from Henry VIII. at its diflblution.

Y

2

.

Thi

:

C

320

The

I

T Y

O F

prebends were didlnguifhed as follows



i

The

firft

St.

Mary

prebend of the morning mafs which was daily faid in the morning before the image of the Virgin at St. James's of

was

call the

the Virgin,

altar.

The

2d.

chancellors prebend.

Whoever

held

was generally vice-dean.

this

The treafurer's prebend. The precentor's prebend. 5th. The prebend of the provoll* 6th. The facrifl's prebend. 7th. The chapter's mafs. 8th. The prebend of the high mafs. gth. The prebend of the blefied Virgin Mary. loth. The prebend of the great mafs.

3d.

4th.

The

condu^ls were chauntry

fix

prieflsj

who

daily

celebrated mafs, at the various altars there, for the fouls of their feveral founders

1.

2.

and benefadors.

Condu6l or Kyrkcby's chauntry pried.* Condu6l or Appleyard's chauntry priefl.f 3.

* Catherine de Kyrkeby in mortmain,

all that

in 133

1

Con-

obtained a licence to fettle

her tenement abutting fouth on the horfc-

market, and north on the

common

market, (now the hay-mar-

ket) on the college of the Chapel in the Fields, on condition

of their maintaining a chauntry her

own

prieft,

to fay daily

mafs for

relations.

This chauntry was founded in 1388 by Bartholomew and

•f

"VV'illiam

and

and thofe of her

foul,

Appleyard, for the fouls of themfelves, their anceftors

fuccelfors.

from

the faid

find a prieft,

The

college,

on receiving one hundred marks

Bartholomew and William, obliged themfelves to

who was

to dwell

amongft them as one of

their fe-

cuiar canons, to ling daily in their collegiate church for the fouls

NORWICH.

321

3. Conduifl called Churchcman's chauntry pric(}.:|: 4. Condu(9: called Kentone's or Rees piicft.'^

Y fouls aforefaid,

and

to allow

5.

3

Con-

him a decent chamber, with meat,

drink, and wafliing within the college, and a yearly ftipend of

payable out of the

3I. 13s. 4d.

the parifh of

St.

appropriation

;

Andrew

in

tithes,

and

offerings,

profits

of

Norwich, of which they had the

and the chaplain or chauntry

prieft,

on

his ad-

would perform daily

miflion, was obliged to fwear that he

fer-

vice for his founders f.uls, whofe anniverfary was o.ferved on the

Sunday

after Afcenfion-day,

The

college had the nomina-

tion of the prieft, and the chauntry was ferved tion.

Bartholomew Appleyard,

of the

city,

the fon, office firfi;

the father,

and twice burgefs in parliament

was recurned eleven times

;

the diffolLi-

thrice bailiff

and William,

to parliament, ferved the

of bailiff twice, and that of mayor

mayor of

till

was

fix

times, being the

this city.

X Ralph Churcheman, clerk, citizen of Norwich, fometlmes Roger de Neclon, gave two

called Ralph de Nccion, fon of

houfes, called Depe's and Sadeler's, to found a chauntry for the celebration of divine fervice in this colh-giate church for ever, in which commemoration was to be made of his own foul, and of the foul of Alice Renter, and the fouls of Walter de Horftede and Bafil his wife, her father and mother, of Simon Rentar, her late hufband, and Elizabeth her daughter.

* This chauntry was founded in 1405 by John Alderford, and Alice his wife, who gave the college 220 marks, and the refidue of a leafe held of the parilh of St. Andrew, on condition that they fhould had at their own charge a fecular chap-

cfq.

having cure of fouls, nor being under any relioious to perform dsily fervice as the other chaplains did, in which he was particularlv to pray for the fouls of Robert Kenton and his wife, William Rees, efq. lain, not

vow, or of any profeiled order,

and his wife, and for the welfare of fir Simon Feihrigge, lent. Roger Pratt, clerk, mafter of St. Giles's hofpital, John Aiderford, and Alice his wife, during their lives, and of their fouls after their deceafe.

This prieft was bound to obferve the anniverfary

CITY OF

.22 K.

6.

Conduct or Sedman's priefl,'" Conduct or W'yggenhales pncfl.:|l Be fides

verfary of Robert Kenton and his wife, with placibo, dirige,

and mafs of requiem, according to the ufe of the chiirch of Sirum. The dean and canons alfo obliged themfelves and their fucceifors to find the prieft ^ handfome chamber in the college, and to keep it in good repair, and to allow him the fame meat, drink, wafliing, &c. as the other canons had, and to pay him

\

a yearly ftipend of 3I,

* William Sedman, cence from Richard

citi^'.en

of Norwich, by virtue of a

li-

on the college the manor and advo.vfon of Bowthorpe, with one meffuage, one tuft, 320 acres of arable and pafture land, fix acres of meadow, 16 acres of marfh, (livcn acres of broom, and annual rents to the amount of nine IhilHngs, ilTuing out of divers eftates in Hcigham, Eaiton, Coftefey, Ringland, Honingham, Colton, jN-Iarlingford, Melton, Bauburgh, and Bowthorpe, out of which they were to find a chaplain to pray for the welfare of the faid \Vm. Sedman and Margaret his wife, during their lives, which fecular and of their fouls for ever after their deceafe prieft or chaplain was to hold no other cure whatever, being obliged to fay mattins every morning at fix o'clock, in St, Pe11.

did in the year 141

1

fettle

;

church, at the altar of the

t
Holy

Trinity, for one week,

and fo aland alfo to perform daily fervice in the He hid a chamber ia choir there widi the reft of tlie canons. wafhing, &c. found meat, a barber, drink, and college, the him, and lix marks annual ftiptnd. and

in the collegiate church in the fucceeding one,

ternately for ever

;

X This chauntry

was founded

in

1460 by Mr. John de

Wyg-

genhale, doctor in the decrees, fome time dean of the college, and archdeacon of Sudbury, who gave 200I. for the purchafeof lands and tenements for the benefit of the fociety, on condition that they

of

fouls,

fare,

would appoint a fecular chaplain, one who had no cure nor of any religious order, to pray daily for his wel-

ind for his foul

of John and Margirct, ther,

after his death, together with his father

find all tlie faithful

the

and mother, William

fouls

his bro-

dcceafcd, and to keep his anniverfary

with

NORWICH.

523

Befides thefe, there were two chauntrv priefls, the

one

and

called Bokenham's''',

The whole and of

of their

the oiher

Goldweirst.

was valued

fpiiituals

at 79I,

their temporals at 4I. 10s. 4d.

Y

The

4

with placebo, dirige, and mafs by note.

He

meat, drink,

and

as the other priefts had,

&:c.

had a chamber, a penfion

of h\ c

marks a year. *

vho

Was

founded by Edrt'arddeBokenham, of Snetterton, efq.

died in '479, at his city houfe in

He

ried in the collegistc ahurch.

ments, called Buxton's

in

St.

and was bu-

Peter's,

fettled divers lands

and tene-

Smallburgh, the prohts of which were

from All Saints and alfo two tenements in St. Giles's paridi, for maintaining a yearly light in a lamp before the high altar, and approf.;iated to the finding fuel for thechoriiters

to Eafter

;

He

another before the fep 'Ichre, at Eafter for ever. alfo his city houfe to le fold, and that the

money

ordered

arifmg from

the fale thereof (hould be fettled for the finding a chauntry prieft

fmg

to

"t"

and for

for his foul,

Was

that of

Dionis his wife, for ever.

founded by the executors of bifhop James Goldwell,

out of the furplus o^ his fortunes

Henry VII.

tained a licence of

;

for

which purpofe they ob-

to fettle fifty-three

in mortmain, on the matter and bre:hren of

marks

St. Giles's

a

year

hofpital

in Norwich, conditionally that they Ihould for ever find three chaplains, either fecular or regular, to pray for the faid bifhop.

In confequence of

above value

Trowfe

;

and

this

agreen.ent, lands were purchafed of the

the hofpital tied their

payment of

for the

ten

marks

a

manor of Rokele's

in

year to a chaplain, for

celebrating divine fe-vice in the cathedral, in the chapel where his

tomb ftood

;

ten

marks

mafs in the collrgiate lain, for perfo. rning to

to a fecond chaplain for celebrating

church,,

fervce

and ten marks

in the hofpital

to

church

a third chap;

the "rl'cue

be applied towards the relief of the poor in the faid hofpital.

.

CITY OF

324

The

laft dean, and 37th year of Henry VIII. on the payment of 105L 13s. 4d. included the whole college and its fite, being in the paviflies of St. Stephen and St. Peter of Mancroft, vviih the church, fleeple, and church-yard, and all walls and buildings what-

grant to Miles Spencer, the

his heirs,

in the

ever in the faid fite, to be held in free burgage, and and alfo a capital mciTuage, with, not in capite gardens and orchards, in St. Peter's Mancroft, and and alfo the capitwenty meffuages and tenements :

;

mefTuage called Abraham's Hall, in the parifhes and the corof St. Stephen and St. Peter aforefaid ner houfe and two adjoining tenements in St. Stephen's, and a flabie and four other mefluages in and a meffuage and all their (hops and that paiifh and three meffuages in St. cellars in St. Andrew's George's, with their gardens and orchards, and 2s. and divers rents out of houfes, rent from the ciiy to the value of 12s. and alfo a moiety of a garden, apd a parcel of ground adjoining, in St. Stephen's ; tal

;

;

;

;

and one

great garden, called the

Dove-houfe Clofe,

with one dove-houfe therein built, in St. Peter of and a garden and Mancroft, and another garden waite meffuage there, and fix gardens more in St. Stephen's, and one in St. Peter's, and all flails, garand alfo the manor, leOiOTy, and dens, &;c. there ;

;

advowfon of Bowthorpe vicarage and the redories of Eafton and Field Bailing in Norfolk, and Frefmgfield in SufFolk, and the advowfon of their feveThe manor, advowfon, and re61ory ral vicarages. of Bowthorpe, with the advowfon and redories of Eaflon, Field Balling, and Frefingfield, were held in capite, at the fixtieth part of a knight's fee and the following lums were paid yearly at Michaelmas ;

:

it

10

the court of

Augmentations in lieu of tenths, Bowthorpe 4s, 8d, for Eaflon;

VIZ. igs. 2d. ob. for

j

igs.

NORWICH. I9S. Sd. for Field

Bailing

;

and

8s.

325

4d. oh. for Fre-

fiDPifield.

The faid Miles alfo obliged hlmfelf to pay 40s. a 2s. a year to the year to the colleftor for his fee bifhop of Norwich for Bowthorpe fynodals, and 6s. to the archdeacon of Norwich for procurations 6s. ;

;

8d.

to the

e as a penlion iiTuing out of the

bifliop,

and 40s. out of

re6lory of Eaflon,

that

of Field

4s. Dalling 3s. 4d. to the facrift of the cathedral to the bifhop for fynodals, and 3I. as a penfion from Frefingfield lis. Sd. to the archdeacon of Suffolk for procurations, and bs. 8d. to the facrifl of the ;

;

;

cathedral.

From

the Spencers the college defcended to

Cornwallis's,

the

and afterward was purghafed by the

noble family of Hobart.

The prefent proprietors purchafed it of the earl of Buckinghamfhire, and on part of its fite have built two large and elegant rooms, in which the public alTemblies are held on another part thereof is creeled a neat and commodious theatre, licenfed by the lord chamberlain, in confequence of an ad of parliament palTed for that purpole. ;

Abraham's Hall Stands on the fouth

of the hay-market,* partStephen, and partly in that formerly a very it was of St. Peter Mancroft ancient inn, and known by the fign of Abraham offering up his fon Ifaac ; but the eftate being in a very ruinous condition, was purchafed by Mr. Ti-

ly in the parifh

of

fide

St.

:

mothy Matthews, merchant, who pulled down

the

whole

C

526

whole, and on the fonie building, It derived Sec.

T Y

I fite

of

it

O F has ere^led a very hand-

now Hudfon and Hatfield's bank, its name from Abraham the fon of Jew, who being convi£led of, and

Dculecrefs the burnt for blafphemy, and other crimes, forfeited his eflate to the crown.

On

7th of July, 1278, Edward I. granted with feven fhpps thereto adjoining,

the

this raeffuage,

to Vincent de Kirkeby,

and Lucy

his wife,

and

their

heirs for ever.

In 1331, Edward

main

to Catherine

III. granted licenfe in mort" de Kirkeby, to fettle it on the

Mary in the Fields, which fhe did, name of her tenement in the horfe-markct,

college of St.

by

the

called

Abraham's Hall, for a chaplain to pray daily and the fouls of John de Kirkeby, Sec.

for her foul,

St.

This tvas

open

at

Peter of Mancroft,

conftltuting a fmal! ward of itfelf, beginning of the ConfeiTor's reign an that part of it now the market-place

pariOi,

the

field

;

being the great

croft of the caflle*,

upon

the out-

From its fituawhereof it abutted. part, was fouth-weft tion the church, built on the ward

wefi; ditch

by the name of Magna Crofta, or Towards the end of the ConfefTor's reign

diftinguifhed

Mancroft. it

began

to

be inhabited

;

and

at the

Conqueror's furvey,

: X Crofta or croft, is a clofe adjoining to a manfion-houfe fignicrjeaft, word Englith feems to be derived from the old fying handicraft, becaufe fuch grounds, on account of their fituation, are for the moft part drelfed and triaimed by the la-,

bour and

ikill

of the owner in a more than ordinaryjmanner.

NORWICH. was

the ^vhole field

furvev,

Ralph de Waiet

O'.vned

527

and held bv

or Guader, earl of Noifolk, in rigb.t

who granted it to the king in common, new burgh between them, which burgh

of his caflk,

make

to

a

contained

and

croft

tire

pariQies

entire

of

St.

Peter of

Man-

St. Giles.

This earl Ralph founded the church of St. Peter and Paul at Mancroft, and gave it to his chaplains.

On

his

forfeiture,

Robert Blund,

the

flierilf,

re-

ceived an ounce of gold yearly from the chaplains ; and on Godric's becoming fherifF, the Conqueror

gave

it

in fee to

was worth

3I.

Wala his

chaplain

;

at

which time

it

per ann.

This W'ala, after the grant, was called Wala de San61o Petro, by which name he entered himfelf a monk in the abbey of Gloucefier, and at his admiffion gave the church to that monafterv. This donation was confirmed firfl by William the Conqueror, and afterward by

Thomas

Becket, archbi-

fhop of Canterbury, who granted the abbot a iiccnfc but as William Turb, bifnop of of appropriation Norwich, vvould not confent thereto, the matter dropped, and it continued a rectory in the gift of ;

the abbey at Gloucefier.

In

1383,

advowfon clerks,

to

the

abbot and convent conveyed the

John de Pyefhall and Thomas More,

Robert Afhfield, Bartholomew de

cholas de Blakeney,

Salle,

Ni-

Henry Lumnor, William Ap-

plcyard, and Robert de Pyefhall, on condition that they conveyed it to the dean and chapter of St. Mary in the Fields, which they did in 13S8, with li-

berty for them to get it appropriated if they could, and fo appropriated to hold to them and their fuccetTors, on payment of the old penfion of 4I. a yea^-

C

S28

t

OF

T Y

to the abbot of Gloucefter, of which penfion they afterward obtained a perpetual leafe from the abbey. It

is

very certain that the college foon after obtained

a licence of appropriation, for the dean and chapter of St. Mary held it as fuch, and never prefented either re61or or vicar, but took the whole profits to themfelves, and nominated a parifh chaplain. They paid 3d. yearly for the fynodals

;

53s. 4d. tenths

;

marks per ann. bound moreover college The facrifl 4s. the to and themfelves at the appropriation to advance the ftipend of the parifh chaplain to eight marks a year.

monks,

to the bifhop, prior and

five

It appears by the college accounts, that In 1431 they paid the parifh chaplain 61. 6s. 8d. clear, and jirovided him a decent habitation in the college, with meat, drink, wafhing. 8cc. as one of their ca-

nons

and 2s. to the fextheir accuflomed above flipends, over and

2 OS. to the parifli

;

ton, as

clerk,

the tenor of the appropriation, the college v/as obliged to repair the chancel, and pay the procurations to the archdeacon of Norwich, in whofe fees.

From

jurifdiftion the church

expences paid, clear yearly

the

fum of

is

;

and

after all flipends

and

college that year received the 26I. 8s. yd.

In 1441, the whole

profits

were affigned by the and the parifh

college to the rebuilding the chancel,

chaplain, and every perfon officiating there, remitted their flipends that year for the fame purpofe.

In 1492, fir Robert Beverle, then parifli chaplain, appeared at the bilbop s vifitation as fuch, with the two chauntry chaplains who ferved in the church,

and nine other

fiipendiary priefls,

all. of

ciated there as foul priefls by his their fupcrior;

from the number of

whom

leave,

offi-

he being

priefls fubordi-

nate

;

W

N O R

I

C

H.

533

nate to him, the paiini chaplain of St. Peter is oftentimes, and even in records, ftiled the prior of

Peter in Mancroft.

St.

In 1545, 57th Henry VIII. Dr. Spencer, dean of the college, and the prebends, joined with the bifhop of Norwich, their patron and ordinary, in a

conveyance of the college and all its revenues to the king, which was alfo confirmed by the chapter of

Norwich

cathedral.

Edward VI.

in the

7th year of his reign, anno

1352, July 21, granted to William Mingay and William Neelon^\ of Norwich, gents, 10 hold of the manor of Eaft Greenwich in Kent, by fealty only, the re61ory and church of St. Peter of Mancroft in the city of Norwich, and the tithes of the fame, with all their appurtenances, free and difcharged of the penfion heretofore due to the abbey and they by deed, dated March 1, of Gloucefter in the fame year, conveyed the whole to Richard ;

Catlyn, ferjeant at law.

In * For

the fum of 510I. 13s. lod. the faid king conveyed to William Mingay and William Nefton, and their heirs, the advowfon of the reftory of Shottifham All Saints, and the advowfon of the vicarage thereof and of Shottifham St. Mary, ;

and

St.

Buttolph, lately belonging to Pentney priory, and the

advowfon of

the

redory and vicarage of Corpuily,

longing to Horfham

of

St.

lately be-

and the rectories and churches Andrew the ApoiUe, and of St. Peter of Mancroft in

Norwich,

St.

Faith

;

lately belonging to the college

in the fields

Freethorpe redlory and church, lately belonging to

St.

:

and

Faith's

and the reftory of Eaft Tuddenham, and advowfon of the viand the redory and church of Buxton, and .all great tithes thereto becarage thereof lately belonging to Pentney priory

;

longing, and the advowfon of the vicarage there, lately appertaining to the monaftery of

Sempringham

in Lincolnfliire.

C

330 In 1^62,

O F

appearing that the church was a do-

nominated thereto, and his was licenfed by the blfliop, on producing his

Tiative,

clerk

it

T V

I

the impropriator

deed of nomination. In 1 569^ it was conveyed to Charles Brockdifh, and his heirs.

le Grice,

of

In 1581, the 24th of Elizabeth, William le Grice of Norwich, gent, fon and heir of the faid Charles le Grice, conveyed the impropriation, with all its appurtenances, to Henry Greenwood, Chriflopher Earret,

and

others,

jifhioners of the

as feoffees, in truft

faid parifh,

for

the pa-

who purchafed

it

of

him. In 1595, the

feoffees,

with the majority of the

parilhioners, appointed an aiTiftant minifter or cu-

who

always chofcn by a majority of the paand afhgned to both minlflers their flipends, which arc paid by the feoffees, who annually receive all the profits arifmg from This appointment the living, of what kind foever.

rate,

is

rifliioners dw-elJing in the parifh,

found necelTary after the diffolutipn of the chauntries, whofe priefls were confiant affiftants to

was

the pariQi chaplains.

In 1658,

Hugh

Roberts was inflituted

reiTlor,

on

the prefentation of the king, as to a lapfed rectory,

but die parifhioners, on a contefl, proving their

right,

he was outed. In 1658, George Cock was ele^led upper minilfcr the parifliioners, and thereupon obtained a nomination from the feoffees, they having no power to cle6l folely, being compellable, by an obligation entered into with the churchwardens and parifhioners,

by

NORWICH.

331

to transfer all their right to fuch perfons as they (hall appoint, whenever called upon io to do.

In 1670, Mr. Rively was chofen afTidant mlnifter, a ftipend of 50I. allov\ei him, the fame as

and had is

now

paid.

In 1674, Thomas Tcnnifon, D. D. afterwards archbifhop of Canterbury, was chofen miniilcr: hii flipend was lool. per ann.

The prefcnt upper minifler (1779) is the Rev. Mr. John Peele, and the afliftant miniller the Rev. Mr. Thomas Nichols. The upper two

firft

aiTiflant iaft

month

The duty

is

miniftcr's flipend,

including the Tueffees of the that of the

and the furplice months in every quarter; and minifler 50I. and the furphce

day's lefture,

lool.

is

reader's place to

holidays,

fees of the

in every quarter.

was eftablifhed

in

i68o:

his

read prayers daily (except on Sundays and

when

the minifter or affiftant officiates)

morning, and at three in the afternoon. It is chiefly fupported by voluntary contributions, and is worth about 30I. a year. The preient reader is the Rev. Mr. Stephen Buckle.

at ten in the

In 1707, a noble organ was creeled at the weft end of the nave. The organift's falary is 20I. a year; the parifh clerk's ftipend 81. and the fexton's he has an additi mal falary of 4I. 4I. befides fees ;

a year, for ringing the bell at four o'clock in the rooming, and eight at night.

The

C

335

The

I

T Y

church

prefent

is

O

F

a noble regular freeflone

fabrick, far exceeding any parochial church in this it is recity, of which this is the principal parifh been thoroughly has reand lately pevved, gularly paired and ornamented, the organ new gilt, the altar new decorated, and a capital painting of St. Peter delivered out of prifon, painted by Mr. Catton of London, was prefented to the parifh by Thomas Starling, efq. and put up in the front of the altar. There are many fine monuments in this church, and other curiofities worthy obfervation. :

In 1367, the parifh had fo greatly increafed, that the parifhioners were obliged to enlarge their churchyard, to do which they obtained a licence from king Edward III. in virtue whereof they purchafed thirtynine perches of land of Thomas de Bumpftede and others, and obtained of the city two pieces of land, being fraall lanes condguous thereto, the whole of

which was

laid to the church-yard, walled in,

and

confecrated in 1375-

In 1430, the old church was pulled down and the prefent one began, which was finifhed and conAt the weft end ftands a fine fecrated in 1455. fquare tower, one hundred feet high, though dehave been built much higher, as appears both from the double buttreffes reaching to. figned at the top,

firfi

and the thicknefs of

tower are a bells,

to

fine peal

the walls

:

in this

of twelve large and mufical

and a clock.

The

nave

is

ninety feet long, and the two ailes

of equal length, exclufive of the chapels at their eaft ends, which are forty feet long each ; the ailes are twenty feet broad, and the nave thirty ; and to reduce the whole into the form of a crofs, there are

two

:

N O R

^\^

C

I

H.

533

two chauntry chnpcis or tranfepts tliiitccn feet long each fioin louth lo north, and fifteen feet broad from cafl to wcR the hcighih fiom the pavement of the nave to the fummii of the roof is fixty feet. The chancel is alfo fixty feet lon^^, and of the fame breadth there are two porches, one on the with the nave fouth fide, the otiicr on the north. At the call end of the chancel is ihiC old veRry, and under it a room called the trcafury, fupportcd by an arch. The high altar, which is very advantageouflv raifcd above the reft of the church, Hands upon another arch, through which tliere formerlv laid a common paffage, now flopped up. The whole fabrick is covered with lead, and very remarkable for the ncatnefs and flendernefs of its pillars. The furniture of the altar is made of velvet, and the plate belonging to it exceedingly grand, all but one cup being doubly gilt: one piece of k is remarkable for the elegancy of its workraanfiiip, being a magnificerit Handing cup and cover, given by fir Peter Gleane, knt. whereon is beautifully reprefented the flory of Abigail bringthis cup is efteemed a great ing prefents to David curiofity. A very large handfome brafs branch, confiftingof twenty-four fockeis, hangs in the nave. ;

:

:

In the north eaft end, St.

John

aile,

at the altar

dedicated to the holy

in the chapel at

name

its

of Jefus and

the Baptift, daily mafs v/as ccleVjrated, call-

ed Jefus mafs,

inftitiited at the finifhing

of the church

In, this chapel lies buried iir Peter Rede, in 1455. knt. though that honour havincr been conierred upon

him by an

the Emperor, he was

acknowledged here

as

complete armour, may be feen on a brafs plate on his grave-ftone, which has a fhicld at each of the four corners, and die following infcription at his feet efcjuire

only

:

his

effigv,

Z

in

Hcii

CITY OF

354

Ilerc under

lyetJte the corjis

of Peter Rede,

wlio hdili worthely ferved not only his prince try,

Efqniet,

and coun-

hut alfo the emperor Charles the Vth, both at

th-

of Barbaria, and at the Jiege oj Tunis, as aljo in other places, wJio had gcvcn hym by the fayd emperor for his valiant dedes the order of Bavana,

ccnquejt

xoho died the

^qtk of December, in the year of our

Lord God, ij6S. Sir Peter was fon of John Rede, efq. who ferved the office of ma)-or in 1496, and gave his houfe In St. Gileses to find the great bell to be rung at four

o'clock every morning, and eight

every night, for

the help and benefit of travellers

but thefe falling

into dccav, the

;

ground was leafed out and built upon

It lies at the weft a refcrved rent of 4I. a year. corner of the triangular piece, at the meeting of St.

at

t'.vo flrects, called Upper and Lower NewThere is a portrait of him in the council chamber in the Guild-hall, with a hawk on his fift. He was knighted by Charles V. at the taking of Tu-

Giles's port.

nis in 1538.

The

north chapel, dedicated to St. Nicholas, forCofyn s chauntry, was founded for two The revenues were taxed priefls to fing daily mafs. at 61. 13s. 4d, and the chauntry priefls collated by At the diffolution, its revenues, iffuing ihe bifihop. fhops in the butchery, one tenement with four from jTierly called

another fhop in the in Spiccr-Row, poultry market, and 15s. 4d. rent from divers fifliihops, were purchaied by the city.

a wool-fliop

On

the fouth fide of the fouth alle, oppofite ta Nicholas's chapel, is the chapel of the bleffed Virgin Mary, a place of great repute in times of Romifli fuperflition. Here the fiflimongcrs, Sec. kept

St.

their

k O R

VV

I

C

it.

335

on ilic nindi Sanciay aft.T Trinity. The was dedicated to the holy Trinity, and comnionlv called Bronde's altar, from John Eronde, the At chantry priefl, who officiated at it daily. iirfl: t)ic diilolutioii its revenues were purchafcd by the In this chapel flood an altar of our Lady, citv. v.ith her image, called cur Larly of Milan. In 1504 an image of St. Edward was fet up in it. their guild

altar

At

the cafl end of the fouth aile

we

find the cha-

where an image of St.

pel of St. Anne, whofe principal altar flood die ne\v \-eftry

now

is

;

it

had

alio

Robert.

In the veflry hangs a good old painting, reprefentIng St. Paul in prayer, and faying, '" O! wretched " man that I am. who fliall deliver mc from this

" body of death!" Rom. vii, 24. And to exprefs the law of the law of the members warring again the mind, and bringing that into captivity to the law of fm, Satan is flanding bv him tlirufting a thorn above, to into one of his knees, which is bared; the faint's great comfort, a glory appeareth, from whence proceed thefe words of confolaiion, " My fl;

" grace

is

There

fufhcicnt for thee."

is

alfo a curious old piflure

of our Saviour's

on board, a reprefentation of ^vhich likewife on tapcflry againft the wall hangs

refurre6tion there

is

:

a neat old painted carving in alabafler of nine fe^ male faints, probably dcfigncd for fome altar of St. Margaret, who is the principal figure, and here re-

down a dragon amongfl the Hilda holding a book and paftoral Aaff", and St. Barbara a tower and palm branch, 8:c. Tlic foregoing, together with fevcral books, were given by do6lor Howraan, and added to the library, forZ 2 mcrlv

prefented as holding refl arc St.

;

CITY OF

S36

*Jie noitli porch, now removed hiHere is a fair ofiavo manufcript bible, written in 1340, and a folio manufciipt much more ancient, and illuminated, containing all St. Paul's eplRles, It was formerly owned by with a glofs on them. Robert ds Novell.

inerly kept over ther.

Befides thofe lights already mentioned, there were others kept burning before the images or reprefentations of St.

Mary Magdalen,

St

Thomas,

St.

Doro-

Margaret, the two angels in the choir, the patible over the perke, St. Saviour, the holy fepulchre in the chancel, and St. Peter and thefe St. Paul, the patron faints of the church flood the one on the north and the other on the In the north chapel flood fouth fide of the altar. thy,

St.

Catharine,

St.

;

an

altar

conftant

and image of St. John the Eaptift, and a light was kept burning before the holy

on the rood and chancel. rood,

loft,

fituated

between the church

In 1581, the parifli became poffeffed of the houfc oppofite to the fouth fide of the church-yard, " it " being the old parfonage-houfe of the parifh, and *'

fo reputed

and taken

to

be in times paft."

In 1712, it was leafed by the feoffees for fixtyone years, at 61. per ann. and is now fettled by alderman Rifebrow for a charity-fchool houfe, as the following infcription, fixed againft the wall, fhews

;

This fchool was founded by Mr. John Rifebrow, of this city, in the year of our Lord 1721, for the teaching poor children to read and write, and for late

injlru6ling them in the principles

church of England

:

and for

the

and

dofirine of the

fupport and main-

tenance of this charity fchool^ he ajfigned to truflees

a

leafc

NORWICH. kaje cf

this houfe,

and by

Jettled an ejlate in Walpole it

for

for

Iqfi

will

the uje

and and

tejlament, benefit

cf

ever.

The

truftees

which

his

337

is

pay die above rent

to

the pariOi,

applied to the repairing the church.

In 1651, alderman Thomas Pyc gave the houfcs, Alms houfes, nearly opporue to the fouthfor fix vveft corner of St. Gregory's church-yard, called the

poor people to dwell in the firfl or mofl wefteriy dwelling, and the third, to be filled from St. Giles's parifli the fecond and uxth, or moft eaflerly dwel:

;

from St. Michael's of Coflany and the fourth and fifth from St. Peter's. The houfes in St. Lawling,

;

at the fouth-eafl corner of Fifliersbelong alio to this parifli, and are leafed to Mr. alderman Gay, at lol. a year.

rence's parifli,

lanc,

The

foUowino; religrions houfes had revenues in the prior of Norwich to the amount of

this parifli lol.

:

14s. 2d.

the priors of Canterbury, Alvefbourn,

Cokesford, St. Faith's, Wymondham, Weybrigge, Pentney, Peterfham, and Hickling; the abbots of Wardon, Holme, Waltham, Ramfey, Langley, Sibof Bungay, Swaffham the dean of the Carrowe, in Cambridgefliire, and Chapel in the Fields, and the mailers of St. Giles and Hildebronde. ton,

and Creak; the

prioreflfes

Chapel Field, corruptly called ChaplyField,

From erly

owners

:

Mary which abutted eaflwas herecofore the property of divers

the chapel of St.

upon

it,

that portion of

Z

it,

3

now

particularly fo de-

nominated,

CITY

^c^S

nominated,

l\-inn;

wiihin

O

F

the ^valls,

^iKicnily

•was

called Chapcl-ficId croft, and the adjacciu fields, lyii.g on the outfide of the ditch, were properly

Chapel-fields,

now

in die

hands

ot various proprie-

the croft was purchased by the city, and at Its anthis time is leafed out by the corporation. cient owners '.vere the prior of Bokenham, the pritors

;

orcfs

of Carrowe, the dean of

Chapel tilth,

when

the

college of the

was kept in plough coming into the on its the diffolution, paflure land, convened was into it ci^y.

in the Fields, &:c.

but at

it

hands of the and fo continues.

In 1578, it ^vas fiiR ufed as a place of mufler for the trained bands, or artillery of the city, as well as for the cxcrcife of fhooting in guns, harquebuffes, calivcis, See. and for trial of all iuch pieces as were

named

in the

proclamadon

fet

forth

for that pur-

pofe.

In 1609, Mr. Attorney-general Hobart obtained a Icafc of the croft for forty-one years, and had a deed of the fec-fimple of the cherry-yard made to him

and

his heirs.

In 1668, the city tent was pitched in Chapel-field again R the general mufter, for the ufe of the deputy and again in 1671, for the ufe of the lieutenaius ;

lord lieutenant of Norfolk and Norwich, and the deputy lieutenants of the city, at a general review

of the city regiment.

This was pradifed yearly

for

feme time. In 1707 the field was railed in, as it flill contiSir I'homas Churchman, knt. and aldernues. man, holds it by leafe of the corporation that gentleman has regularly planted jt, and laid out three :

beautiful

;

NORWICH.

539

bcnuLiful and fpacious walks for the ufe of the in-

This clelighLful fpot is much reforted and may be juflly fliled the city mall.

liabitants.

The Market Formerly the great

upon ^vhoic outward

croft

diicli

it

entire piece oi \vaue grouiid,

church

to the Holtor, or

to,

Place.

bc]onp;ing to the caflle,

abutted.

This was an

open Irom

St.

Dove-lane,

Stephen's

'i'he firit parts

upon were the call and ^v'e{l fides and north end; the middle rou', between the market-place and. filli-market, was built ujucli later, and at different and by the fame times, in virtue of royal licences authority, all the buildings at the eafl; end of the church, the Weavers-lane, R:c. were erecled: but notwithflanding tliis, it is flill the grandefl marketThe place, and the bell lingle market in England. market-days are Wcdnefday, Friday and Saturday, built

;

in every \veek.

Heretofore every bufinefs had its particular row accordingly wo. read of the following or flation places in ancient deeds and evidences, ChirothecaSpiceMerceria, Merccr's-row ria, Glover's-row Pcliiparia, Spicer's-row; Acuaria. Needier s-row; ;

;

;

Ferraria, or IronAllutaria, or Tawer s-row monger s-row ; Forum Unguentarium five Apothccaria,

ria,

;

the Apothecary's

market

;

market

Herbaria, the herb

;

Puletaria, or the poultry

market

;

Forum

the flefli-maiket or Piflorum, or the bread market butchery; the wo-ol and flieep markets; the frcfli the pudding-market the old water or fifli-market Forum Tannatowood-market; the chcefe-market ;

;

;

;

rum, or the leather market; the Worftead-ro ;r Sheerman's, or Cloth-cuttei's-maiket ; Forum Sutolura, Souters or Cobler s-row; Parmentaria, the

Z 4

rarchmcnterajp

C

340

Parchraeiiter's-rovv

T Y

I

the

;

O

F

Wltite-v/are-markct

Scoutheres, or Scowrcr\s-rovy

;

Soper s-lane

;

!e

;

the I'ea-

Sea-lifli-markct, &.X. all which we finol mentioned before the reign of Richard 11, for about the latter end of Richard III. trades began to be intermingk^d and confounded together in fuch a manner, that many of thcfe original names weie

ther-houfe'"

;

l0fl.

At the fouth-caft corner of

tlic

prcfent hay-market fet np by the and appoint an

flands a good engine to v/eigh hay, corporation, officer to

The

who

receive the profits

do the bufuiels.

waflcl or wheat-bread-markct extended from

the upper wahel

gate to

the

late

brewhoufe (now

convericd into dwelling-houfcs) fimated on the triangular piece of ground near Hog-hill, and from thence to the prefent entrance into the hay-markec, near to which was the Ibuth entrance to

The new Synagogue and School of

the

Jews. This fynagogue had two other entrances, one from Kog-hill on the eaft, and the other from the hay-market en the wefl, by the paffage now leadinginto the Star-yard that part of the market from :

waflel-raarket aforefaid, to the White-lion-lane, called

in

is

old evidences, Judaifmus, Vicus de Ju-

dailme, or the Jewry ; in the reign of Henry

new fynagogue was built when the Jews fixed themcity. The fchool flood at

the II.

felves in this part of the

the * Joined to Abraham's-hall on the the weft.

eaft,

and

the gun-lane

on

W

N O R

I

G

H.

the foiuli end of the Jewry, near to

341

vvliicli

they had

Tlie houfe appropriated for an haa burial *place. bitation for the high pried, called the biiliop of the Jews. Piood in pai t on the very fpot \vhere the houfe

now

by Mr. James Keyir.er, furgeon, became afterward the eRare of alderman, AnguiPa, and then of the learned Dr. Browne. The next houfe to this on the north, was fettled on the wardens of the mal's of the blelfed Jclbs in the church of St. Peter of Mancroii, and in ailuGon The houfe thereto had the fign of the holv Lamb. inhabited

ftands.t

now

the

-It

formerly bclono^ed to Elias the

Star-inn,

Jew, and abutted eafl; on the garden belonging to the Jews fchool, and north on tiic entrance to their fynagogue.

In 1286, when Edward I. expelled all Jews out of the kingdom, the fynagogue was deflroyed, and this whole the whole Jewry feized by the king quarter was afterward burnt down, which is the reafon that we can find no traces of any of thefs The north fide of the Jewry was boundbuildings. it has ed by White-lion-lane, as it is now called :

;

had

feveral different appellations, the raoli ancient

one is, Selaria, Sellaria or Saddler-gate of the two firfl Edwards it was called

;

in the time

Sadler's row,

Rolimere's or Lorimer's-row in Edward III. Bridlcin Henry IV. Sporier's-row ; and in fmith's-row Edward IV. Sporowe-lanc. ;

;

The t

In the time of

Edward

the Jews at Norwich, fold

I.

it

Urfell fon of Ifaac biftiop of to

John de Wroxham, and

executors in the reign of

Edward

In that of Edward

was confirmed

III.

it

II.

fold

it

to

his

John Pirmund.

to the prior

and con-

vent of Norwich, by the king's licence, by JK.alph de Atdei)urgh.

C

342

The

eafl fide

I

T Y

O

F

of the market from the White-lion^

lane to the Cockcy-Iane, was called nGihefl^or lowtr row, ri'ovv the gciitlemens' walk ; the fouth part of

which was ner's,

the Coiduaineria or Calceria,

Cordincr

s,

or

Shoemaker s-row

;

Cordwaiand the

northern part the Caligaria or Hofier s-row.

The fons de Sellaria or Saddlegate common well, non^ ditufed, was, as well as the whole north {idt of Whitc-lion-iane, on the fee of the prior of St. The northern corner of this row at the enFaith. trance into the Cockey-lane, was called Jenney'srow» from John Jenney, one of the bailiffs in 1368 and 1373, who at that time owned the corner houfe.

The Cockey-lane had

anciently the feveral

names

of Latoner or Tinmcns-row, Cutler-row, and Hofrer-gate ; it extends from the maiket-place eaflward. to the meeting of the lane called the back of the inns from the fouth, with Rackey's-lane from the north ; this is properly the Cockey-lane, although extending another formerly called Smethe-row,

northward from the middle of the aforefaid lane

to

now commonly called by that The two cockeys or common fewers which

Pottergate-flreet,

is

name. meet here, the one coming from Nedham-flreet on the backfide of the nether-row, and the other from St. Giles's-flreet by the north end of the marketplace, were open, and palfed over by bridges till the time of Edward IV. when the lane was paved, and the cockeys were firfl covered.

The north end of the market-place from the Dove-lane to Smethe-row, was th& Aurifabria or and the lane jufl before mentionGoldfmith's-row irom the working goldSmethy-lane, ed was called The lane »ow the Dovein it. dwelt Iraiths tha,t ;

iana

N O R

\V

C

I

H.

343

lane was aucicnily called Holtor-lanc, from the old tower which flood at the foudi-wefl comer, buik by tlie Jews in William Ruius's time for a fynagogue, and ccmtinued to be ufcd for that purpofc till the ieign of Henry II. when they built a new one at this tower Avas effecthe fouth end of the market tuallv^ dcfiroved in the great fire, and the fue rebuilt upon. :

Fiom

this lane to

Stoncgatc or the Goat-lane, ran

the Peilaria or Hatters-row, city gaol,

which ftands the

in

anciently an inn called the

Lamb, pur-

chafed by St. George's company in the time of Henry VII. and ufcd by them as a guildhall, and after-

ward

affigncd to the city for

;

to the city,

and

is

leafed out

The

prefent ufe.

its

boufe next adjoining had the fign of the was anciently called the common inn

caflle, it

and

belongs

by the corporation

:

it

formerly extended to Pottergate on the north, and that part of it next the gate was ufed as the \vorftcdfeld, or hall for felling of worfleds, the petty cuftoms of which were lett at eight marks a year but :

in the time of

Henry VIII.

the cloth-hall at the wefl

end of the guildhall was appointed for diat buGncfs. 0\'er-againll the gaol and lafl-mentioned iioufe Hands,

The

Guildhall;

Originally a fraall thatched building, erected on fee as a toll houfe for collecting the toll of

Carrowe

In the time of Edward III.

it was and in the latter part of his reign a fingle room was added to it, of flud work, and thatched, from which addition it acquired the

the

market.

called the toll booth,

name till

of the o-uildhall.

the reign of

In

this flate

Henry IV. when

it

continued

that prince grantins:

G

S44 ing

I

r Y

O

F

charter for elecling a mayor^ inflead was refolved to build a new guildhalJ, prifons, &:c. the old one being fo very fmali and racan as to have room only to erecl a feat for the mayor and fix others to fit. In confequence of this refolution at an alfcmbly held i.\oj, John Danyel, Robert Brafyer, and twenty-two odiers, were eleded to compofc a fet of laivs for the government of the city agreeable to the charter, and to confult proper means to raife money for building a guildhall this matter was purfued fo vigoroufly, that within the courfe of the year the ^vork was got lo forward that the arches under it, defigned for prifons, were comIn 1409 the roof was raifed, and in 1412 pleated. the prifons were made uie of, but the whole 'building was not perfeded till 14-13, when the windows of the council-chamber were glazed, and the cheIn 1435, the porch quer table was placed in it. ilie

city a

of bailiffs,

it

:

and tower

called

the

tvhich being the prifon

and

in

1440,

all

the

trcafury,

called

the lower part of

city records,

time had lain difperfed White Friars, the chapel

in

were built, which till that

little eafe,

the monaflcry of

in the fields,

Sec.

the

were col-

The flails joinlefied together and depofitcd here. ing to the hall, now covered with lead, were the ancient icriptories, or places where the writers fat at In 1511, the roof of the council-chamele(?iions. ber at the eafl end of the guildhall and the treafury the council-chamber was repaired in fell down :

152^ and 1524, but the treafury tower was never The windows contained many ftories on rebuilt. painted glafs relating to the adminiflration of juflice; but the glafs has been fo much broke and milplaced that ed.

little

of the original defigns can now be collectis adorned with the pidures of king

The room

William and queen Mary, and of

Icveral mayors,

benefactors, kc.

In

N O R

\V

I

C

H.

545

In 1635, the hall was very near being demolillied by the lervants of the deputies for falt-petre, who wilfully

digged'

m

the

cellar

under

the

council-

chamber more than three feet lower than the foundation, and would not be perfuaded to forbear till fome of the aldermen attended the king's council at London, and obtained an order for them to deull. .

In 1660, the lower room

at

the wen;

end

^\-as fct

apart for a cloth-hall, the entrance to which was on the free chamber o\er it was made a the north fide ;

wool and yarn every pack paid and each cloth 2d. The uppermoft chamber over the guildhall was the old magazine each guild liad a gun kept here. and armory fale-hall for foreign

:

to the city 4d.

;

In 1597, ^^ order was made that " the rooms on the eaft end of the guvld-hall, heretofore ufed for " a common gayle, fhall ceafe to be ufed for a pii*' fon after 20 Ocl. next: and that the common gaol " for the county of this cittie, [hall be kept in the houfc *•

" called the Lamb," where it flill continues. The fheofhce continued to be kept on the north fide of the guildhal till 1625, \vhen it was removed into the old chapel oppofite to it on the fouth fide, but that running into decav was pulled down, and the preiiff's

fent fheriff' s office built

The Chapel

on

its file.

called the Guildhall Chapel,

Was

dedicated to St. Barbara the Virsiin, w^io in was efceeraed the prifoncrs faint ; her commemoration-day is the 4th of December. The

thofe days

chapel was founded in the time of Lienry IV. and by indenture between the mavor,

in the year 1472, Sec.

and

t4ie

maileii of St. Giles's

hofpital, for the

fitm

C

M.5

I

t Y

O

f

r';ivcn (.hereto by Ralph Sepjryme, RichRichard Drolle, the hoipital cuvc>and ard iirown,

fum oF

200I

jiantcd for ever to find a fecal ar chaplain to perform fervice every Suniiav and holy-day in die chapel aiorcfaid, for die benefit of die prlfoners, and to :" and find the ncccffary ornaments for the chapel ever fince the chaplain of the city gaol has been, and Is now paid 16I. per annum out of the hofpital The Rev. Mr. Stephen Buckle is the revenues.

prefent chaplain.

In 1626, the old cope, pax, cru-

mafs-book, &:c. were remaining- in the guildhall, but burnt foon after on a thankfgiving-day. The altar was demollfhed at the Reformation and it was in ufe creeled again in cjucen Mary's time cifix,

:

books and ornaments were then bought for it. Before die Reformation, every May-day, as foon as the mayor was elected, a mafs of the Holy Ghoft was fung at this altar, at which the nevv-ele^l was always prefent : and on the day of the tranflation of St. Nicholas the bifliop, every parlfh clerk in the city was obliged to attend and join in finging a mofl. folemn mafs of St. Nicholas, on which account they were by compofition excufed from ferving on juries within the in the reign of c|ueen Elizabeth, for

city.

In 1349, an Inventory of tlie corporation goods, in the cuilody of Mr. Mayor, was depofited here, among which were " an hatte of crymlyn velvet for " the * The ornaments of

this

chapel were, a pair of gilt chalices,

and a patten weighing twelve ounces, a cope of red worfted embroidered with labels, a facryng bell, a bell hanging in a frame without the chapel door, and two large pewter candleIn 1 549, there was a book of fticks ftandlng on the altar.

Common

Prayer and a Bible, the gift of

chaplain there, and a furplice.

fir

Robert Dewe^^

NORWICH. *'

tlic

fw'or J-bcarer

;

a fword,

the hylts

S47 and pome

and doubyl gvit; ancdier fword +, the hylts " and pomel gylt a fcabbard of riche clothe oF " goold fet with perlcs, with a giet chape of fyiver ''

fvlver

;

" gylt a fcabbard of clothe of goold checkered, with a little chape of fyiver g\'lt ; a fcabbard of *' purpil velvet, anodier of crymfyn velvet, v/itli •" two letters of H. doiibyl crowned, with a chape " all fyiver doubyl gylt a mace of arms of fyiver " and doubyl gylt, wrought upon cry flail and fet ;

"'

:

" with ilonys Item, another •' doubvl 2;vit.'' :

The

mace of

leffer

fyiver

wePc fide of the marlcet-place was anciently over or upper-market, and the

called the Vuere,

behind which fouthern part of it the linen-drapery laid the old barlcv-market-yard, which had two entrances, one out of Upper-newport, called Barley;

tlie fame name, though Ibmetimes Herlewyns-lane, leading from the butchery: there were alfo two other lanes in this row, one called Ct)fyn's, and the other Fifhhoufc or

market-lane, and another called by

Elmefwelfs-lane.

The Weaver's was formerlv betVv^een

tlie

lane at the fouth end of the church

called Cobler s-row

:

the middle-rowj,

fifh-market on the weft,

and

the

mar-

ket-place on the eafl, confifts of ftalls with rooms over them ; in diis row Rood the ancient moragc or

toUer-houfe where the market tolls or cuftoms were Part of this row was fettled on the city received. in *

A

cap of maintenanc-e worn by the fword-bearer in

all

public proceflions.

f

Tliis

jl^rter.

was

tlie

gift

of Henry IV, when he granted the aXf

S4S

CITY OF

In 1527, by Robert Janays " towards the charges of " carrying away the dirt arifing from the fvveejnng of *' the firects and cillerns of the city."

The Market

Crofs

Was

ereded in the reign of Edward III. and reHenry IV. it contained a httle oratory or chapel, and had befides four ffiops in it. In the time of Edward IV. it was the dweliing-houfe of the colleflor of ahus for the prifoners in the cuildhall, whofe chaplain officiated here, whene\-er he pleafcd, in a morning for the conveniency of the market people, and received their offerings as his reward. The whole being much decayed was pulled down in 1501, and rebuilt by John R.ightwife, then mayor, partly at his own expence, and partly with It the gifts and legacies of well-difpofed perfons. was a neat odogonal building, furrounded by fleps, and had, as before faid, an oratory or chapel, with a chamber over it it mull; have made a very grand appearance before the leads and pillars to fupport them were added round it. At the diffolution the chapel was turned into a florehoufe. and in the time of Edward VI. the crucifixes that flood at each corner were taken down by order of the king's vifitors. paired in that of



:

The common

fealed meafuies

of the

city

were

always kept here.

i

In 1574, the chapel was let to the mafters, fearchcrs, and fealers of leather, and the wardens of the

bound to feal no leather but at this which purpofe they ufed it till a room was allotted them in the guildhall.

cordwainers were place, for

In.

N O R W

I

C

H,

349

In 1(^46, the whole city was taxed towards the reand new paving ihe croCs, every one paying

pairins;

what

in proportion to

was

lie

laid to the poor's-rate.

In 1732, it was fold, immediately pulled down, and the fitc of it paved over.

Againfl the eaft end of the guildhall was a comwell and in 1404, a cage with a pillory over

mon

;

was creeled near ii the whole was covered with lead, and had a vane on the crucifix placed on its roof. Ihe building was hexagonal, each fide being In 1679 the well was railed in, but nine feet long. is now difufcd and pa\'ed over. it

;

The

(Irect

now

Bedlam-flreet, was anciently called

Over or Upper Newport, becaufe

it

leads

to

the

new-po.t or St. Giles's gate the moft eaflern part of it was the ropery, Vvhcre the cord and rope:

luakcrs formerly dwelt.

On

the nordi fide of this flreet flands the hoafe

lately the

White Horfe

inn,

and formerly

fettled

on

the parifli for finding a light to be kept burning be-

holy iacrament, but feized at the diffoluiion. houfe next the Wheat-flieaf belon2;ed to Cofvn's chauntry prieft. The mofl. eaftern tenement but fore the

The

one, on

on

the fouth

was called the Stone-hall,

fide,

the weft fide of vvhich laid the ancient paffage or

lane called Old Lady's-lane, which led directly to the yard of the chapel of our Lady in the fields : in 13S3 this pafTage was put by, and the prcfcnt

Lady's-lane opened in

fame

fide

of the

way

ftead.

its

is

houle, on part of vvhich

A

the is

a

fitc

More

weft on

the

of the committee-

built

Bethel

;

C

350

I

T Y

O F

Bethel or Bedlam Founded by the third daughter of John Man, and widow of th:- Rex Mr. Samuel Chapman, ie(51or of Thorpe by Norwich, in the year 1713, efq.

.

for the convenient reception and habitation of lu" naticks, and not for natural-born fools or idiots." According to the defire and advice of her late hufband, by her will, dated Dec. 4, 1717, fhe fettled all her eftatcs in Norfolk and Norwich on truflees, giving to them, and the majority of them, the fole power and management of the houfe, ordering them to choofe and place, or difplace the mader (who is to dwell therein and take care of the lunatics) and to appoint phyficians, apothecaiies, Sec. thofe only tvho are dellitute of friends or relations to be kept there gratis and according to the directions of the will, there are as many poor deflitute lunatics kept there as the revenues will afford, (which are greatly increafed through the good management of the trultees, and by numerous benefadions) the inhabitants of the city of Norwich being always to be preferred: and whenever it fhall happen that the truflees be enabled to maintain more than the city offers for relief, they are then impowered to receive fuch objeds from any parifh in the county of Norfolk or elfcivhere but the phyfician mufl firfl certify that they are proper objc6is, and the mafler have an appointment under the hands of a majority of the feven truflees before he can receive any one into the The truflees may alfo admit lunatics whofe houfe. friends or parifhes agree to pay them the moderate allowance of 4s. 01 4s. 6d. a week. The prelent truflees are, John Vere, Jeremiah Ives, and John Slaney, efqrs. Jehofaphat Pollle, John Boycat, and Charles Marfli, gents. The phyficians, Dr. Beevor *'

:

:

and

:

N O R W and Dr. Manning. are jufticcs

I

35*

of ihc prcfcnt truftecs tiiy, but aft in

lirce

.1

G H.

of the peace for the

their private capacities as to this charitv, there being

following claufc in the will of the foundrefs ; " it being my expreis mind and will, that this cha" rity fhall never come into the hands of the couit " of mayoralty nor any of them, acting as a pub*' lie focieiv, fliall be anv wav concerned in the ex.*' ecution of this tiuft.'' Each truflce lias 20s. a year, and when any one of them dies, or removes out of the city, fo that on fummons he doth not attend, he is to be di ("placed, and within three months another elected in his room by a majority of the remaining truliees. t'le

;

She ordered the v/ord

BETHEL

be fixed over

to

the door of the front entrance, and under

it

the fol-

B\it to do good

and

to

CLVimurucatc forget not, for with fuch facrijicts

God

is

lowing

text of fcripture,

well pkofed.

Heb.

viz.

16.

xiii.

On a flonc in the wail near the entrance, following infcription

is

the

This houfe was

built for the henefit of diflreffed luanno 1713, a7id is not to be alienated or em'Tis ployed to any other tfe or purpofe whritfexjer.

va ticks

^

alfo required that the mafler,

tnne to

ti??ie,

be a

man

who fliall

that lives

in

the

andfets up the Proteflant Religion in will have

of

a due regard, as

thofe that are

under

loell

to

be chofcn

from

fear of God,

his family,

and

the fouls as bodies

his care.

A

very elegant committee-room has been lately which is adorned v.ith the portraits of the foundrefs, and feveral of the truftees. built,

A

a 2

The

CITY OF

35^

The maflei's falarv, beGdes his dwelling and tv/o chaldrons of coals vcarly, is forty pounds; ten ponnds of that fum are in lieu of the money given by thofe who vift the houfe, now put into a box, the keys of ^vhich are in the truftees hand^, and applied by them to the increafe of the foundation.

The

prefent mailer

The

is

Mr. Thomas Doyne.

Parifh of St. Giles,

and part of the new burgh fee reign, at which time the Conqueror's out in the church was founded by Ehvyn the prieil; on his own eilate, and given by him to the monks of Noiwich, after he had procured an indulgence ot twenty days pardon for all who fhould come and offer here on St. Giles's day, or within feven days after. Is a fmall ward'",

Theobald, archblfhop of Canterbury, apprdpriit to the monks, before which event it was a re61ory, and paid 6d. fynodals to the bifhop, to whofe jurifdi61ion the parifh is fubjed, as well as to Afterwards it that of the archdeacon of Norwich. was fettled by the monks on their infirmary, and no vicarage being endowed, was ferved by a parifh chaplain. It is now a donative in the gift of the dean and chapter, who appoint the chaplain, and the bifhop thereupon licenfes him. ated

In ancient evidences it is called St. Giles on the and St. Giles of Over Newport, and fometimes The tower is large, fcjuare, and very of Pottergate. for which reafon, in lofty, being forty yards high 1549, a large lanthorn, to ferve as a fire beacon,

Hill,

;

was In the great ward of Manjoined to the fmall ward of St. Stephen,

* Eaton and part of Earlham are croft

and

;

the former

is

the latter to that of St, Giles,

NOR was

fixed

bells.

on

The

its

top.

great bell

Vv It is

I

C H.

355

contains a clock and eight run 2; throughout the winter

the morning and eight at night, morning and nine at night: during the funimcr. The nave, two ailes, and fouih porch arc leaded: the chancel was quite demolifhed in 1381, when the dean and chapter gave to the truftees of the parifli, "all the lead, timber, iron' and " flone, which did come and remain of the decay" ed chancel of this church, for a flock to be put " out for the encouragement of poor traders in this " paiifli." By which means they .eafed themfclves of all repairs at once; for the chancel belonged to, and was to be repaired by them. There was an hermitage in the church-yard, and a crofs and image of the Trinity in a nich on the weft fide of the

half year

and

at fix in

at five

in the

ftecple.

At the

end of the fouth aile, there was a chaand image of St. Catherine, with a light burning before it, and againft one of the pillars, a famous rood, called the brown rood, The guild of St. Mary was kept before the altar of the Virgin of pel,

\ve{\.

altar,

The weft window of the north aile contained the hiftory oi our Lord's Paffion, and there were lights burning before the images of St. Mary, St. John Baptift, St. Chriftophcr, (whofe efifigies of a monftrous fize,* with his ftaif fprouting by him, Pity.

A

a

* la moft chuiches which had north, this faint

"

and hye of

him

a

was pourtrayed over

wall would perniit

;

door opening towards the it

in as large a fize as the

his legend telling us,

ftature,

"

he was noble,

that

and ftronge in membris."

The

ftaff

by

alludes to the proof, which the legend fays Chrift gave

of

him, that he had carried him over the **

were

3

may knowe

river,

" by

caufe that thou

that 1 fay to the truthe, fet thy itaffe

iii

tiie

erthe

" by

C

354

T Y

I

O F

were painted over the nonli door) St. Giles, St. Unkumber, and Sc. Wilegeiortis; befidcs thofc that coiitinuallv burned before the holy rood, or crols, the holy Icpulchie, and the facranient.

The

fervice of plate

for

and was given by Robert

the altar

Is

very noble,

gent, in

1738: it two flaggons doubly gilt, as the whole fet is, weighing together better than one hundred ounces, two cups with covers forty-three ounces, a neat patten twenty-two ounces, and an offering bafoa of above Snell,

confifts of

thirty-one ounces.

There was formerly a hermit dwelling over St. and jufl on the outfide thereof flood a

Giles's gate,

the time of Edward III, but continued as an hofpital or fick-houfe, as long as that did without St. Stephen's gate. leper- houfe,

founded

This was not

diffolved,

The

in

nave cf the church and

twenty-feven yards long, the

and the nave in

its

ailes

The whole was

eight.

the time oi Richard

II.

are

ailes

rebuilt at

which accounts

being fo neat and uniform a building. minifler is the Rev. Mr. Bcckwith.

The

two

four wide each,

once

for

The

its

prefent

rehgious concerned here were the abbot of

Sibton, the prior of Hickling, the priorefs of Carrowe, the dean of the Chapel in the Fields, and the prior of Norwich.

Service *'

by thy houfe, and thou

'*

floures

and

fruite."

flialt

He

by to-morue

fee that

was placed over

it

fhall bear

the door, becaufe

children to be baptifed were ufually brought in at

it,

alluding

to the water in baptifm, which brings falvatjon and fafety to thofe infants, as he did to all,

whom he carried over

time, amongft which was Chrift in form of a

in his life-

little child.

NOR Service ers

is

performed

Vv

I

C

H.

«5n J'> o

every Sunday, and pray-

iiere

read every Friday.

Wymer's Great Ward. Takes time of

div

d



'

name from Wvraer, \',ho Conquerors furvev. This

its

cH

^

i

to three

lived

at

the

is

fub-

fmall \vards, Weft, Middle,

and

^vard

Wvrner, the whole extending on the fouth hde of the river quit.! through the city, from Bifhop'sgate in the eaft, to thofe of St. Benedid and Heigham 'Ea.il

on

the weft.

The

fmall

Ward, called Wefl Ward,

Wymer

Contains within the walls the pariflies of St. BeSt. Swithin, St. Margaret, St. Laurence, and St. Gregory, and without the walls, part of the pa-

nedict:,

rifhes of

Earlham and Heigham.

The church of

St.

Benedict or Bennet,

Standing near the moft weflern part of the city,' the fteeple is round at an ancient fmall building bottom, and at the top o6bngular, and containeth is

three bells

;

:

the nave, fouth porch, north

veflry are leaded, the chancel

aile

and north porch

and tiled.

This part of the city is called Weflwick, from its being fituated on the weftern wick or winding of the river ; and the parts next the river are faid to be in the Nether or Lower Weftwick, and thofe more remote in Over or Upper Weflwick.

A

a

4

The

C

S56

T Y

I

The advowfon

O F

r:^61orv was given to the Norfolk, about 1160, byThomas "de Sanito iEgid'o, (or St. Giles) chaplain, together wiih two acres of giound adjoining to the weft fide of the church-yaid. with' his meffuage

priory of

of the

Bokenham

in

thereon built, between the church-\ard on the eafl; St. Benedid's gate on the weft, and divers rents

and

that were annually paid

meffuage ftood the garden adjoined at the the church-yard: this revenues of the priorv, this

to it. On the eaft part of parfonage-houfe. to v/hich a extreme noith-eaft corner of

houfe, together with

came

all

the

hands at the dilFolution, when the impropriation and ad\-owfon of the church were purchafed by the pariftiioners, the majority of whom eleft their minifter. It is augmented by lot, and fcrvice is performed here once a into the king's

fortnight.

The Holme,

religious

concerned here were the abbot of Norwich, and the priorefs of prefcnt miniiler is the Rev. IMr. Ri-

the prior of

Carrowe. The chard Tapps.

Weftwick or

St.

Ecnnet's. gate,

hermitage, and without

it

was an ancient

ftood a leper-houfe, which

continued as long as the other leper-houfes did, as a iick-houfe or hofpital for the poor.

A

boy belonging to this parifh is raair^tained in Boys hofpital, on the gift of Michael Smith, worftead-weaver, who in 1688 tied his eftate in St. John's Sepulchre for the payment of 61. a year to the

the receiver of that hofpital for the purpofe.

?^

N O

Pv.

W

C H.

I

357

Sl» Swithin's Churcli, Hatli a fqiiare ftccplc and three bells; ailes, north and fouth porches,

and (outh

are leaded, and the north veftry

north

and nave

The

tiled.

is

tlic

cha-

Mary, at the caO: end of the north ailc, had an altar, and the guild of the Holy Virgin, called the Tanner s Guild, was kept there. pel of St.

The

reclory

was anciently

in the

donation of the

of Norwich, and in the year 1200 annexed to the dcanrv of Norwich, as were the chuiches of St. Simon and Jade, and Crollwevt, and tlie deanry of fee

Taverham, and

fo held

1329,

till

when

the deanries

were fcparated from the churches, which were then Sut notwithitanding this union, perpetually united. in 1546 bifhop Rugge feparated the advowfon from the biftiopric, and granted

it

to

William Farrar and

others.

In i6o8 John

Ward was

patron,

who

fufiferlng

and entry it a lapfe, was by the bifhop in full him collated had bifliop being made that the collated to

;

has ever fuice been fuppoled to be in the and held by fequelbation, or liThe fervice is cence, at the bifhop's nomination. on every other Sunday. The Rev. Mr. John Black-

right,

it

bifhop's patronage,

burne

is

the prelcnt miniller.

The New fuic

Mills are, as

to

the

principal part of

was proved in 1459, on a commenced between the prior of Bokcnham, im-

them,

in this parifh,

propriator of in Coflany,

Benedict's,

who had

the reclor of St.

Mary

a fmall part allotted him,

and

St. Swithin, for the tithes of the faid Formerly all the city bakers were obliged ta erind

the rector of mills.

St.

as

;

338

C

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grind here, and the miller, as a public fervant, had a livery and badge given hiia every year.

In queen Elizabeth's time, the water-works were undertaken, and in 1,583 brought to fo great perfection as to fupply the hall and crofs in the market at which time John Fofler and Alexander Peek furreodered all their right therein to the city, for the fum of 63 ol. and undertook to keep them in repair for a fixth part of the annual rents : fince that time the works have been fo greatly improved, that the

whole

city

is

moll commodioufly fupplicd with

river

water.

The

the property of the city, and with the bakers grint thereto belonging, for the term of eighty-feven years, at the yearly rent of 200I. but reduced in 1708 to 180I. in

mills are

1706 were

flill

lett,

Here is a handfome fet of plate for the altar, viz. a fdver flaggon weighing upwards of 38 ounces, a bafon of 20 ounces, a patten of 1 1 ounces, and a cup with a cover.

Margaret's Reclory,

St.

Commonly xvick,

called St.

Margaret's of Over Weflat 40s. and paid 3d. fy-

was anciently valued

nodals it ftands at 5I. 4s. gd.l in the king's books, but being fworn of no certain value, is difcharged It hath been augmented ol firft-fruits and tenths. hy lot, and an eflate purchafed with the money, lying in Newton Flotman in Norfolk, rented at 14!. per ann. part copyhold, but fine certain at 4s. an :

acre.

The

lords of Cokefield-hall in Yoxford, for-

merly prefented

to

it,

but ever lince 1613, the rectors

NOR

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C

I

H.

359

tors liavc been inditurcd ciihcr in right of the king, The Rev. Mr. John or of the bifhop by hip!c. Blackbarne. the prefent rccior, was inilituted at the

CGllation of the billiop.

fouth alie, nave, chancel, and north and porches are leaded ; the north vcflry tiled ; the tower is fquare, and hath hve bells befides a at the eaft end of the fouth ails linall faint's be'i to S:. Anne. The black flint dedicated chapel is a houle oppofite to the nordi fide of the church -ya?d,

The

foiuh

;

was the dwelUng-houie of the ancient family of the Redes.

The

priorefs

of Carro^ve, the abbot of SIbton,

the prior of Bromholrn, the dean of the chapel in the fields, and the brot tiers and afters of Magdalea hofpital

had revenues

iffuing out of this parifh.

Mr. Thomas Seaman, by

his will, dated Augufl;

700, fettled his clofes lying

10,

1

and

St.

between

St. Giles's

Stephen's gates, containing nine acres, call-

and alfo the fum ed Crab-tree or Clay-pit clofes of 20 ol. with which an eftate was afterward purthe clear profits of the former were approchafed priated to the binding out two girls yearly, and of the latter, two boys, to be taken from the pariflies ;

;

of Heigham,

St. Benedi
and

St.

Mar-

garet, fo that every year each parifh may have a child bound out alternately, a boy one year and a The apprentice fee given with the girl the next. girls

on

was fixed

at

50s. each,

and with the boys 5I. would produce thofe

a fuppofition that each eftate

fums.

C

35o

St.

T Y

I

O F

Laurence's Church

Stands upon the fpot which, before the retreat of fea, and vvhilft this continued a confiderable

the

fifhing town,

was the quay or landing-place

The

for all

of this tifliery were fo confiderable, whilfl in the hands of the bifhop of the Eafl Angles, that about the year I09j8, on bifliop Alfric's granting the quay, ftaiihe, Lagh (or clofe inclofed with hedges) together with the adjoining manfion, to Bury-abbey, and the abbot's undertaking to build this church, he referved to his monaftery a yearly payment of a lafl. of herOn this hagh, in the time of the Confeffor, rings. the parifh began to be buik, the abbey having parted wiih it iliough they referved the quay or (laithe, on which they founded the old church, which was the abbey had the houfe s. re^ory in tw'O medietics

hrrrines brou2;ht into the

citv.

tithes

;

:

and one mediety,

and

William Rufus's time

the rector

the

other.

the medieties were joined,

In and

ever fince it hath continued one entire reflory. The lafl of herrings payable by the re£lor to the abbey, was converted into a yearly payment of 40s. fome

time in the reign of Henry III, which continued to be paid till that of Henry VII. when it was remitted on account of the fmallnefs of the profits. The redory being valued at hve marks was taxed at half It remains in the a mark, and paid 3d. fynodals. king's books at 4I. 13s. gd. and being (worn of the clear yearly value of 16I. 5s. iid.t is difcharged of firft fruits and tenths, and capable of augmentation.

The old church was pulled down about the year 1460, and the prefent beautiful and regular pile finiflit'd in 1472, at the cxpence of the abbot and xnonaflery of Bury, the parifhioners, and many private

-

^

N O R

Vv"

H.

361

of a noble fquarc tower,

It confills

vate benefactors.

C

I

one hundred and twelve feet high, having a door at over it on the norih part is a carved the well end reprefcntation of the martyrdom of St. Laurence in flone ; the faint is Iccn broiHng on a grid-iron, and On one the foldiers are biified in tending the fire. part is figured a king crowned, defigned to reprefent the Father with a fword in his hand, flriking at the emperor Decian, at whofe comn-iand this cruelly was exercifed on the faint, who is faUing under the ;

On

flroke. ing,

the other fide

reprefenting

Edmund

is

another piece of carv-

the king tied to

a tree,

near and the Danes Qiooting arrows into his body them lies his head among fome bufhes, alluding to that part of the legend, which fays, that when they could not kill him widi arrows, Hunguar the Danifli general ordered them to fmite off his head, and throw it amongft the thicked thorns in an adjacent wood, where a wolf f.nding it, prcfcrved it from be-» ing devoured by any bird or beaft of prey, till ic was difcovered by ihe Chriflians, and buried widi ;

'

the body.

There great bell

are is

fix

mufical bells in the tcwcr.

rung every morning

The

and e\'e!y Earlham, called

at four,

evening at eight a piece of land at St. Laurences Acre, being given for that purpofe. The nave, two ailes, and the two chapels ac their ;

eall

ends,

leaded,

and

witli

the fouth and north porches,

the north

veRrv

is

are

tiled.

The

convent of Bury prefented till 1557. In Mr. Ihomas Bartram, of Melton in Norfolk, prefented, fince which time it hath been difpofed of by the crown/ or held by fcqueitration. iG'^C),

The

.

C

3^2

The

I

T V

O

F

hi^

ilizn in this cinircli were cbrec, iL'

siLir.

5

were

a.

"

'*f

the

hoW

rood

:

dicrc

of Sc L.-^fiTGDLe skv, the fcrmo' -»ii he foaV

icsa:gcs

2nd Sc

Frfm^zaj, near the \ash. '

the nonh, sird tapers bonnnc

r.

;

i$ th

NkfaolLS, Sc ChnlLcpber, Sc Marv, Sc Mii-,-

Sc-

-

or

me

p :!TKe or

the lsmjc

:

-

In

TT

I

•'

TTie reIi|toti3 cocccni-:

Hirtlipg and CirroMPC die dezn of

NoTViicit,

T

-' '^•"-00. 2iid tiw _..-:^.^ ,. _ .. __ - ifbnaor is the Rev. Mr. Pirr.

zlc" pre.

.

^

..

2. dii'^azt berweaa tHc cky abcct repairing die ftreets, viz, O'.tT CT L.'pp<;r Weftwick, or Sc. Bexmet's-ftntct, on ttt fc::tl! fide oi the dmrcb-yard, aod Nether or Lower W'eihtficlL. HoOe^ate or Hrlkgarr-toeet oq db= pafegcs and fteps called Sc. ziorth, zed

Is 1--;.

^^

>-2«

•;

ar.d the parifhiocer?,

L2urenc:'5

no;

:

thai d:

::

the

:.

Ik

cl

when k was

-

:.

-

as being

and pib-

^cy of the dcT.

.

^

ad^fodgol

repair the ftrects, ~

-

- s: 5

CO

HceLim,

NORWICH. of

the

cliiircli is

now

laid into

s6«5

common

tlic

way, by

Nvliich means the ftreet leading to Collany bridge rendered very commodious.

is

The fides

fine painted windows on the north and foutb, of the nave, were deftroycd in 1643.

The

well;

called

Laurence's Well, is a very tiuie of Edward I. we read well. In 1547 ^^^ corpora-

St.

ancient one, for in the that

it

^vas a

common

tion granted the parifhioners the lane extending from the high flreet well,

to

the well, together with

on condiLion

th:it

the faid ihey fhould ereS: a door at

and keep up every night.

the foudi end of the laid lane,

day, and iccurely (hut

it

it

open

all

In 1576,

Robert Gibfon obtained a grant of the faid lane and well, provided that he at his own charge convevcd the water from the faid well into the public Ureet, and continued it fo conveyed. It is now called St. Laurence's Pump, and hath an infcription over it, denoting that the water v/as brought thither from a ipring at the diilance of fixtv-threc

feet.

Coflany bridge is the common paffage to that part of the citv Iving beyond the water and was the firll ;

common

bridge on

St.

its

weflern part for carriages, Sec

Gregory's Church,

Was an ancient re£lory, in the patronage of the Valoines, or Valoyns, In 1210 it was fetded on John Fitz-Barnard, one of the co-heirs of that famiand his heirs, by the name of the advowfon of Gregory's church near Mancroft. It was afterwards given by one of that family to the priory of ly, St.

monks

at

Norwich.

In

CITY

364

O F

In 1276, Roger de Skeining, biOiop of Norwich, appropriated it to the ufe or the flrangcrs ball, and but in 1289 Ralph de their entertainment ihere; Walpole reverfed the former fettlement, and appro-, priatcd it to the infirmary of the monailcrv, the ma fter

of which received

pricft

for

all

the fervice of

chance], and anfvvered

all

the profits, paid a fecular the

church, repaired the

fynodals, kc. to the bifliop

and archdeacon of Norwich, to vvhofe jarifdi61ion ic was fubje(!^, as before the appropriation, when it was valued at nine marks, taxed at four, and paid 6d. fynodals.

chancel was rebuilt in the handfome form in which we nc».' fee it in 1394, at the expenc« of the priory, aided by feveral private benefa61ions, and the church-vard was much enlarged on the north lide.

The

It

is

now

and chapter;

gift of the dean and the reverend Mr. Whittingham

a donative in the

Service is performed here the prefent minifter. once every Sunday, and prayers read on faints days, is

The church is an ancient building, but was new Its infide is handfome covered with lead in 1537. and convenient, and conlifts of a nave and two ailes, with chapels at their call ends; that on the fouth is dedicated to St. Thomas, archbifliop of Canterbury, and its altar to St. Thomas and Sr. Anne, both of whom had their images near it in niches in the wall: on the north was St. Mary's chapel. At the well end of the fteeple is a fmall chapel flill remaining, which opened into the common paflage ; it was called the chapel of the Affumption of the Bleffed

that

Virgin, and at the altar flood her image with a light

continually burning before

it,

and Jefus mafs was celebrated.

NOR

w

I

n.

c:

S''

At the difTuIuiion it came into the celebrated in it. hands of the churchwardens, who have conflantly leu it out, as thev did aifo the vault under the chancel,

In 13Q7 the fpire or pinit is the only one in

formerly a charnel.

nacle was co\'ered with lead

:

the city, except ihc catheurai.

In 1626, about

1

was

lol.

laid out in beautifying

the church, when, amon^fl other benchiclors to this

wc

tvork,

find one Francis

Watfon, a pedlar, who

not only contributed the Turn of thirty (hillings, but painted and marbled all the pillars, railed in the " out of his own free font, and adorned the altar, " will, zeal, and de'v'otion, to the houfe of God."

In 1634 the font was repaired and fitted up in the as it now appeals, at the cxpence of forty pounds.

manner

Before the Reformation, the following images

and

reprefentations had lights burnt before them, viz. of St. Catherine, St. Margaret, St. Ehzabeth, St. John, St.

James,

St.

Chriflopher, of the

Saviour, and the

Holy Rood, our

Holy Sepulchre.

The chancel, fouth vcflry, fouth and north ailes, and fouth and north porches are leaded. The tower is fquare, and contains a clock and five bells. Here remain two \'ery fair altar cloths the firfl, of black filk, was always ufed when rcafs for the dead w-as celebrated it is embi;oidered with the figures of dolphins embowed, each having a fifh in its mouth half devoured the whole interfpcrfed with nvimerous reprefentations oi angels holding extended Hiects thofe perfonating men having a naked demi;

:

;

;

man, and

thofe reprefenting

B

b

women,

a

naked demi-«

woman

C

565

T Y

I

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F

each fheet; by which this docl)ine was be inculcated, that by their miniflration the fouls of the righteous are conduced to heaven. " Pray for the fowlis It has the fohowing infcription " of John R.ccde and Agnes his wyff." The other " Pray for the is of gold brocade, and has on it,

woman meant

in

to

:

" fowle of John Wcugatc, alderman, and " his wyff."

Mawde

The font is a large pile, the upper part o£lagonal: oh four of its fides are figured the four evangelifts, and on the other four, pcrfons reprefenting the four lliere is befides, an angel quarters of the world, holding a mitre in one hand, and the gofpcl in the odier.

The

were the priors of

religious concerned here,

Broniholm, Dunmow, and Norwich.

The

brafs branch with fixteen fockets,

the nave, was

the

gift

hanging in

of Mrs. Elizabeth Goofe in

1703.

The

north eaft part of the church yard abuts on hill, which took its name from the Iheer-

Sheerer's

men

who dwelt there. On this hill, meeting of the three ftreets, flood a (lone

or cloth-cutters

at the crofs,

by corruption

er's-crofs

The

:

it

fmall

called Charyng-crojs, for Sheer-

was taken

down

Ward,

called

in

1

732.

Middle

Wymer

Ward, Contains the parifhes of St. John of MaddermarSt. Andrew, and St. Michael at the Pleas.

ket,

St.

N O R St.

\V

I

C

H.

John BaptiR's Church

in

367

Madder-

market, So deriOminatcd from

on

its

north fide for the

tlie

fale

market formerly kepL oC madder, a plant of

principal u(c in dyeing. The church is built of flint, has a nave, two ailes, and two porches, covered the north vcflry is tiled it has a fquare with lead tower wiih fix bells, which were new calt in 1766. ;

;

founded before the ConfcfTor's time, and oriholy Trinity and St. John the patronage was in tweh-e burgeffcs, the Baptlll by whom moil; probably it was built. The Conqueror feized it and gave it to the bifliop, from whom it afterward devolved to the GifFards. Walearl of .Buckingham, who died in ter GifFard, 1102, fettled, it on the priory of St. Faith at Newington Longueville in Buckinghamfhire, a cell apj)ertalnlng to the alien abbey of St. Faith at Longueand in confequence thereof a ville in Normandy penfion of 6s. Sd. was yearly paid out of it to the It ^vas

cdnally dedicated to the ;

'

:

prior of

Newington Longueville.

When

the reve-

nues of that priory ^vere, feized, the patronage became annexed to the crown, and fo continued till Henry VL granted it to Winchefler or New-College It is fomein Oxford, in whofe gift it dill remains. was valued timcs called St. John s at Potterfgate at five marks, taxed at 20s. and paid 3d. fvnodals. It {lands in the kings books at 7 1. 10s. 2d.i and being fworn of the clear yearly value of 13s. gd.y was difcharged of firfl fruits and tenths, and has The iince been augmented by the queens bounty. Rev. Dr. Bathurll is the prefent redor. ;

B b

2

Thtf

CITY OF

36S

The

religious concerned here, were the priors of Olave, Hrckling and Norwich, the priorcfs of Canovve, and the dean of the chapel in the fields.

.St.

'

In 1563, r^bruarv

7,

at night,

at the duke's

pa-

died the virtuous lady Margaret dutchefs of Norfolk, daughter of the lord Audlcy, fecond \vifc to Thomas duke of Norfolk, beheaded lace in this parifh,

in the reign

interred in

on the

choir,

The

of queen Elizabeth, and was folemnly church, on the north fide of the

this

iStli 01 the

fame month.

corner houfe over again fl the duke's palactf,

on the weft fide of St. John s flreet, was built by John Marfliam, anceflor of the Marfliams of Stratton Strawlefs in Norfolk.

roof of All Saints chapel at the eaft end of aile, is adorned with angels holding labels, on which part of the Te Deum is written, and the word Jcfus, encircled with crowns oi thorns ; out Oppofitc of this chapel is a paffage into the veftry. to it, in the fouth aile, is the chapel of St. Mary the Virgin, the roof of which is adorned with an-

The

the north

gels,

holding labels Infcribed with the following fen-

tences

:

Ave Maria

go ferena, ed,

is


gratice plena

the cypher of the

Dominus tecum

;

vir-

word Maria, crown-

fcattered over every part of

it.

Francis GiUians, worfled-weaver, who lies buried in this church, by his will gave looi. to be paid into the hands of the mayor, fheriffs, citizens and

commonalty of Norwich, for an annuity ot 3I. payable out of their eflates on Butter-hills, to be applied to the binding out a boy yearly from one of the ^following parilhes, viz. *Uce, St.

^i.

Simon and Jude,

Mardn at PaMaddermarof John

Helen, St.

St.

ket.

NORWICH.

q(5 'og

kct, and St. Stephen, beginning with th.c firn: of them, and fo on luccelTivelv for ever. He alfo gave, after the deceafe of his wife, all his hoafes called

Sherrod's Gap, in the parifii of St. Michael at Thorn, of the yearly rent of 26I. 12s. or thereabouts, for ever, upon truft, to pay out of the clear rents thereof to the minifter ^vho to

preach

at

fliall

the cathedral on each

be appoi-nted Sundav, from

Low-Sunday, to, and upon the Sunday next before Advent Sunday, for reading pravers and preaching; at the church of St. John of Maddcrmarket on the fame day in the afternoon, the fum of 10s, (except thofe Sundays on which the bifliop or dean are appointed to preach) and 10s. to the minifter of that parifh yearly, for reading divine fervice and preaching on St. Andrew's day 2S. 6d. to him for giving notice, and reading part of his will on the Sunday next before 20s. per ann. to the clerk, and 5s. per ;

;

annum

for

candles

;

15s.

for

the

expcnces of the

churchwardens at their yearly meeting to coun s and the refidue, if there be an^•, ;

ac-

fettle

to

be laid

out in cloathing the tenants in the manner expreffed He died December 20, 1719, aged in the \vill. The fermons were firfl preached fixty-four years. in 1744.

In 1668, the north aile was repaired charge of that eminent and worthy knight, leph Paine,

The common pump, the north

by the

called St. John's

end of the church yard,

is

the

at

Jo-

fir

pump,

at

kegt in icpair

parifto.

Bb3

The

CITY OF

$70

The Duke's Anciently confifled of

Palace

many

tenements, purchafV'sl

by Alan Percy, clerk, brother to the old duke of Northumberland he fold it to the duke of Norfolk in the time of Henry VIII. who converted it inco a palace, and made it his principal pl^ce of rcfidcnce. :

In 1602, the old palace was dcmoliflicd, and a noble one begun by Henry duke of Norfolk, but fcarcely finiPncd before it was pulled down by his grandfon Thomas, on account of the ill-behaviour of the mayor, in not permitting his comedians to enter the city with trumpets, Sec. From that time it hath been entirely neglefted the fmall remaining part of the building is now converted into one of the city workhoufes, and hired of the duke for that :

purpofe.

The

eaflcrn part of this parifh conflituted the an-

cient parifli of die

united to

St.

Holy Crofs

John's

:

its

;

afterward perpetually

church, called

St. Crucis, corruptly St.

Was holy yard

Crowdie's,

dedicated in honour of the invention of the but now totally demoliflied the church-

crofs,

;

furrounded with common lanes or pafiages, and the public houfe known by the name of the Hole in the Wall, flands on its fite the advowfon belonged to the prior and convent of Norwich, and wa:s appropriated to the infirmary. is

flill

:

The fleacon

church was fubjed to the bifiiop's and archjurifdidion, and paid 6d. fynodals. In

s

NORWICH. In 1546,

and by ihem

it

was granted

arid chapter,

dean

to the

37

leafed in 1549, April 10, for five

hun-

dred years, to Thomas Codde and Thomas Marlham, aldermen, by the name of the advoufon of The church was dcmothe church of St. Crofs. lifhed

St.

in 1551.

and

the

parifli

coiifolidaicd

to

St.

except a houfe or two, which were added to Andrew's.

John

s,

The Church of Is a fine fabric,

church in the

The

St.

Andrew

and eflecmed

city,

except

ancient church, which

the Apoflle,

the

bed parochial

St. Peter's

Hood on

of Mancroft.

fame fpot, The rcfiory was was founded before the Conquefl given by John le Brun, the patron, to his college of St. Mary in the Fields, upon his founding that colIt was then valued at 3I. taxed at 20s. and lege. t!ie

paid 3d. fynodals. xAt

the dilTolution

it

devolved

to

the crown,

in

whofe hands it continued till Edward VI. in 1352, granted the advowfon of the redory and vicarage to William Mingay, and William Ne6lon, and their to be holden of the king, of his manor of Eaft Greenwich, by fealty only, and not in capitc. On Nov. 2, 1559, they conveyed it to Thomas Sother-

heirs,

and others, as truftees for the parifli, who purand from that time it has been chafed it of them a donative in the gift of the parifinoners, on whofe donation the bifhop licenfes. ton,

;

In 1614, there were three le£lures preached there,' on Monday, Thurlday, and Friday, at feven o'clock in the morning; the two firfi: at the expence

viz.

of the corporation, and the

laft at that

B b4

of the parifli,

lu

C

372

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In 1661, tliey were all fet afide by the court, an4 one ellablifiied in their room, to be preached by the minifter of the parifh e\'ery Thurfday in the morning, for whicli they paid him a flipend of sol. a This payment continued till 1743, when it year. was flopped, and the lecture thereupon ceafed. ic js now again renewed by a donation of the laie Mr. Benjamin Tiappet of this city, who left a fum of money for that and other purpofes. The Rev. Mr. Simpion is ihe prefent minifler.

The flecple was rebuilt in 1478, and endrely finiOied before the old church and chancel were pulled down, and which were begun to be rebuilt about In 1501, the 17th of Henry Vll.

the year 1500. lie

licenfed the parifhioners

their chancel,

to

rebuild and enlarge

a foot in length towards the

eafl,

upon

the flreet there. the cafl end of the fouth aile is St. Anne's chawhere the guild of St. Andrew was kept, and oppofite to it, in the north aile, is our Lady's Chapel, m which Jeius mafs was daily celebrated. Under the fleeple was a chapel of our Lady of Grace, on whofe altar her image flood, with a light continually burning before |t and a guild to her honour

At

pel,

;

was conitantly held

here.

Befides all thefe, there

were feveral tabernacles with images in them, viz. of St. Andrew, the Vifitation of our Lady, St. Savigur, St. Nicholas, &:c.

The

were the priors of and Norwich, the priorefs of dean of the Chapel in the Fields.

religious concerned here,

Pcterflon,

St.

Faith,

(^arrowe, and the

Againfl the north wall of i)ie

St.

Mary's chapel, ih

chancel, (lands a mofl magnificent

monument, inclofe
NOR

W

C

I

H.

-'

indofcd with an iron palifadc, ereficd to the

375

memo-

John Suckling, and Martha his wife. This fir John Suckhng was fon of Robert Suckling, elq. alderman and mayor of Norwich, and father of the famous poet fir John Suckling: he fhidicd at Gray's Inn, and afterwards fettled at Whitton in Middlclex;

ry of hr

;vas

made one of

the principal fecretaries of ftate in

1G22, and comptroller of the houfhold to James I. and Charles I. to the latter of which kings he was

a privy-connfellor:

he died March

7,

1627, and

was buried here near the remains of his wife; his fon, fir John Suckling the poet, being tlien nineteen His will bears date Sept. 30, 1626* vears of age. in which,

" Item,

" " " " " " " "

among

other things,

Whereas

I

is

infericd;

have erected

in

ihc parifii

church of St. x^ndrcw, in the citv of Norwich, two feveral monuments, the one in memory of rav late worthv and religious parents, Robert Suckling, efq. fomedme citizen and alderman of Norwich, and Elizabeth his wife ; and the other ia memorv- of mv late dear wife, Mrs. Martha Suckand whereas 1 have for the fpace of twelve ling ;

years laft pafl, given feveral fums of money unto " the pool of the pariOi of St. Andrew aforefaid^ " St. Augufline, St. George of Colgate, and St. Sa-r " viour, in the faid city, with a vcarly allowance to " a preacher, for the making of a lermon on il-e

" feaft of St. Simon and Jude, and alio to the cleik " of the parifti of St. Andrew for looking to t!ie laid

monuments: Now, kc. it is my fpeciai defne " and intention, to give a yearly (urn of money to " be dillributed yearly for ever, for the preaching ' of a fermon in the parifli church of St. Andrew,

*•

"on •' '*

the Friday next

after

the feaft of St.

Siaion

and Jude in every year, between the hours of two and four ill the aitcnioon of the fame day, by iome godly

;

S74

C

I

T Y

O

F

godly and learned miniiler and preacher of the wosd of God, to be thereunto appointed by my " eldefl: fon John Suckling, during his life, and af" ter by the mayor of die faid city f6r the time be^' *'

" ing; alfo toward relieving the poor of the parifli " aforcfaid, and for the gratifying fuch others for

" their pains and diligence as herein after " prellcd."

is

ex-

For which purpofes he gave to the mayor, fherifFs, aldermen, and common-council of the city of Norwich, an annuity of eight pounds, payable out of his manor of Barfham in the county of Suffolk, on the feail of St. Michael yearly, to be diftributed in the following manner; twenty fhillings to the preacher on the Friday after the feaft of St. Simon and Jude two fliillings and fix.pence to the mayor, and feven fliillings and fixpence to be divided amongfl the jufticcs, flieriffs,

and fword-bearer,

who

are required

the will to be prefent at the faid fermon

;

by

forty fliil-

poor of each of the paviflies of St. Andrew and St. Auguftine, thirty-five fliillings to the poor of St. George of Colgate, and five {hillings to thofe of St. Saviour, and ten fhillings to the parifh ckrk of St. Andrew, for his pains in making and keeping clean the laid monuments. lings to the

" Alfo, I will that iny executors beflow forty " pounds to buy land of inheritance for the faid pa" rifli of St. Andrew, (where I was born) and the " yearly profits thereof arifing, to go only to the " repair of the two *'

monuments

aforcfaid,

and not

otheiwife."

The churchwardens,

however, had power to apply of the church itfelf, until repair produce the to the the monuments, or either of them, needed repairation.

NO

R

^V

C

I

H.

375

Tlic manor of Barfnam was charged vviih this lum of forty niillings, fo that the whole income is now lol. per ann.

tion.

The lame

fir

John Suckling

alfo

gave ten

fl^illings

be preached yearly at St. Andrew's fe ennight next after Michaelthe Sunday church, on mas fynod, between two and four o clock, as an acknowledgment of God's favours and mercies towards for a fcrnion

to

him.

There

is

a handfome

fet

of plate belonging to the

altar: 1.

A A

fine old gold cup,

A

large hlver patien,

made

in

1

handfome (landing cup and 2. of alderman Remjngton. 3.

56S. cover, the gift

the gift of Elizabeth Sal-

16S0.

ter,

A

large olTcring diili weighing 47 ounces, the Laurence Goodwin, formcriv mayor of Norwich, anno 1704, who alio gave t^vo noble fiaggons, the one weighing 59, the other 5S ounces. 4.

sift of

In the fouth veflry (which is tiled) tliere are fevcbooks, amongil which is atjuarto manufcript

ral old

of Trevifa's tranflation of the Epifiles and Gofpcls. The fleeple has eight bells and a clock.

The fonage,

was the

gift

of Mr. Rugg.

was purchafed in 1570 for which was rebuilt by the Mr. Clagett.

Dean Prideanx with

I

which joins

parifh clerk's houfe,

3I.

to the par-

The

parlonage

lool. the gicateff part of late

incumbent, the Rev-

fays that this donative

per ann. and that

tl^e

Is

endowed

arbitrary contributi-

ons

C

57$

ons were 70I. in more.

I

T Y

all 85I.

O F

It is

now reckoned

vvortli

much

At the north-eafi; corner of the church-yard lies Andrew's common well, in queen Elizabeth's time and on n^ade a common pump, as it hill remains the whole ranging fide of the church-yard, fouth the St.

;

length of

is

it,

The

City Bridewell.

A very noted building, its walls of black flints being eheeiiied the moll curious ot its kind in England.

was owned by Bartholomew Appleyard, bai-

It

here in 1372; WiHiam his fon kept his firft It came afterwards into mayoralty here in 1403. the hands of Thomas Cambridge, who in 1454 conliff

veyed

it

to

John

Paflon.

Sec.

to the Hobarts, the Cuifons, the

snd It

now as a

from ^vhom it pafTcd Brownes, the Coddes

the Sothertons.

was bounded by the feveral lanes and flreets and hath been a long time ufed it,

furrounding

common

bridewell, or houfe of corre^lion.

prefent keeper

is

Between the lane running

at the

end of

drew's chancel, and that leading out of flreet to the

ThQ

Mr. John Staunard. St.

An-

Wymer's-

Red-well, oppofite to the Friars Preach-

ers chi^rch-yard, anciently flood

The

:

NORWICH. The Church of

St.

375

Chrillopher.

One of the oldefl: churches in the city, demollfhed by fire in the time of Henry III. and never afterward rebuilt. At its dcmohtion, the whole ot the parifli became perpetually united to St. Andrew'^ the church-vard was annexed to the reftory, and paffed, at die appropriation thereof, to the dean and chapter of the college of

whom

St.

Mary

in the Fields,

by

upon. Its parifh included all the fpace between the two lanes afore•faid, and part of the north fide of Cutler-Row, to "vvhich there was an entrance from the church-yard. The fmall part of it not annexed to St. Andrew's parifh, was added to St. Michael's at the Pleas. it

was leafed

out,

The Church of

St.

and

built

Michael

at the Pleas,

Is built in form of a crofs, confiding of a nave, fouth and north tranfept chapels, and a chance], the whole covered with lead. It hath a liijuare tower, a

clock, is

and

five bells,

beildcs the faints bell.

There

a veftry on the north fide of the chancel, a fouth

porch, and another chapel built againll the fou^h fide of the chancel, and joined to the eaft fide of the fouth tranfept.

There were formerly eight flails in the chancel, but now removed and placed in different parts of the church ; and there flill remain feveral ancient paintings on board, as an old falutation hanging at the ivefl entrance our Saviour s crucifixion and refurregion on the north fide of the entrance into the chancel ; the Virgin of Pity furveying her fon's dead ;

body:

CITY

5tS

Juaas betraying Clirifl;

body; Virgin

O

and oppofite

:

to

^ John and

St.

the

paintings of the

thele are

cruciiixion, with Mary and John by ihecrofs; St. Eenedift, and Margaret and the dragon ;

St. St.

Auguiline.

The chancel (before thatched) was new roofed and covered with lead in 1711, by the generous bcnefadion of John Harbord, of Gunton, efq. who gave one hundred pounds, and the voluntary contributions of the parifhioners. north tranfept chapel was dedicat-ed to Su and the fouth chapel to St. Mary the There were lights kept before the images of Virgin. and the faints, at their altars, in the faid chapel

The

John

Baptift,

;

likewife before

thofe of

St,

Anne,

Chriftopher^

St.

the Holy Rood, Sepuland a hanging branch, with. lights, before the image of St. Michael, towards the charge of which a meffuage on the north fide of the church-yard was tied, in the time of Edward 1. for the yearly payment of a pound of wax. St.

Nicholas,

Thomas,

St.

chre and Sacrament;

The

religious

who had

revenues in this

parlfli

were the priors of Norwich, Hickling, St. Faith, and Wymondham, and the abbots of Sibton, St. BenneC at Holme, and Creak.

The monly

reclory of St. Tvlichacl ad Placita, was comcalled St. Michael's at the Pleas, becaufe here

the archdeacon of

or courts. chael near

Norwich ufed

In fome old St.

regifters

* Moteftow,

called St.

Chriflopher's, in others

Mote-flow/'^ or Much-ifow, that

Stow, place.

hold his pleas

to it is

the place of plea.^,

is,

the

fromt

St.

Mi-

Michael

head or chief church

Mote,

plea,

and

N O R church of

St.

W

I

C

H.

379"

account of the aforefaid

Michael, on

Michael at Mulpole, i. e. Muchpool, there having been formerly a pool where the well is, late the Red-W^ell, (the pond or pool was filled when the well w'as fank, and die pump was fixed up in 1629) hence to this day the pariQi is corrupdy called St. Miles of Mufball. pleas

It

;

in odicis St.

was

firfl

valued

at 2ns.

not taxed, but paid 3d.

and afterward 6d. procurations is. yd.' halfpenny, and 13s. tenths, of which it was dif-" charged, as being only 61. los. in the kings books,

fynodals,

and of the

certified \alae of

ill.

os.

lod.

The

patronage is alternately in the lords of Horsford and There is a good parfonage-houfe facing Sprowfton. the flreet, and joining to the fouth-eafl part of the^ The Rev. Mr. Hancock is the prcfenf church-yard. rcdor.

The

fmall

Ward, called Eaft Ward,

Wymer

Contains the pariQies of St. Peter of Hungate, Simon and Jude, St. George at Tombland, St. Martin on the Plain, and St. Helen in Holm-ftreet. St.

The Church of

St.

Peter of Hungate or

Hounds-gate, Is one of the mofl ancient churches in the city ; t0ok that name from the bifnop's hounds being kept near it, during the time that the houfe belonging to the fee, ftanding in the parifh of St. Simon and Jude, on whofe lite the Maid's Head inn and the adjacent houfe are built, was made ufe oi as a

it

palace

c

'idO

palace by the bifliops. ciently at

and

or

T V

I

Jt

is

but not taxed

'^os.

;

a rcclorv, valued an* paid 3d. Ivnodals,

ilands at 3!.

aftcrvvaul 6d.

no

king's books, but pays

5d. ob. in the

is.

being certified

firfl fruits,

of the value of 7I. -is. Sd. farthing it is now dif~ charged of tenthii, and augmented \yith the queen's !

;

bounty.

Henry IV. granted

In 1402,

the reftor a licence a piece of ground whereon to build a parfonage, which was accordingly done. It flood directly oppofite to the elm on the north fide of the to purchafe

llreet.

The

ad\-ovvfon of the rcclory

chapter of the college of

who conveyed

was

in the

Mary

St,

dean and

the

in

Fields,

John Pafton, efq. and Margaret whereupon they, together his wife, and their heirs with the reflor, immediately pulled down the old fabrick, which was greatly decayed, and built the prefent church in the form of a crofs, a neat buildThe tower is fquare, and hath ing, of black flint. to

it

:

three bells chancel,

the nave,

;

are

iide of the

altar,

window on

the effigy of

is

Orak under him.

ing at an

at

as

in a

pra)-crs,

the north

Thomas Andrew,

the redor, with an altar,

and

fouih porch, tranfcpts

In a

leaded.

He

is

kneel-

blue veffment,

^yith his crown fbaven on the tonfure is reprefentcd a white cloven tongue, to exprcfs tlie gift of the fpirit by the impofition of hands, of which the tonfure is a mark or token. In the next pane is reprefented. ;

the extreme un6fion, -where ^ve fee Jick

man on

his knees,

at the

him attending

ther prieft, in purple, performs the ceremony

him

ftands the hofl

:

face of the evil angel,

near the bedfide

who however

approach the dying man.

tlie

bed's lect, while ano-

is

is

;

by

feen the

not able to

This famcret^or appeal s in

W

N O R

I

C

3St

IT.

window of ilie noitli uanfcpt. buried in the chancel in 146S. in the cafl

From

the date cut in flone on

north door,

it

tlie

bnttrefs.

He

^vas

hv

the

appears that the church was finifhed has been held bv fequeilration, or ii-

It in 1460. cence at the appointment of the bifhop, ever fince the year 1638, or thereabouts. The Rev. Mr. Price

the prcfent miniilcr.

is

Dr. Prideaux fnys, that it was endowed with 2I. a year, and the arbitrary contributions amounted lo The plate belonging to the altar are, a about 20I. very curious wrouglit ftanding cup and cover, a large paten,

two plain flaggons, and an

offi^ring

ba-

fon.

In 1639, over the well by the elm was placed

common

pam.p, v/hlch

now

remains, and

is

kept

"a

up

the expence of the parifli. The houfe at the north-weil corner of the church yard ufed to pav 2s. a year to the rector, and was anciently inhabited at

bv women, who dwelt together under a reliG;ious vow, called the fiflers of St. Peter, the fiftcrs at Houndfgate, and fometimes the -wido^vs there.

The the

religious concerned here were the college of

chapel in the

fields,

the priorcls

of Carrowe,

Holm, Wymondhara, Bokenham, Bromxholme,

the abbots of Sibton, Creak, St. Alban's, and the priors of

Hickling,

St.

Faith and Norwich, and the mafler of

St. Giles's hofpitai.

The whole v/ellern part of this parliTi having been demoliraed, and laid into the fite of the friars preachers, the reflor fued the prior for damages fuftained by lofs of offerings, tithes and profits, occa-

G

c

fioncd

;

CITY OF

3S2

upon which the prior and con vent, 1451, were obhged 10 enter into an agreement vj'ith the reiior. according to the dired-ion of the

fioned thereby

:

in

king's

writ,

that noLvvithflanding

the

pope's

bulls

by John PNnnefthorp, then prior, to .fecurc to the convent the whole of all legacies given to them, the re61ors of this paTifh fhould be intituled to, and have a fourth pare of all fuch legacies, agreeablc to the facred canons, which allotted fuch a and as the prior had portion to every parifhpriefl cited the reflor to appear at the court of Rome, contrary to the flatute of the 38th of Edward III. he was forced to lubmit, and compound iiiaiters with the redor, and pay a fine to the king. lately obtained

:

The and .part

houfe of

friars

partly in that of St.

was the

IPriory

fite

flood partly in this pariflT,

Andrew

the mofl fouthern

:

of the houle, or

of the Friars de Sacco, or Brethren of the Sac

who fetded here Called alfo de Penitenda Jefu fleeple of St. the to oppofice houfe in a about 1250, Peter's of Hungate church, and in the yard belong;

ing thereto, built an oratory or church, dedicated to In 1258, John de Vaux gave the Virgin Mary. them a meffuage in St. Andrew's parifh, joining to the weft part of their houfe.

In 1271, their foundation was confirmed by Simon reftor of St. Peter at Hungate, and the dean

and chapter of the

college of St.

Mary

in the fields,

patrons of St. Peter s, by which they obtained a licence to appropriate the yards and houfes given

them by

their founder, to their

own

ufe,

upon

find-

ing

N O R

\V

i

C

I-L

335

pcrfons who were willing to cn!;er into an iTic^ four engagement to fave harnilcfs the rcilor of St. Peter's, from any lols as to the profits ol his living. On this expiers condition, they were permitted to have an oratory or private chapel in their houfe, and a church and fteeple, with liberty to celebrate all divine fervices therein, ring their bells, and bury the dead as well regulars as feculars^ except fuch as \vere

time of their death parifhioners of

at the

St.

be buried amongd them but their offerings, &c. belonged to the re^lor moreover, the convent acrrecd not to admit any of the parifliioners to any ecciefiaflical duties, to the detriment of the church, and to pay to the redor 3s. yearly this agreement was confirmed by Roger bifliop of Norwich. Soon after, Robert Laddings, flioe-maker, and Amv his wife, gave them a melfuage in St. Andrew's, adjoining to the laflmentioned meffuage on the north, and abutting well Peter's, unlefs they panicuiarly defired to ;

:

:

on the ftreet leading to the new bridge. In 1276, William Butt confirmed to them a piece of land in St. Andrew's, adjoining to their fite, all which in the year 1307, became

The to

Site

of the Friars Preachers,

When Edw. I. licenfed the prior of the preachers come and fettle here with his whole convent, ic-

ferving to ^Viliiam de Hoe, the laft prior of the brethren of the Sac, then living, but decrepit Witii age, his dwelling

Thefe

friars

their office their habit,

founder,

;

and maintenance during

life.

preachers were fo denominated from

they were called alfo Black Friars from

and Dominicans from St. Dominic their died in 1221, and was canonized in

who

129 9

C

c s

Th«

CITY OF

SS4

of ihi? order came hither In 122G, and fcatecl themfelves in the church of St. John the bnt upon Baptift, then parochial and a reftory TliC firR

friars

;

making

it

united to

their St.

conventual church, the

George

at

Colgate.

parifli

After

vva^

they rc-

Andrew, they continued church or chapel, as ic and placed an hermit there to look

'iTiovcd into the parifli of St.

to

perform fervice

was then

called,

in

this

was granted by the it whole of their old fite (then their great garden) to the city, who ha^'e fmce let it The old fite laid between out on building leafes. George at Colgate. St Clement St. of the churches Unburnt, which flood Mary and St. Bridge, at the They were Lane. Dog the Golden of corner the at fettled here bv fir Thomas Gelham, knt. who gave them the church and a houfe to live in, which he not only got confirmed to them by Henry III. but alfo obtained them a gift of ten marks from that after

At the

it.

diffolution

king, together with the

prince.

In

1

cr,3,

Imcna and

Chrifliana,

daughters of

Tottington, William Curteis and Alice his wife, gave them a mefiuage in the parifh of St. John in 1261, William de Dunwich and Catharine in his wife, a garden on the weft fide of their fite

Hermer de ;

;

1273, fir Richard de Norwich, knt. a meffuage and yard oppofite thereto, extending from the ftreet to and in 1281 they inclofed their fite with the river a wall. In 1284, fir John le Blund, chaplain, and Margaret daughter of Henry de Waleys, of Swarin defton, gave two mcfFuages to the convent 1290, they became pofiefied of another meffuage, the gift of the priorefs of Carrowe, and of a piece of giound prcfented to them by Roger de Pcntencye. Jii 1-99, Joh" de Aclc and Thomas de Depham, ;

;

clerks.

NORWICH. clerks,

each p;ave them a

alLcr then- qulLLing

On

3S5

it

removal

their

iTicfriiaQ;c. This was called Elackhall.

new

to their

fite,

theiv liie

in the year

Petroncl de Neiford, widows daughter of

I'^oy,

fir

her right in the faid fite, being in the pariflies of S.. Peter of Hungatc and St. Andrew, formerly her fathers inheritance, and b»' him given to the brethren of the

John de Valiibus

Sac

;

or Vaas, rcleafed

as did likewife St.

Maud

all

William de Roos of

Ham-

anoiher daughter of fir ]ohn de Vaus. In 1310, William Butt and Chriftian his wife, with the licence of king Edward II. conveyed a piece of land, fi\'e hundred feet long and four hundred feet broad, with a quay lying at

]ak,

and

Newbrigge,

his

wife,

to inlarge their fite

Svlvefler Spariowe gave

them

;

and

the

fame year,

a meffuage in St.

An-

In 1311, Sarah, widow of Ralph the fifhmonger, gave them a melTuagc in Hungate parilli : in 1312, Egidia, daughter of Adam Bcneyt of SouthThorepps, gave them another in the fame parifli mas Boton a houfe in St. Andrew's, and John de drew's,

;

Hingham a cottage in Hungate: and in 1313, Adam de Blickling gave them another meffuage in Hun.gaie.

But before

thefe friars

had enlarged

their

fite

to

mind, their houfe, chuich. Sec. were entirely delhoycd by a terrible fire, which happened May 14, This dreadful accident obliged them to re1413. turn to their old fituation on the other fide of tlue water, Avhere they continued till a lecond fire, in 1449, forced them back again, before their church and convent were finifhed. their

In 1321, Andrew de Bailing gave them a houfe in Hungate, and Andrew de Somerfweyn another,

C

c

3

oppoiiie

C

S86

I

T Y

O F

dppofite to St. Peter's cburch-yard, both which were

dcmolifhed, the giound cleared, and

made

a preach-

ing yard. In 1331, the city being difpleafed at their getting and demohfliing fo many hnufts,

into their pofTtffion,

prevailed

upon

the efcbcator to leize all fuch as

had

been given or purchafed without licence in mortmain. But notwithftanding this, in 13.^)! th-jy were all, wiih fcveral others lately given, confirmed to them by the King.

In 1395, Richard II. granted them a deed of conjBrmation of all their gifts and privileges, and in J 48 5 they obtained the fame favour from Richard III. and the pope. From this time they continued quiec

which confided of their old i\ie, and a mclTuage cppofite to it in Coflany; and their

in their polTeihons,

Kcw

from St. Andrew's flreet, to the and fouth, and from the flreet going down by Hungate church, to Newbridgc-flreet eaft and weft, with a mcfluasie on the other fide of the flreet. For their maintenance, they chiefly depended upon the charitable contributions of the citizens and gentry fite

extendins;

river north

of the county.

At the diffolution the city, through the interefl of duke of Norfolk, obtained a grant of the con-r vent, and all that belonged to it, " to make of the church (according to their petition) a fair and large hall, for the mayor and his brethren, with all the citizens, to repair unto at common affemblies, and to have a pulpit for all flrangers, and others, to preach in every Sunday and holiday, in the forenoon and afternoon, when there was no fervice at the cathedral crofs, and to make a chapel of the choir for the citizens pricfl to perform daily fervice in, and alfo the

a!,

NORWICH. al.-ilieir aiTcnrblies

irator,

;

and

granaries to lav

make of

to

up

the dortor

3S7 and

the city's ftore of corn for

the poof, and to maintain the malt-houfe, niillhoale and bake-houfe, for the city's pront, and to let out tlie fite, orchards, Sec. to maintain the faid church or liall, and the houfes belonging to. it."

fum of Sol. paid bv the city, and 152I. for thirty-eight fodders o' lead upon the church and houfes, the king, \vich con fen. ^f parliament, granted to the mayor, &c. the whole of the new (ite, and all therein contained, together with the old fite in St. Clement and St. Mary's Unburnt, with the. chapels, houfes, ponds, pools, and fiflieries thereto belon2;ing, and alfo one tencment in St. Clement's, being near the water, to be held in capiie, by the twentieth part of a knight's fee, and nine fliil lings a year, payable to the Court of This grant bears date June 25, in Augmentations. tlie 32d year of Henry VIIl. but Edward VI. in the 3d year of his reign, releafed"* both the homage Heretipon, for the

for the preiTiiiTes,

and

rent.

Immediately after the city became pofleffed of them, they leafed off divers parts of both fites, viz. the houfes then lately built over the fouth gate, the maltlng-ofnce, a garden taken out of the preaching yard, the late anchoret's houfe, the chapel in the great garden belonging to the old fite, Sec,

The

infirmary was

grammar

now

converted into a publick

and afterward, on the fchool's bethe place where it is now kept, into

fchool

;

ing removed to a granary for the depofiting a publick flock af corn for the ufe of the poor.

C

c

4

The

C

3SS

The and its

cloifler

T Y

I

O

on the nonh

lies

F fide

of the church,

the convent kifchen, at

inclofes a burial-place:

north-weft corner, in 1625 was converted into a

work-room for the poor: the doitor, or dormitory, was one large room over the entire caft fide of the on the as the Irator was over the weft cloifter, foudi fide, at its weftcrn end, was the in.firmary, and ;

the chapter-houfc abutted on the middle part of us the library was a long bailding, extending eaft fide:

from

eaft

to weft,

nigh to the north

(ide

the

ot

They arc cftcemed to chancel, and parallel with it. remains of any conpcrfc6l moft and nobleft the be vent of

The gant

friars in

chm-ch

is

a magnificent, beautiful, and eleperfeft, except die

whole and very which through negled

pile,

ileeplc,

England.

ftill

fell

down Nov.

16,

1712, (the weather being very calm) and much damaged the nave and choir, between which it ftood. This fteeple, built about the year 1462, was very it contained three large neat and hexangular at top were repaired by breaches the clock: bells, and a ;

building a

new gable which

over the door of

to is

the weft end of the hall, the following infcription

Tempore majoratiis Johannis Goofe armigeri, civitatis majoris,

hie

rc-adijicatus

dejecius,

i.

mums ejl,

A.

of

the fall

this city,

D.

hiijus

turris

i-j]2.

e.

Jn the time of the mayoralty jiiayor

onentalis lapju

:

of

John

this eajleyn loall,

of thejleeple, was

Goofe, Ffq, down hy

heat

rebuilt, in the

year of our

Lord 1712.

That

N O R W That

at

C

I

H,

the \A'eR end of the choir,

church, was rebuilt the {ollo^viLg

2,^

now

tiic

Butch

and has

\'ear,

tins

infcripticn:

Tempora majorctus Kicholai Hclu'js anrJgcn, 1713. i.

c.

Jn the time of the vmjGraltY oj Xichdas Hckvjs, Efa.

The church was as tliat on their old

dedicated to lite

St.

had been

;

Jolin the Baptiil,

and

built

on the

very fpot on which foiineily flood the church of ihe Brethren of the Sac, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. At the wed, end of the choir (lood an organ ; and on the rood loft, befides the holy rood, were placed the images of Sr. Oavrine, St. Peter of Milan, &c.

with

them, as liad the following images, of St. Michael, our Lady, St. As (00:1 Nicliolas, St. Chriftophcr, %zz.

lights before

up

fet

Agnes,

in the choir, St.

was ufcd as and daily fervice performed in it both morning and evening. Here the guilds of the feveral companies attended to hear mafs, and to make their offerings. as

it

came

into the

hands of the

a publick chapel for

all

the

city,

it

citizens,

In the yard, on the fouth fide, a pulpit was placed. ferinons were preached on thofe Sunda\s and holidays, in which there were none at the cathedral crofs. This yard was called the Preaching- Place, or Green-yard, at the Hall, and ufed as a burialplace for all who died of the plague in the parilli of

and

St.

Andrew.

In 1542, fir John Kcmpe, whom the corporation had appointed chaplain, built the three rooms over the fouth eiitiance of the hall for his

own

ufe,

upon which

CITY OF

.go, wbicli

tlie

city granted

them

him

to

for

life,

wiih a

and profits of Lib chapel of St. John did not vcarly amoant to GI. 13s. hatever they fell Qiort of id. they would pay him After his death, the city prefented no that fum, the

condition, that if

offerings

,'

other chaplain, fo that of courfe the fjrvice ceafed. The rooms aforefaid were affia;ned to the iwordbearer, as a place of reception for fucli of the clergy as

came

common

at the

to preach,

place in the city,

where thev weic the expence of This ufc of them continued till the corporation. l6o8, when they were converted into a publick li-

on Sundays or other publick to.

be fupplied with

times,

all necefiuries at

brary for the uie of die

city, in

which

flate

they

now

remain.

Upon

up the church, the Dutch congre-

fliutting

gation petitioned the city for the ufe of it, which they had, by leave, till 1629, when they obtained a leal'e at 6s.

8d. a year.

It is

now

called

The Dutch Church. Roman

In 1687, the

Catholics applied to have

this church affigned to them for the free exercife of their religion, but the Dutch kept poffeffion, and the

corporation pole.

The

fet

apart the weft granary for that pur-

lall

commencing June

leafe

to

Dutch congregation, was made for two hun-

the

15. 1713,

dred years, at the former yearly rent of

fix fhillings

and eight-pence. This church is now ufed for the numerous poor belonging to the city workhoufes, and the prefent Other parts of minifter is Mr. Thomas NichoUs. this houfe are converted into

A

Workhoufe

NORWICH. A V/orkhoufe "The

sgi

for the Poor,

which pays lo the city, for the the Court of Guardians, for feveral apanmcnis the term of iixiy vears. commencing at Michaelmas trcafurer of

Ictt to

1712, the yearly rent of 20I. The remainder of thefe buildings, except what the corporation keep in their

own The

hands, are

on

lett

to different

leafe

perfons.

were formerly kept

halls for fcaling bavs, Sec.

here.

In

1',

70.

of Meffrs.

the

city, for

DAlves

the

Ann of ^Dol. pmchafed

and. FiLzwillianis, her majcily's

penlioners, the leafe of the alnage and

new commodities made

the i

6

1

6,

they purchafed of the duke of

which were put

feals

The had

feal

the city

lubfidies of

And

Norwich.

in

Lenox

the

ia

crown

to every cloth.

ufed for thofe manufadured In Norwich

arms

for thole in the country, the caflle

;

made by itrangers, the in Norwich by EnglifliNorwich in a ring; word men, were flamped with the if made in the and Alien the word with by ahens, Thefe fcals aie countr)% with the word Norfolk. vvithout the lion

fliip

:

;

for thofe

defe^live pieces

made

;

laid afide.

In the great rebellion, the Green-yard, or preachmade ufe of as a place of exercife

ing place, was

for the artillery

company, who had the low rooms

joining to the porch aihgned them, as a depolitory

arms were remoyed,

for their

:

and

in 1672,

the fcafFolds

to repair the fouth iide

of

and

icats

the hall.

The

C

,.q2^

I

The

T Y

O F

City Library.

Over tLe fouth porch, was firft fet on foot in the year 1608, fince which time it hatli received confitierable additions, by the benefa6tions of the fuband others; and in 1774, a very neat and handfome flru61ure in the Gothic tafte, was buik under the infpetlion of Mr. Thomas Rawhns, for the That pait of ufe of the above hbrary. fcribers

The Church, now Called

St.

Andrew's Hall,

beautiful building, about

Common

the

Hall,

a neat, grand, and yards long and thirty

is

fifty

wide, covered with lead, confiding of a nave and two ailes, each of half the breadth of the nave the :

Toof is fupported by twelve pillars, remarkably flenIt was new paved in 1646. der and elegant.

The

as mayor's guild- feails are always held here of it are die Courts Confcience, the Guardians for the Poor, Sec. and formcily the feveral companies of tradefmen ufed this hall at their anniverfary feafls, and many of ;

in dilfcrent apartments about

them had

the

arms of

their

companies fixed up

in

it.

This noble fabric was built by fir Thomas Erpingham, knight, who died in 1428, before it was completely finiftied, which was effected by fir Robert Erpingham, houfe.

painted

At

his fon, reclor of Bracon,

The windows glafs, but now

the

a

friar

in

this

were originally of very fine almofl demoliflied.

aile formerly flood an alBarbara, which before the year

end of the north

tar dedicated to St.

J459

N O R W 1459 was inclofed by

I

C H.

a neat chapel, erected

Skeet, called Skeet's Chapel.

Oppofite to

393 by Ralph it,

in the

was another chapel, whole altar was deand in the nave, at the dicated to the Virgin Mary upper end. flood the great rood and an altar of the Holv Crofs, before which Floly-rood guild was kept. At the eafl end hangs a clock, over which is placed the effigy of Jullice, and below it the arms of Engfouth

aile,

;

land, in carved work.

The

very handfomely decorated with the Anne, prince George. Robert earl ol Orford, John lord Hobart, afterward earl of BuckinghamQiirc, Pioratio Walpoie, efq. feveral of the hall

Is

pictures of cjuecn

aldermen and benefactors

Near

to the city,

&:c.

the fouth door hangs a table of benefactions

by means of which, and the annual contributions of the fubfcribers, this great charity hath been fupported. to the chxrity-fchoois,

Againfl the wall in St, Mary's chapel, at the eafl end of the fouth aile, is placed the figure of St. George on horfeback killing the Dragon, done in i685 by order of

St.

George's Company,

Who nfuallv held their feafts and mcetins-s at the STOXE, lately removed, which covered the grave of Robert Diirnara, cf^. x;f ilib city, buried here in 1511. This company, or

fraternity,

took

its rife

in 1385,'

and were a fociety of brethren and fifters, affociated in honour of the martyr St. George, v/ho by voluntarjr

CITY OF

394

larv contributions fapported a chaplain to celebrate every day in the cathedral before the high

fervicc altar,

for the welfare of the

the cuild whilfl

brethren and

and of

livins;,

lifters

their fouls

of

when

dead.

In this flate thev cOTitinued till the 4th year of that prince granted them a charter,

Henry V. when

dated at Readine, incorporating them by the name of a-iderman, mailers, brethren, and fifters, of the

and guild of St. George in Norwich and impowcring them to chocfe yearly, one alderman Snd two maftcvs, and to make all reafonable orders and conflitutions for their own government to have to fuc and be fued; and to maina common feal iiaternity

;

;

;

tain a chaplain

king,

to

pray daily for the health of the maifers, brethren and fifters,

the alderman,

whilll alive, and their fouls when dead; and laftly, to purchafe lol. per ann. in mortmain. The prior^\ mayor, flieriffs, and alderman of the guild, had

power

to expel

or remove any

member

for

bad be-

haviour. this charter, ordinances \rerq of the fociety, and for well-governing made for the four mafters, and one alderman, choofmg yearly the

In confequcncc; of

twenty-four brethren,

for-

the alTerably or

common-

council.

In 1451, by the mediation of judge Yelverton, and the city were fet-

the difputes between the

^uM



*

On

this

tied

-^

account the guild was efteemed part of the corpoby the ftatute of Edward VI. for we

ration, and not dilfolved

meet with no interruption of

their affairs,

of their fuperftitious ordinances, .given them to make or

alter

only a difcontinuance

by the power

their charter ha(J

any ordinaaces whatever.

NORWICH. when

ticd,

395

was agreed, that the mayor

it

for

the

rime being fliould yearly on the day after the guild, be chofen alderman of the guild for the year next that ihe affembly of the cnfuir«g his mayoralty guild Should confift of tv\'^nty perfons, and that the common council of the city fhould be eligible into the company, but liable to the charge of the feart. Every brother took an oath"' on admiffion. The al;

derman and common-council ol the guild had power to choofe fach men and women, inhabitants of the city, to be brethren and fifters of the guild, as thev think

fliall

But no

fir.

man

city could be chofen, unlefs

or gentleman

made

dwelling out of the he was a knight, efquire^

Many

of note.

were was al* ways

other orders

in relation to their procelhon,

^vhicll

* The charge for brethren of the guild of

mayor, '' iVIr.

"

flieritis,

citizens,

Alderman and

fraternitie

«nd

all

of

gj-ld

"this day foreward,

" *'

" '•'

St. George of the and commonalty. " This hear vc trewe bretheren and fuftryn of this

feyiit

George

v\ Noru-ich, that ixo

the iioner, profperitcs,

welfares of this fraternitie and gyld, after

vvorihepes, antl

myn power

I ihall

mayntene and defenden, and all leful ordinances made or to be made, with all the circumftaunces and dependents thereto longing, trewely obferven, and duely fufteyn. Carefully

" payen myn duetez. after " ble or grevauncss of the *' officers *' all

of them, and

the faid ordinaunces, without troufeid bretheren or fuftres, or of

buxom be

your fuccefTours aldermen, h\

" to myn power and konnyng. " dome, and be this booke."

any you Mr. Alderman, and alle lefull commaundments

to

So help

me God

at the holi-

After the Reformation the word

COMPANY

was inferred inftead of fraternity and and the following added t9 the oath. " So that this oath ftrecche not to ony thing ageynes the law of Godde, ne

GILD *'

*'

"

;

ageynes the law of the land, ne ageynes the llbertye and and fraunchifes, the welefare, good pees and reft of the c'l-

*'

tye, ne ageynes

"

afornc to •'^'-.e -kyng, and to the faid cytye."

ony

partikelle of the othe that

I

have made

C

Ss6 ways very of

T T

I

O F

In 1468, an inventorv ivas takrn

granci.f

the goods, jewels, Sec. belonging to St. George's

all

guild.

This company incrcafed fo as to be able at any time to lend the city 100 or 150I. and was of fuch reputation that from its foundation to the year 1560, we find die following perlons of diftinftion memSir John Fafloif, lir Thomas Erpingbers of it. ham, hr Thomas R)'ngman, fufhagan bifhop WaiWilliam de la Pole, ter Lvhart, bifhop^ of Norwich earl of SutTolk, fir William Phelip lord Bardolf. and lady Joan his wife, William Paffon, the king's judge William Yelvetton, lady Joan chief juftice Thorp, John Underwood, luffragan; fir Robert CatThomas duke of Norfolk ; ton, prior of Norwich ;

;

;

;

fergeant Catlyn, fle^vaId;

lergeant Ga\vdy. recorder;

Norwich, Henry eail ol Suifex, iir Thomas Wodehoufc, fir William Wodehoufe, Matthew Parker, D. D. Philip earl of Surrey, fir Henrv Jerningham, lord Hunfdon, fir Nicholas LTnrange, In 1454, the whole number of lord Cobhara, Sec.

John

bifliop of

brethren

-f

In 1471, ordered that everj' alderman fnall fend a prieft,

with a cope, to the proceffionj the conimoners in long gowns.

be

George

to

Hnd apparel.

velvet

the

this

In

1

:

fo that the

Dr A GON,-as

lol. for

Foreman

his labour,

547, bought for apparel of the

\vp.s

to

wear

Ma r g a r et, well as St.

at

who

is

Geo R ge

always painted with

-George, was

reprefented in

the feaft a red hood, afterward

the fhoulder in a knot,

led PJuckrnen.

almfmcn,

to

The

whom

to

and

eight yards tawny, and four yards crimfom

every procellion, and called the Lady of the Guild.

man

In

gowns and hoods, and

In 1534, Philip

year, and to have

Margaret,

and

twenty-four in number.

to attend in fcarlct

1472, the aldermen

Every

worn on

and from thence the .members were cal-

guild had fevcral poor brethren, calltxl

they paid a weekly allowancej

NORWICH.

397

brethren and fiflers was two hundred and fixty-fourj In 1494, they held their feafl in the great hall of In 1 -04 they purchafcd the the bifhop's palace. Lamb inn, now the city prifon. In 1519 they fold the George inn. in St. Simon s pariOi, to Thomas Greenwood, which they had purchafed in 1494.

In 1549, after the new erecllon, an inventory of the company's goods was taken, in order to difpofc and make fale of fuch, as fincc the alteration of the old ordinances would be of no fervice, when Mr. Aug. Steward had a gown of velvet pirled with gold, in recompence for a mace of chryftal fet in filver and silt which he then a;ave for the ufe of the city r among other things fold, were a black velvet vellmcnt, a jerkin of crimfon velvet, a cap of ruffet velvet, a coat armour of white damaflc with a red a horle harnefs of black velvet, with copper crofs a horfc harnefs of crimbuckles gilt for the George difor the Lady gold of with flowers velvet, fon ;

;

;

vers banners,

books, vcftments,

Sec.

In 1550, they granted all their temporals, amongfl tenements and grounds called the Lamb,

-the reft, the

the Star, two acres

in the

fields

\vidiout St. Giles's

and the cuftoms of Fyebridge ftaithe, to the houfe of the poor called God's lioufe in Kolraegate,

flrect.

In 1,533. ^'^^ company made an order for the buying yearly as much freeze as would make thirteen gowns, to be given to fo many of the forty poor people in God s Houfe each gown to have the conyfance of the guild on it, viz. the red crofs. In 1556, a gown of crimfon velvet, pirled with In 1538, it was gold, was bought for the George.
Dd

Margett,

C

jgS ^*' *'

I

T V

O

F

Margett, but for paCime the Dragon to come iti In 1357, and fhew himfclf, as in other yercs."

Gai diner was eie61ed on-e of the company by confent, and excufcd bearing a part of die ieaPf, on his rnal<.ing the company a preient of a chryflal (alt, fet in filver gilt, weighing twenty
bis

own

ounces.

In 1612, ordered that every alderman fliall find two tapedry hangircs for the feaft-makers of the guild to hang the hall with, and each of the OicrifFs and fir John Wodeand common-council one to buy hangings for gave 20I. in houfe, knt. 1561, ;

that purpofe.

In 1704, the company prefented the mayor wiili flate, now ufed, in a fcabbard of criinfon velvet with gilt lockets, and a mourning, fcabtwo new bard of black velvet with gilt lockets ftaves with filver heads, having the city arms, viz. the caflle and lion, on pedeflals of filver, to be borne before the mayor by the two marfhal-men, and two new filver badges with the city arms likewife, to be worn by the rnarfhal-men when in waitat the fame time they had a new flaff made, ing filver head, reprefenting St. George and the a •with dragon, the arms of the company, on a pedellal, to be borne by their beadle before the alderman of the the fword of

;

:

faid

company.

In 1731, February 24, the committee appointed that purpofe, reported at an affembly held that day, that they had treated with St. George's compa-

for

who

agreed to deliver up their charters, books and records, into the hands of the corporation, provided they would pay Jicir debts, amounting to 236I. 13s. id. which being agreed to they were ac-

ny,

hacl

cordingly

I

NORWICH. cordingly delivered up, and are

now

S99

depofited with

the city records in the Guildhall.

were put under the care of the city to appoint a keeper thereof, and to lend any part of them to the mayor, the flicriffs, the judges, or the companies of the fhoe-makers, barbers, taylors, &c. at their annual

Their

effects

committee,

who had power

and to order every thing relating to the procelhon on the day of fwearing the mayor. fealls

;

Thus was

this

company

ancient

and and ap*

laid afide,

iheir goods furrendercd up, the inventory

praifement whereof are as followeth.

£.

One

filver-headcd

ftafF,

with the

5.

d.

effigies

George on horfeback trampling upon the dragon 5 One new dragon called the fnap-dragon Two flandards, one of St. George and the of

St.

dragon, the other the Englifh colours for the flandard-bearers

Four fwadies

Two

habits for ditto

Five habits for the \vhifflcrs Two ditto for the club-bearer and his man,

now Eight

-

called fools

fine large damafl-i

broad

-

0106

ten

cloths,

damafk napkins, one large coarie -cloth, 20 and twelve coarfe wipers

o

o

4 10 Twenty-fix long tables, twenty-one long forms g 13 Eiditv-cne trulTels and flools, one hi2;h

o

Five vards green cloth for the fl;one Fiftv-three yards green bays to cover the -

tables

flool

-

10a

-

-

-

-

-

4

o



:

NORWICH. The Bridge commonly

40*

called Black-friarS

Bridge, Rut formerly Ne^v-br^dlTe, was built of timber about the time of Henry V. rebuilt in the reign of Edward IV. and in 15S6 again rebuilt of ilone.

St. Is

lliop s

Simon and

as ancient as

any

St,

Jude's Church,

in the fity,

parifh church before die fee

and was the bjwas fixed here

the bifliop's houfe flood againft the flreet fince cali^ ed the Cook-Row, leading down to Fyebridge, and the principal entrance to it was where the Maids.

head tavern now

ftands.

In Edward die ConfelTor's time bifliop Ailmer held of land, and three it, widi dre houfe, half an acre In bifliop Arfaft. him after by parts of a mill, and exalienated, was whole the reign the Conquerors cept the advowfon, which has continued with the fee ever fince.

The

Rev. Mr. John

Burcham

is

the

prefent rcclor.

This rectory \y,as ^;ncieptly valued at 40s. taxed at and paid 6d. fynodals, but being the bifliop's church was exempt from archdiacqnal jurifdidion it Hands in the king's books at 3I. los. pays no firfl fruit$ or tenths, and has been augmented with the 20s.

xjueen's bounty.

There was anciently a chapel, dedicated to St. SiJude, on the eafl fide of the Cook-Row,

mon and

adjoining to the north part of the fite of the bifliop's It was in ufe in houfe, to wliich it was an oratory.

D

d 3

'

1314,

:

C

402

T Y

I

O

F

1314, aad at that time belonged to

St. Giles's

hof-

pital.

The

religious concerned in this

parifh were the

Norwich and Hickling, the priorefles of Blakeburgh and Bungay, the hofpital of St. Giles, the abbots of Sibton and St. Mary at Creak, and the dean of the Chapel in the Fields.

priors of St. Faith,

"George's Guild held a tenement here, which they fomedmes ufed as a guild-hall, and the culloms at Fyebridge ftaithe, where they were obliged to proSt.

vide a cucking-ftool, and the following entries arc in the court book

A woman for whoredom to rvde in a with a paper in her hand, and tynklyd with " a bafon, and fo at one o'clock to be had to the 1

*'

562.

*'

cart,

**

cokyng

flool

and ducked

in the water."

" Margaret Grove, a common fkould, to '597be carried, with a bafon rung before her, 10 the

*'

" cucke-flool at Fyebridge, and there " times ducked." After this flaithe

came

into the

to

be three

hands of the

city,

Miles Hobart, of Plumpflead, efq. contributed largely towards making a new quay there, and in 1062 the butchers flails were pulled down.

Murlamp and wax taper to burn in this church, the Uceplc 0} which is fquare the nave and chancel are both and hath fix bells

The Maids-head,

tiil-fifh

formerly the Molde-fifli or

tavern, was tied to fnid a

;

there was an image of St.' Anne, with a light burning before it, and the image of our 1 ady placed in the .aliev in the church-yai d.

leaded.

In 1331

'. .

-

The

NOR

W

I

C

H.

405

The houfe adjoining to the weft fide of the churchyaid was formerly inhabited by the Pettus's, principal merchants here, and fir John Pettus, the firfl knioht cf the family, lies buried in the church, whofc grandfon, fir Thomas Pettus, of Rackheath, was created baronci on the 23d of September, 1641.

George

St.

Anciently

St.

George's

at

at

Tcmbland. the monaftery gates,

and

a rectory in the gift of the college of St. Mary in the Fields; but in 1330, by licence from Edward III. and the duke of Lancafter, lord of the fee, appropriated

thereto,

on condition of

their appointing

a

vicar or parifli chaplain to ferve the cure, with a fuf-

and his dwelling in the college; and hath been ferved by parifli chaplains. The refiory was valued 2.1 five marks, taxed at sois, and paid 4d. fynodals. ficient ftipend,

e\-er fince

it

advowfon of with the nomination cf the parifh chaplain, devolved to the crown, and there continued till the 18th of Elizabeth, who At the

the

\

diffolution of the college,

icarage

and appropriate

the

rectory,

granted them to Roger Manners, efq. to be held of but manor of Eaft Greenwich in free foccage a defigned exchange between the queen and him not the

;

going forward, he furrendered his grant, and on the 27th of June, in the 42d year of her reign, the faid queen granted the rectory, church, 8cc. to the bidiop of Ely and his fuccefTors, in whom the nomination The Rev. Mr. John Greene is the ftill remains. prefent parifli chaplain.

The church rifh in

hath a fquare tower, built by the pa-

1445, containing five bells and a

Dd

4

faint's bell;

the

G

404

T Y

I

O

F

the nave, two ailes, two porches, chancel and vcftry are leaded.

The communion

handfome, the

gift

plate

is

extremely

of Stephen Gardiner, efq.

About 1565, Ratton-Row was united to which foimerly belonged to St. Mary

this

pa-

in

the

rifh,

Marfli.

The St.

religious concerned here were

Dunmowe.

Faith,

Norwich, the priorelTes of dean of the Chapel in the

Magdalen

The

the priors of

Walfingham and Carrowe and Bungay, the Fields, and the cuilos of

Hickling,

hofpital.

houfe,

now

called

Sampfon and Hercules,

was formerly owned by fir John taitolf, knt. afterward by the countefs of Lincoln, and in the time of Henrv VII. was the city houfe of Elizabeth dutchefs of Suffolk.

on Tombland in this paiiffi, viz. on Holy Thurfclay, and the Saturdays befoie Vv^hit-Sunday and Trinity-Sunday, all which

There

are fairs held yearly

formerly belonoed to the convent, but

now

to

the

city.

The Church of

St.

Martin

at

the Plain,

Anciently called St. Martin at the Palace-gate, its (landing oppofite to' the noith gate or grand

from

entrance into die bifhop's palace.

In the time of the Confcffor bifhop Stigand held In the twelve acres of glebe. it pofTeffcd it, when Noiers. de William by held time it was Conqueror's as of the fee of Stigand, of whom it was purchafe^ •

:

b-

NORWICH.

405

bv

blfliop Herbert, and bv hlin fettled on the fee, bat afterwards appropriated to the infirmarv of the convent. It was taxed at 20s. and paid 3d. fynodais, but no procurations, as being an exempt belonging to the jurifdi^iion of the dean of the manors

of the prior and convent. Formerly the liberty of the citv did not extend into this pariQi, it being v\

holly under the jurifdiflion of the biOiop, as part

of the hundred of Blofield. However, the fpiritual jurifdidion over that part of the parlfli lying on the well fide of St. Martin's, now called White-friarsbridge, is in the archdeacon, that being the diffolvcd parifli of St. Matthew which before its union widx St. Martin's, was in the patronage of the archdeacon. At the appropriation there was no vicarage endowed, lb that it remains a donative in the gift of the dean

and

chapter.

The

were the priors of Norwich, the priorcffes of Chickfand and Bungay, and the abbot of Holme. 'J 'he Rev. Mr. Walker is the prcfent miniflcj:. St.

religious concerned here

Faith,

The

ar^d

fleeple is fquare,

fl\e bells:

their

Mendham

call

and contains a clock and

the nave, two ailes, with the chapels at

ends,

chancel and fouth porch,

are all

leaded.

In the year 1300, mention is made ol a publick fchool for teaching children to read and ling, kept ia the Parvis, or lower part of the church, between the

north and fouth doors'",

ufually let apart for that

purpofe.

White* Called the Parvis, '.'!'-•.<

a parvis liberls

tiwht

there.

ibidem edofli:

;

froai

G

^o6

I

T Y

O

F

White-friars Bridge, So called from its nearnefs to the monaflery oE" is compofed of one ftone arch there were formerly two turrets to guard the paflage, but demolifhcd in the reign of James I.

White-Friars,

:

The Rcftory By

of

St.

Matthew

the Apoflle,

the palace, or at the fchool gate, was fo fmall,

upon trial before the juflices itinerant in 1286, it was found that this church, and thole of St. Helen, St. Martin and St. Paul, with their feveral parifhcs, were within the hundred of as not to be taxed:

Ever fmce the great pefiilence in 1349, it It flood on the hath been united to St. Martin's. right hand of the flreet, leading from the plain to the

Bloheld.

old mens hofpital, diredly

at the

turn of that

flreet,

Oppofite to the church joining to the precinft wall. it, at the north-eaft corner, on the left hand of that turn, flood

The

old

Grammar

Founded and endowed by

who

collated

the

mailers,

School.,

the bifliops of the fee,

and the archdeacon 01

Norwich inducted them.

The

fmging znd grammar fchools belonging

to the

convent, were kept in the almonry, the mailers of

which

\vere irc(}uently collated

convent's nomination

:

as

by

the bifliop,

on the

foon as indu£led,

they

generally publifhed the bifliop's inhibition, prohibit-

ing

all

other perfons to teach grammar, or fmging, in

NORWICH.

At the Reformation they were diHolvcd,

in the city.

and

407

the prefent free-fchool appointed.

St. Giles's Hofpital,

bifiiop

the Old Mens Hofpital, was by Walter Sulfield alias Cakhorpe, of Norwich, together with the church, then

made

parochial

.

Commonly

founded

called

in 1249,

:

for the old

Church of ^V]nch belonged

to the

Helen,

St.

monks, and flood

in their

being demolinicd, the parifh was united ro the church beand longing to St. Giles's hofpital, and fo remains from this circumflance, that church has ever fmce

precintt, oppofite to the prefent hofpital,

;

been called

The

Helen's.

St.

hofpital

is

fituated nonh-eafl; of the cathe-

from vvhofe precinct it flreet, and is governed by a

dral,

corporation,

to

vvhofe

care

is

divided by

is

Holmc-

by the committed the folc

raaPter

elected

The chaplain has a dwelling thereof. precind, and performs divine fervice in the church, the whole of which is Hill Handing, with a fquare tower at its fouth-well corner, in v.hich hangs

management in

its

one fmall

bell.

The

choir

is

converted into lodg-

ing rooms for the women, and the nave and ailes, from the fleeple to the fouth porclx or entrance, for the middle part of the two ailes and the men nave, with a chauntry or chapel, in which the akar :

is

placed, are

flili

ufed for divine

fervice.

.

The

.

G

4oS

The

T Y

I

O

F

of flonc, arched, and work: in the middle of it is reprefented the coronation of the Virgin Mary, and in another part her afcenfion, the faluta-

rpof of

chapel

this

is

curioufly adorned with carved

and divers other hiftorical pieces the outward row of figures are defigncd for the twelve apo flics, and the four on each fide for the evangeliPts. There are feveral old flails remaining, in which the bretion,

:

The north dcoi: thren of the hofpiul formerly fat. of the church opens into the cloiffer, a quadrangle, vvhofe fide

is

twenty yards, with a burial place for over the door of it

the parifliioners in the midfl of

m after s

:

which was on the eaft fide, are the arms of bifhop Lyhart, in in ftone, carved whofe time it was built, and of prior Molet. The refe(51ory or eating-hall is ftill remaining, on the weft and on the ftonc-work of the fide o^" the cloifter church are feen the arms of bifliop Goldwell, by wjiom part of it was built.

the

lodge,

:

The

by the beneSpencer and others, and called In 1451, the cloifter, mafter's the new chancel. lodge, nave and tower, were built by bifhop Lyhart, choir was rebuilt about 138«, of bifhop

faclions

prior Molet, &;c.

The

foundation deed, executed by bifhop Suf^ield on t^ie calends of is dated at Norwich, Oc':tober, bv which he gave and confirmed to God,

in

1249,

the Virgin

Mary,

St.

Anne, and

all Saints,

and

to

iht hofpital of his foundation at Norwich, to their honour, all tliofe mefluages which he purchafed in Norwich, of Henry de Salle and Robert de Stanford, fut the uie of the mafter and brethren of the iior])it.il

;

together with the churches of Calthorpe,

and Southwalftiam St. Mary ; 'which he appropriated to the hofpital, with the

Coftefy, Cringlefbrd all

confenc

NORWICH. confent of the prior and chapter,

nance of four chaplains

for

409 the mainte-

to celebrate daily fervice for

the poor and decrepit chaplains Norwich who had not wherewith to maintain themlelves, and thirteen other poor people who were to be lodged in the houfe, and to

his foul for ever,

all

diocefe of

in the

In 1253, he appropriated to have one meal a day. the church of Senges or Seething, in Norfolk, \vhich was alternately prefented to by himjelf and the prior, on condition that they paid to the almoner of Norwich convent ten marks a year, and kept his annlverfary with placebo and dirlge bv note, and fed on that day one hundred poor people the whole was confirmed by with meat and drink the bull of Innocent IV. in 1251, and bv that of Alexander IV. in 1256, when the llatutes of the hofpital were figned by the founder, by which he appointed a mailer for their confeffor and ruler; four chaplains, priells, to perform divine fervice in the choir,''' and two clerks to affifl them, one a deacon, four fifters of fifty years old the other a fubdeacon his hofpital

:

;

take care of the cloathing,

bedding,, and no other women to be other neceffaries for the fick there, all other offices being to be done bv men. each, to

;

Ths * They were mathis

;

to attend every

and every day

to the ufe of Salilbury, viz. blelTed virgin,

and

all the faithful

decenfed

St.

a

in their furplices 3C

;

They were

by note, according

one of the day, a fecond of the

third for

Giles, unlcfs hindered

intervening.

morning

to fay three maJTcs,

the founder's foul,

and once in a week

and thofc of

a full

fervice of

by Lent, or fome other folemn all to

obferve the order of

St.

fc^(\i

AuiVm,

except as to habit, and as to that the mafler and priefts might

go

in

any decent

furplices

clerical habit, provided they

and black hocds In the church

:

always wore

the brethren were to

be drelfed in wliite coats with grey cloaks, and the white gowns, grey mantles, and black

veils.

li/iers i.a

C

410

T

I

O

Y

F

The

mafler and chaplains were to eat, drink, and lodge toi^ether in one loom, and every day after grace at dinner, before any one drank, at the ringing of the bell, the chaplains were to go into the choir and fing the

The

fifty-firft

pfalm.

collation to the maRerfiiip

was annexed

to

the fee of Norwich, the bifiiops whereof were to be vifitors,

and

to

have

fpiritual

jurifdi(?aon

thirteen poor people,

and (even poor

by

grammar

the mailer of the

their dinners thirty

beds

income

fet

daily in

the

over

fcholars,

fchool, were to

hofpital.

it

:

named have

There were

up, and more were to be added

if the

increafed.

If any poor, infirm, or Tick

man came

to the hof-

he was taken care of till he recovered but every poor chaplain of the diocefe, who had nothing to.^npport himlelf, or was fo old that he could not officiate, or laboured under any incurable infirmity, was received and maintained as long as he

pital,

;

lived.

An

Area Domiiti or Lord's Box was fet up, from by were daily relieved, as far as the revenues would bear. From Lady-dav to the A (Turn prion,'" the great bell ^vas ordered to be rung c'/eiy day ai a certain hour, and a quantity of biead fufficicnt to repel hunger given to all the poor And bccaufc this houfe fhould be then prefcnt. pioperlv the House of God, and of the Bishops of Norwich, he ordained that, as often as any bifiiop of tlic lee palfed that way, he fhould go in and gi\e

v/hich the poor that ])a[red

and that on that day, and the dead, the thirbe wholly fed, and on the day

his L^lelfing to the fick there

:

for the wcllare of the living

teen poor Uicu fljould

after

* Auguft 15.

N O k

W

I

C

H.

411

He appointed do the outward bufinefs of The mafter, who muft be a priefl, and the houfe. fvvear to perpetual refidence, provided he had no other ecclefiaftical benefice, and that he would not alienate any thing belonging to the houfe, had the power of nominating and admitting the brethren and fillers, and of holding a chapter every Sunday for after

be a mafs of the Holy Ghoft.

alfo four lay-brothers to

the corrc<51ion of offenders.

The common

feal was kept by the mafter and el* and never ufed but in a public chapter. On every vacancy, the biQiop appointed one of the priefts to officiate as m.aller, till a new one was inThe hofpital was exempt in every rcfpecl, dueled. within its precind, from all fpiritual and temporal all power of that kind being in the jurifdidion mailer, except the right of patronage and vifitation, and which ^vere rcfencd to the bifhops of the fee to all that obferved his flatutes, and became benefa(5lors, he gave the blefhng of God and our Lord, and e^•ery year, on St. Giles's day, an indulgence of but at the fame time deuounced fortv days pardon the fcntence of excommunication againft ail fucli After a as endeavoured to fruftrate his intentions.

deft prieft,

;

;

;

confirmation of

all

his

former

gifis,

he further ap-

propriated to the ufe of his hofpital, the church of all thofe lands in Hethel and Carle*which Roger Bigot, earl of Norfolk, and Mar^ of England, had conveyed to him.

Hardelev, and ton, flial

With

he ordertwo of the brethren fiiould certify every vac>ancv to the prior and archdeacons of Norwich and Norfolk, who widiin three weeks from fuch notice, were to meet and (wear the brethren, as to the fitnefs of any of the priefts in the hofpital foi that ofed,

refpecl to the eleclion of a mafter,

that

fice.

;

G

4t2

I

T Y

d

F

or any other out of it, and to ehCi a prieft, whether gremial or not, fuch as they thought fit, to the mafterfhip, and within eight days after fuch elecfice,

tion,

prefent

in 1272,

it

him

to the bifliop,

or his official

but

:

was agreed bCLween the bifhop of Nor-

wich and the archbifliop of Canterbury, chaplains fhould ahvays choofe their

own

that

the

mafter.

The founder died in 1257. In bis life-time William de Donewyco, or Dunwich, burgcfs of Norwich, gave his meadow near Bifhop's-bridge, extending from the river to the hofpital, and 6s. 8d. rent in Holme-flreet, to find thirteen pints of wine yearly day before St. Mary Magdalen's. day, and to maintain a priefl for ever to fmg daily for the prior, the

and his Avife's foul in the hofpital church he likewife gave them three meffuages in Conkford. and rents payable out of houfes in moil parifhcs of the citv, and a confiderable fum of money to provide lor five fick people in the hofpital, and two chaplains dailv to ling for him, his wife, and their anceflors, and to iind four wax tapers conllantl;^ He was reckburning during the time of fervice. daily commemorated with and oned as a co-founder, for his

the bifliop

:

till

the dilTblution.

Roger of Dunwich, and Alice his wife, gave a pkce of land near their lite. William, fon of Ralpli de Cringleford, gave lands, and the v/ater-mill called Bek-mill, v;ith the pool and finicry thereto belongWilliam, fon of Robert de Bukenham, granting. ed" them two villlans, with their families, in Brakenc. kichard de Hethill gave half an acre in Hethel Ralph, fon of Roger dc Hethill, gave three roods; and Ralph, Ion of Reginald de Hethill, a meffuage, thirty-two acres of r.-rable land, five acres of wood, of mtvadovv, iuur ^

and

live

of pafture there.

Th;:v alio

N O R

\V

pofTcrTed fcvcral houfes

aifo

I

and

C

H.

rents

in

413

Norwich

Bene-of divers perfons. faflors after his death were, William de Berfoid, lord of Cringiefv)rd, who gave them a meadow there. In 1260, William de Suffield, alias Calthorpe, arch-

and cKeuhere, of

tilt

gift

deacon of Norfolk, the founders brotlicr, gave them a melfuagc and croft, together with the advpwlbn of^ Reppes and Ballwick. In 1275, Mafter Walter de Calthorpe, the founder's nephew, gnve them two melTuagcs in Holme-flrcet, and blCiop VVakon acres of land in Seething.

fix

In 1280, Edward I. granted them a licence in mortmain to hold their fite, with leave to enclofe the whole from the water to Holme- 11 reet, and to enjoy all paths, ways, kc. which led through it.

About St.

Mary

the fame time, the abbot and convent of York lett, forever, to die hofpital, two

at

of the earl of Britanfuch tidies as the prior of

parts of the ancient demefncs

ny

in Coflefey,

Ramburgh

and

all

poUclTed there, referving to the faid prior fix marks.

an annual rent of

In 1285, the prior of Norwich perpetually leafed to the hofpital the third part of the dthc corn of the demefncs of Henry de Hcllefden and Adam de Ber-

and all other tithes due to them on their paving a yearly pcnfion of two marks

ford in Cringleford, there,

and a half

to the facrift.

In 1310, the rents v/ere fo greatly increafed by ti:e foregoing and other benefactions, that four cbauntry chaplains were added to the firft inflitution, fo thac there were eight brethren, v/ho wore the habi:

now

of regular canons.

E

e

In

CITY OF

414 In 1330,

Edward

and Edmund liofpital,

III.

llcenfed Walter dc Filby

Parfon, of Lounde, to

one lEeffuage,

acres of meadov.',

and

fifteen acres

fettle

and

on ihc two

a half,

forty-four acres of reedbarth,

or juncary, in Norwich, Hardeley, Seething, Reppes, W'ickmere, Ciingleford, Hetliel, Limpenhoe, and

Reedham. In 1^,32, Walter de Filbv, fir Thomas dc Prcflon, Colby, and fir Stephen, lec^or of Lounde,

reclor of

gave thereto a meffuage, eight acres of land, and

About the the advowfon of Mundham St. Pct;!r, purchaled advowx^-vremine the biiliop time f&rae ft)ns

of the two raedieties of Thui-ieton or Thuriton^ land, and gave them to ihe hof-'

and half an acre of pital.

In 1334, the king granted a fpccia! licence for apMujldham St. Peter to the hofpital, referving out of the profus thereof a yearly penfion of i!>roplriating

to be paid to the ofHciating curate* and 1350 they- got the church of Seething confirmed them.

3I. 6s. 8d.

in to

In 1409, William Wefiacre, archdeacon of Norwich, William Kees, efq. John de Thornham, re61or of Sparham, Edmund Perke, clerk, Williiim Sed-

man, merchant, and Walter Eaton, citizen, fettled in mortmain on this hofpital their manor in Cringleand in 1411, ford, formerly of Adam de Berforth; the faid Sedman and Eaton conveyed it to the hofpital, together with the advowfon of VVickmere, and an acre of land there. In 1424, John duke of Norfolk, Walter biOiop of Norwich. Ralph Shelton, efq. and John Heydeii, counfellor at law, releafed .to John Sciloc, m after of Uxe

NOR

W

I

C

H.

4r5

one hundred and and one rood of Jand, one acre and

the horpitnl. a mefTuagc,

thirty-

three acres

a halt

of meado'v, ten acres of pallure, thirtv acres of wood, and feven fliiliings and fixpence quit-rents, in Hechcl, and two mefTuages, one hundred and nineteen acres of land, four acres of meadow, and four pounds ouit-rents, in Eaft Carieton, which they held of the 2;iant of the prior and convent at Aivefbourne. In

1.1.

Henrv VI. granted

lo,

of

St.

Maiy

the hofpiral a Hcence

now

pounds a year more towards the maintenance oi confifling of a mafler, eight chap-

clerks,

feven poor fcholars cliorillers, eight

in morturain to purchafs twenty

than they then the fociety,

two

lains,

poor perfons others

who

who

travellers

would

lodged in the hofpital, and thirteen

daily dined there; and two

tend tht poor

poor

poffciTed,

in the hofpital:

as the

beds

fet

fiflcrs,

to at-

befidcs this, as

many

apart for that purpofc

hold, were entertained for one, night;

and

as

revenues would permit, the poor chaplains of the diocefc, worn out with age. or labouring under fuch infirmities as difabled them from officiating, were wholly maintained. far as their

In 1430, fir John FaRolf, knt. fold them for two hundred marks the manor of Mundham, and the advowfon of St. Ethelbert s church there, which v.'as afterwards appropriated.

In 1532, they leafed out the fite of ilielr manor of Rokeles in Trowfe, with the dove-houlc, Sec. and a fold-courfe in Trowfe and Bixley, and three hiils

of brucry, called £lake-hil!s,

E *

There

are three

e

witii Eiake's '"'fv.an-

2

fwan-marks belonging to the

mark city,

on^

called Blai,e's^ appertaining to xhe sa^nor of Kokeie'siu f-Q^i-.

CITY OF

41-5

mark

thereto belonging:

the ten^n* covenanted in ihs

?nd, amongiT: other things,

leave three panes of glafi manor-houfe, with the figure of St. Giles in to

thcni.

when

and revenues of the biadvowfon of the hofpital came to the king, and being then vaUicd at goL paid firll fruits and tenths, as an ecclefiadical benefice but was afterward difcharged therefrom by In 1333,

the lands

fl:oprick were exchanged, the

;

Edward VI. In

i.'JsG,

the hofpital

leafed out the old

fchool-

houle yard, or ciofc (now Adam and Eve's gardea) to dame Jane Cahhorp, widow, abutting eaft on th^ capital manfjcin of her late hufband, fir Philip CalAnd in thorp, knt. and on the kings river noith. 334,11., they lealed to alderman Thomas Codde, all that ground called the Lathe, with the buildings, the gildencroft, a pightlc, dove-houfe,

AuRin's

and thirty-one gates, contain-

acres in the field without St. ing in the whole about fifty-three acres.

King Henry VIII. intended and to have granted

hofpital,

all firfl-fruits,' tenths,

complete his defign. ovill,

ordering

that

to it

have diffolved

thi*;

to the city clear

of

kc. but died before he could However, in purfuancc of bis exchanges, promifes, Sec. all

Ihould be punctually performed; on March 6, 1547, the I ft of Edward VI. William Rugge, bifhop of Norwich, diocefan and patron, and Nicholas Shaxton, D. D. late bifliop of Salifbury, matter or cufthe brethren, chaplains and felof the dean and chapter, fuvconfcnt 'lows, with the hands, the fite of the hofpiking's the into rendcred los of the hofpital,

tal.

the fecond called Pafton's, or

tiie

hofpital

the city's, but formerly the ki

-.g's

aiark.

mark, and

the third

NORWICH. T.il,

with

all

the

417

manors, lands, tenements, poffef-

and things thereto appertaining in Norfolk, Suffolk and Effcx, which being thus vcfted in the king, he by indenture tripartite, dated March 8, in the firll year of hi« reign, did give and grant to the ma)'or, flierilfs and commonaky of the city, and fions,

their fucccfT'irs for ever,

" "

" all the Cue, circuit, coro-

and precincl of the late hofpytall of St. wvihcn the cytie of Norwich, in the pa" ryfli of St Elyn, next Bufhhope (;a:e there, and *' all the churchc of the fame Ja^e hn;pvtall, and the " lead, bells, tymbre, ironne. frlafTe, tyle and flone "'of the fame charche and late hofpytall. and all " the ornaments of the fame churche and late hoi'* dytall, and all plate, ftuti oi houfnold, a:^d other " thyhgs to the late churche and late hofpyiall, or " to eyther of them, belongyng or appertaynyng, " and alfo all ai.d finglcr houfes, buyldvngs. gar" dvnes, meadows, manors, meOruag?s, lands and *• tenements, and all other his grace's poffelTyons ** and heredytaments, wyth\n the fite, circuyt, and *'

pafs,

Gylv^s,

compafs, or precinft of the fayd

late

hofpytall

;

manors, per'• fonages, melTaagcs.mylls, houfes, buyldvngs, lands,' ' tenements, meadows, fedyngs, paflurs, wodds, un-' •'

and

alfo all

and

fingler his

grace's

" dcrwodds, rents, reverfyons, fervices, courts, leets, '• perquyfits and proffets of courts and leets, vewfi' ' of frankpleg, advoufons, tithes, oblacons, pen-

" "

wavyes, ftrayes, wards, marriages, efchets, warrens, folde courfes, •' and all other his graces heredytaments, with all " and hngler their appurtenances, as well fpiritual " as temporal, of whatfoever kynd or nature they " byn off, or by whatfoever name or namys the tlons, portions,

releyfFs, harryots,

fame bvn reputed or taken, Icituat, lyeng, or behi the laid citie of Norwich, and in the coun" ties of Norfolk, Suffolk, Effex, and Norwych *' and E e 3

**

" ing

:'

CITY OF

4!S

''and the rcclory and peiTonage of the fame paryflie ''.church of St. Elyii, in Hohn-flret aforelayd, or by '' wharfoever other name or narays ihe fame charchc *' is called or knovvcn, and die fteple, bells, lead, and *' fite of the fame churche, and all the tythes. ob'a". cons, obvencons, and offryngs of th'ynhabytaunts "•of the fame paryflie, from hensfordi for the tyme •'.beyng, and all the melFaages, lands, tenements, " heredytaraents, pencons, porcons, and other prof" futs, rcvencws, commodvties, and poffeffyons, as " well fplrituali as temporall of the fame paryflie " churce of St. Elvn, or to the fame belonayng or " in any vvyfe apperta^'nyng." To have and to hold, 8:c. to the mayor, flieriffs, citizais, and commonalty, and their fucceffors for ever, of the king The in foccage, by fealty only, and not in chief. faid hofpital to be a place and houfe for poor people, and to be called God's Houfe, or the houle of the poor in Holme-ftre^t, within the city of Norwich, of the foundation of king Edward VI. and king Henry VJlI. his moll noble father: and it was agreed, " that the church there iliall be the paryflie •' church of St. Elvn." as well for the " ufe of the *' paryfhners of St. Elyn's paryfhe, in Holme-flreet *' aforelayd, as alfo the poore people, officers and " mynyfiers, henslorth to be refydent in the precyncl * of the fayd hofpital." And there is for ever after be " in the fayd paryflie church of St Elyn, one

to *'

priefl fufficiently lerncd to

**

which

fhall

*•

which

fhall

fervc

the cure

there,

be called the curate, or chapeleyn, of " the paryfliners of St. Elyn's in Holme-flreet, near " Bufhope-gate, and to the poorc of Gods Hovvfe." His yearly flipend was fixed at 61. 13s. 4d. and a fufEcient dvvelling-houfe allowed him within the precin£l of the faid hofpital. And there fliall be in the fame parifh church, " one other priefle, be called the vyfytor of the guy Id - hall

NORWICH. hall in

Norwich, who

fliall

piifoners of the guyld hall, N'ine fervice,

and

419

attend and vyfvt the

and fav and doo

malTe, in the

chapel there,

di-

and

mynyfler the facraments; and alio fhall be confeffor to the fevd prifoners, and accoinpanye fuch as go to execuiion." His yearly fiipcnd was to be 61. and a fufficient manfjon in the fite of the hofpital. And there fhall be from henceforth for ever in the faid hofpltal, one fchooi mafter, and one ufher under him, fufHciently learned in the Lac'n tjngue, to learn children the art or fcience of grammar t)oth which fliall attend there, for the intrud;

ing the children there by thera to be taught, freelv \\ithout an\' reward, other than their ftipends or falaries: the fchool-mafter to have lol. and the uilier bl.

13s. 4d. per ann.

within the

fite

The mayor

and convenient raanfion-houfes

of the hofpital. for the time being,

with the majoritj^

of the aldermen, to nominate and appoint the chaplain, villtor, fchool-mafler, and uflier, and all other ofRcers of the faid hofpital, and to amove, expel, and put out from their places any of them " for " any notable cryrae, offence, or neglygence '*

com-

mitted by any of them, or for dyfobeving, or not

doing and performing of fuche good and reafonaordynances, and precepts, as fliall be *' prefcrybed or appointed to tnera by the faid mayor, " fheryffs, cytyzens, and commonaltie, or theyr fuc" ceiTors." And the court was obliged to prefcnt to any vacancy within the fpace of three months, and alfo to find fufHcient and convenient lodging, meat, drink, and all other necellaries, for forty poor perfons, to be rcfidcnt in the hofpital, and four women to make the beds and attend on the poor, with a flipend of 33s. 4d. a year to each of them for their wages aild apparel. *' *'

ble rules,

E

e

4

The

C

430

The

had

T Y

I

O F

by puicharei tenements, or other revenues, to the value of 200I. a year, o\er and above the ancicni; revenues of the holjiital. And

gift,

city

alfo licence to receive

bequefl. kc. any manors,

the faid mayor,

*

flieriffs,

lands,

8cc.

did covenant, pro-

and grant, Sec. that the whole vearlv profits and revenues, now given, or which fliould hereafter by any means come to them, fhould, after paying the chaplain, vifitor. Sec. and doing neccffary repairations, and difcharging penfions, falarys, &:c. be expended on the hofpital. the officers and poor people there;" whofe number they agreed to augment as the revenues increafed and the king, for ever, difcharged the hofpital, and all churches appropriated thereto, from the payment of iirfl-fruits and tenths. '

mife,

'

'

'

'

'

'

;

The whole by

letters

minfter,

of the foregoing grant was confirmed patent under the broad feal. dated at Weft-

May

7,

the

being then valued

3d of Edward VI. anno 1549,

at 142I. 19s.

2d.|

In this ftate things continued till Feb. 5, the 14th of Elizabeth, 1571, when the queen gave them the lands of Robert Redman, grocer, of Norwich, lying in Cringleford, Intwood, Hetherfet, Cantley, Colney, and Eaton, forfeited by him on his attainder for high treafon, for the payment ©f an exhibition'% and the increafe of the foundation (he alio granted a licence in mortmain to purchafe 20I. per ann. for the ufe of the hofpital, and 40!. for the ufe of the ;

city.

This * The fcholar,

exhibition

Is

who muft be

univerfity of

4I. a year,

refident in

Cambridge,

to be paid to a

Norwich

one of the colleges in the

:

NORWICH.

4^1

This building being named the Houfe of God, none can be admitted under fixty years of age, and over the great tablet,

leading into the hofp::al.

gr.tc

oa ^

are the rullouing vcrles.

The House

of God.

King Henry

the Eighth of noble fame, Bcqucath'd the city this commodious place, Wiih lands and rents he did endow the fame, To help decripcd age in woful cafe:

Edward

the Sixth that royal princely flem,

Perform'd his father's generous bequeft: Good queen Elizabeth imitating them.

Ample endowments added to the rell Their pious deeds we grctefuUy record. While Heaven them crowns with glorious rc.vard.

The

bifhop hath the fame power of vifiting the

hofpital as before the granting the charter, and may appoint the chaplain, vifitor, mafter, or ufher, pro-

vided the court do not nominate wiihin three months

and any oth-^r officer, on their any vacancy do fo for one month after avoidance: the church, parifh, and hofpital, arc exempt from the jurifdidion of the dean and chapter, and the archdeacon of Norwich, being fubjccl tO the bifiiop only as to fpirituals. after

;

neglecTting to

The Rev. Mr. Hancock chaplain, or curate lurer,

;

and Mr. Leeds,

the prefent mafler,-

fen.

trea-

keeper, cater, or lleward.

of poor men now maintained there and women forty-Cx.

The number lorty-four,

is

Alderman Thomas Rogers

is

The

CITY OF

422

The Tower

in the Hofpital

Meadow,

Called the Dungeon, is about Fifty-two feet higb, and twenty-four feet wide wiihin; the fiair-cafe is it ferved as a tollvery large, and on the fouth fide :

houfe

nnd till

it

for

ajfo

colleaing the

tolls

payable

to the priory,

a piifon for the jurifdiclion of the cathedral,

the toll-lioufc was creeled in Holrae-flreet, v^^hen the mafter of which, in to the hofpital

was given

;

being then in a ruinous ilate, conveyed it to the citv bv the name of the great tower called it was afterwards rebuilt at a very the Dungeon

iQyS,

it

;

large expence, and finiQied in 1390.

Bifliop's Bridge,

So called bccaufe it led direclly to the bifliop's paIn the year' lace, and formerly belonged to the fee. citizens, in whofe the up to delivered was it i!^q3 bands it has ever hnce remained. .

Paffing over

we come

White

to the great

friars

or

St.

Martin's bridge,

ward called

The Northern Ward, Or

tlie

great

ward beyond

the water, lying

whol-

of the river, and containing the three fmall v/ards of Coilany, Colgate, and Fyely

on the north

fide

bridge.

Fyebridge Ward, Includes the following panPiies,

Tamcss,

St. Paul's,

St. Saviour's,

St.

and

Edmund's, St.

St.

Clement's.

The

N O R

W

C

H.

423

the Fiiher-gate, of

King and

I

The Church of St, Edmund Martyr

\Vas founded in the nth century, and fo called from the fiflicrincn who principally- dwelt in that The vvatciing-placc at the fouthiKighboaihood. wcfl corner of the thurch-yard, was the ancient water-gate, or ftairhe, where they landed their fifiu The flecplc is fquare, and hath five bells; the nave, iouih ed.

ailc,

chancel, nortli veftry and porch, are lead-

At the

call;

end of the louth

aile

was a chapel

Amongfl the of the blcfTed Virgin, buik in 1463. rclicks preferred here, the mofl famous one was a piece of the fliirt of St. Edmund the martyr, preferved in a box of chryftal, and vifited in thofe davs

with great reverence.

The 6s. 3d.

reflory

is

valued in the king's books at 4I. clear yearly value of

and being fworn of the

14I. 10s. 2d. I is difcharged of firfl fruits and tenths, and has been augmented widi an eftate of 20I. a The Rev. i\lr. Wilfon, vcar in Stratton ht. Mary.

fen. of

The

Eihng,

is

the prefent redor.

Childrens Hofpital,

Boys

now

called the

Hofpital,

Is fituated in this parifli a little to the eafl of the church, on the oppofue lide of the flreet its rife is owing to the charitable difpofuion of Thomas An;

guilli,

at

dcfcended from an anticnt family of that

Walhngham, and mayor

of this city in 161

name 1

;

ia

1617, he becjueadied hii houfe, &;c. in St. Edmund's then rented at 14I. a year, to the mayor, flierifFs, citizens, and comnionalty, to lett ouL and to receive the

CITY

4H

the profits, " untill

"

it

O F

fliould pleafe

God

to

put into

fomc abie and godlve-minded men, *' or bv the general cl)arge of the city, to ereft and " found an hofpital, for the bringing up and teach" ing voung and poore children, born iu this city of " Norwich, Sec. the harte of

was fitted up for that purpofe by the and in 1620 rules were drawn up for the government of the childrens hofpital, and orders given, that all the rooms on the eafl part of the houfe be fitted up for orphans, and that ten boys, and two girls be admitted at the nomination of the mayor and court of aldermen. Tiiey then proceeded to e.\e£t a mafler and dame, or miPirefs, to keep their children at work, and a mafler to teach them In 1618,

it

coiporation;

The to read Englifli, with a falary of 1 ol. a year. niaUer and dame were to have 40I. a year, their At the farhe dwelhng, and the benefit of the work. time four aldermen and four commoners were apthe firfl eleded alderman and poi?ited governors; commoner to be yearly removed, and new ones chofen in their rooms

at the

Afiembly on the 5d of

May. In 1626, Thomas T-efmond, of Norwich, gent, gave to the corporation fixty-nine acres of land in Bixley, on condition that they pay yearly to the p;rcachers at the common place in Norwich, on the <;iays obferved in memory of Kett's camp, Cowrie's conlpiracy, gunpowder treafon, and the coronation, 5s. to each preacher; the refidue to be applied to the ulc of the childrens hofpital.

King Charles I. by charter dated Nov. 28, in the 4lh year of his reign, eftablifhed this hofpital by the name of the Children!* hofpital in the city of Norwich,

W

N O R

C

I

H.

425

I'.icb, of the founclaiion of king Charles, and 11cenfcd the corporation to hold all the lands, Sec. already given them, and to purchafe and hold in fnoic-

main other

eilatcs to the

amount of 300I.

a

j'ear.

In 1^32, June 30, it was ordered, that the maflcr fhouid have for the year's diet of each child 4I. 6s. Sd. that no child be admitted who is above ten, nor continue in the hofpiial longer than till fifteen years of age

:

that for the future the fchool-mafler learn that all the boys

be

them

fermon 1:1 the morning, the mafler accompanying them; that on notice they attend the funeral of any benefaclor in their proper drefs, and go before the corps in a decent manner, fmging a pfalm each boy to liave a penny loaf, and the maftcr 1 2d. and that they niall perform the like fervice for any other perlon but that in fuch cafe the trealurer be paid bci. to write

;

at the cathedial

;

;

for the attendance of every boy,

who

with the mailer,

fame allowance

fliall

liave the

over and above, as at

the funeral of a benefactor.



The

revenues of

managed,

this hofpital

that there are

now

have been

fo juflly

thirty-four bo)'s decent-

blue coa's and red caps, maintained with meat, drink, waQiing and lodging, taught to read and write, and bound out apprentices at quitly cloathed in

ting

the hofpital.

The

,piefent

governefs

is

Mrs.

Goofe.

St.

James's Pariih,

Abuts eaft on that of St. Edmund; part of it on the eafl fide of the ftreet leading; from White-hiars bridge to St. James's church, from thence to Pockthorpe gates, and from thence by die lane leading under. the city walls to. the. river, and all aloog.jhj; rr.cr

CITY OF

4.^5 river file

to the aforefaid bridge,

ficie

was formcrlv the

of the monaflcry of the

Carmelites, or

White Mary

Friars.

Mount Carms!, from the colour The firfl: knowledge we have of of their habit. them is derived from their expullion from Mount Carmei by the Saracens about the year 1238 their ,

So denominated from

the place of their

firfl

St.

of

refidence, aiid

;

rule

England ter in

they were introduced into 240, and held their firil European chap-

that of St. Bafil

is

in

1

;

1243.

Its

founder was Philip Ernold or Arnold, called

Philip de Cowgate, from his living in that part of the city fo named; who about the year 1256, fet-

and yards lying between the melTuage of the chaplain on the fouth part, and the mef-

tled his meffuage, with all the buildings

thereto

Ralph

belonging,

fuage formerly of Robert de Holvellon on the north part, and extending in length trom the highway called

Cowgate on the

weft, to the ditch

of the faid

on William de Suffield, archdeacon of Norwich, and his heirs, on conditioa nicfiTuage towards the eaif,

that the brethren of feffion of

and dwell

Mount Carmei there,

fhould take pofwithout any moleflation

whatever.

Thefc friars, through the benqvolcnce of their founder and other benefadors, creded a noble church ht;r
NOR

W

C

I

H.

i27

nf the prior and convent, the patronage of their houie was accepted by the mayor; aldermen, Oieriffs and cirizcns of Norwich, and this their accep:ance. confirmed in the general chapter of their oider held at

Burnham.

but being contrary to their rules to have any poITeffions, except thougii the fite of the houfcs in which they dwelt this was fomctimes broke through under pretence of

This houfe had

tiiefe chiefly

its

fliare

confifted of

of

benefaflions,

money and

goods,

it

;

conveuiency. In i4g8, the prior and brethren were exempted from the payment of any toll and cuitom in tlis city, as weil as from all fees due to the city officers, for every thing uled ana confumed in their hoafe.

To

the monaflery belonged two houfes for an-

chorets, ealt

fide

tlic

former near St. Martin's bridge, on the flrcet, with a fmall garden reaching

of the

down

to the river, inhabited by a brother; the latter under the chapel of the hoh" crofs, now converted

into dwelling-houfes,

by

a

filler.

This houfe was fuppreffed in 1543, and a grant of it to Robert Andrews and Leonard Chamberlain, by letters patent, dated June 17, to hold to them and their heirs, of the king in capita by

made

knight's fervice. It hath paffed through feveral hands, and that part which lays in St. James's is now the property of Mr. John Ciiambers, and others.

The

only remaining ruins of the monaflery are hall, with the kitchen under it, now the AnabaptiU's meetiiig-lioufe, and the chapel of the hoiv the

friar's

'

C

r-S

I

T Y

O F

weft ^nd thereof, 'Trrlcr ^vhich tij.c anchoress dwelt. T!ie church {load near that of ^^r* James, there bring only a pa{rage between the two lioly croTs at tlie

church-yards, but

its

lite is

uow wholly bulk upon.

The Church of Standing Friars

fite,

at

St.

James,

the north-weft corner of the "White in die Conqueror's time,

was founded

and anciently

called St. James's at Bar-gates, aftcrJames's at Pockthorpe, being till then part of the manor of Thorpe. The reclory was endowed with all great and fmall tithes till its appropriation, by John de Grey, biftiop of Norwich, to the prior and convent, who by that means got all

ivards

St.

the glebe and tithes into their own pofleftion, on condition ol ferving the cure and repairing the chan1 he chaplain is Hill nominated by the dean cel.

and chapter. It paid 3d. fynodals, and at the appropriation was valued at 26s. Sd. is one of the peculiars under the jurildi^lion of the dean and chapter, and augmented by lot. The nave and fouth ailc are leaded, and the chancel tiled the fteeple is octangular, and has. three bells its upper part was The Rev. Mr. Newton is the rebuilt about 1740. ;

;

preient chaplain.

At the extremity of Pockthorpe hamlet, bdonging to this paiifh,

we

find the

fite

St. Catherine's

of

Chapel,

Which Rood north-eaft of the faid hamlet, above a nule diftant fiom it, near the race-ground on IMoulchold heath, on the fpot where the road divides between the ftarting-poit and ihe lodge on that It was parochial, and foundea fide, next the city. about

/

N O R

\V

C

I

H.

429

.

about the time of the conqucft, afterward re-ccnfethe. honour of St. \VilHam at Norwich, the bov cTucified by the Jews, cotnraofllv called St, WilHam in the Wood. Formerly there flood near cell of monks belonging tg the priory of Norit a

.crated to

wich,

who were maintained out of the profits of theof Lakcnham and Arminghall, holdcn of

churches

monks.

ihcfe

In

was appropriated to the ofiFice of. alconvent, and about 1410, united to ai the diffolution it u as toof St. James

]2')C),

moner of

it

the

the parifli

:

of it beirig now commonly in of Pockthorpe church-yard was leafed by the dean and chapter to

tally deraollflied,

l^nown, by the

1550,

it

William

the

fitc

name

:

Bleverhayffet,

gent,

by the name

of

the

It chapel yard, called St. William's in the Wood. vifited to who it pilgrims, was much frequented by

the time of its diffolurion accounted for the offerings and thole ac ;

1506, the almoner William's chapel,

for in at St.

The Chapel of the Tranfiation of Thomas Becket. Which St.

St.

flood very near the former, and was called

This chapel was never in the Wood. being fupported by the bredircn and filThomas's guild, yearly held here, wiili

Thomas's

parochial, ters

great

of

and of III.

St.

pomp, on the

the

feafls

the holy relicks.

members of

with a famous Becket.

of

St.

Thomas

Rocket,

In the' 2d year of Richard

the guild prefented this chapel

picfture

oi

F

the

f

hiflorv

of

bilhopL

St.

:

CITY

43°

OF" Chapel,

St. Michael's

In tliis parlfii, ftcod on the brow of the liill on the north fide of the road jult vvrthout Bifliop's gate, It got the name the ruins of which are ftill vifible.

of Kett's caRle from that rebel's encamping near it biQiop Herbert was its founder, and the cure was fer^'ed by the monks of the adjacent

Priory of

Which the

Leonard,

St.

on the other it, This was likewife of

flood oppofiie to

Yarmouth

road.

fide

of

bifliop

Herbert's foundation, before he built the cathedral*

which it ferved as a cell till the dilfoluwas governed by a prior, appointed by the prior of Norwich, and confirmed by the bifliop. St. Leonard's church was of great note on account of a famous image of Henry III. vifued by pilgrims from all parts, for the cure of their diieafes of what-

pviorv,

tion

e-ver

:

kind they were.

The his

to

it

priory was totally demolifiied

rebellion

:

the

fite,

now

walled

by Kett during in,

contained

At its diffolution, Henry VIIL granted it to 1 homas duke of Norfolk, whofe ion, Henry earl of Surrey, built on its fite a fumptuous lioufe, thence called Surrey Houfe, as the hill was On the earl's being beheaded, the Mciunt Surrey. hotlfe devolved to the crown, where it remained till 1362, when queen Elizabeth granted it, with the

-about fourteen acres.

Thorpe, to Thomas This grant was duke of Norfolk and his the addition of with
wood

called the Prior's

wood

in

heirs.

two

NORWICH. hvo

capita! houfcs'"- {n

ard,

earl

Norwich,

to

431

Thomas How-

of Sulrolk, and his heirs.

liss a deep valley, now a which the followers of John Wickliff, one of die firfl reformers, were burnt for Lollardv, as it was then termed, from whence the place ob-

Undrr Mount Surrey

garden, in

tained the

name of

Clofe by the

Lollard

Pit.

s

on the

river,

hand, jud without

left

foN which occafioned f:r John Petrus, knr. in 1611, to build a handfome freeftone conduit over it, adorned with the arms of Pettus, Bifljop's gate,

meriy

much

flows a fpring of plcafant water,

refortcd

to,

bcaiing the following inlcription

'^ohamus Ptttus

miles,

:

mG7iumaituni ccvjlruxit,

1611. T\Ioufehold,

commonly

principally wood-land, but

was

called

Muffel-h-ill.

now

a large heath,

ex-

tending about four or five miles in length, and as many in breadth. It is frequently in very ancient evidences written Monks-hold, mofl probably its proper name, as belonging in a great meafure to the Norwich monks, who always maintained a cow-

herd

there.

PockthorDe Manor, Originally part of Thorpe, but the Conqueror's time,

of

St.

Thorp and

James and

St.

Paul, took the

F *

fevered in

name of Poc-

enjoys a court baron and belongs to the church, as it hath al-

or Little Thorp.

iete,

when

together with the pariOies

it,

I

It

L'

Tlie Dckt's palace; and Surrey houfe in Newr-^te,

wayti

C

43^ v.'avs

done from

T Y

I Its

lately called the

O

The

foundalion.

Lathes,

F

flands at a

manor-lioufe, little

diftance

from Pocktliorpe-flreet, at its eafl end, and is known by the name of HalTet's Houfe, from William Eleverhayffct

who

formerly dwelt in

The Church and Was

founded on a

it.

Hofpital of St. Paul, then called Cows-croft,

croft,

originally part of Thorpe,

till St.

Cow-gate was fevered from

it,

James's paridi at

when

it

became and

continued part of that parlOi till Eborard bifliop of Norwich, Ingulf the firft prior there, and Richard de Bcllofago or Beaufo, bifiiop of Avranches i^i Normandy, and archdeacon of Norwich, feparated the croft from the parifh, and built the hofpital and church, dedicated to St. Paul the apoflle and St. Paul the firfl hermit, the reputed patron of fuch difeafed poor as were obliged to retire from the The foundation was confirmed by feveral world. charters

and

the hofpital

The whole croft was fettled on bulls. and church, and divers parts of it were

granted to different tenants

which

conftituted the

Norman's

Spital

of Which

at

certain yearly rents»

manor now

called

Manor, and the

Parifli

St. Paul,

union with the difiblvcd pj^rlfh no farther than to the fpot where St, Paufs pound flood, and conof

AH

before

its

Saints in Fyebridge, extended

tained only the aforefaid croft, inhabited bv eighteen families, befides thofe within the fite of the holpital, to

which they

all

paid annual rents.

In

NORWICH.

453

Thomas de Blumville confrrmed to ihcm revenues which they then pjfTeiTcd of the benefaflions of divers perfons. viz. the refiories of In 1226,

all

the

Paul in Norwich, the churches in Ormefoy, and the tithes of the demefnes of Ormefby-hall, and of the third part of the tithes of the the flieep there demeines of the bifliop's manors of Blofield, Badon, two parts of tl:e Thorpe, Thornage and Langham biiliop s demefnes in MariTiam, and the third part the moiof the tithes of his demefnes in Blickling ety of the tithes of the biQiop's demefnes in Taverham, and of the monks demefnes in Trowfe Newand two pans of the tithes of the demefnes gf ton Bifnop Waker Robert de Ulmo or Holm in Filby. third part of the tithes of them the gave de Suffield Homersfield, or Begeton, in Beyton demefnes his and Julian, a reli£^ of Robert de and Thornham Horkneye, of Spitelond, gave them a piece of arable land at Galtre or Gallows-bill by Norwich, St.

;

;

;

;

;

By means of re\'enues

were

thefe

and other benefa£iions,

their

maintain fourteen poor decrepit with age, or languifhing

fufficient to

men and women, under incurable

and a procurator,

difeafes,

cuflos,

taken from am.ongfl: their appointment of the prior and monks at the own From the convent, and approved by the 'bifliop. year 1198, at which time John of Oxford, bifhop

or mafler in

prieft's orders,

of Norwich, appropriated the reflory of St. Paul's church to the hofpital, the mailer ferved the cure hirafelf,

or

by

his

chaplain,

had

all

didion over the pariili, and proved ficial of his exempt jurifdi5:ion.

fpiritual jurif-

wills,

&;c. as of-

In 1429, the flate of the hofpital was changed, no more men being admitted, and fourteen women only, feven of whom were whole filters, i. e. eat,

F

f

3

drank

CITY OF

4?A

drank and lodged

hofpital

In the

;

die odicr fevrn

aaencled divine lervice, but weje Upon this aheneither lodged nor cloathed there. was appointed guardian ration a wardemjs or woman half

Tiflers,

who

by the mafler, whole duty it was to ferve the cure, and overlook the hofpiial. After the diffolution of die priorv no more mafiers were appointed, but ihe remained under the care of a wardcnefs. Agnes Lyon, the laft wardenefs, in 3565. the dean and chapter, who had the whole holpital and its revenues affigncd to them, leafed to the city for five hundred years, at one penny a year.

hofpital

On

the death of

thofe their chambers, lodgings, houfes, &c. (of the outward court) of the hofpital of St. Paul, late in the cuilody of Agnes Lyon, deceafed, together with the bedding, cloadiing, and fluff there ; on all

condition that they fliould employ the houfe for the lodging, comfort, and rehef of poor llrangcrs, and

and impotent perfons, during the whole term ; power of vifitadon to the dean, and any two of the prebendaries. Soon after this, the city ]aid claim to the manor of Norman, and the advowfick

referving a

fon of St. Paul, as part of the preraifes leafed to them, and a conteft enfued, the refult of which was, the granting the city a leafe of the manor for a ccrtainterm, at the yearly rent of 40s. but the city flill per fi fling In their right of nomination to the church

of

St.

Paul, the dean and chapter refufed to renew

the v/hole therefore fell into their hands ; again, except the fitc of the hofpital, the leafe of which was cancelled about the year 1570, and a new one granted without any condition of it$ being

the leafe

continued as an hofpital and the year following the corporation converted it into a bridewell, or houfe :

Thus the of corredion for idle and lazy beggars. the city, of the hands fice oi the holpital fell into .

whiUl

all other

its

revenues, together

wuh

the right

of

N O R

\V

C

I

of nomination to the church of with the dean and chapter.

St.

H.

435

Paul, remained

Norwich Doomfday fays, that this church is valued at 33s. 4d. and is an exempt place inhabited by brethren and fillers. It is not fubjed to archdiaconal jurifdi61ion, neither doth it pay fynodals.

The

church, north

are leaded;

aile,

the fi£eple,

fouth porch and chancel at bottom, and oflan-

round

is built of free-flone, and adorned afGo. hie manner, and has three bells. At the

gular at top, ter the eafl try,

end of the

aile is a chapel,

dedicated to our Lady,

placed

at

the altar,

during the time of is

now

ufed as a vcf-

before whole image,

hung a lamp, always burning The Rev. Mr. Newtga

fervice.

the piefent minifter.

There

is an ancient houfe in this paiifh, oppofiie James's church, formerly called FaftolFs place, built by the great fir John Faftolf, of Caifler near Yarmouth, knt. and denominated in fome old evidences his place or city-houlc in Pockthorpe to which, manor it pays a, rent of is. 5d. a year. The great hall is now converted into a baking -office, the bow window of which is adorned with the images of St. Margaret, St. John Baptift in his garment of camel's hair, the Virs;in Marv, St. Blaze holdins; a wool-comb, and St. Catherine. In a large north window are the remains of the effigies of ten puiffant warriors and chiefs, as David, Sampfon, Hercules, Sec. with bows, fwords, halberds, or fome other warlike inftrument in their hands.

to St.

;

At the extremity of the north-weft corner of this where Cowgate or St. James's ftreet meets with Tokhorpe-lane, leading from the north end of parifh,

F

f 4

Rotten*

C

436

T Y

I

-Pottcfi-'Rovr, fbrrftfcrly

and near

it

The

iran.

flood the

was a

F

pit callhd

pound

St..

Paul's Fit.

manor

Jbr the

of

Nor-

other part of the parifli bexond the pit

^hd pound, not being Pf.uTs holpiial,

St.

O

oi

irx

the

exempt jurifdiQion of

cofifequetice

the dc^n and chapter, ioi anciently feparate pariih of

is

not in that of

it

confiituted the

All Saints in Fyebridge-Hreet,

One

-

of the ancient parochial churches mentioned

The patronage of it, as well as that Margaret in Fye-bridge-gate, was given to the toftv'en't by Hubert fon of Ralph, being a redory in

Doomfday.

oi

St.

i'&lued at

!

ner of the

2s.

not taxed.

Pirect called

It

flood

Cowgate,

at the

at its

north cor-

entrance into

dire6lly oppofite to Mr. Beevor's and abattcd fouth on Cowgate. The parilli extended up the north fide of the ftreet to Magdalen ^ate, and from thence under the walls to the bounds of Sti James's: its iouth boundary was Cowgate, Cjtcept the houfes Dppofite to the church-yard which

Magdalen-ftieet,

hcuffe,

belonged

to this parifli,

but

now

to St. Paul's.

The Leper-houfe without Magdalen On liili

Gate,

the eaft fide of the road, belonged to this pa-

Here was a (mall oratory or chapel

vate ufe, but no burial-place

;

for pri-

for the lepers

9fed thei'eM'ere buried in All Saints church-}'ard

who till

1488, when a ntw chapel was ereded for the lijjcrs at Fyebridge gate, with a burial-place adjoining to it the vea'

Ort

N O R

^V

C

I

H.

437

On the nonh-wefl; corner of All Saints churchyard {lood a very good parfonage, in which the chapiains dwell

March

till its

lo,

dillolation.

1530, the dean and chapter granted

this church, church-yard, kc. tizens for five

hundred years

ulio immediately pulled

down

the church-yard for 6s. 8d. hofpital

revenues.

i

he

to the

mayor and

ci-

at the rent

of ^d. 3. year, the church, and leafed

a year, as part of the

was united

paiifli

to

Sr.

Pauls.

St.

Margaret

at

Fyebridgc-gate,

Is now united to All Saints, and with that became a part of the parifli of Sl. Paul. This church Hood on the weft fide of Magdalen-ftreet, and was given. It w'as anciently called to the prior and convent. St.

Martin

s

in

Combufto,

part of the city burnt

down

frora

its

in the

m

thac

Conquerors

time,

fituation

and fometimes St. Margaret's by the Gates it was valued as a reftory at 13s. 4d. paid 3d. fynodals, but not taxed. Every perfon executed on the gallows without Magdalen gate had a right of burial in this church-yard, which proves that all the land on the weft fide of the road, now part of the parifh of St. Paul, and the triangular hill where the eallows flood, were originally in this parifh. The church :

was ferved by a ftipendiary

prieft

till its

diCTolution.

Magdalen Hofpital, Stood about half a mile to the norih-eafl: without the gate, from thence called Magdalen gate; the old ifiames of Fyebridge and the Leper's gate being difThis hofpital -ftood in a bottom, juft within ufcd. the

45S

C

T Y

I

,

O

F

the bounds of the ncic:hbonrine; vil)a2;e of Sprow~ Ron, and joined to the loiuh Tide oi its chapel, row Biihop Herbert, its founder, built u(cd as a barn. it on the ground belonging to his church, for the re-

ception of lepers, and lettled a handlome

upon wavs

it.

It

was valued

iol.

at

endowment

and the

bifliop al^

collated the mailer or 2:uardian.

In 1547, Edward VL for the fum of 27GI. grantRobert Southwell, knt. maRer of the rolls,

.ed to fir

and John Corbet, efq. the diffolved chapel, of St. Mary Magdalen in Sprowfton, and all its lands in the adjoining fields, and all the revenues in Sprowflon and Thorpe thereto- belonging, and all the fair called Marv Magdalen fair, held yearly, and )ate belonging to the chapel, and all the cufloms, together with the pie-powder court, held in the faid

which fair continued day, and monow of

three days,

for St.

viz.

fair,

the vigil,

Mary Magdalen.

In 1549, William bifiiop of Norv/ich, and Ssfnplon, mafler, releafcd and quit-claimed to Corbet, fen. and his heirs, interefl in this

venues

;

free chapel

all their right,

and

from which time

it

John John title, and

and

its

re-

barb pafTed, and

ftill

hofpital,

continues with the manor of Sprowflon.

Formerly the mayor, to this chapel

on

St.

flicriffs,

aldermen, &€. rode day, preceded

Mary Magdalen's

by the city watch' in their watching harnefs, which was always new fcoured againfl the procelfion. Every con liable and his watch were obliged to attend in their armour; and the court, after offering at St. Mary's chapel, u fed to goto the common wreflling place and fee the excrcifes there, according to ancient cudom. This ceremony has been difconiinued ever fiuce the time of Jgmes f.

The

;

NORWICH. The Church of St. Buttolph

the

439

Abbot

in

Fyebridge-gate, Stood faid

a llitle to ine nonh of church-yard abutted eaft on the

in Magclalen-fireet,

Stump-Crofs ftrcet,

;

its

and wed on St. Enttoiph's, commonlv and is now the VVhitc-horlc yard.

called Buttle-Hreet,

The advo'vvTon was either p'vcn or fold, about the year 1446, by fir 'Ihonnr.s Kcrdcflonc, to the prior and convent of St. Faith at Horfliam, and they preXcnted till the diiToltuion, when Henry Vlll. granted it to William Godwin; and in 1548, the church being entirely denioliflied, the pariGi was united St. Saviour's.

On

the eaft fide of the

ftieet,

to

mor?

fouth, ftands

The Church

of

St.

Saviour,

Or the church of the Transfiguration of ChriQ, a rectory given in the time of John de Oxford, bifiiop of Norwich, by \ViUiam Bardolf, Ralph Bufmg, and Robert fon of Ulfkctel Bufmg, to the almoner of the convent, to whofe ufe it was appropriated bv the bifhop. It was valued at 12S. and paid 3d. fyno.dals, but not taxed. The convent repaired the chancel, and ferved the cure by a flipendiary chaplain and after the diiTolution, the dean and chapter paicl the curate an annual ftipend of lol.

church was formerly a chapel and altar St. Nicholas, and near it an anchorage. The fouth porch and nave are leaded, and the chancel is tiled: in die tower, which is fc^uare, hangs a clock and one beiU In

this

dedicated to

The

:

C

446

The Rev. Mr.

I

T Y

O

F

Richard Tapps

is

the px^cfcnt mi-

fcider.

Doughty 's In

Kofpital.

was founded by WilHam Doughty,

this parifh,

gent, as appears from the following infcriptions on two tables oi (lone fixed at the entrance

who

" William Doughty, gent, part of his days

in this

fpent

did by his

city,

the

latter

laft

will,

dated April 25, 1687, appoint feveral truftees to difpofe and lay out 6000I. for ere6ling and endowing this hofpital, and did therein appoint (alur a certain time) the court of this city to fill up and continue twenty-four poor

men and

eight

poor women,

in this

p'ace, to the end of the world, each being aged iixty years,

and

dowments, &c. hereof, vAho

is

above

to receive the profits of the laid ento pay weekly to th^ mailer be a fmglc man, and by them

ai:id

to

fucceffiyely chofen, 3!. 8s.

and lay into the

cellars

yearly thirty-two chaldrons of coals, and to clad the ivien \vith coats, and the'women with gowns, of purple cloth, at their entrance, and every tW'O years and to turn out cither mafier or poor if they after; obfer\'e not the orders of this place,

as

briefly

men-

tioned in the other table, viz.

'

The

mafler of this place is every Saturday toornpay to each poor perfon two fliillings, and daily and equally to deliver the coals to them, and to fee good orders kept, and when any die, to ac-

ing

to

quaint the court therewith immediately, and to do for the due perforfame if any be diforderly

"the

"fiiatice

;

Uhefeof the faid mafter

for his pains four fhillings,

uhich he muft

fliall

tetain

weekly

befides his dwelling,

coiiIlaELly inhabit)

and

the faid

(ifi

poor

people

I

W

N O R

I

C

H.

^^.t

people mufl conftantly dwell in this place, and lo \vcar their coats or gowns, and live peaceably witli the niaOicr, tians,

nnd with one another,

as

becomes Chrif^bad hours,

neither cnrfing, fwearing, keeping

nor being drunk."

By means

of fome late benefactions, the

truRess allow every poor man and woinaH and fixpence per week.

arc enabled to

two

flaillings

Wore

on die weft

fouth,

fide

of Magdalen-flreeE,

flood

The Church of Valued called St.

in

the

Mary

the college of St.

St.

Mary Unbrent,

books at 3I. Combufto, in the

kin£;'s

in

Mary

in the Fields.



5s. ^d.

and

of At the dHlopatrona_2;e

whole of its revenues were granted to the and chapter, who having got it confolidated to the pariQi of St. Saviour, granted the church, churchyard, lead, two little bells, and all the materials to Nicholas Sotherton, the then patron, and his heirs ; in confequencc whereof it was totally demolifhcd, and in 1538, the fald Nicholas conveyed to the citv «L foot-path or paiTage through the north fide of thij church-yard, fince called the Golden-Dog lane, from a noted ta\en oppofite to the north end of it, known by that name. To the weft fide of the church-yar4

Jution the tlea-n

joins

The

Girls Holpital.

WTiIch has the following infcription over the eur " Ivobert Baron, efq. mayor of this city^ An. Dora. 1649, was the firft benefacSor towards the trance,

erecting

CITY OF

442

creeling this hofpital,

and endowing

ilie fan:ie for tlte

education of young girls in which year he aHb died." The following is an extrad froni his will: ;

••

I

give unto the city of Norwich, the

" 250I.

fum

of

be employed for the training up of vvo" men children, from the age of feven untill the " age of filteeh, in fpinning, khitting, and dreffing " of wool, under the tuition of an aged, difcrect, *' religious woman thereto appointed, at fome pub** lick hopplace by the magiflrates appointment *' ing fome other well affeded, will io add to the ** lame, that it may become a means of great benc*' fit the fame to the city, and comfort to the poor ** 1 v^/ill to be paid within one year after my deceafe, _** in cafe fome place be appointed thereto, and an *» ovcrfeer thereof by the city aforefaid.' to

;

;

In 1652, the court appointed a dame of the dren, to be kept in the

new

chil-

erefled hofpital called

the Girls Hofpital, and afTigned her a houfe at the new hall, with bedding, apparel and linnen for the children,

and

5I.

a year for every one of them, and

which, and a chaldron of coals was to maintain them in meat, drink and waflimg, and to learn them to knit, fpin, few and read. In 1664, the houfe in the Golden Dog Lane was repaired, and the poor girls removed thither on Michaelmas Day; and in 1670 the houfe was rebuilt, and made a convenient, ilrong brick their

work

vcarly,

;

for

flie

building.

The revenues of this hofpital have been fo prudently managed, that from two only, it now contains twenty-four poor girls, who are decently cloathed in blue gowns, and maintained with good and lufncieut meat, drink, wanmig and lodging, during iheij

N O R tlieir fit

flav iliere,

them

C

H.

413

and taught every thing

necefTai y to

for fervants

AV

I

or apprentices.

The

prelerit

alderman jererniah Ives, and the governcls or matron Mrs. Morris.

ticaiuier

is

The Churdi of at

Ciement the Martyr,

St.

Fyebridge by Colgate,

one of the mod ancient in the city, and originaliv belonged to the manor of Tokcthorpe, or Toithorpc cum Fclthorpe. the firfl part of which took its name fiorh Toke its owner, in the time of EdIs

w'ard the Confeffor, v.'ho held it of bifhop Stiga^id. other, which was part of Fclthorpe, was held

The

of Allan earl of Richmond, as of his manor of Coflefey, and belonged to the lords of Taverham They were both joined in in the Conqueror's time the Gifney family, by whom they were held of llic earls of Clare,

The trv,

bells

held them of the biOiop.

church hath a nave, chancel and north vef-

all leaded, :

who

a fquare tower, a clock, and three The patronage of porch is tiled.

the fouth

the reftory was in the priors of folk

till

Mendham

from that time

the diirolution,

till

in Suf-

the be-

ginning of the preient century in the family of the Woods of Braken, and now in the mafteis, fellows, Sec. of Gonvile and Caius College in Cambridge, The Rev. Mr. v/ho firft prefented to it in 1719. Charles Carver

is

the prefent redor.

In the church-yard, dircdly oppnfite to the foutli porch, fta ds an altar tomb ere6led to the memory of archbilliop Parker'^ f^ithei and nuthcr. •

-

This

C

444

T Y

I

O

F

This re6iory wgs valued at feven marks, taxed at paid 6d. fynodals, and is now rated in the king's books at 7I. gs. 2d. but being fworn of the

40s.

clear yearly value of 23I. 3s.

i

id,

is

difcharged of

and tenths. Dr. Prideaux reckoned the certain endowments to be worth 28I. a year, and the contributions 14I. but fmce his time the living has been augmented with an eftate of about 21I. a year, and the voluntary conthe donation of Mr. Brook lirft-fruits

;

iribuiiops are confiderable increafcd.

There were formerly St.

In this church the images of

Clement, our Lady,

Catharine,

St.

James, St. Andrew, and "before them.

St.

St.

The As

it is

now

St.

Agnes,

Michael, with lights

Infirmary,

called,

from

its

being occupied by

and pad their and not fit to be put into common workhoufes, was formerly a houfe of lepers, dedicated to our bleffed Lady and St. Clement, fituated without on St. Augufline's gate and belongs to this parifh there they who died (as the lepers which account had no burying-pUce of their own) had a right of It is probable that this houfe was burial here. founded by a bifhop of Norwich, as it belonged to the fee, and at the diflblution became an hofpital for ancient poor people

who

are infirm

labour,

;

filch

poor as the bilfiops thought

and h now held by

fit

to place there,

leaic fron; the bifhop.

Fyebridge, or Fivebridge, As

anciently called,

time of Henry IV.

was

when

it

a timber bridge

till

the,

was rebuilt with flone

;

it

t

:

NORWICH. jr

connfls of two arches, the large ft

U3

t'.vc-ntv-fjx

feet

wide, and was the firR rione bridge in the city being fallen into decay, it was carried away by a vio:

lent flood in 1570, tonis of this biidge,

and

fliops

and

in 1573.

on the qua)' on the (outh

flalli

v.ere fet apart for

ii\er,

rebuilt

The

cuf-

together witli the profits of the

its

fide

of the

repair.

The Independents Meeting-houfe, on part of the (ite of the whole of which belono;s to the girls hofpital. It was finidied about 1693, is a large handlome fqiiare building, and has a burial place on the north hde. Stands in this

friars

jrreat

The of

paiifii,

frarden,

fmall

the

Ward

of

Colg-ate,

Joins to F\cbridge ward, and contains the pariflies i)t. George in Colgate, and St. Auguitine.

St.

George's in Colgate

;

So called from

its fituation near the water-gate of ufed for landing of coals. It v\as Iieretolore known by the names of St. George in Coflany beyond the bridge, and of Mus-pool or Much-pool, from a large pond or pool of water lormeily near it 13s. 4d. and paid 3d. fynodals, it was valued at taxed at half a mark, appropiia