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MAIN LIBRARY

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21

379.794 Sa52sa

789152

NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY Form 3427

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY

3 1223 03475 4813

1QCUMENTS DEPARTMENT

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT

.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

No.

\(ll l)H^°®

1

of voters.

Portola Junior High, Visitacion Valley,

Com-

modore Stockton, Balboa High, Raphael Weill, Dudley Stone, Ridgepoint School, Marina Junior High, Mission High, James Lick Junior High, Samuel Gompers Trade School, Farragut, Starr King, George Washington High, RooseHigh, Polytechnic High, Commodore Sloat, Francis Scott Key, Jefferson, Ulloa

velt Junior

and Redding Schools. Principals are requested to notify janitors to be on duty on the evenings specified. A suitable location near the main entrance of the school building should be allocated for the use of the registration officer.

Day Enrollment

Elementary principals are requested

to report

enrollment as follows:

Grade Enrollment.

Total School Enrollment including Kindergarten and First Grade. to report total school enrollment.

Enrollment data should be telephoned to the UNderhill 3-4680, on the of Research

afternoon of the



first

day

Mr. Levison has been proposed by Mayor Robinson to fill the vacancy which will be created when Adrien J. Falk, current Board president, retires in January.

The nomination must be confirmed by November 8 election.

the

voters at the

of the University of president of the Better Business Bureau, governor of the National Association of Better Business Bureaus, trustee of the Government Research Bureau and director of the Pacific Hebrew Orphanage.

Mr. Levison, a graduate

California,

is

now

—Attendance

Reminder

Data Principals are reminded that in order that absent pupils may be checked immediately, and transfers and Left Without Transfer pupils be followed up speedily, it is necessary for them to send the following items regularly, to the Bureau of Attendance:

2.

Junior and senior high schools are requested

Bureau

John G. Levison, San Francisco insurance broker, last week was nominated to the Board of Education by Mayor Elmer E. Robinson.

1 Registration of Minor blanks for all kindergarten and first grade pupils, and for all pupils who are new entrants to the city schools from out of town.

Kindergarten Enrollment. First

1949

To School Board

The Superintendent has granted the Office of the Registrar of Voters permission to use certain facilities in the schools listed below on the evening of September 13, 14 and 15, between the hours of 7:00 and 9:30 p.m., for the registration

First

7,

Levison Nominated

Schools for Registration of Voters Listed

Report

SEPTEMBER

is

imperative that

all

by incoming pupils be endorsed and returned to the Bureau of Attendance immediately. 3.

new

of school.

All transfer blanks. It

transfers presented

4.

Entered Without Transfer blanks for who have no transfers.

all

pupils

Left Without Transfer blanks for

all

who

leave without transfer, or for deaths.

Attendance Bureau Moves

5.

All communications to the Attendance Bureau except mail for individual supervisors

should be addressed to the

new Central

File

location at 750 Eddy Street. While there is no change in the assignment of supervisors to schools, their offices will be located in the following area units: Room 254 Galileo High School, Rooms 9 Or 15 Sutro School, Room 24 Hawthorne School, and Room 18 Balboa High School. All units may be reached by telephoning the Central Office, UNderhill 3-4680.

Change

of Address slips as soon as children

move. 6.

name

Change is

of

Name

slips as

soon as child's

changed.

Phone Number Change

Members

of the certificated

and

non-certifi-

cated staffs are notified that the telephone number of the Central Administrative Office, 93 Grove Street, has been changed to UNderhill 3-4680.

S

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

A N

Board Approves Administrative Appointments and Transfers The Board of Education, upon recommendation of Superintendent Herbert C. Clish, approved the following administrative appointments and transfers at its meeting of August 2 and 16 and 23: At the August

2 meeting: Nichols transferred from the position of dean of semi-professional courses, City College, and appointed coordinator of person-

Ward M.

nel, effective

August

22.

C. Browne, coordinator of personnel, appointed dean of men at City College, effective

Edwin

August

22.

Mrs. Theresa Mahler, supervisor, Child Care Centers, appointed director, Child Care Cen-

August 1. At the August 16 meeting: Edward H. Redford, coordinator, adult edu-

ters, effective

cation, transferred to the position of coordinator, secondary education, effective August 1,

vice Louis G. Conlan.

Edward D. Goldman,

principal, Ridgepoint

Schools, appointed coordinator, Adult Education, effective August 1, vice Edward H. Redford.

Marcus

Skarstedt, dean, university parallel courses, City College, transferred to the position of coordinator, division of instruction, City College, effective August 22, vice J. Paul Mohr, resigned.

Lloyd D. Luckmann, dean, general college courses, City College, transferred to the position of dean, university parallel courses, City College, effective

August

22, vice

Marcus

Skarstedt,

transferred.

dean, student activiJ. Brady, assistant City College, transferred to the position of dean, semi-professional courses, City College, effective August 22, vice Ward M. Nichols,

John

ties,

transferred.

Louis F. Batmale, teacher, City College, transferred to the position of assistant dean, student activities, City College, effective August 22, vice John J. Brady, transferred. Edward S. Sandys, dean of men, City College, transferred to the position of dean, general college courses, City College, effective August 22, vice Lloyd D. Luckmann, transferred.

At

its meeting of August 23: Melvin Peterson, from teacher

to

at

Lowell High

assistant principal at Lincoln High.

Horace Mann. George J. Moscone, from teacher at Everett Junior High to assistant principal at Aptos. Marian H. Dunbar, from assistant principal at Alamo School to principal at Monroe. Virginia Kent, from assistant principal at

Commodore Sloat School to acting principal at Grattan. Julia G. Merrell, from assistant principal at West Portal School to principal at Junipero Serra.

Edith Cummings, from principal of Golden Gate School to principal at Visitacion Valley School.

Tennessee Kent, from assistant principal at John Muir School to principal at Golden Gate. Margaret McCullough, from assistant principal at the Franklin and Lincoln Schools to principal at Ridgepoint Schools I and II, and Excelsior School. Mary J. O'Farrell,

from assistant principal at Alvarado and Twin Peaks Schools to principal at Ridgepoint Schools III and IV and Ridgepoint annex.

Margaret Perelemoff, from assistant principal at Glen Park School to assistant principal at Franklin-Lincoln Schools. Martha Lowary, from teacher at Parkside School to assistant principal at Glen Park. Ueen Keith, from yard teacher at Twin Peaks School to assistant principal at Alvarado- Twin Peaks Schools. Teresa Mahoney, from assistant principal at Paul Revere School to assistant principal at the Redding-Spring Valley School. Donald Anderson, from teacher at Ridgepoint IV School to assistant principal at Paul Revere. Victor Robinson, from teacher at Lick Junior High to assistant principal at Alamo School. Isadore Pivnick, from teacher at Daniel Webster School to assistant principal at Daniel Webster.

Harriet McCullough, from teacher at Bay at the Sher-

View School to assistant principal man and Gough Schools.

Rose Marraccini, from teacher at Pacific Heights School to assistant principal at John Muir. Amy Wisecarver, from assistant principal at Monroe School to assistant principal at Farragut School.

Ruth O'Kane, from

Evert K. Frederick, from head counselor at

Commerce High

to assistant principal at

Com-

assistant

principal

at

Candlestick Cove School to assistant principal

Monroe.

merce.

at

Ruth Adams, from teacher at Lowell to assistant principal at Commerce. Nellie Walsh, from head counselor at Marina Junior High to assistant principal at Marina.

Lucille K. Bertelsen, from teacher at Hawthorne School to acting assistant principal at Edison School.

at

Samuel D. Kermoian, from teacher at Laguna Honda School to assistant principal at West Portal-Miraloma Schools. Mary E. Smyth, from yard teacher at Commodore Sloat School to acting assistant princi-

at

pal at

from assistant principal at Junior High to assistant principal

Sylvester Kelly,

Horace Mann at James Lick Junior High. George L. Camp, from assistant principal Aptos Junior High to assistant principal

Commodore

Sloat.

.

.

.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN "A" 1949

Triple

To

Schedule Released Game

Dale

Kezar

Sept.

22, Mission-Washington

Sept.

-Sacred Heart 24, Balboa-Lincoln

Sept

Sept 11 Polytci hnic-Connnerce Sept. 23, St. Ignatius-Lowell Sept 29. Mission-Sacred Heart I. In-Galileo ... Sept. i, Balboa-Sacn d Heart II

....

nie-Miuion Lowell-Lincoln Wa»hington-Galileo

6, 7,

JCezar

i

Balboa K, zat

.

12,

Ki ai Washington .

Washington-Sacred Heart li,i ialilco-Commercc Pol) > hnii -Lowi II

Washington Galileo

-

K' sai

".

i

W

IS,

Washington

ishington-St, Ignatius

Heart-Commerce S ... Polytechnic-Lincoln 21, Balboa-Galileo 20,

.Kezai .Kezai

25,

Balboa Kozai

19,

I

Commerce-Mission

26, Lowi il-Balboa 27, Galilco-St Ignatiui

2,

Heart Washington-Lincoln Balboa-Mission

3,

Ltncoln-Commerci

27, Polytci lim. -Sacred

28,

19,

K.

Semi-final Playoff*

7

i

No

pupil shall be allowed to continue in a shop class without receiving this instruction.

Kezai Kezai Kezai

In order that birthdates may be- checked imprincipals are requested to send -it once i<> the Bureau ol Attendance "Registra lion "i Minor" blanks for all pupils entering tin kindergarten and 1A grades. II the parent does not hll out one "I these, the teai her will have t" prepare the blank from data on the permanent ard Inly in ibis waj will it be possible foi thi Bun au to make iti immi diati hei h oi agi s.

Superintendent of Schools.

Saturday Corrective Centers

i

hospital

ma)

n instead lueh birth verification is nol readirj available, however, "Registration oi Minor" blanks are ertifii ati

i

delayed but are to

bi

used

I"-

bi

ent in

immedi.

Everetl

Stn

is

i

will

Girls

Sin. a

.

ii

i-

will

Center, at Sixteenth and Church be open from 9 a.m., to 1 a.m. 1

High School Center, at Geary and Seott will be open from 9:30 a.m.. to II: in

.i-

being

in

need

d< rgai

M

i

Foi

ten hi

a bii

i

hild to

thdate

tered in the kin-

I

mu

I

ntranu musl have been born on oi in h

1944.

i

[945

\ll

i

be noi to the bi fori

than

latci firsi

gradi

Man

b

l

i

and room number

in addition to

thi



A

houses, rooming houses, and hotels, ment or room number.

The

should contain only

list

children

i

who

are

ai

tin

apart-

list

names

ol

thi

tuallj enrolled in the class,

In ordet to keep record; correct, anj hild w ho returns to school alter Septembei 21 or enters after that date should be repoi ted to thi Bureau of Attendance at once either b\ a transfer, i( be has one, or by an Entered Without Thansfer i

slip.

not now credited in the Retirement System, please contact the employee in your department whose name appears below. If you were a temporary employee prior to July 1, 1942, it is probable that you are eligible for the benefits of The only groups not affected this amendment. by this proposal are policemen, firemen and certificated employees of the Board of Education.) "Please do not attempt to check payrolls or call Retirement System or Civil Service office. Service will be checked by Retirement System. "If you are in doubt regarding your status. check with your office representative designated below. " Education: Joseph P. McElligotl

Goethe Festival Under Way The Bay Area is now in the midst ol gr Goethe Festival. The festival opened August

and will conclude with aft all-day celebration in Marin County at Sausauto on September 11.

Left Without Transfers

who have

may

"I

all

made, priiv ipals are asked to send to the Bureau of Attendance, not later than September 2'i, a Left Without Transfer slip for every hild who was on the school mil on June 24, but who has nol left

school

be

i

S

v,

1

1

up itrongl) i

.,

justice

,

the responsibility of each

m gardli

in,, n

and

-I

n

i

age

among

cqualit)

against discrimination of

auspices

ol

.'i

in .ill

working people

and for

and

any kind on the basis

origin.

is

ol

a

being conducted undci

thi

San Francisco

<'

Citizens'

joinl nit-

headed by Superior Judge Herbert C Kaufman and forty-two lerman-Amerii an Societies lead by Adolph Schauroloeffel, ch nan, ai rangement committee. tee

<

h< progri niversarj of the

emorates the 200th an Woll g \ on Goethe, mighty figure of the literary world I

bii ib

of [oh

g ol the Fe

'"'n fe red by an impartani ranged b) ither the litift nsr German Amerii an Soi ieties

ivi<

i

1

i

i

I

(

:

ti\



Throughout the term all pupils who leave school for any reason without taking a transfer to another school should be immediately reol Attendance as Lefl Without Transfer. These Lefl Without Trans,i so often the ones to i>, hei k< d onci rned aboul sini c the) must be carefully in order that the Attendance Hun, ,u may be sure that students do nol use thil B a

fer students are

i

tee oi

-<

hool

hai ai

thi

The daily newspapers should be consulted foi "in luding events.

In

Memoriam

FOSTER JAMES FORD Teai hei

Abraham Vpril

8

Lincoln 1949

WILLIAM WANTZ

i

iibilit) to device for i-m aping their n t\ as defined by the compulsory school law.

lI

ion

i

registered this term.

ported to the Bureau

la)

ing .

The event

|

pupils

<

28

t

In order that an immediate check-up

reachers in the public schools arc urged to encourage their pupils to attend the Exhibition i. n Superstition, Fear and Prejudice which will tenl„ Library in the Civil hi Id .it the Publii ter for thirteen days beginning Tuesday, September 13. Admission is free Hours are 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., week days and 1:30 p.m., to I) p.m.,

il

i

and dram. iii, Ever) if, n since the ope

oi thi se servii es.

Exhibition at Public Library

i.

In ordi

i

both American and Chinese names. List complete addresses for children livbuilding, section, and aparting in the projects ment numbers. For children living in apartment

i

Principals are requested to send to these (enters any children observed by nurses or teachers,

The Exhibition is to be a graphi< and unique pun is. of the principles of demo< rat \- point-

ately.


1

the floor

correct this inequity it is necessary to the Municipal Charter. group of permanent employees desiring to correct this condition will shortly submit tu the Board of Supervisors a proposed amendment asking redit for said service. "It is believed that hundreds of city employees who are now permanent employees would become eligible for the benefits of this Charter

i

i

1

street address; also

I

centers for posture correction

'

"Registration ol Minor" blanks should contain the Following iiiit.nnati.ni, ii available: the bcr ol the birth certificate, the place and date «'i birth as stated thereon, and a tigrn d statement that tin teacher has seen tin birth M no bii th ei tifii ati is obtainabli ei tificatc

-



is

be open on Saturday, September 10, and every Saturday following during the school year, except for holidays.

Needed

Ii a ti ai hplainly in ink. Do not use nil knami "!< Ir ion than our iImhi separately, y has In listing the addresses of Chinese pupils, give

"If you are a permanent employee and have temporary service in excess of six months whit h

Washington

mediate!)

i

"To amend

,

i

Amendment.

Kezai Balboa

.

i

i

tai

The

Birthdate Information

on September

Washington Kczar

Game

Nov, 24, Championship

senior high

and elementary and 8, 1949. The

Washington Kczar

4, Lowell- Wash un: i en 5, Sacred Hearl-St. Ignatius Nov. 9, Lowell-Galileo Nov. 10, Miuion-St. Ignatius No\ 10, Washinglon-CommiTcr ,\ 01 11, Polytcehnic-Balboa '-.

the

II the two-day period is insufficient, the lime shall be extended in order that all students shall be thoroughly instructed.

.Balboa Galileo K- tai

.

.

shops in

m

Kczai Balboa

13,

all

City College may Lake two dates in accord with its calendar to carry on the same program. limine, this time students are to rein mass and individual instruction in the general principles of safety, receive the necessary help in preparing the forms which they are required to sign before participating shop work, and are to be given the presi ribed During this period no tests, machinery is to be operated except as the instructor may require for demonstration purposes

.Balboa

Lincoln-Mission Bolboa-St. Ignatius

11,

schools,

K" ear

.

in

schools, junior high schools

Balboa .Washington

.

and Shop Teachers:

two-day instructional period in safety organized and conducted by shop

teachers

Washington Washington

The Superintendent is lowing Special Notice from the Retirement System: "Many city employees are members of the Retirement System and are not receiving full credit for city service as temporary employees. "Since July 1. 1942, all time served as a city employee has been given full credit for retirement purposes after completion of the six months probationary period. Individuals whi have joined city service subsequent to that date have been receiving full credit. "Prior to that date, city employees received no retirement credit for service as temporary employees. in receipt of the fol-

to be

is

..Kezar

Commerce-Lowell

All Principals

A

Field

Sept. 20, Polytechnic-St. Ignatius Sept. 21,

School Lists Required The principal of each school will send to the Bureau of Attendance not later than Septembei 23, 1949, the complete enrollment by of September 21, 1949, on the class list forms supplied by the Bureau. (Please notify the Bureau of Attendance or your Sup. Attendance the number ol these class lis! form you will need.) Arrange lists alphabetically, and type or write

Retirement System Data

Football

Tcachei Mission High & ('•

Maj

13

pi

1949

i

I

Schw

'

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

MY FELLOW TEACHERS: It is

with a great deal of pleasure that

1

welcome you back to your duties in the Public Schools of San Francisco. Through you I would like to extend to every pupil a welcome to his studies and the hope that very successful year for him. i nder the guidance of our Board of Education a number of worthwhile changes arc

Outdoor Art Show Scheduled Appointment of Franz Bergman, prominent San Francisco artist, as show director, and Frank Merwin, as architect, for the second annual Outdoor Art Show, was announced today by the Visual Arts Committee of the San Francisco

this will be a

our schools. The benefits which our pupils shall reap from these changes, however^ will result only because of tlh work done by each teacher in the classroom. Without doubt the classroom teacher is, next to the pupil, the key individual in any system of education. I am sure that all of you realize what a great blessing is ours living in a country where human and spiritual values stilt hold a high place. On many sides one hears that mere patriotic exercises do not of necessity taking

plact

in

make good citizens. However, in limes like these when there are so many individuals, who for selfish reasons, are inclined to make

who manibehooves those of us who are privileged to be working in a great public school system, to defend staunchly our system oj Government. We can defend this system by helping our students to understand the benefits which are ours because we live under such a Government. I know that our teachers and principals will continue to see to it now, as in the past, that patriotic exercises are held reguit

larly in their schools, that their pupils are able to give the flag salute; that they know

the story of the flag; the struggles in which our forefathers were forced to engage in order that we might have our present benefits;

and

The

that they

children of

know our patriotic songs. San Francisco are privil-

edged to work with teachers of the fine caliber which we have in our schools. It is the hope of the Administration of the Schools to do everything possible to provide conditions which will set free the creative abilities of our teachers in order that they may be free to do their best work with the pupils in their

is

from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

drew 150,000 visitors last year, will again be presented at Union Square, for four days starting September 29. Ernest Born, chairman of the committee, said that more than 600 artists are expected to display their entries of paintings, ceramics, weaving, sculpture and jewelry. All artists of Northern California are eligible to participate in the non-jury exhibition. Until a show headquarters is established, artists may at

the Art Commission,

Wednesday, Sept. 14, 3:45 p.m. St. High School Women.

313, 750

Room

313,

St. Jr.

15, 3:45

St. Jr.

Professional Organizations

In regard to the solicitation of membership professional organizations, Superintendent Herbert C. Clish calls attention to the following regulation adopted by the Board of Education at its meeting September 14, 1937: in

Rule No. 74c: Membership

in

Room

administrative officer or other influence any teacher to join or

any organization

shall be deemed conduct. 4. The Superintendent of Schools shall call attention to this rule at the beginning of each school term by means of a notice in the Superintendent's

during confident that by work-

school year. J am ing closely together, we shall be able to overcome all obstacles and help make this one of the finest years of our experience. tJiis

Placement Test To Be Held Sept. 8

A

placement test will be administered Thursday, September 8, at 8:30 a.m., at the Bureau of Research, third floor, 93 Grove Street, for pupils of the junior high school level who have entered without adequate transcripts of record. Pupils of Grades 6, 7 and 8 who have failed or for other reasons have not completed their grades arc, upon recommendation of their prin-

Sincerely,

Won

by Balboans

Principal Robert R. Chase of Balboa High School advises that eight graduating seniors

were awarded scholarships

part of the San Francisco Festival.

adults are cordially invited.

Both children and

12

time

o'clock

the Monday

is

necessary to insure

of the bulletins to the schools on the

Monday

of

mornings.

deliver]

foilcwjne

Administrators,

teachen

secretaries are requested

to

special note of this "deadline."

must be signed and should be typeand should not contain more than 200 words to insure publication. Articles

written, double-spaced,

Articles

announcing courses should

through Watt A. Long, associate

be

cleared

superintendent

of instruction, prior to submission to the intendent's office.

Super-

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Frandsr.0 School System:

Six of them were from the University of California Scholarship Fund. These went to Marilyn Johnston, Lucille Forsyth, Neil Jordan, Mildred Berg, Forrest Wilde, and Glen Dahler. Emanuel Williams was the recipient of a general scholarship,

and Nancy Rocssing received the P.-T.A.

award. All plan fornia.

attend the University of Cali-

The

Soroptimist Club of San Francisco appropriated $500 to send Miss Ellingson to this session, where she studied American Government and democracy. She worked and

competed with 20 girls, representing high from all parts of the state. She was the only student representing San Francisco. schools

Jr.

High—

Commodore

1

Sloat

Janitress



1

C 102.1 C 106

Janitor

John Muir— 1 Janitor C 106 Kate Kennedy— 1 Janitor C 106 Lick-Alvarado 1 Janitor C 106



These vacancies of fifteen

will be held open days except in case of

Even though these to

ship to the Junior Statesmen School, held at Mills College for six weeks during the summer vacation.

Aptos

last semester.

Valeric Ellingson, high three class president at Mission High School, was awarded a scholar-

is

by

torial

Hans Pusch, well-known Goethean actor, will be the storyteller at the Main Children's Room,

Goethe Bicentennial

office

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Mission Student Wins Scholarship

dren. This event

Superintendent of Schools

Bulletin

in sufficient

cipal, eligible to take this test.

Storyteller at Library

San Francisco Public Library, Civic Center on Saturday morning, September 10. The program will begin at 10 o'clock when Mr. Pusch will tell "The Magic Circle" for younger children, followed by "Reynaud the Fox" for older chil-

reach the Superintendent's

make a

classes. I trust that you have returned from your vacation, rested and refreshed, ready for the challenges which must be confronted

for publication in the

and organization

1.

principal or other school employee to refrain from joining to be unprofessional

Bulfc!

of interest

of the teaching profession.

This "deadline" 313, 750

High School Men.

Scholarships

Teachers and all other employees of the Board of Education shall have complete freedom in selecting the professional organizations which they may wish to join, without coercion of any kind from any administrative officer or other school employee. 2. Whatever courtesies are extended to any teacher organization in the schools shall be fully and unreservedly extended to all teacher organizations. 3. The use of any coercion or pressure by any

seh™i

313, 750

Professional

Organizations:

members

noon of the Tuesday preceding

High School Women.

Friday, Sept. 16, 3:45 p.m.

Eddy

Room

p.m.

staff are

publication.

100 Larkin

Art Commission members serving on the show committee are: Ernest Born, chairman; Paul Verdier, Francis Joseph McCarthy, Douglis Bay lis and Antonio Sotomayer.

On

which they think would be

should be mailed or delivered to

750 Eddy

Thursday, Sept.

of the certificated

Copy intended

Monday, Sept. 12, 3:45 p.m. Room Eddy St. High School Men.

Street.

Rule

tin

Physical Education Meetings

Eddy

members

vited to furnish contributions during the year to the San Francisco Public Schools

other

event, which

register

All

issued weekly during the school year

Art Commission.

The

disparaging remarks about those

fest patriotic citizenship,

"Bulletin" Deadline

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin

filled,

they

may

for a

period

emergency.

positions may be temporarily be applied for under the

still

seniority rule.

Requests for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service

Building Maintenance Union, 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

Polytechnic Student

Local

Wins

In competition with candidates from Marl high school in San Francisco, Raymondd Mail student of Polytechnic High School, was awar* ed the recent annual Elks Club Scholarship.

The award carries an annual stipend of $50| for four years. Young Mark plans to matriculate at the University of California this fall. H

'

1

will

study medicine.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN XXI

Vol.

— No.

SEPTEMBER

1A

8,

1949

In-Service This Bulletin has been prepared to acquaint

San Francisco teachers with the educational courses offered by the universities and colleges in or near the city. In addition to these offerings by the institutions of higher learning, the

and seminars sponsored by the San Francisco Unified School District, the San Francisco State College, and the City College of San Francisco are given. courses

The jointly sponsored courses are of immediate value in their application to classroom teaching. All of the listed offerings will provide teachers with an opportunity to secure valid salary increment credits and also implement the

program

of curriculum development.

Registration in these courses is entirely optional. Enrollment is limited to not more than two courses in one semester.

Since some of the classes will be limited as to registration should be prompt and final.

size,

Watt A. Long, Associate Superintendent of Schools; Dr. Margaret Leonard and Miss Ethel Mealey, San Francisco State College. 2 Semes4 to 6 p.m., starting Septer units. Thursday



tember

22.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELE-

MENTARY SCHOOLS,

Kindergarten - 3rd Grade. Attention in this course will be given to appropriate activities for kindergarten and prichildren, rhythmics, folk dancing, mimegames, posture training. Also, a review of the recent literature in the field will be required. Florence Hale Stephensan, Professor of Physical Education, San Francisco State College; Mrs. Mary Mannelli, Miss Viola Beck, San Francisco Public Schools. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6

mary tics,

p.m., starting September 22, 1949. Girls School.

High

PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELE-

MENTARY SCHOOLS, 4-5-6-7-8 Grades. The this course is to provide teachers of the intermediate and upper grade pupils with training in appropriate activities for their work with children; rhythmics, folk-dancing, mimetics, games, posture training. Also a review of the recent literature in the field will be required. Florence Hale Stephenson, Professor of Physical

purpose of

Jointly Sponsored Courses San Francisco State College and the San Francisco Unified School District

The lege

jointly sponsored courses will carry colundergraduate and in some instances grad-

uate credit or in-service training credit. College credit may be earned by registering, paying the fee of $3.00 per semester unit, and fulfilling the requirements of San Francisco State College. In-service training credits may be earned without the payment of a fee. All members of the

Education, San Francisco State College; Mrs. Mary Mannelli, Miss Narda Schuldt, San Francisco Public Schools. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 21, 1949. Girls

High

ED.

School.

152.

certificated staff registering for In-service training credits will be expected to fulfill the same

ROOM: A

work requirements and attendance as that required of students in the same course who are taking the work for college credit. Classes start Wednesday, September 21, 1949.

to the

CURRICULUM

272. SEMINAR: In seminar, attention will be given to the problems with which organized curriculum committees working on specific problems will be concerned, such as, organizing course content, selection of appropriate materials for classroom use, and the developing of objectives. Dr. Fred Wilhelms, Associate Professor of Education, San Francisco State College; Dr. Edward Redford, Coordinator of Secondary Education;

ED.

this

VISUAL AIDS IN THE CLASS-

study of the function of visual aids in the learning process. Attention will be given

management of the visual program, including the selection of materials and the use of equipment. Morris Williams. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 22, 1949. Auditorium, Girls High School. Registration limited to 60.

ED.

273.

TIONS:

In

SEMINAR IN HUMAN RELAthis

seminar,

opportunities

will

be offered for the study of group relations in the school, of the individual and his personal adjustment, and also the adjustment of the school curriculum to meet the needs of the child. The work in this seminar will be focused on actual classroom situations where the participants will

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

endeavor to discover ways and means of improving human relations in the schools. Dr. Fred Wilhelms, Associate Professor of Education, San Francisco State College; Miss Margaret Heaton, Curriculum Consultant in Human Relations, San Francisco Public Schools, and staff. 2 semester units. Fall and Spring semesters. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting Sep-

tember 21, 1949. Girls High School. Section Section

ART

B Horace Mann Junior High School. C Marina Junior High School.

375.

WORKSHOP

CRAFTS. The aim

IN ARTS

of this course

is

AND

to give ele-

mentary teachers an understanding of child growth and development in Art and methods for releasing the child's creative ability. Specific attention will be given to techniques for handling finger painting, poster painting, water clay, and papier mache. A. Johansen, San Francisco State College; Mrs. Sue Irwin, San Francisco Public Schools. 2 semester units. Fall semester. Thursday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 22, 1949. Room 27, Sanchez School. Registration to 25.

color,

chalk,

firing

Waldemar W.

READING GUIDANCE IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE:

This course will include a re-

view of outstanding books from children's

liter-

ature in the various subject fields of the elementary curriculum. It is also designed to acquaint teachers, through wide reading, with how they may enrich the instructional program. Special emphasis will be given to methods of presenting books to the children in groups and as individuals, and on ways of encouraging the use of books other than textbooks in the various subject fields. Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Director of Texts and Libraries. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 21, 1949. Girls High School.

READING GUIDANCE IN THE SUBJECT FIELDS: This

course

is

designed to develop

on the part of secondary teachers and librarians with the outstanding books of each subject field, with emphasis upon methods

familiarity

of teaching students to use the library resources

Miss Elizabeth Scott, Librarian, Lowell High School, San Francisco. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p.m., starting September

intelligently.

22, 1949. Girls

High School.

University of California, Berkeley Registration Opens September 13 Education courses being offered evenings and Saturdays Fall Semester, 1949



112 The Improvement of Reading. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

160 Vocational Education. Monday, 7:309:30 p.m. 164 Introduction to Student Personnel Work. Saturday, 10-12 a.m.

201AB History of Education, Seminar. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 216AB Educational Psychology, Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 217 Experimental Education. Thursday, 7:309:30 p.m.

224AB School

Curricula, Seminar. Thursday,

7:30-9:30 p.m.

227 Problems in Curriculum Development. Saturday, 10-12 a.m. 230AB Elementary Education, Seminar. Monday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 232AB Elementary School Curriculum, Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 233AB Supervision of Elementary Education. Thursday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 234AB Supervision of Elementary Education, Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 240AB Educational Administration, Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 244 Problems of Schoolhousing. Friday, 7:309:30 p.m. 248AB Educational Administration. Saturday, 9-11 a.m. 249AB School Surveys, Practicum. Saturday, 11-12 a.m. 258AB Social Studies, Seminar. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 260AB Student Personnel Work, Seminar. Thursday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 270AB Secondary Education, Seminar. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 272A Secondary School Curriculum, Basic Principles. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 275 Secondary Education Survey. Thursday, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Stanford University School of Education Late Afternoon, Evening and Saturday Classes for Educational Workers Fall

Quarter



1949-50

These courses are available for part-time registration by teachers and others regularly employed in educational work, who live sufficiently close to the University. In so far as possible, students will be encouraged to relate their study to the professional problems with which they are concerned in their present positions. Part of the work for advanced degrees may be met by this type of study. Registration dates for educational workers are September 26 through Saturday noon, October 3. Teachers in the vicinity who plan to take part-time courses must have been admitted to the University prior to August 15, 1949. Complete admission credentials must be filed at the Registrar's Office by August 15. Consult the Registrar's Office for details. All students will

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

ing for this work.

Secure your registration booklet in the Registrar's Office, Administration Building. Inform the clerk that you wish to register for special classes for educational workers. 2. Proceed to the School of Education for signature and approval of the program you have planned to take. 3. Call at the Office of the School of Educa-

Room

tion.

20, first floor

and leave your No. 5

card from the registration booklet and receive certain departmental record blanks. 4. Secure and file a class card for each of the

Have

fees

adjusted to unit basis at the Reg-

and pay fees at Cashier's Office. Return the registration booklet, signed, to

istrar's Office, 6.

the Registrar's Office.

MONDAY 120 Public School Administration. 4 units. Monday, 7-10 p.m. Room 2. 197 Methods in Social Studies for Elementary Grades. 4 units. Shaftel. Tuesday, 7-10 p.m.

Bartky/Odell.

Room

35.

130 Guidance

Educational Institutions. McDaniel. Wednesday, 7-10 p.m. Room in

322 Seminar in Administration. (For doctoral Students in Administration). 3 units. Odell/ Bartky/MacConnell. Wednesday, 7-10 p.m.

Room

Engl. 1A Introduction to Composition Literature. Tuesday.

350A Master

of Arts Research Seminar.

Thursday, 7-10 p.m.

Room

3

2.

SATURDAY 254 School

Surveys and

search. 3 units.

9-12 a.m.

and

B.A. 2 Introduction to Business. Wednesday.

Econ. 1A Principles of Economics. Monday. Math. 5A Mathematics of Finance. Wednesday.

B.A.

1A Elementary Accounting

I.

Monday

II.

Tuesday

and Wednesday. B.A. 1A Elementary Accounting and Friday.

B.A.

IB Elementary Accounting. Tuesday

and Thursday, B.A.

8A

B.A. 100

Room

Educational ReMacConnell/Odell. Saturday,

Evening Classes Registration will take place on September 15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m. and classes will commence on Monday evening September 19. All classes art- open to both men and women. Educ, 106 Principles of Education. 2 units. Friday.

Mon-

B.A. 121 A Business

Law I. Monday. 122A Business Law III. Monday. 122B Business Law IV. Wednesday.

B.A. 124A General Insurance. Thursday.

Monday.

B.A. 142A Advertising. Friday. B.A. 143 Marketing and Sales Analysis. nesday. B.A. 146 Salesmanship.

Wed-

Monday.

B.A. 147A Retail Merchandising. Tuesday.

B.A. 107A Economics of Enterprise. Tuesday. B.A. 151 Corporation Finance. Wednesday. B.A. 160 Business Policies and Management.

Thursday.

Educ, 121 Mental Hygiene. 2 units. Tuesday. Educ. 122 Problems in Pupil Personnel. 2

Monday.

Educ. 125 Audio-Visual Education. 2 units.

day.

Educ. 206A Philosophy of Education. Seminar. 2 units.

I

Monday.

Educ. 212A Psychological Foundations of Educalion. 2 units. Thursday. EcIlh-. 240A Secondary Education. Seminar. 2 units. Tuesday,

directed by the material, utility, and individual creative instinct; suitable techniques for the elementary schools presented by lecture, demonstration,

and

class participation, including basic

glazing and firing. H. Roy Walker, City College of San Francisco. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 22, 1949. Room 10-E City College.

hand

ED.

processes,

303.

ELEMENTARY MECHANICAL Methods

in Mechanical Drawdesigned for teachers of in the secondary schools of

San Francisco. Attention will be given to the content and methods utilizing American Standards for Drafting Room Practice. Cecil Aggeler, City College of San Francisco. 2 semester units.

21.

Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 3, City College of San Francisco.

Room

ED. 304. ADVANCED COURSE IN MECHANICAL DRAWING. A prerequisite: Ele-

B.A. 162 Personnel Management. Monday.

— Methodist

— T Th AB9 (/a unit) Music 81 — Introduction

4:10-5:00.

Elementary School

Tax Problems. Tuesday.

B.A. 148 Retail Credit: Principles and Practice.

5:30.

Music 18A — Techniques Organ Playing — Th Westminster Church Music 118 BCD — Techniques Organ Playing — T — Westminster Church 4:10-5:50. Music 119 ABCD — Literature of the Organ — W — Methodist Church Music 196 — Literature and Method Mixed Woodwind Class — MW — MA Church Music 198 — Literature and Methods for the String Class — MW — MA Baptist Chuch

B.A. 121A Business

(1

of

(1 unit)

(1 unit) 4:10-5:50.

for the Baptist

(2 units) 4:10-6:00.

(2

units) 4:10-6:00.

Speech (Drama and Radio) Speech

— AB5

Speech

Thursday.

W

jors)

1

16

— Radio Administration — T Th

(3 units) 4:10-5:30.

20-120ABCD—Drama

6:00.

Speech 22-122 (3 units)

Activity (Maunit) 5*10-

and hours arranged (J^



Stagecraft 5:10-6:00.

— MWF—Shop

ED. 272. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS.

ED.

RADIO. An

introductory course in the utilization of radio as a learning aid in the classroom, use of equipment, preparation for listening, follow up the integration with the specific subjects, also elements of simple production. Henry Leff, City College of San Francisco. 2 semester units, Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 21. Room 147, City College 320.

This seminar

is designed to implement the work by the California Health Education Project which was set up on a trial basis in one of the San Francisco elementary schools. Miss

initiated

Ethel Mealey. 2 units, Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting

September

Ed. 133-233

San Francisco State College Semester



1949

September

19.

CREATIVE ARTS Art Art

4— Introductory Art— MWF

T Th AB1

in the Integrated

(2 units) 4:10-6:00.

— Evaluation

in

Education—

(3 units) 6:30-7:45.

(2 units) 4:10-5:00 plus 1 hr. 5-6 and 1 hr. to be arranged. Ed, 152 Audio-Visual Education

T

FB208

T

FB208

Registration will be September 13-16. Classes will start

High School.

— FB109 Ed. 152 — Audio-Visual Education — T —

T Th

Late Afternoon and Evening Classes Fall

21. Girls

Education

San Francisco.

—Art

I.

unit) 4:10-5:50.

College of San Francisco.

Art 104

Law

of

1

seminar is designed to implement the curriculum development in health education at the junior and senior high school level. Dr. Margaret Leonard. 2 units. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 21. Girls High School.





(2 units) 4:10-5:00 plus

1

hr.

12-1 or

— Th — 12-1 or

5-6 and 1 hr. to be arranged. Ed. 19! Parent Child Relationships

FB212

(2 units) 4:10-5:00.

Wednesday.

Music in the (3 units) 4-10-

be given in the use of new materials developed for the high school curriculum in mechanical drawing. Cecil Aggeler, City College of San Francisco. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 22, 1949. Room 3, City

Friday.

B.A. 184 Federal

to

MW FB2 07

ED. 272. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. This

B.A. 170 Foreign Trade. Thursday.

B.A. 180A Advanced Theory and Consignments. Tuesday and Thursday.

unit)

4:10-5:50. — Arranging and Com— T Th AB9 (2 units) 4:10-5:00. Music 48-148ABCD — Dance Band Routine

will

of

B.A. 181 Cost Accounting. Wednesday and

— Sacred Music Choir — M

Church (y2

Music 47-147ABCD posing for Dance Band

B.A. 164 Office Management. Monday.

Wednesday. Educ. 170 Educational Hygiene. 2 units. Thursday. Educ. 195 Education Law. 2 units. Wednes-

This course will give attention to the introduction of ceramics through basic principles of form

mentary Mechanical Drawing. Attention

B.A. 130 Statistics. Thursday. B.A. 140A Marketing.

This

BASIC CERAMIC PROCESSES:

This course is mechanical drawing

day.

2.

University of San Francisco Department of Education

311.

ing:

Banking. Friday.

Econ. 168 History of Trade Unionism.

B.A.

ED.

DRAWING—

Money and

Music 23-123

JEWELRY, BEGINNING:

310.

course is designed for teachers of Art in the secondary schools. Attention will be given to the fundamentals of design, the elementary principles of fabrication and finish. A survey of related literature will be required. H. Roy Walker. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting September 21, 1949. Room 350 City College.

Intermediate Accounting. Tuesday

and Thursday.

B.A.

THURSDAY

units.

9:00 p.m.

56.

units. Curtis.

week of September 1 9. Regon September 15 and 16, from 7 to

Classes begin the istration

Econ. 12A Economic History. Tuesday.

WEDNESDAY 3 units.

ED.

Engl. 10 Business Letter Writing. Thursday.

courses to be taken. 5.

In-Service Training Courses

College of Business Administration Evening Division

1.

Music

City College of San Francisco

University of San Francisco

follow the procedure outlined below in register-

Program

— Ed. 220 — Survey

— AA12 FBI

10

ranged.

(2 units) 4:10-5:50.

(3 units)

—M Defects — T—

of Physical 4:10-5:50 and hrs. to be ar-



M

Ed. 222 ance of the

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

BULLETIN SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

San Francisco State College (Cont'd)

San Francisco State College (Cont'd)

— Education and Vocational GuidHandicapped— W—FB 114

(2 units)

7:00-8:40.

— Supervision Elementary Edu— MW — FB108 6:30-7:45. Ed. 240 — Public School Organization and units) Administration — MW — FB109 4:10-5:25. Ed. 242 — School Finance and Business Adunits) 6:30ministration — MW — FB109 Teaching Personnel Ed. 245 — Problems 4:10-5:25. _TTh — FB109 Ed. 246 — The Community School — MW— 4:10-5:25. FBI02 Ed. 247 — Supervision and Curriculum units) Secondary Schools — T Th — FBI 14 4:10-5:25. an Elementary Ed. 250 — Administration 4:10-5:25. School — T Th — FB207 Ed. 312 — Art Education — MWF — AB1 4:10-5:00. Ed. 317 — Elementary School Reading — M _ A123 units) 4:10-5:50. Education — Ed. 295 — Seminar — FBI 14 (3-6 Ed. 312 — Art Education — MWF — AB1 4:10-5:00. - Elementary School Reading — M Ed. — A123 4:10-5:50. Ed. 329B — Instrumental Literature and 4:10-5:50. Materials — Th — AA12 Ed. 340 — Secondary School Science —MWF — H1B Ed. 341 A — Teaching Speech- W—AA12 4:10-5:50. Ed. 361 — Speech Correction: Basic & Techniques — Th — FBI 10 units) Ed. 239B

of

(3 units)

cation

(3

(3

7:45.

of

(3 units)

(3 units)

of

(3

paired Vision 5:50.

— MW — FB114 (4 units) 4:10-

(3 units)

(2

in Special

units) 7:00-8:40.

(3 units) (17

(2 units)

(2 units)

(3 units) 4:10-5:00. of

(2 units)

Princi-

ples

(2

4:10-5:50.

Ed. 375A

Language Development & ReadChildren— FBI 10 (4 units)

Ed. 376A Children

MW—



Speech Training for Deaf FBI 10 (3 units) 7:00-9:30. Ed. 378A - Teaching Elementary School Subjects to the Deaf W FBI 13 (2 units)

M

— —

7:00-8:40.



Ed. 396 Education and Methods of Teaching Blind Children T FB102 {4 units)

— —



—M—

(3 units) -1:111-5:50,

— Teaching — W — FBI 10

Ed. 383 Child

Psychology

Psych. 108A

— Child Development — MWF

— A210 units) 4:10-5:00. Psych. 208A— Behavior of Children — M — A207 units 4:10-5:50. Psych. 208B — Seminar Clinical Study of the Problem Child School — W — A207 (2 (3

Difficulties

(2

in

in

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Health and Hygiene

— Home Nursing and Care of the — T Th — A125 (2 units) 4:10-5:00.

Hyg. 4-104 Sick

Cerebral Palsied

(3 units) 6:30-8:30.



Ed. 390 Curriculum and Method of Teaching the Mentally Retarded Child

FB208

Physical Education

(Women)

— Swimming Elementary — T Th — YWCA unit) 4:10-4:30. PE12B — Swimming Intermediate — T Th YWCA (/, unit) 4:30-5:00. PE12C — Swimming Advanced — T Th — PE12

{'fy

YWCA

unit) 5:00-5:30.

(/a

— MW —

(3 units) 4:10-5:25.

8:40.

Ed: 394

Physical Education

(Men and Women)

— Fundamentals Dance — MWF — Gym unit) 4:10-5:00. PE54A — Folk and Square Dancing — T — Gym (/ unit) 7:00-9:00. PE55A — Modem Dance Group — T Th — Gym unit) 4:10-5:00. PE55A — Modern Dance Group F — Gym (/a unit) 4:00-6:00. PE54BCD — Folk and Square Dancing — W — Gym unit) 7:00-9:00. PE60-160 — Athletic Sports Appreciation— T — AB2 (lunit) 7:00-9:00. PE83ABCD — Fencing — T — Gym unit) 5:00-7:00. PE200 — Problems in Physical Education — W — CH203 units) 7:00-9:00. PE202 — Seminar Physical Education — Th — CH203 units) 6:00-8:00. PE5

in

{'/i

Th

— Fill 13

Ed, 395

ol

Remedial Reading

(2 unit!) 4:1(1-5:50,

Education

of Children with

{
(•/,

(
(2

in

(2

Recreation

— Outdoor Cooking — T — FBI 13 C/t unit) 4:10-6:00. Rec. 4G — Clay Modeling — Th — CH21 unit) 4:10-6:00. Rec. 5G — Astronomy for the Layman — T 2A

— A207

(1 unit) 4:10-6:00.

Humanities

— Survey of English Literature — MWF — CH207 units) 4:10-5:00. — Elementary French — MWF — French AA6 units) 4:10-5:00. Philosophy 152 — Modern Philosophies — MWF — AA7 4:10-5:00. Russian Elementary Russian — MWF Eng. 56

1

(3

(3 units)

1

Im-

(3

— Geology of Western — MWF — A125 (3 Math. 2 — Mathematical Analysis — MWF — CH207 units) 5:10-6:00. Physics 65 — Sound for Music Students — MWF — A125 (3 units) Physiology 10 — Fundamentals Human Physiology — MWF — A110 Geology 131

(3

Language Arts

Eng. 1R — Reading Laboratory — MW — CH216 unit) 4:10-5:00. Eng. 1R — Reading Laboratory — MW — CH216 unit) 5:10-6:00. Eng. IS — Speech Laboratory— MW—H2B unit) 4:10-5:00. Eng. IS — Speech Laboratory — T Th — H3B unit) 4:10-5:00. Eng. IS — Speech Laboratory — MW —HI A unit) 5:10-6:00. Eng. 1W— Writing Laboratory— MW—H2 unit) 4:10-5:00. Eng. 2 — Composition — MWF — H3A (3 4:10-5:00. — Composition — MWF — CH209 Eng. 5:10-6:00. Speech 3 — Fundamentals of Speech — T Th — H3A 4:10-5:00. Speech 3 — Fundamentals of Speech — T Th — CH203 5:10-6:00. Speech 10-110 — Workshop Public Discussion — T — AA12 unit) 4:10-6:00. (1

(1

(1

(1

(1

units)

2

(3 units)

(2 units)

in

(1

AA9

(3 units) 5:10-6:00.

United units) 4:10-5:00.

States

5:10-6:00.

of

(3 units) 5:10-

6:00.

Social Science

Econ.

I

— A110

A—

Elementary Economics

— MWF

(3 units) 4:10-5:00.

Geog. 20 — Geographic — MWF — CH208 (3 Geography — Geog. 101A — Field Work MWF— -CH208 (3 units) Gov. 134 — International Relations Far East — MWF — CH203 — 4A — History of Western — MWF — AA8 Soc. 61 — Introductory Sociology — MWF — CH209 (3 4:10-5:00. Bus. 10A — Beginning Typewriting — MWF

Basis of Social Studies

units) 4:10-5:00. in

5:10-6:00.

of the

4:10-5:00.

Hist.

Civilization

(3 units) 4:10-5:00.

units)

CH219

2

Political

Problems

Scientific

(2 units)

(3

Teaching Arts and Crafts to the Handicapped M PB212 (2 units) 7:00Ed. 393

Natural Science

(1

units) 4:10-5:50.

{
the

units)

4:10-5:50.

Rcc,

Methods ol Teaching OrthopedHandicapped Children FBI 13

Ed. 381 ically

— Intermediate Review and Read— MWF — AA9 (3 4:10-5:00. Reading — Spanish 109 — Spanish — MWF AA8 units) 5:10-6:D0. Russian 3

ing

of

(3 units)

ing for Deaf 4:10-5:50.

A

1

Notes

(2 units) 5:10-6:00.


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

SEPTEMBER

No. 2

Architects for New Public School Projects Listed

Delivery Dates for

For general information, the Superintendent below the names of the architects assigned by the Board of Education to various new public school projects in San Francisco: Cantin, Cantin

September Time Sheets should be delivered Department, third floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates:

to the Payroll

Teachers

Project

&

Page

704 Market Street (2) Ciampi, Mario J. 333 Kearney Street (8)

high, junior high and elementary September 22, 8:00 a.m. 18 days Teachers 20 days Principals and assistant principals September 26, 1:00 p.m. Adult schools

Senior

#59 Ocean View Home

schools

School Unit

#23 San Miguel Lawton Additions

-

&

Alterations

Clark & Beuttler 210 Post Street (8)

Day, W. Ill N.

#52

Montgomery

&

Main

&

42nd

Street (5)

#10 New #26

Sunset Reservoir School Unit

Home

#13 Quintara & 14th Elem. #14 Funston & Santiago High

to the air this Saturday,

for the schools'

#67 Noreiga & 44th Ave.

Home

School Unit

Reid, John L.

#20 Lake Merced

405 Montgomery St. (4) Roller, A. F. Crocker 1st Nat'l.

#1 Ulloa Elem.

Silver Ave. Elem.

Patrick

Henry

City College

:00 p.m.

own

KGO

is

return

radio program.

Former Quizdown announcer of

will

opening a new season

Quizmaster

Tom

Paxton

this year.

All elementary schools

may

participate in the

program by contributing questions. These questions should be based on the fourth, fifth and sixth grade curriculum and should be of general interest.

must be entered on the and signed by the classroom committee of teachers appointed by

All questions used

proper blank

(4)

teacher.

Spencer & Ambrose 251 Kearny Street (8) Thomsen & Wilson 315 Montgomery St. (4)

#9

Sunset

Jr.

High

Ward &

#5

#2 Sunnydale Elem. Comm.

Sunset Elem. "A"

#31 A. Lincoln High Addition # 1 1 Candlestick Cove

Emmons

A

the superintendent of schools will review the questions.

Each

submitting a question

child

used on the program will receive an Eversharp repeater pencil.

Question blanks to the

may be

Quizdown Editor

at

obtained by writing

The Examiner.

Tickets to the broadcast are available at the

402 Jackson Street (11) Supervising Architect Sunset Community

Center

#33 Trade and

Riedy, Dodge City Architect City Hall

Industrial (Ford Bldg.)

Wm.

F. S.

Mooser 251 Kearney Street

1

22, 8:00 a.m.

Quizdown Returns to the Air The Examiner-KGO Quizdown

#3 Miraloma Elem.

Peugh, W. D. 333 Montgomery St. (4) Pflueger, M. T. 580 Market Street

Bolles

26,

Bret Harte

#17 #24 #34

369 Pine Street (4) Weihe, Frick & Kruse 251 Kearny Street (8) Wurster, Bernardi &

September September

Elem.

(4)

Dailey, Gardner A. 442 Post Street (2)

September 16-30 Adult schools Other schools

#15 Fremont Elem.

Jr.

Masten & Hurd 526 Powell Street (2) Meyers and Evers Kohl Bldg., Market St.

Bank Bldg.

Clerks and Janitors

(5)

Knowles

Hertzka 85 Post Street (4) Hobart & Kerr 525 Market Street (5) Johnson, Alfred W. 681 Market Street (5) Kump & Falk 9

Santiago

Home School Unit #6 Hillcrest Elem.

P.

1949

September Time Sheets

lists

Architect

12,

Key Addition

KGO

box

request

office

envelope) from tor.

or

(enclosing

may a

be obtained by mail

self-addressed,

stamped

The Examiner's Quizdown

The program

Edi-

goes on the air every Saturday

morning from 10:00 to 10:30 and the United Artists Theatre.

originates in

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools

Bulletii

issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools

Industrial Education

Convention Coming

is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

San Francisco has been honored

in

being

selected as the host city for the annual convention of the California Industrial Education As-

March 24 and 25, 1950. San Francisco Chapter, C.I.E.A., therefore is planning at this early date to show true hospitality to the six to seven hundred guests from every section of California. Every local teacher sociation,

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, September 12 Physicians

will

visit

the following

schools:

George Washington, Commerce, James Denman, Candlestick, Jean Parker, Raphael Weill, Grattan. Physical Education meeting. High 3:45 p.m. school men. Room 313, 750 Eddy Street. Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Room 226, Mission High School.

— —

Tuesday, September 13 Physicians

will

visit

the

following schools:

Samuel Gompers, Commerce, Aptos, RidgePotrero Terrace N.S., Alta Vista, Daniel Webster, Sutro.

point Site

in the field of industrial education

Wednesday, September 14

View, Westside N.S., John Muir, Emerson, Redding. Physical Education meeting. High 3:45 p.m. school women. Room 313, 750 Eddy Street.



Thursday, September 15 Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Galileo, Portola, Washington Irving, Dudley Stone. 3:45 p.m. Regular meeting. Day Adult Americanization teachers. Marina Adult School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets. 3:45 p.m. Physical Education meeting. Junior high school women. Room 313, 750 Eddy





Street.

Friday, September 16 Physicians will visit the following schools: Abraham Lincoln, Polytechnic, Everett, Bret Harte, Jefferson. 3:45 p.m. Physical Education meeting. Junior high school men. Room 313, 750 Eddy



Street.

urged to is

designated as Ladies' Night, tentatively set for October 10, 1949 at the City College. All instructors in trade and industrial, vocational, or industrial arts education and the many friends of this phase of education are invited to bring their ladies to a gala occasion. Further details will be announced soon.

Registration Procedure

2,

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Commerce, Mission, James Lick, Bay

is

give his full cooperation in this matter. The first social affair of the local chapter,

The



Stanford

registration procedure for

educational

workers for the autumn quarter at Stanford University is as follows: The regular registration days are Monday and Tuesday, September 26 and 27, but full time educational workers may register without fine anytime during the week of September 26 October 1 The deadline will be Saturday noon, .

October

1.

Teachers in the vicinity who wish to take part time courses but have not yet been admitted to the University may apply for admission through August 15. They must file complete application

by that date. Concerning tuition and credits, full time educational workers may register for a maximum of six quarter units. Four units of credit constitutes the minimum tuition payment. The charges are credentials

as follows:

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 6 units ....$85.00

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 5 units ..$75.00

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 4 units $65.00 -

Verification of illness Cards Verification of illness cards for individual pupils must be retained in the schools. These records are subject to audit by the State Depart-

ment of Education at any time. The must be kept indefinitely and it not to be sent to

pupil's card

at any time another school with his cumulative

record folder.

Americanization Teachers' Meeting The regular meeting of the Day Adult Americanization Teachers will be held on Thursday, September 15, at 3:45 p.m., in the Marina Adult School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets.

Within the next week this information will be distributed to the San Francisco schools by the School of Education.

Saturday Concerts Announced Saturday Music, Incorporated, announces three concerts to be presented on successive Saturdays October 22, 29 and November 5. These concerts will be given at the San Francisco Museum of Art, Van Ness and McAllister Streets, beginning at 10:30 o'clock. Season tickets at $1.50 may be obtained from The Record Shop, 14 Tillman Place. Artists to be heard include Florence Ouartararo, Ruth Slenczynsky Born, Eileen McCall Washington.



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Recent Accessions

A



Teachers' Library on California

special collection of books

on permanent loan from the California State Library, is now on display in the Teachers'

history,

Professional Library. The purchase of these books for the use of the schools of California

was made

possible

by

special legislation in 1947.

individual books may be borrowed by teachers who are interested in reading about the background of our state's background.

The

The

collection includes the following

Berger, John Anton. fornia.

New

ed.

The Franciscan

titles:

Missions of Cali-

Doubleday, 1948.

Camp, William Martin. San

Francisco: Port of Gold. Doubleday, 1947. Caughey, John Walton. Californis. Prentice-Hall, 1940.

Caughey, John Walton. Hubert

Howe

Bancroft. Uni-

versity of California Press, 1946.

Cleland, Robert Glass. California in our time, 19001940. Knopf, 1947. Cleland, Robert Glass. From wilderness to empire. A history of California, 1542-1900. Knopf, 1944. Cornelius, Fidelis, brother. Keith, old master of California. Putnam, 1942. Drury, Aubrey. California; an intimate guide. Rev. ed. Harper, 1947. Dumke, Glenn S. The book of the eighties in Southern California. Huntington library, 1944. Federal writers' project. California. California; a guide to the Golden state. Hastings House, 1947. Hanna, Phil Townsend. The dictionary of California

land

names.

The Automobile Club

of

Southern

Scholarships Available

To promote future American leadership in democracy, Standard Oil Company of California today announced sponsorship of 36 new scholarships for the 1949-50 academic year in nine public universities.

Four undergraduate awards, for $500 each, have been given to the universities of Alaska, Arizona, California (two at Berkeley and two at Los Angeles), Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. While selection of the winners will be entirely in the hands of the universities, Standard is suggesting that they be chosen primarily on the basis of potential future leadership. Standard's

only restriction is that they be granted to men or women regardless of course of study or race or creed. The scholarships will be awarded, one each, to the four undergraduate classes. Thus, it would be possible for one student to qualify throughout his four college years, although comis on an annual basis. These awards are in addition to 23 fellowships the company provides for advanced scientific studies in thirteen institutions and six undergraduate scholarships given annually to members of the 4-H Club and Future Farmers of America. Total current outlay for these programs is approximately $60,000 yearly.

petition

California, 1946.

Hunt, Rockwell Dennis. John Bidwell, prince of California pioneers. Caxton Printers, 1942. Hutchinson, Claude Burton, ed. California agriculture.

By members

of the faculty of the College of Agriculture, University of California Press, 1946. Jackson, Joseph Henry. Anybody's gold. The story of California's mining towns. Appleton-Century, 1941. Kneiss, Gilbert H. Bonanza railroads, 3rd ed. Stanford University Press, 1947. Knowland, Joseph Russell. California, a landmark history. Story of the preservation and marking of early-day shrines. Oakland Tribune, 1941. McGlashan, Charles Fayette. History of the Donner party. Rev. ed. Stanford University Press, 1947. McKittrick, Myrtle Mason. Vallejo, son of California.

Binfords and Mort, 1944.

McLeod, Alexander.

Pigtails

and gold

dust.

Caxton

Printers, 1947.

MacMinn, George Rupert. The

theatre of the golden era in California. Caxton Printers, 1941.

MacMullen,

Jerry. Paddle-wheel days in California. Stanford University Press, 1944. Paden, Irene. The wake of the prairie schooner. MacMillan, 1943. Paul, Rodman W. California gold. The beginning of mining in the far West. Harvard University Press,

1947. Peattie,

Roderick ed.

The

Pacific coast ranges.

guard Press, 1946. Putnam, George Palmer. Death Valley and

its

Vancoun-

try. Duell, 1946.

Rensch, Hero Eugene & others. Historic spots in California. New one volume ed. Stanford University Press, 1948. Russell, Carl Parcher. One hundred years in Yosemite. The story of a great park and its friends. ed. University of California Press, 1947. Scherer, James Augustin Brown. Thirty-first star. Put-

Enrollment to Be Reported September 16 Elementary principals are requested to report as follows:

Kindergarten enrollment, enrollment by each

and total school enrollment as of September 16, 1949. Junior and senior high schools are requested to report enrollment by each half grade and total school enrollment as of September 16, half grade

1949.

Forms have been sent to the schools upon which to record enrollment. These forms should be returned to the Bureau of Rsearch not later than September 19. Schoolcast Resumes Today

At 11:30 this morning the 1001st Examiner Schoolcast program will be beamed into San Francisco and northern California schools. This year, as in the past eight years, Dwight will background the news for elementary school students, providing supplementary information not available in textbook form.

Newton

The program

will

school year over

and Friday

be heard throughout the

KGO

Monday, Wednesday

at 11:30.

New

Shinn, Charles Howard. Mining camps. 1948.

versity Press, 1948.

Oscar Osburn. Via western express and stagecoach. Stanford University Press, 1945. Wright, William (Dan DeQuille, pseud.) The big bonanza. New ed. Knopf, 1947.

Winther,

nam, 1942.

American

Weston, Otheto. Mother Lode album. Stanford Uni-

frontier

government.

New

A ed.

study in

Knopf,

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Triple

"A"

Art Commission Announces

Soccer

New

Schedule for 1949 GAME DATE

FIELD

— Washington-Lincoln — Galileo-Lowell — Mission-Polytechnic —Commerce-Balboa — Polytechnic-Balboa — Washington-Lowell —Lincoln-Commerce — Mission-Galileo — Polytechnic-Lowell — Balboa-Lincoln — Commerce-Mission — Washington-Galileo —Lincoln-Lowell —Washington-Polytechnic — Commerce-Galileo — Mission-Balboa — Commerce-Washington Nov. Nov. — Polytechnic-Lincoln Nov. — Balboa-Galileo Nov. — Lowell-Mission Nov. 8 — Mission-Lincoln Nov. 8 — Commerce-Lowell Nov. 9 — Balboa-Washington Nov. 10 — Polytechnic-Galileo Nov. 14 — Galileo-Lincoln Nov. 14 — Commerce-Polytechnic Nov. 15 — Washington-Mission — Balboa-Lowell Nov.

Oct. 4 Oct. 4 Oct. 6 Oct. 6 Oct. 11 Oct. 11 Oct. 13 Oct. 13 Oct. 18 Oct. 18 Oct. 20 Oct. 20 Oct. 25 Oct. 25 Oct. 26 Oct. 27

1

2 1

2 1 '-

1

2 1

2 1

2

1 1 1

1

2

3

15

All games to be played at Beach Chalet; Field No. located at North end; games start at 3:30.

1

2 1

2 1 1

1

2 1

2 1

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

Lowell High School Janitor

C



1

Working Foreman

106.1.

John Swett



1

Janitor C 106. 1 Janitor C 106.

Ridgepoint No. 4



be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these vacancies may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Requests for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

These vacancies

will

Outdoor Art Show The San Francisco Art Commission's third annual Outdoor Art Show will set a record for artist-participation and public interest, it was predicted today by Ernest Born, chairman of the commission's Visual Arts Committee.

Last year more than 100,000 citizens viewed work of approximately 600 Bay Area artists. The exhibit will again be held in San Francisco's Union Square, from September 29 through Octhe

tober

nounced today. The announcement was made by Harold L. Zellerbach, president of the Art Commission, following a meeting of the music committee, composed of Mrs. William B. Poyner, Herbert Fleishhacker, Edward S. Moore and Mr. Zellerbach.

The eight-concert 1950 series will be presented in January, with Artur Rodzinski, worldfamed conductor, leading the orchestra. It will include six symphonic concerts; a performance of the dramatic oratorio, "King David", with the 185-voice San Francisco Municipal Chorus, and a concert version of Strauss' opera "Elektra." Prominent local and nationally-known artists will appear with the orchestra in "King David" and "Elektra."

Under the new formula, approximately onehalf of the total seats will sell for $1.00 or less, plus federal tax. In announcing the 1950 policy, Mr. Zellerbach said: "With regard to the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, subsidized by public tax funds, members of the present Art Commission interpret provisions of the City Charter as clearly designating two primary responsibilities to be borne by the commission: "(1) To make the music of this great orchestra financially available to as

many of our people

as possible.

"(2) To encourage and assist, actively, in the development of local artists. "We feel our first objective, that of making the music of the Symphony Orchestra available to all, has been achieved only to a relatively small measure of its potential. "In recent years, particularly, the emphasis has been on the presentation of famous individual guest-artists, rather than on our great orchestra, and this practice necessarily resulted in the establishment of admission rates beyond reach of many of our music lovers. "We are looking forward eargely to our 1950 series in January. It will offer the finest in symphonic programs, at a price-range within the means of all. In doing this, it is our belief that we shall more effectively support the purpose for which public funds are used to present fine

2.

"The

city's

annual exhibit has become the its kind in the nation," Mr.

outstanding event of

Born

A new policy under which the San Francisco Art Commission will present the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra at the Opera House, at prices ranging from 50 cents to $1.50, was an-

1

2

1

3

is

2

Price Policy

said.

All artists in the varied fields may exhibit, without charge, in the non-jury show.

Local 61 to

Meet

The

regular meeting of the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61, will be held

on Monday, September

Room

226, Mission

High

12,

at 4:00 p.m., in

School.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

SEPTEMBER

No. 3

19,

1949

City College of San Francisco Resumes Classes Today College of San Francisco, now in its open its doors today, Monday, September 19, with an enrollment of over 5,000 students.

The City

a terminal nature, general college courses of a

fifteenth year, will

broad and cultural nature, university parallel

This fall semester of 1 949 will find the college presidency in the capable hands of Louis G. Conlan. Mr. Conlan succeeds to the vacancy created by the retirement of Dr. A. J. Cloud.

courses designed to satisfy specific subject requirements of colleges and universities, and remedial courses to aid students in removal of high school deficiencies. The College aims to cultivate responsible citizenship and to acquaint the student with his cultural heritage and the environment in which he lives. It is in every sense a community college. The Associate in Arts degree is conferred by the City College.

"To accomplish its purpose the College has developed courses to meet the needs of individual students. These courses are grouped into the several curricula which make up the program of instruction in the College, i.e., SemiParallel Courses, University professional Courses, General College Courses, Remedial and High School Courses. Among the Special Services offered are: Counseling and Guidance, Housing for Students, Placement, and Vocational Rehabilitation."

In the sports program City College ranks high. For the fall football season over 150 gridders turned out for the varsity. In a recent issue of the Superintendent's Bulit was stated that "Cogswell is the only school in this area offering two-year courses in electrical, mechanical and structural engineering to high school graduates at no tuitional cost." That statement was in error, the City College of San Francisco also offers these identical courses as well as many other related techniletin

Louis G. Conlan C.C.S.F. President

Mr. Conlan needs no introduction to the members of the certificated staff of the San Francisco schools.

Upon

entering the depart-

ment in 1929 he served as an instructor at the High School of Commerce, and as an instructor

cal subjects.

at City College (then Junior College) in 1935. appointed coordinator of educational

Education for Catastrophe

He was

management

at City College in 1940;

was on

military leave in 1943-44, and during the interim was appointed principal of Mission High School. In 1945 he was appointed coordinator of secondary education with offices in the Central Administration Building, and in July 1949 was elevated to the City College presidency. Commenting on the organization and purpose of the City College, Mr. Conlan said: "Its philosophy, organization, and personnel equip the College to serve the educational and vocational needs of men and women students in the presentation of semi-professional courses of

Dr. Lynn T. White, Jr., president of Mills College, will speak on Education for Catastrophe on Thursday, September 22, at 8:00 p.m.,

Church, Franklin and Admission free.

at the First Unitarian

Geary

New

Streets.

Elementary Teachers

and long-term subare entering the San Francisco Elementary Division this term are directed to attend the Orientation Course on Wednesdays at the Sanchez School. The first meeting will be held on Wednesday, September 21, at 4:00 p.m. All probationary teachers

stitutes

who





SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin is

issued weekly during the school year

from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, September 19 Physicians will visit the following schools: Raphael Weill H.C., Balboa, George Washington, Marina, Ridgepoint Site 1, Jean Parker,

Twin

Peaks. 4:00 p.m. Meeting of the Governing Council of the Teachers' Association of San Fran-

cisco.



Auditorium, 101 Grove Street.

Tuesday, September 20 Physicians will visit the following schools: Presidio, Lowell, Francisco, Ridgepoint Site 3, Commodore Stockton N.S., Sheridan, Visitacion Annex, Emerson SSC.

Wednesday, September 21 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Mission, Girls High, James Lick, Candlestick, Hawthorne, Excelsior, John Muir,

Emerson.

Thursday, September 22 Physicians will visit the following schools: Hancock H, Polytechnic, Aptos, Washington Irving, Dudley Stone, Sarah B. Cooper. Friday, September 23 Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Everett, Burnett, Commodore Stockton, Guadalupe, Golden Gate.

This course will include lectures and demoncovering the advances made in the various fields of biology during the past ten or fifteen years. Each field will be covered by a specialist in his particular field. The following lecture topics will be considered: strations

Dr. Sanford Elberg Dr. Agnes Fay Morgan Hormones Dr. Howard Bern Parasitology Dr. Harold Kirby Protozoology and Classification Dr. Harold Kirby Virus Dr. Jacob Fong Biological Aspects of Cancer Dr. Morgan Harris Embryology and Experimental Embryology Dr. Richard Eakin Photosynthesis Dr. Melvin Calvin Induced Mutations Dr. Curt Stern Evolution Dr. Curt Stern Eugenics Dr. Curt Stern Bloodfactors Dr. Curt Stern Sex Education in High Schools Dr. Alex Sherriffs Antibodies, Antigens, Allergies

Vitamins

The prerequisites of this course are junior standing or the equivalent and eight units of credit in zoology.

The course as now planned comprises fifteen regular sessions: the first for the purpose of organization, followed by fourteen lecture-anddemonstration meetings. For those desiring the two units of credit, an extra meeting will be provided for the final examination. Note that the units are upper division. The class will meet on Tuesdays beginning January 18, 1950, from 7 to 9 o'clock in the evening, on the University campus at Berkeley. The fee is $20. Time will be arranged so that ques-



Jewelry, Advanced. Jointly sponsored San Francisco State College and San Francisco Unified School District.

For secondary art and 7th and 8th grade elementary teachers.

The content

of this course will include the fabrication of jewelry, the setting of stones of special cuts, and

other advanced problems. Appropriateness of material to use. One of the early meetings will be devoted to a talk on stones of special cut to fit specific designs.

These are especially adaptable to modern pieces. Guest speaker, Francis Sperisn, expert in designing stones for jewelry.

Edward Fourtane, Instructor. 2 semester units. Wednesday 4-6 p.m., starting September 21. Room 326, Marina Junior High School. Registration to 20. Enrollment through Miss Ruth McNitt, UN 3-4680 Extension 221. Art 377a Weaving, Beginning, for secondary art and 7th and 8th grade elementary teachers. An introductory course which will include lectures, demonstrations, and class projects in the basic principles of weaving. Setting up of looms, cutting warps, and actual weaving by each student. Also, design in color, texture, and space related to weaving. All processes will be simplified for the teaching of children. Mrs. Katherine Geary, Instructor. 2 semester units.



Thursday 4-6 p.m., School,

C. Extension.

tions

Art Courses Offered Art 372b

Course for Science Teachers "Recent Advances in Biology" X-104AB, U.

Room

19.

starting

September

Registration

through Miss Ruth McNitt,

UN

Sanchez Enrollment 3-4680, Extension

to

18.

22.

may

be asked of the speakers.

Important:

Because of the cost involved in giving a course of this type registration must be known by October

1,

1949. If the course of students

imum number

Write immediately to

is

to be given, a

min-

must be guaranteed. M. Van Waynen, presi-

dent, California Science Teachers Association N.S., Berkeley High School, Berkeley California.

Teachers desiring to take the course are requested to so state and the university will fol-

low up.

Luncheon for College Women The San Francisco Branch, American Association of University Women, will hold its opening luncheon in the North Room of the Women's City Club on Saturday, September 24, at 12:30.

A

cordial invitation

is

extended to

all

college

women among

the certificated and noncertificated personnel of the School Department. An original program will be presented by Mrs. Carol Green Wilson, author and traveller. Reservations

may

Dolores

be

St.,

are $1.75.

made with Mrs. E. W. Ayer, 161 MArket 1-1154. Luncheon tickets

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Charles C. Danforth, Retired Principal, Passes the School

in

Department

the death of Charles C. Danforth, retired principal of Girls High School, who passed

nil of

away on May

21.

Year of Birth

and school advisors to inauguGreen Pennant Safety

rate the third year of the

will be held at Everett Junior High School on Friday afternoon, September 23j at 1 :30 p.m.

DATE OF

Campaign

Jan. Feb.

Mar.

the various schools.

June

because of illness. He served the school faith-

should

and well, carrying on its high stan-

new

scholarship

of

citizenship.

becoming

to

principal of Girls H 'S h Mr Danforth Charles C. Danforth was a member or the teaching staffs of Oakland Technical High and Lowell High in San Francisco, where he taught mathematics. For a number of years he was principal of Hamilton Junior High School, and before serving at Girls High he was a member of the teaching staff" at Mt. Vernon High School -

-

,

York.

The "Dedication" in the 1928 "Journal" issued by Girls High School, gives an excellent picture of the man: "He has listened to us in silence and judged

He

has given us an ideal of justice. He has worked diligently to give us every educational advantage. He has fostered our school activities and recreations. Therefore, in sincere appreciation of all his work for Girls High, we dedicate this book, "The Journal" of December, 1928, to Charles C. Danforth, our Principal."

The meeting

will also

July

All schools, as of the opening of the semester,

the

now be

flying the

Green Pennant below

American Flag on the school

flag-pole.

The

period for accumulation of accident-free days began on September 7, and a sixty-day accident-free period from that date will entitle a school to a new gold star.

1

Sept.

1

Oct.

1

Nov.

1

Dec.

Miss Mary A. Coglin, a member of the teaching staff of San Francisco's Continuation School,

who provided a "home away from Home"

for the

an estimated 100,000 servicemen during war, received the Navy's highest civilian award last Thursday. Miss Coglin was presented the Navy distinguished Public Service Award by Rear Admiral

Lynde D. McComiick, USN, Commandant

of

With a group of friends, Miss Coghlin organized and opened one of the first servicemen's dormitories in San Francisco. Called the "Harbor Club," the dormitory was opened at 32 Clay Street in early 1943, and remained in operation

pals

and

assistant principals this

summer. is making

A.C.E.. all

interested edu-

cators.

courses, "Physical Education in the Ele-

3-4680.

Miss Ruth McNitt,

UN

4

6-6

;-ti

30...

1

65

to

May

31..

1

6-4

7-5 /-4

a 5 a 4

to

June

-:l

(..:)

31....

-2

6-2

l-'l

a S a 1

Ill-V

1

1-2

SI

•1

6-1

l-\

a

1

9-1

10-1

11-1

12-1

-0 -11

6-0

7-11

H

1)

9-0

10-11

I

5-11 5-101

J

i-9

b-11 6-1C b-9

7

-In

July

1

30...

Aug

to

to Sept. 31. lo Oct. 31. to to

No*

H

Dec. 31

....

Functional Capacity

M

7

1

1

II!

7-9

10-4 10-S

11-8 11-7 11-6 11-5 11-4 11-3

•>-/

1-0

19Jb" 1935

.

13-8 13-7 3-6 13-5 13-4 13-3 13-2 13-1 I

1

12-0

|

!

Mil

1934 1933 15-8 15-7 15-6 15-5 15-4

14-E 14-7

14-6 14-5

14-4 14-3 14-2 14-1

I

!

15-3

15-2

I

15-1

|

16-8 16-7 16-6 16-5 16-4 16-3 16-2 16-1

14-0 15-0 [6-0 12-11 13-11 14-11 15-11 13-1)

8-11

9-11

lu-11

B-ll

9-1(1

8-9

9-9

10-10 ll-IOi 12-10 13-10 14-10 15-10 10-9 11-9 12-9 13-9 14-9 15-9

I

!

Locate the day of the pupil's birth in the Date of Birth column at the Find the Year of Birth at the top. The pupil's age in years and months be found in the space where the two columns meet.

left.

will

DATE OF BIRTH

CHRONOLOGICAL AGE

June 15, 1939 February 6, 1943

10 years, 3 months 6 years, 7 months

Meeting of P.S.A.L. Teachers

A

Code

For the information of principals and teachprinted below is the Functional Capacity Code of the San Francisco Department of Public Health, Bureau of Child Hygiene, School

ers,

To Elementary-School You

No

Class I

Competitive or Equally Strenuous Activi-

new booklets, the Public School."

Instructions for distributing the booklets: 1.

N.R. Unrestricted.

Principals:

will receive shortly the

"Your Child Enters

Diagnostic Center:

Examples Light Apparatus Work Ballroom Dancing 3. Horseshoes - Marching - Swimming Class II Postural Exercises and Games of Slight Ac1.

2.

Only*

tivity

ten

Send at once to all homes of kindergarand low first grade children. Send home

with the children.

Limber up

b.

Stretching, etc.

meeting of P.S.A.L. teachers will be held on Monday, September 26, at 3:45 p.m. in Room 207, 750 Eddy Street.

a. b. c.

After this term, the books will be dishomes of only the first grade and kindergarten children who are entering the school for the first time.

of Slight Activity



Group Singing Singing Games (If not too strenuous) Ball Passing Free Gymnastics -

•To drop out



if tired.

Class III Complete Rest.

NO

ACTIVITIES

WHATSOEVER

classification.

Certain activities, such as baseball, may be permitted on an individual basis at the discretion of the examining physician. He will also decide when ihe use of wind instruments is contra-indicated.

Notations on the above exceptions will be srnt to the proper office to be placed on the students' school health records. activities

cations except N.R.

4. The principal should feel free to use extra books for any public relations purposes that seem advisable. More copies may be

Eddy Street. The Elementary Department

ordered from 750

is most gratecommittee which worked last semester in getting the copy of this book ready for press. The committee members were: Mary McCarthy, Margaret Buckley, Alberta Galley, Fanny Carter, Marion Gay, Marie Gliddon, Martha Goldberg, Janet Greeley, Jean Hiden, Virginia Kent, Evelyn Levinson, Belle Mclntyre, Norecn Noonan, Lucille Schmidt, Doris Sinclair, Edith Van Orden, Helen Walsh, Barbara Wisecarver.

ful to the

Children placed in Class III should not be required to take other class work and should not be used for errands or other school activities which require physical effort beyond capacity permitted in this

R.O.T.C.

children.

tributed to the

Postural Exercises

Games

2. In the case of a first-grade room that has both low and high first-grade children, it may be less complicating for the teacher to send the books to the homes of both low and high

3.

a.

2.

the display for the perusal of

call

31.

Apr.

EXAMPLES:

Books on Display

The San Francisco Branch

For registration

Mar.

to

to

10-8 10-7 10-6 10-5

19:17

12-7 12-6 12-5 12-4 12-3 12-2

Examples

750 Eddy Street. This is the material referred to by Wm. Dela Perry Gilette during the workshop for princi-

40.

7-7

end of the war.

Saturday mornings, beginning September 17. Miss Hartwell will be available to discuss in-

5-6-7-8" will each be limited to enrollment of

i,.7

19401 J939J 1938 9-8 9-7 9-6 H-5 9-4 i-n

ties.

the Twelfth Naval District.

Starting today, Monday, September 19, there will be a display of books and publications of the Association for Childhood Education International at the Teachers' Professional Library,

mentary Schools, Kindegarten-3rd Grade" and "Physical Education in Elementary Schools, 4-

to Feb. 28....

-1

l

8-8 8 7 8 6

Teacher Receives Award

a comprehensive course in design for teachers. In this will be featured a series of approaches to creative work in various fields of design as well as a series of approaches for teaching design.

The

/-«

INSTRUCTIONS:

1.

Courses Limited

1942' 1941

6.8

Safety Campaign is sponsored by the San Francisco Call-Bulletin as a public service.

Design Course Available

dividual interests in the fields of design or personally to answer questions.

M*»3

•8

to

1

Aug.

1'ttl

The Green Pennant

until the

Marian Hartwell School of Design announces

1

BIKIII

to Jan. 31

1

from 1926 to 1941, at which time he retired

1

in P.E.

1

1

Prior

Enrollment

1

May

and

impartially.

Bureau of Research patrol cap-

1

dards

Age Table

September 15, 1949

Apr.

fully

New

tains, lieutenants

Chronological

be attended by members of Parent-Teacher Association units from

Mr. Danforth was principal of Girls High

in

Green Pennant Rally at Everett September 23 A city-wide rally of school safety

HAROLD

SPEARS.

Assistant Superintendent. are excluded from

all

classifi-

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETI

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN "A"

Junior Varsity

Geographic School Bulletins

Triple

Resume

Football Schedule Game Dale Sept. IP— Polvicchnic-St.

Publication

National Geographic Society announces will resume publication of the Geotli.it it graphic School Bulletins this fall. The 1949-50 II,,

volume

The

begin with the October 3 issue. Society's School Service Division which "ill

10 years has prepared the Bulletins and in Foi other ways aided teachers in the teaching of scographv and related subjects, looks back with pride on three decades of service to American

education.

This war. as usual, each of the 30 weekly and seven illustrations or maps. Nearly 35,000 teachers used the Bulletins last year for accurate, up-to-date

issues will contain five articles

material on places, peoples, industries, commodities, natkma boundary and government ntific developments in the changes, and s 1

news.

The publication is one of the National Geographic Society's leading educational features. U is. in fact, a gift to education by the Society's 1.850.000 members. The twenty-five cent subscription fee merely covers the mailing and handling charges. Other costs are borne by the Society's educational fund.

A

large staff of able researchers of the Society keeping abreast of fast-moving world events.

is

All the resulting material, carefully filed,

forms

— 1949



Field

1

Beach Chalet

1

Calilco

1

Balhoa ....St.

St.

Beach Chalet Galileo

Balboa

— 5—

Beach Chalet Beach Chalet Washington Beach Chalet

6—

St.

Galileo

Beach Chalet

draw material for teachers and students throughout the school year.



....Commerce Balboa St. Ignatius

Beach Chalet Washington Balboa

— — — —

Commerce Beach Chalet St. Ignatius

well-Galileo

Nov. 9 Mission-St. Ignatius Nov. 9 Washin^ton-Comnurce Nov. 10— Polytechnic-Balboa

St.



The demand

for such news-background service originated during the first World War when newspapers urged the National Geographic Society to

make

available up-to-the-minute geo-

graphic data.

Many

requests for this material, illustrated

with geographic photographs and maps, then came from teachers. The Society agreed to defray the cost of preparing and printing the data in a form suitable for classroom use. The U. S. Office of Education distributed it under government frank. Thus, in 1919, the Society inaugurated the Geographic School Bulletins.

The demand

for the Bulletins soon overtaxed the mailing facilities of the Office of Education. Educators suggested that, rather than suspend distribution of the publication, the Society mail jt directly to teachers who would pay the mail-

ing costs. Since 1921 this procedure has been followed. Now. upon payment of 25 cents, any accredited teacher, librarian, or advanced student in the United States or its possessions may subscribe. Teachers may also obtain subscriptions for their pupils if copies arc mailed in bulk to

one add~ess.

Within the past year the Bulletins have touched upon s «ch subjects as countries of every continent, with fparate treatment of government changes; news-highlighted areas, such as

cities, rivers,

railroads,

subjects;

1

1

C

Ridgepoint

James

Li< k Jr.

#4

High

Pacific Heights (night)

Argonne

106 Janitor

be held open for a period emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Requests for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

These vacancies

will

of fifteen days except

in case of

Commerce Beach Chalet Balboa

Galileo Ignatius

Washington Balboa

a rich reservoir of information from which the editors of the Bulletins

Hancock

106 Janitor

St. Ignatius

— —



Ignatius

Beach Chalet

— — —

— Nov. 8— Lo

Ignatius

C

C101-1 Janitress C101-1 Janitress C 106 Janitor

.Commerce

Ignatius-Lowell Mission-Sacred Heart Lincoln-Galileo Oct. 3— Bnlboa-Saered Heart Polvtechnic-Mission Oct. 4 Lowell-Lincoln Oct. Washineton-Galileo Oct. Oct. 10—Lineoln-Missi.m Oct. 1 1— Balboa-St. Lsnatii.s Oct. 11— Washington-Sacred Heart Galileo-Commerce Oct. 13 Polytechnic-Lowell Oct. 14 Washington-St. Ignatius Oct. 17 Oct. 18 Sacred Hcart-Cmnineree Polytechnic-Lincoln Oct. 19 Oct. 20—Balboa-Galileo Commerce-Mission Oct. 24 Oct. 25—Lowell-Balboa Oct. 26— Galilco-St. Ignatius Oct. 26— Polytechnic-Sacred Heart Washington-Lincoln Oct. 27 Nov. I Balboa-Mission Nov. 2 Lincoln-Commerce Nov. 3 Lowell-Washirmtun Nov. 4 Sacred Hcart-St. Ignatius

— —

Theme for the 22nd annual Standard School Broadcast course in music-enjoyment, to Inbroadcast over 58 western stations beginning September 30, will be "A Music-Map til America." Correlating American music with American history, geography, art, literature and folklore, the course will use song and ballad to trace the nation's growth.

Commerce

Galileo-Sacred

Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. 28 Sept. 29

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System:

Beach Chalet

Ignatius

Heart — 23— Balboa-Lincoln 26—Polytechnic-Commerce 27— 22

Standard School Broadcast

torial

Commerce-Lowell Srpt. 20 Srpt. 21— Mission-Washincion -»ept.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

mountains, and islands; aviation,

and other newsworthy transportation industries and commodities in the

Opera Guild Presentations The San Francisco Opera Guild

will

again

present two opera matinees for students. The Opera Faust by Gounod will be given on Thursday afternoons, October 6 and 13, beginning nl 1:00 p.m.

KALW

will broadcast the co—p!etc Station opera with narration on t'.ie FM Conceit Pro-

gram from 12:30

p.m., to 1:00 p.m., daily.

Reservation blanks for tickets have been sent to schools. Those desiring more than the allotted number may send in a supplementary request. This may also be done by schools which have not been sent reservation blanks. In case of under-subscription such schools will be given as

many

tickets as are available.

news.

The terial

writers of the Bulletins collect their

from such sources

ma-

Classification Reports

Due September 19

as the travel experience

Geographic's library of geographic reference

Four copies of the elementary school classification report are due in the office of the Bureau of Personnel, third floor, 93 Grove Street, on

books and

September

of National Geographic staff

men; the National

maps; stories published in the National Geographic Magazine; and Government bureaus, scientific institutions,

its

collection of detailed

and available

specialists

geographic information

— sources

which an individual

Bulletins are illustrated

from the So-

300,000 photographs, obtained at the cost of years of arduous travel and some-

ciety's files of

times at the risk of

In fine with

life.

purpose of increasing and diffusing geographic knowledge, the National Geographic Society has sent expeditions to exits

plore remote parts of the world and

realms of science.

unknown

Geographic School Bulletins are a further expression of the same purpose, helping the youth of America to understand geographic factors that touch their lives. Its

Study Conference at Asilomar

Historical background for each program, together with suggested music and literature correlations, are contained in the 1949-50 Standard School Broadcast Teacher's Manual. To further aid the classroom teacher in following the course, a full-color America (28" x 42")

pictorial

also

Music-Map

of

available for each of the Manual. An-

is

educator requesting a copy

nouncements of the course, containing request cards for the supplementary materials have been mailed to principals of all western schools by Standard Oil Company of California, sponsors of the program. Additional requests should be addressed to Standard School Broadcast, 225 Bush Street, San Francisco 20, California.

The Standard School Broadcast Orchestra year will be conducted by Carmen Dragon,

music educator and motion picture Academy

Award Winner. Also

featured will be special guest artists and the Broadcast's original characters, headed by Jack-of-All-Tunes, Clancy Hayes.

Prominent California educators again will serve on the Standard School Broadcast Advisory Board. Recent national recognition for the program include the Institute for Education by Radio's first award for intermediate musiceducation programs, and a special citation from the National Federation of

Music Clubs.

The

California Associations for Nursery Education have announced a Study Conference to be held at Asilomar, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, September 23, 24 and 25.

The

general theme of the conference, designated to aid and interest teachers in nursery education and child care is "Teachers and Parents Learn." Dr. {Catherine Whiteside Taylor, director, Family Life Education, Long Beach Public Schools, will speak at the introductory general session, and Dr. Glen E. Barnett, associate professor of education, University of California will conclude the discussion at the final session of the conference. Small discussion groups led by other well known leaders in nursery and family life education will make up the rest of the three day program.

^

this

of

teacher could not tap in several lifetimes.

The

19.

To assure clear reception of the program in every school in California, the School Broadcast will be carried over 7 new stations in addition to NBC outlets airing it in previous years It will be heard Friday, 10-10:30 a.m., PT over NBC, and at other times prescribed as convenient lo schools over the new stations.

"Rooms The Rooms

Thome

in

Miniature"

first

Western

showing of American

Miniature by Mrs. James Ward opened at the California Palace of the in

Legion of Honor September the last tour of the

1.

This also marks

Thome Rooms,

pean groups were shown two previous occasions.

in

whose Euro-

San Francisco

on

The American interiors include 37 units, reconstructing rooms intimately connected with the lives of famous Americans, such as Washington,

Thomas

Jefferson

and Andrew

Jackson.

;



f&&TCl*l&l4C>0' J

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

<'?'-(

No. 4

SEPTEMBER

26, 1949

Heart Symposium Set October 12-15

Students to Visit Centennial Schoofhouse

for

San Francisco's elementary school children from the third through the sixth grades will learn about California's pioneer days by means of one-day "field trips" to historic Portsmouth Plaza's "Days of '49" exhibits and re-created famous buildings of early San Francisco, Her-

The Twentieth Annual Postgraduate Symposium on Heart Disease will be held at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on October 12, 13, 14 and 15 under the sponsorship of the Heart Division of the San Francisco Tubercu-

superintendent of schools an-

Three distinguished guest speakers will be Dr. William Dock, professor of medicine, Long

Arrangements for the unique "classroom" were worked out by Dr. Clish in cooperation with Edward D. Keil, president of the San Francisco Centennial Committee, which sponsored erection of the replica buildings and exhibits in Portsmouth Plaza. First class was held on Friday morning, September 23, and present plans call for two classes each weekday, in the morning and afternoon.

Island College of Medicine, Brooklyn, New York; Dr. Myron Prinzmetal, senior attending physician and director of Beaumont Laboratory for Cardiovascular Disease, Cedars of Lebanon Hospital, Los Angeles, and Dr. Arnold R. Rich, professor of pathology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.



bert C.

Clish,

nounced.

Each class will first visit the re-created "Dr. Robinson's Dramatic Museum" where a film on early-day San Francisco will be shown. The children will then study the historical paintings hanging in the museum and hear a talk by Edward V. Borup, a San Francisco grade school teacher assigned by the Board of Education to the Portsmouth Plaza history project. Many pieces from the De Young Museum will be displayed.

From

the Dramatic

Museum,

the children

be guided to the "Old Custom House" where many dioramas depicting famous scenes in California and San Francisco history are on display. The dioramas were last displayed at the World's Fair on Treasure Island. Borup will give a short talk on each diorama, explaining its

background

to the children.

Third, the last building to be visited by the touring "field class" will be a re-creation of a schoolhouse of the period of 1849 complete with round-bellied stove and old fashioned desks. Seated on long rows of stiff -backed benches, today's youngsters will hear about the days



when

California first started growing into today's mighty State. And, they will have an op-

portunity to compare today's modern school buildings and equipment with the quill pen era.

Dr. Clish states it will take many months for the elementary school classes to participate in the program, on a rotating basis but eventually all the three-to-sixth graders will have had all

Association.

The symposium will open at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning, October 12, with courses in Electrocardiography. Participants will be Doctors Francis L. Chamberlain, Francis Rochex, John J. Sampson, Robert L. Smith, Jr., Maurice Sokolow and Clarence M. Tinsley.

Committee Extends Invitation The Superintendent is in receipt of the following communication from Edward T. Mancuso,

honorary chairman, of the forthcoming

Columbus Day Celebration:

will

historical

losis



"On behalf of the Citizens' Committee for the celebration of the landing of Columbus, appointed by Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, we are this year having a special program of music and entertainment. "In addition to the usual celebration,

it is

the

unanimous opinion of the committee that the children of the schools of San Francisco would be interested in viewing this musical and historical pageant, which depicts the discovery of America.

"We ask your cooperation in urging all school children to attend this 457th Anniversary which will be held at Aquatic Park, on Sunday, October 9, at 1:00 p.m. The celebration should be over by 4:30 or 5:00 p.m., and we urge also that the parents attend." an opportunity to visit Portsmouth Plaza and view the many historical landmarks, including the Robert Louis Stevenson statue and the Vigilante's Bell.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN "Honor High Schools" Named The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin is

issued weekly during the school year from the

Office of the Superintendent of Schools

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

Ernest

J.

Cummings,

assistant superintendent is in receipt of

in charge of secondary schools,

the following communication from Leroy B. Wilson, Lt. Colonel, Infantry, P.M.S. & T., designating "honor high schools" in San Francisco:

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

"We have just received Department of the Army Bulletin 24, which designates the "honor

Monday, September 26

high schools" among all of the secondary institutions in the country maintaining Junior RO-

the following schools: Monroe HC, James Denman, Mission, Roosevelt, Bret Harte, Jean Parker, Emerson, Lincoln,

Physicians

Raphael

will

visit

Weill.

—Regular

meeting. San Francisco Local 61. Room 226, Teachers, Federation of Mission High School. 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 27

Wednesday, September 28 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Roosevelt, George Washington, Marina, Franklin H., Starr King, John Muir.

Thursday, September 29 the following

units.

"I am sure that you will be pleased to know that six of the eight San Francisco High Schools have been named as "honor high schools" for the academic year 1949 in recognition of the

high standard of military training and discipline which has been attained by the ROTC unit at those schools.

the following schools: Physicians will Laguna Honda HC, Abraham Lincoln, Francisco, Fremont, Alta Vista, Daniel Webster, Pacific Heights, Dudley Stone, Jean Parker. visit

Physicians will visit Lowell, Balboa, Horace

TC

schools:

Mann, Washington IrvDudley Stone (Tox), Fairmount, Sunnydale NS. Friday, September 30

ing,

Physicians will visit the following schools: Portola, James Denman, Ridgepoint Site 2, Golden Gate, Jefferson, Marshall, Andrew Jack-

A collection of approximately 150 dolls will be shown in Macy's of San Francisco Auditorium beginning Tuesday, October 18 through Saturday, October 22. These dolls are from the collection of Mrs. Irene Nagy and will include a bridal party group of 9 dolls, the bride being 37" tall; a doll formerly owned by Sarah Bernhardt; several mechanical dolls, one that plays a piano; and many fine examples of very old dolls dressed in their appropriate period costumes. Others include dolls of all nations; a baby doll made in the likeness of the infant Kaiser Wilhelm and many

A

others.

door prize of a doll from Mrs. Nagy's collection will be given away and the winner will be announced in the Shopping News October 26. Tickets are 30^ for children under twelve years of age, 50(£ for adults and may be secured at the door. The proceeds of this showing will be given to Guide Dogs for the Blind, Inc.

six

schools officially desig-

Abraham Lincoln High School Balboa High School George Washington High School Lowell High School Mission High School Polytechnic High School."

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

1 1

1

C C C

Working Foreman Janitor 106 Janitor—Double Rock 106 Janitor Junipero Serra 106.1

—Balboa



will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even

These vacancies

may be temporarily be applied for under the seniority rule. Requests for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66 A, 916 Ortega Street. though these filled,

Exhibit of Dolls at Macy's

The

nated as "honor high schools" are:

they

positions

may

Local 61 to

still

Meet Today

The regular meeting of the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61, will be held today, Monday, September 26, at 4:00 p.m., in Room 226, Mission High School. The order of business will include election of a president. State College Offers Course

San Francisco State College announces the following course:



Educ. 265 Seminar in Counseling in Guidance (2 or 3 units,) Wednesday evenings, 7-9. First session: October 5 (room to be announced that evening.) Instructor: H. C. Lindgren. The course is given by the extension division. Fee: $6.00 per unit.

:

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN State Proposition No.

Sierra

1

The Board of Education at its meeting of August 23 adopted the following resolution relative State Proposition No. 1 (calling for issuance of a $250,000,000 state school bond appropriation for school building purposes )

WHEREAS

a constitutional amendment, as Proposition 1, will be submitted to

known

the voters of California on November 8, 1949, which said amendment proposes that the state will

bond

provide

the sum of $250,000,000, to school housing facilities for

itself in

minimum

school districts which have

up

to their legal

bonding

to solve their acute side aid,

bonded themselves and are unable

limit

housing needs without out-

and

WHEREAS

several

hundred thousand

chil-

dren of our State are denied adequate or decent educational opportunities by being forced to attend classes in makeshift rooms or in substandard buildings or are crowded into classrooms in numbers far larger than is universally considered safe or desirable or who have had their educational opportunities rationed on a half

day

basis,

WHEREAS

and all

children of the State are en-

adequate education and present conditions are such that some local communities in which they live have not at the present time adequate resources to provide even the minimum school housing necessary without State titled to

assistance,

and

WHEREAS

the financial aid to be provided

measure is required to be repaid to the State by the districts receiving such aid to the extent of their ability to pay and therefore

under

this

community the basic responproviding free public school oppor-

retain in the local sibility for

tunity,

THEREFORE BE

IT

RESOLVED

that the

of Education of the San Francisco Unified School District endorses Proposition 1 as essential to the welfare of the State in that it seeks to guarantee to the boys and girls of Cali-

Board

American educational birthright of and equal opportunity to an education, and we hereby urge the citizens of San Francisco to support and work for the passage of this very worthy amendment at the Election,

fornia their

a

full

November

8,

1949.

Test Results Due Because of the short first week of school the majority of schools delayed their testing program until the third week. As in the past, test results are due at the Bureau of Research three weeks after the date of administration. It is hoped, however, that the results of the tests are functioning in the improvement of instruction in the classrooms before the final records are prepared for permanent files.

Club Resumes Programs

The San Francisco Bay Chapter of Sierra Club will present its first fall program on Thursday evening, September

29, at 8:00 p.m., Everett Junior High The program will feature a photographic review of the Club's summer outing

the School.

in

auditorium

of

activities.

The Club summer into

sponsors varied pack trips each the high Sierra, where members may explore and enjoy the mountain regions, thus furthering the interests of conservation. The photochromes presented on this program are selected and edited from the summer's production of some of the Club's many fine photographers.

Anyone interested in the activities and purposes of the Sierra Club is welcome to attend this

program.

Return of Material Rec'd Reports During the past 10 days more than 200 requests have come to the Division of Supplies from the Purchasing Department for the return of Material Received Reports (M.R.R.). This means that materials have been delivered by vendors directly to the schools and the delivery has not yet been reported. Vendors cannot be paid until these reports are turned in. The frequent long delays between the time deliveries are made and payment is received is beyond all question the greatest source of dissatisfaction vendors have with the department. Principals will be doing the School Departservice if they will insist that Material Received Reports are checked frequently

ment a great

and returned promptly. If in doubt about the proper procedure cessing these reports please call Mrs. fin

at the

Board

of Education,

in pro-

Edna

Grif-

UNderhill 3-

4680, Extension 298.

Delivery Crates

Needed

The warehouse,

in

making

deliveries to the

schools, frequently packs small items in collapsible wooden crates. These crates are frequently

the schools with the understanding that the materials will be uncrated and checked and the crates returned. During the past months schools have not been returning these crates.

left at

Principals are requested to have a check made number on hand in their schools and noti-

of the

fy the Division of Supplies so they can be picked up.

Unless such notification is received and the crates returned it will be necessary to charge them to the schools' budgets for instructional supplies.

The

present cost on these crates

proximately $6.25 each.

is

ap-

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

TABLE FOR USE IN RECORDING ABSENCE* 1949-50 San Francisco Unified School District Bureau of Research

KINDERGARTEN

KINDERGARTEN &

140

180 Minute

150 Minute

Column A: Find the pupil's time in actual attendance in school. Column B: Enter in the register the corresponding percentage of

A

B

1

133

120- 126 113- 119

10% 15%

106- 112 99- 105 92- 98 85- 91 78- 84

20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

134- 140 127

-

7164575043-

77

70 63 56 49

362922158-

42 35 28

-

7

1

21 14

0% 0% 5%

Over 180 172163154145-

180 171 162 153

136- 144

127-135 118- 126 109- 117 100- 108

45% 50% 55% 60% 65%

91

70% 75% 80% 85% 90%

463728-

54 45 36

1910-

27 18

-

99

82- 90 73- 81 64- 72 55- 63

95%

240 Minute Apportionment Day

B

B

181- 190

0% 0% 5%

180 170

10% 15%

20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

151- 160 141- 150

111

-

120

45% 50% 55% 60% 65%

101

-

110

61-

70% 75% 80% 85% 90%

51 41 31

Over 200 191 -200

10% 15%

171 161

-

131

-

-

-

240

217-228 205-216 204

20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

181

-

192

121- 132 109- 120

70

45% 50% 55% 60% 65%

60 50 40 30 20

70% 75% 80% 85% 90%

61- 72 49- 60 37- 48

95%

12

140

91-100 81

229

-

121- 130

90

71-80

21 11

10

100%

0% 0% 5%

Over 240

193

95%

9

100%

GRADES 4-12

3

absence.

B

0% 0% 5%

Over 140

1 -

200 Minute Apportionment Day

Session

Sessions

GRADES

10% 15%

20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

169- 180 157- 168 145- 156

133-144

45% 50% 55% 60% 65%

97- 108 85- 96 73- 84

2513-

70% 75% 80% 85% 90%

36 24

95% 100%

100%

of actual attendance in school shown in the above table shall include recesses in kindergarten but shall not include recesses in elementary grades nor noon intermissions in either kindergarten or

*The minutes

elementary grades.

News Items Requested The Music Department

Contractural Services will

issue

its

Fall

Music Bulletin in the near future. Principals and special music teachers in all schools are requested to send in news-worthy items concerning their activities and plans to Nelle Griffis, 750

Eddy

Street,

who

will act as editor of this issue.

Principals are reminded that copies of the contracts for school garbage removal and window cleaning services were mailed to all schools at the beginning of the Fall term. The contracts specified the number of services each school

would

receive.

The

Parliamentary Procedure Class Teachers are invited to enroll in the new class, which will open Marina Junior High School, Chestnut and

Physical Properties Division would appreciate immediate notice of the failure of the contractors to comply with the agreements.

Parliamentary Procedure at

Monday

In

Memoriam

evening, Septem-

MISS ETHEL O'BRIEN

ber 26, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. This instruction,

General Clerk-Stenographer Continuation School August 14, 1949

Fillmore Streets, on

which

is

offered

by Marina Adult School,

be particularly helpful to teachers tive

in

professional

who

organizations

groups, as well as to those

who

will

are ac-

and

club

are responsible

for student organizations in their schools. Mrs.

Helen Beanston, parliamentarian, San Francisco Second District, California Congress of Parents and Teachers, will conduct the class.

FELIX



McHUGH



Working Foreman Janitor Lowell High August 31, 1949

JOHN DEVINCENZI



Argonne School September 11, 1949

Janitor

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

OCTOBER

No. 5

Municipal Theatre Announces

San Francisco Chapter, CIEA

Presentations for 1949-50 The San Francisco Municipal Theatre

Announces

announces that the following plays are scheduled for the 1949-50 season in the Marina Auditorium, Bay and Fillmore Streets:

Opening October 6 with "Strange BedfelBroadway success by Florence Ryerson and Colin Clements, the 1949-50 lows", sophisticated

season will include: "The Glass Menagerie", by Tennessee Williams to open November 3, 1949; to open December 1, A Christmas Play





Fall

1949

3,

Program

Inaugurating its new Fall Program with a Ladies' Night Program, Monday, October 10, at 6:00 p.m., at City College, the San Francisco California Industrial Education Association issues an invitation to all those interested or teaching in the field of Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. Administrators are especially invited. Joseph M. Trickett, vice-president of Golden

Gate College and dean

of the school of

Man-

agement, will be the principal speaker. Taking

New Demands Upon

1949;

as his subject "Industry's

"Amphitryon 38", by Jean Giradoux, adapted by S. N. Behrman to open January 19, 1950; "Tale of Two Cities", from the novel by Charles Dickens to open March 16, 1950; "Arms and the Man", by George Bernard Shaw to open June 1, 1950; "Another Part of the Forest", by Lillian Hellman to open July 13, 1950.

Trickett brings to bear his practical background and experience. A question period follows the talk for those who would express their own convictions or gain further





— —

In addition, the prize-winning entry in the state-wide $500 play contest currently being

conducted by the Municipal Theatre will be presented by the group beginning April 27, 1950.

Each play

forthcoming season will be scheduled for Thursday, Friday and Saturday of the

evenings of three consecutive weeks. established three of Education as part of

years ago by the Board its adult education program. Beginning with dramatic school and "workshop" plays, the nonprofit organization rapidly developed and expanded to the presentation of major theatrical productions. Try-outs for parts in major plays are open to the general public. of the

Board of Directors of the San

Francisco Municipal Theatre are: Mrs. Swinerton Mills, Joseph J. Geary, George Johns, Mrs. Carl Livingston, Dan E. London, Mrs. Louis Macouillard, Mrs. Eugene M. Prince, Antonio

Sotomayor and

F.

Cowles Strickland.

Members of the Board of Sponsors include: W. W. Crocker, Gardner A. Dailey, L. M. Giannini, Richard B. Gump, Robert B. Howard, Clarence R. Lindner, Garrett McEnerney II, Pierre

Monteux, Paul Verdier, Michel

Mesdames John Jr.,

Mortimer

Dean

insight.

In addition, items of entertainment and play are planned.

Weill,

L. Bradley, Charles deY. Elkus, Fleishhacker, Jr., Richard B.

dis-

Reservations may be made with Harry M. Krytzer, 750 Eddy Street, phone UNderhill 34680, Ext. 223.

Schedule of Report Card Dates

The following schedule of report card dates has been approved for the School Year 1949-50: October 14

The Municipal Theatre was

Members

Education,"

December February

March

May

2 2

17

First reporting period

Second reporting period Third reporting period Fourth reporting period Fifth reporting period

5

June 16

Sixth reporting period

A. Haas, Thomas Carr Howe, Chauncey McKeever, George A. Pope, Stanley H. Sinton, Jr., Nion R. Tucker, Wm. R. Wallace, Jr., and Miss Phoebe H.Brown. A member of the American National Theatre and Academy, the Municipal Theatre has an Advisory Committee consisting of: Dr. Frank L.

Gump, Walter

Jr.,

Fenton,

Miss

Margaret V. Girdner, Luther

Herb Reynaud and Edward E. Sandys. David W. Hunter is managing director of the San Francisco Municipal Theatre. Additional information may be obtained by telephoning JOrdan 7-7700. Nichols,

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of School 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

San Francisco State College Extension Division Courses

is

1

;

CALENDAR OF EVENTS



Monday, October 3 Physicians will visit the following schools: HC, Mission, Balboa, Marina, Bayview, Excelsior NS., Fairmount, Yerba Buena,

Chinese

Argonne.

Tuesday, October 4 Physicians

will

Laguna Honda

visit

following schools: Lincoln, Galileo, Page-Broderick NS.,

the

HC, Abraham

Aptos, Ridgepoint Site

1,

Emerson, John Muir, Daniel Webster, Francisco SSC.

Wednesday, October 5 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, George Washington, James Denman, F. S. Key NS., Le Conte, Columbus, Raphael

NS. Thursday, October 6

Weill, Mission

will visit the following schools: Mission, Francisco, Washington Irving, Cleveland, San Miguel, Edison, Pacific Heights. Regular meeting. Day Adult 3:45 p.m. Marina Adult Americanization Teachers. -School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets.

Physicians

Commerce,



Friday, October 7 Physicians Polytechnic,

will

following schools: Portola, Commodore Stockton, Madivisit

George

the

Washington,

Ridgepoint Site 2, Sarah B. Cooper.

son,

Purchase Authorization Required The attention of principals and teachers

The following courses will be given through the Extension Division of the San Francisco State College. The fee is $6.00 per unit, and registration and collection of fees will be taken on the second meeting of the classes. Art 4. Introductory Art. (2 units). Place: Campus Room 211 CH. Time: Tuesday, 7-9:30. Instructor: Mrs. Olson. First Meeting: October 4. Art 143. Portrait. (2 units). Place: Campus, Room 213 CH. Time: Monday, 7-9:30. Instructor: Mr. Gutmann. First Meeting: October 3. Art 31 and 131. Landscape Painting. (2 units). Place: Campus Room 213 CH. Time: Saturday, 1-4. Instructor: Mr. Locks. First Meeting: October 8. Ed. 265. Seminar in Counseling and Guidance. (2 and 3 units). Place: Campus. Time: Wednesday, 7-9. Instructor: Mr. Lindgren. First Meeting: October 5. Ed. 389. Orientation Course for Parents of the Visually Handicapped. (2 units). Place: Campus. Time: Tuesday, 7-9. Instructor: Mrs. Henderson. First Meeting: October 4. Eng. 142. Literature of the West. (2 units). Place: Campus. Time: Monday, 7-9. Instructor: Mr. Baker. First Meeting. October 3. Eng. 195. Semantics. Place: Campus. Time Thursday, 7-9. Instructor: Mr. Arnesen. First Meeting: October 6. For. Lang. 110. Esperanto. Place: Campus. Time: Tuesday, 7-9. Instructor: Miss Wolff. First Meeting: October 4. Hist. 1 1. Economics and Social History of the U. S. (3 units). Place: Presidio, Building 222. Time: Tuesday, 6-8:30. First Meeting: September 27. Instructor: Mr. McClelland. Music 53C. Music Appreciation. (2 units). Place: Campus. Time: Wednesday, 7-9. Instructor: Mr. Otey. First Meeting: October 5. Psych. 1A. General Psychology. (3 units). Place: Presidio— Building 222. Time: Thursday, 6-8:30. Instructor: Mr. Cooper. First Meeting: September 22.

is

directed to the following: During the past year a number of purchases were made by various members of the certificated staff from vendors without written authorization from the Division of Supplies. This is to again call attention to the fact that any purchases made and paid for by any individual without the authorization of the Division of Supplies, is not reimbursable. This notice is given at the beginning of the term in order that all personnel will be advised and be protected from loss.

Opera Quiz Radio Programs The San Francisco Opera Guild is sponsoring two Opera Quiz radio programs over Station KGO from 6:30 to 7:00 p.m., on Wednesdays,



Rec. 104. Recreational Crafts. Place: Campus. Time: Thursday, 7-9. Instructor: Mrs. Righetti. First Meeting: October 4. Soc. 166. Methods in Social Work. Place: Campus. Time: Thursday, 7-9. Instructor: Mrs. Bisno. First Meeting: October 6. Soc. Sci. 102. UNESCO Workshop. Place: Campus. Time: Tuesday, 7-9. Instructor: Mr. Treutlein. First Meeting: October 3. Soc. 160. Crime and Delinquency. Place: Campus. Time: Tuesday, 7-9. Instructor: Mr. Outland. First Meeting: October 4.

Pi

Lamba Theta Luncheon Meeting Lambda Theta members are

All Pi

invited

luncheon meeting of Northern California Alumnae Chapter to be held next Saturday, October 8, in the Emerald Room, Hotel Claremont, Berkeley, at 12:45. Dr. Bernice Baxter, director of education in human relations, Oakland Public Schools, will speak on "An Educator's View from Our Nation's Capitol." Dr. Baxter has recently returned from Washington D. C. where she directed the planning for the 1950 White House Conference on Children and Youth. to attend a

will

October 5 and October 12. The participants be students of the San Francisco public high schools, with music editors of local news-

Edna W.

papers as guest speakers.

cisco.

Reservations 7:

may

be

made by

addressing Dr.

Bailey, 1022 Spruce Street, Berkeley

or by telephoning

WE

1-4148 in San Fran-



.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Verification of Illness

The Superintendent

is

in receipt of the fol-

lowing communication from the State Department of Education relative code changes concerning verification of absence due to illness. "QUARANTINE. Absence due to quaran-

be allowable and acas absence due manner same counted for in the added to the been has 6803.5 Section illness. to follows: as Education Code and reads 6803.5. The absences of a pupil due to his quarantine under the direction of a county tine,

when

verified, will

or city health officer is not an absence in computing the total days of attendance.

Absence due to quarantine shall be verified by the district in such manner as the Superintendent of Public Instruction shall require.

"PROFESSIONAL SERVICES.

Education

refers to absence for

Code Section 16486, which

certain professional services has been and expanded to read as follows:

"Section

1.

amended

Section 16486 of the Education to read as follows:

hereby amended 16486. Any absence of a pupil from school or for the purpose of having optometrical not does which rendered service medical exceed one day or fraction thereof during each school month of four weeks shall not be deemed an absence in computing average daily attendance. Section 2. Section 16486a is hereby added to the Education Code, to read as follows: 16486a. No absence of a pupil from school for the purpose of having dental service rendered shall be deemed an absence in computing average daily attendance. "Procedures to be followed in the accounting

Code

is

"A"

Lightweight 1949 Basketball Schedule

Triple

Code Changed Re

.

of non-attendance for these types of service are: "1. Any non-attendance for dental services

be recorded in the same manner as other absence, then a small letter 'd' placed in the same square and the square circled in red ink. Such non-attendance shall not be included in either absence column but shall be included in the attendance column as if no absence had occurred. "2. Only one period of non-attendance of a pupil, not to exceed one day in any school month, for the purpose of having optometrical or medical services rendered shall not be deemed an absence in computing average daily attendance. Such period of nonattendance shall be circled in red ink and included in the attendance column as if no absence had occurred." All of the preceding will be recorded in the same manner as other verified absence due to illness. All changes become effective October 1 Questions concerning these changes should be directed to the Bureau of Research, 93 Grove Street, telephone UNderhill 3-4680. shall

(



Game

Date

Mon. Oct. Mon. Oct.

Galileo at Balboa Sacred Heart at Commerce Lowell at Polytechnic Lincoln at Washington St. Ignatius at Mission Washington at Mission Commerce at Balboa Lincoln at Polytechnic Sacred Heart at St. Ignatius Lowell at Galileo Mission at Commerce St. Ignatius at Lincoln Polytechnic at Washington Lowell at Balboa Sacred Heart at Galileo Galileo at Polytechnic Commerce at Lowell St. Ignatius at Balboa Lincoln at Mission Washington at Sacred Heart

3 3

Tues. Oct. 4 Tues. Oct. 4 Tues. Oct. 4 Thurs. Oct. 6 Thurs. Oct. 6 Fri. Oct. 7 Fri. Oct. 7 Fri. Oct. 7 Mon. Oct. 10 Mon. Oct. 10 Tues. Oct. 11 Tues. Oct. 11 Tues. Oct. 11 Thurs. Oct. 13 Thurs. Oct. 13 Fri. Oct. 14 Fri. Oct. 14 Fri. Oct. 14 Mon. Oct. 17 Mon. Oct. 17 Tues. Oct. 18 Tues. Oct. 18 Tues. Oct. 18 Thurs. Oct. 20 Thurs. Oct. 20 Fri. Oct. 21 Fri. Oct. 21 Fri. Oct. 21 Mon. Oct. 24 Mon. Oct. 24 Tues. Oct. 25 Tues. Oct. 25 Tues. Oct. 25 Thurs. Oct. 27 Thurs. Oct. 27 Fri. Oct. 28 Fri. Oct. 28 Fri. Oct. 28 Tues. Nov. 1 Tues. Nov. 1 Tues. Nov. 1 Tues. Nov. 1 Tues. Nov. 1

Commerce

at St. Ignatius at Galileo

Washington

Polytechnic at Sacred Heart Lincoln at Lowell Balboa at Mission

Balboa at Washington

Commerce at Galileo Polytechnic at Mission Lowell at St. Ignatius Sacred Heart at Lincoln Mission at Lowell Commerce St.

at

Washington

Ignatius at Polytechnic Galileo at Lincoln

Balboa at Sacred Heart St.

Ignatius at Washington

Lincoln at Commerce Balboa at Polytechnic Mission at Galileo Sacred Heart at Lowell Polytechnic at

Commerce

Washington

at Lowell Mission at Sacred Heart Balboa at Lincoln

Galileo at St. Ignatius

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

1

1 1 1

1 1

— —

CI 06 Janitor Lowell CI 06 Janitor Abraham Lincoln CI 06 Janitor— Balboa CI 06 Janitor—City College (night) CI 06 Janitor Madison C 106.1 Working Foreman School Janitor



College (night).

These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Requests for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or

through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66 A, 916 Ortega Street.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Practical Nursing

Gold Rush Committee

S. F.

Year

Presents

Completes

San Francisco's year-long observations of the '49er era will near a climax on Saturday evening, October 8, when the San Francisco Gold Rush Committee presents another free-admis-

Marina Adult School held its first practicalnursing graduation exercises on Friday, September 30. In a ceremony observing the first anniversary of this training program, seventeen trainees received certificates, marking the completion of a year in the school and in the hospital in a program provided by Marina Adult School.

sion outdoor spectacle in historic Plaza, it was announced recently

Keil,

Portsmouth by Edward

committee president.

attractions in the two-hour performance, entitled "San Francisco Night in the Old Plaza", will be Marion Bell, star of "Brigadoon" and a pageant-production, "Tribute to the Pioneers", outstanding show-hit of the recent Sacramento State Fair.

Major

Two

elaborate sets will provide the back-

ground for the production. The first will picture San Francisco in the gold rush days. As the scenes progress to modern times, the huge curtain will drop to reveal a panorama of the city as it

appears today.

Against these scenes will be presented a wide variety of entertainment, including the noted Aida Broadbent ballet ensemble of 12 artists.

The show

will

open with an orchestral pre-

lude under direction of Jack Petty. Immediately following a dramatic narration by Hal Burdick, depicting scenes of pioneer fife in San Francisco, a 30-unit male chorus will offer a specially-arranged program of songs.

The show

will start

promptly

at 8 p.m.

Discussion on Gregg Shorthand

Commercial teachers

of

San Francisco: City

College, adult and secondary levels are invited to attend a discussion by Charles E. Zoubek, co-author, "Gregg Shorthand Simplified" in

Room

10,

High School

of

Commerce, on Tues-

day, October 11, at 3:45 p.m.

Refreshments will be served.

— A Radio

Discussion

"How to Build Better Teeth" will be the topic of a discussion today, Monday, at 11:30 a.m. over KSMO, 1550 kc. This is the second of a series presented by the San Mateo County Dental Society. These programs are being presented within the framework of the long popular "Your Physician Speaks" feature of the San Mateo County Medical

Society.

Many

schools are cooperating by bringing the programs directly into the classrooms. the following Mondays, discussions will be con-

On

cerned with "Some Causes of Irregular Teeth," October 10; and "Safeguarding Teeth," October 17.

Among

the 200 who were guests at the exerand the tea given by other students in the program were members of the class who will soon enter San Francisco Hospital to complete their training, as well as students from the evecises

ning

classes,

Teachers

who are already employed. who know of girls over 18

years of are interested in nursing, but do not have the time or the money or the aptitude to become professional nurses, are urged to refer to this free training program offered by the San Francisco Public Schools. Those interested in securing information or in enrolling in the new class which opens in October should report now to Room 203, Galileo High School, between 10:00 a.m., and 4:30 p.m.

age

who

Council Appoints 1949-50 Committees

A

special

meeting of the

officers of the

San

Francisco Chapter, California Council for Adult Education, was held at Marina Adult, July 29. The meeting was held for the purpose of appointing special committees to carry out the wide range of activities planned by the chapter.

Robert Conley, president of the San Francommit-

cisco Chapter, appointed the following tees:

Executive Committee

—Chairman James Downey (MisMembership — Chairman Edward Fowler (Marina) Public Relations — Chairman Ivor Callaway (Marina) Social — Chairman Miss Wilma Wright (Marina) Teacher Relations — Chairman Claude West Finance

Mr. Zoubek will discuss the teaching of the Simplified System and answer questions regarding techniques and objectives.

Diet and Teeth

First

sion)

(Gompers)

A

resolution

was

also passed to foster greater

effort to enlarge the

membership beyond the

teaching profession, by encourageing all public spirited people to join. It is the aim of this organization to further San Francisco's adult program through the cooperation of both educational people and lay citizens of the city.

The meeting was

closed with an introduction newly elected officers: President, Robert Conley; Vice President, Claude West; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Ruth Loew.

of the

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

OCTOBER

No. 6

United Nations Week Set for October 17-24

Commemorating

the

School Students to be Tested designated

ratification

and pro-

mulgation of the United Nations Charter, Monday, October 24, has been set aside as a day of international observance by the General Assembly. The President of the United States, Harry Truman, has issued his proclamation setting the day apart as the birthday of the United Nations.

Throughout the week commencing October many activities and sustained programs will be carried on throughout the Bay Area to arouse public interest in, and afford fullest exact information of, the problems, undertakings and achievements of the United Nations during its 17,

brief four years of existence. notable program will climax the

A

week when

William Agar, chief of the Department of Public Information of the United Nations Secretariat, will deliver an address in the Auditorium of the High School of Commerce at Van Ness

Avenue and Hayes Street, San Francisco, at 8 p.m., Monday, October 24. The event will be particularly colorful through the participation Quintet, the San Francisco of the Youth Association, and the Federation of Folk

UNESCO

Dancers.

An invitation has been extended by the United Nations Week Committee to administrators, teachers and students to attend the Monday evening event. General Business Meeting Called

A

general business meeting of the San FranClassroom Teachers' Association will be held at 4:00 o'clock, Monday, October 10, in the Chinese Room of the Women's City Club, 465 Post Street. Members are invited to attend and paricipate in the business of the association. Tea will be served before the meeting. cisco

Local 61 Meets Today regular meeting of the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61, will be held today, Monday, October 10, at 4:00 p.m., in Room 226, Mission High School.

The

1949

New Junior High

officially

October 17-24 has been as United Nations Week.

10,

In accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Evaluation which completed its work in June 1949, all new pupils entering junior high schools without test results other than those at high eighth grade level should rerecive a Pintner Mental Abilities Test and a California Basic Skills Intermediate Test. These results are to be returned to the Bureau of Research in the same manner as when entire grades are tested. It is important that the separate grades be recorded in alphabetical order

on separate

sheets.

Schools carrying on optional programs in evaluation are requested also to return copies of test results, indicating plainly dates of testing, grade tested and test administered. Refer all questions on the junior high school evaluation program to Mrs. Bernice Vukota, Bureau of Research. Dr. Alberto Lleras

Coming

opportunity to hear a leading Latin American statesman will be offered residents of San Francisco and the Bay Area in October with the appearance in San Francisco of Dr. Alberto Lleras, secretary general of the Organi-

An

zation of American States. Dr. Lleras will be guest of honor at a formal

banquet

to

be attended by members and their

friends of several organizations interested in cultural, economic and social relationships with Latin America. The dinner will be held at the

Palace Hotel on October 14. The Organization of American States, successor body to the Pan American Union has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. and is the official organization representing 21 American Republics. A limited number of reservations at $3.75 per plate are available to the general public and may be obtained by writing to the Pan American Society, 310 Sansome Street, San Francisco,

Room

408.

Asst. Principals' Assn.

A

Meeting

meeting of the Assistant Principals' Association of San Francisco will be held on Thursday, October 13, at 3:45 p.m., at the Raphael Weill School.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Films



Filmstrips

On American

The Audio-Visual Aids Department, located at 750 Eddy Street, lists below films, filmstrips and records which should prove especially useful to teachers during United Nations Week, October 17-24. FILMS: Airplane Changes the World Map. Sound film. 10 minutes. 912-MS2. Evolution of world map concepts JH. Atomic Energy. Sound

traced.

11 minutes. 541.2film. Introduction to the atomic principles and structures involved in making possible atomic energy.

MS2.

SH. Boundary Lines. Sound film. 12 minutes. (Rented for the week only. One day circulation period.) A plea to eliminate the arbitrary boundaries which separate people from one another as individuals and nations. EL JH SH. Democracy. Sound film. 11 minutes. 321.8-MS1. Nature and meaning of democracy with its two unique characteristics, shared respect and shared power. JH SH. Discussion in Democracy. Sound film. 10 minutes. 321.8-MS2. The relation of organized discussion to a democratic society. JH SH. Does it Matter What You Think? Sound film. 15 minutes. (Rented for the week only. One day circulation period.) Raises the question as to whether our conclusions are the result of our thinking. Don't be a Sucker. Sound film. 20 minutes. (Rented for the week only. One day circulation period.) Dramatic exposition of the Nazi technique of setting group against group to destroy freedom. Although reminisecent of war, the film is a reminder of the lessons of the last 15 years. SH.

Georgraphy from the Air. Sound film. 12 minutes. 910-MS2. World geography as seen from the air. EL JH SH. House I Live In. Sound film. 9 minutes. 172-MS1. An Academy Award picture starring Frank Sinatra. Community relationships, religious tolerance and democracy are stressed. JH SH. How We Elect Our Representatives. Sound film. 10 minutes. 324-MS1. Explanation of the election system. The need to vote intelligently to make our democracy work is stressed. EL JH SH. Make Way for Youth. Sound film. 22 minutes. (Rented film for one week only. One day circulation period.) Sponsored by the Youth Division, National Social Welfare Assembly. The film demonstrates how councils contribute toward cooperation, understanding and useful community projects.

community youth SH.

Meet Your Federal Government. Sound film. 15 Q353-MS1. Bill Miller, a high school senior,

minutes.

Washington visits his and learns about our federal government. EL JH SH. Our Constitution. Sound film. 20 minutes. Q342.73MS1. Dramatic events leading up to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. JH SH. Our Shrinking World. Sound film. 10 minutes. 380uncle, Congressman Miller,

in

MS3. The

necessity of appreciating the problems of the peoples of the world. Development of many phases of transportation and communication through the ages. EL JH SH. Patterns for Peace. Sound film. 15 minutes. (Rental film. One day circulation period.) Structure and purposes of the United Nations organization. Perfect Tribute. Sound film."l9 minutes. 921-MS2. Dramatization of The Perfect Tribute, the story by Mary Shipman Andrews, telling of Lincoln's composition of the Gettysburg Arrdess". EL JH SH. all

Tomorrow Begins Today. Sound film. 1 1 minutes. rented for week only. One day circulation period.) The role of UN in promulgating cooperation among nations in the fields with which the Economic (Films

Ideals of

Freedom

— Democracy

and Social Council concerns

itself

and with interviews

of various delegates to present their points of view.

SH.

The World

Rich. Sound film. 43 minutes. (Rental

is

for one week only. Circulation period one day.) Basic facts of the world food situation today. SH.

FILMSTRIPS: Our American

heritage

series.

Six

filmstrips

as

follows. 323.44-FSL. A. Birth of our freedom. B. Freedom's foundation. C. Freedom's progress.

D. Freedom today. E. Vocabulary of freedom. F. Literature of freedom.

EL JH

SH. of Democracy. Seven filmstrips expounding the rights and responsibilities of individuals in an ideal community. Nature

A. B.

Democracy Freedom of

at work. religion.

C. Equality before the law. D. Taking part in the government. E.

Freedom

F.

Education.

of expression.

G. Bv and for the people.

EL JH SH. United Nations Charter. Filmstrip. 85 frames. 341.1-FS1. Structure of the and the functions of its six main bodies. SH. We, the Peoples. Filmstrip. 42 frames. 341.1-FS2. Organization and significance of the United Nations Charter. JH SH. Aims of the United Nations Charter. Filmstrip. 20 frames. 341.1-FS3. Photographs and captions consisting of a slightlv paraphrased version of the Preamble of the Charter.' JH SH. To Serve All Mankind. Filmstrip. 67 frames. 341.1FS4. Explains chapter 9 of the charter in regard to colonial problems. JH SH. Economic and Social Council. Foundation for peace. Filmstrip. 69 frames. 341.1-FS5. Organization. Role in building the peace. JH SH.

UN

UN

RECORDS: One set only of the following Can Hear It Now. Our American Heritage.

albums.

I

NOTE: For material on a particular country see the Audio- Visual Catalog under the name of that country. Youth Conference "The Child in His Family and Community" be the subject of a workshop to be held at Asilomar, California, November 17 to 20. Theme for the conference is the same as that of the 1950 White House Conference. Representatives of all groups with an interest in child health and well-being are invited to attend. For further information, contact Mrs. Bartlett Heard, California Youth Authority, 215 Joslin Building, 507 Polk Street, San Francisco. will

State College Course

The following course will be presented through the Extension Division of San Francisco State College: 152.

Phil.

units.)

structor:

tober 10.

Modern

Political Philosophies

(2

Campus. Mondays 7-9 p.m. InMr. Wasserman. First Meeting: Oc-

State

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Preview of Architect's' Drawings of San Francisco's

New

Schools

V^r^'~T'7^\^,r *

I. ;*'?

M R A LOM A

C

I

PEOjECT

KIUM&EB

MIRALOMA 3

UURD

ENTRANCE

'

'

S 5AW

MA5TEN AND

PROJECT NUMCC.R

LE M EM T A R Y

3

SAM

ARCHITECTS



COURT



ELEMENTARY

FRANCISCO

CUO OL FKAKJClSCO

<

SCHOOL

MASTEN AND UUBD

<

ARCHITECTS

1

)

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin is

issued weekly during the school year from the

Music Extension course (2 October 11, at 7 o'clock. The

Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

at the college in B9.

Monday, October 10



General business meeting. San 4:00 p.m. Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association. Chinese Room, Women's City Club, 465 Post

that ol the child, composing songs, creating rhythm patterns and dances as well as doing creative work with instruments. The teacher at the end of this time should have a fund of materials to be used in each of these areas and the skill in directing children's activities on each

age

level.



Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Room 226, Mission High School. Dinner-meeting. California In6:00 p.m. dustrial Education Association, San Francisco Chapter. Dining room, City College of San



Francisco.

Tuesday, October Physicians will

visit

the

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: 1 C 106 Janitor—John A. O'Connell Vocational and Technical Institute (Ford Bldg. 1 C 106 Janitor Sheridan. torial

following schools: 3,

trero Terrace NS., Pacific Heights, Everett

Po-

SSC.

These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even

may be temporarily be applied for under the seniority rule. Requests for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Lmion, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

though these they

filled,

Wednesday, October 12 Columbus Day

—A holiday.

Thursday, October 13 Physicians will visit the following schools: Hancock H, Lowell, Presidio, Bryant. Fair-

mount.

— Meeting of Assistant Principals' Raphael Weill School. meeting of school year. p.m. —

3:45 p.m.

First

Council of San Francisco Schoolwomen. French Room, Sir Francis Drake Hotel. Friday, October

14

Physicians will visit the following schools: James Denman, Burnett, Jefferson NS., S. B. Cooper, Parkside, Mission (hearts.)

positions

may

As

in previous years the State

Education

Francis Drake Hotel.

program has been arranged be served. The officers for 1949-1950 are as follows: President: Miss Elsie M. Schou; Vice-President: Mrs. Mildred Colmar; Secretary: Miss Alice Connolly; Treasurer: Mrs. Elizabeth Kohlwey. interesting

and tea

Department

of

requesting the active enrollment of all schools as of October 31, 1949. There will be no change in procedure over last year. Forms are being prepared by the Bureau of Research for use in the schools and they will reach you before the last week in October. is

Course Offered Council of San Francisco Schoolwomen The Council of San Francisco Schoolwomen will hold its first meeting of the year, Thursday, October 13, in the French Room of the Sir

still

Active Enrollment Required

Association.

4:00





1

Laguna Honda, Aptos, Ridgepoint No.

An

is

Mrs. Lynctte M. Messer

be the instructor. This course will include developing skills in singing and rhythms on the part of the teacher in order that she may effectively guide children in creative music. The teacher will participate and experience actual situations comparable to

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, James Lick, Candlestick, Jean Parker, Laguna-Golden Gate NS., Raphael Weill, Em-

Street.

class

a beginning being held

offering

is

units)

will

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

erson.

Music Extension Course San Francisco State College

a

at U.S.F.

The University of San Francisco announces new course "Education X280 Problems in



Adult Education," (2 units,) will be conducted on Saturdays from 10 to 12 noon (15 meetings,) beginning October 8. Fee: $3.00 per unit, $1.00 registration fee. Instructor:

Henry

I.

Chaim.

will

All administrative women and all senior and junior high school women teachers are cordially invited to become members of the Council.

Governing Council to Meet

The

regular meeting of the Governing Counof the Teachers' Association of San Francisco will be held on Monday, October 17, at 4:00 p.m., in the auditorium of the Health Cencil

ter Building, 101

Grove

Street.


XXI

;

.::,. OCTOBER

No. 7

School Bonds Widely Backed by Many Groups

Lectures on Health of School-Age Child Teachers are invited to attend the current series of six lectures entitled "Your Child and His Health" on Wednesday evenings from 8:00 to 9:30 p.m., at Roosevelt Junior High .

.

.

School.

on October 19, "Your What Makes Him a Healthy Child?", Child will be given by Portia Bell Hume, M.D., director of the Berkeley State Mental Hygiene Clinic, California State Department of Mental Hygiene. Other lectures in the series will in-

The opening



— and His Health Problems"

JOHN A. ANDERSON,

Ph.D.,

issue will

— and His Dental Health"

Chief, Division of Dental Health California State Department of Public Health

— and Accidents" Chap-

16:

— and Chronic Diseases"

said.

California State chamber of commerce, Berkeley chamber of Commerce, Bellflower chamber of commerce, California Real Estate Associa-

Contra Costa County Taxpayers AssociaLos Angeles chamber of commerce, Los Angeles harbor district chamber of commerce, Oakland chamber of commerce, San Francisco chamber of commerce, and the California PropS. F. Examiner. erty Owners Association. tion,

tion,

LESTER BRESLOW, M.D. Chief, Chronic Disease Service California State Department of Public Health

NOVEMBER

Corey

possible,"

Included in the list of tax-guarding groups that have urged a "yes" vote on No. 1 at the November 8 election are:

9:

ter.

"Your Child

make

of thousands of students."

JACK WALLACE

NOVEMBER

room bond

issue will provide no educational frills classrooms to take California children out of basements, garages, lodge-halls and tents, and to give them a full day's schooling instead of the half -day sessions now attended by scores

2:

Director, Safety Educational Services American National Red Cross, San Francisco

to relieve impoverished

—only

HUGO M. KULSTAD, D.D.S.

"Your Child

general recognition of the

way

"The

Supervisor, Child Guidance Services San Francisco Public Schools

NOVEMBER

indicate

school districts and provide adequate class space is through the State loans which this

M.D.

ALICE HENRY

"Your Child

Arthur F. Corey, executive secretary of the California Teachers Association, which is spearheading the drive for No. 1, recently made public a partial list of indorsements by organizations that pride themselves on safeguarding the taxpayers' pocketbooks. fact that the only

Professor of Pediatrics Stanford University Medical School

NOVEMBER

tures.

"They

26:

"Your Child

Proposition 1 on the State ballot, authorizing a $250,000,000 school building bond issue, has received the virtually unanimous indorsement of statewide and local civic groups which rigidly scrutinize all proposed governmental expendi-

lecture

clude:

OCTOBER

1949

17,

23:

— Wednesday Before Thanksgiving NOVEMBER "Your Child — How Do Child-Parent-Teacher ReNo Lecture



30:

lationships Affect His

Health?"

KENT ZIMMERMAN,

M.D.

Mental Health Consultant California State Department

of Public Health

These lectures are the annual series presented by the Adult Education Division of San Francisco Public Schools for parents and teachers, given in co-operation with the City and County of San Francisco, Department of Public Health; San Francisco District, California Congress of Parents and Teachers; Baby Hygiene Commit-

tee,

American Association

of University

Wom-

en; National Council of Jewish Women, San Francisco Section; San Francisco Tuberculosis Association; California Social Hygiene Association; San Francisco Mental Health Society. lectures are given both in the in the evening of the dates indicated. Teachers are urged to invite mothers to attend the Wednesday morning sessions at the San Francisco Public Health Department, 101

These free morning and

Grove

Street,

from 10:30

to 12:00 noon.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, October 17 the following schools: Commerce, James Lick, Bay View, Yerba Buena NS., John Muir (Tox) Raphael Weill (Tox), Emerson, Edison, Fairmount (P.E. ).

Physicians will

visit



Regular monthly meeting. Gov4:00 p.m. erning Council of the Teachers' Association of San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street.

Tuesday, October 18 Physicians will visit the following schools: Galileo, Polytechnic, Horace Mann, Bret Harte, S. B. Cooper NS., I. M. Scott (Tox), Daniel Webster, Bryant, Fremont (Tox), Golden Gate, Lafayette (Tox), Lowell (hearts).

Wednesday, October 19 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Abraham Lincoln, Girls High, Everett, Candlestick Kdgn., Franklin, John Geary, Hawthorne, Lawton (Tox 250).

Thursday, October 20 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, Lowell, Presidio, Commodore Stockton NS., Dudley Stone, Fairmount, Patrick

Henry (Tox). Friday, October 21

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, George Washington, Roosevelt, Candlestick, Franklin (Tox), Edison NS., Golden Gate, Marshall.

Livestock

Show Tickets on

Teachers and students

Sale

be interested to that tickets for the Grand National Livestock Exposition, Horse Show and Rodeo, which opens at the Cow Palace on October 28,

went on

sale in San Francisco last week. Reserved seat prices were some 16 J/2 per cent below last year's scale.

the

new

scale, reserved seats will sell

$2 and $1.20. Box seats will remain at These prices include general admission

at $2.50,

$3.60.

and

Both 110 and Unlimited teams play on the same date at the same place. Each school must furnish a ball, a scorer, and a timer. The ball furnished your school by the Physical Education Department is the official league ball. Visiting team has choice of baskets. Games are scheduled to start at 3:15 p.m.



110 exponent game six minute quarters, two minutes between quarters. Unlimited game seven minute quarters, one minute between



quarters.

—Everett, Francisco, Marina, Division B — Aptos, Horace Mann, James Denman, James Lick, Week —Thursday, December Division Roosevelt.

A

Presidio,

Portola.

First

1

A A

Everett vs. Presidio Francisco vs. Roosevelt

Aptos

James Denman

vs.

B B

Mann vs. Portola Byes: Marina, James Lick

Horace

Second Week

Marina

vs.

Francisco

Presidio

Roosevelt

Aptos Portola

—Thursday, December 8 A A

Roosevelt

vs.

At At At At

Presidio

At Marina At Francisco At James Lick

James Lick B James Denman vs. Portola B At Jas. Denman Byes: Everett, Horace Mann Third Week Thursday, December 15 Everett vs. Marina A At Marina Presidio vs. Roosevelt A At Roosevelt Aptos vs. Horace Mann B At Aptos James Denman vs. James Lick.. ..A At Jas. Denman Aptos

vs.



Byes: Francisco, Portola

Fourth

Week

—Thursday, January 5 A A

Everett vs. Roosevelt Francisco vs. Marina

At Everett At Francisco At Horace Mann At James Lick

Horace Mann vs. James DenmanB James Lick vs. Portola B Byes: Horace Mann, Aptos Fifth Week Thursday, January 12 Everett vs. Francisco A At Everett Marina vs. Presidio A At Presidio Aptos vs. Portola B At Portola Horace Mann vs. James Lick B At Horace Mann Byes: Roosevelt, James Denman Sixth Week Monday, January 16 First place Division A vs. Second place Division B. First place Division B vs. Second place Division A. Thursday, January 19, Winners of January 16.





will

know

Under

Junior High Schools 1949 Basketball Schedule

tax.

General admission to grounds and exhibits only for adults will be 60 cents; children under 12, 30 cents. Tickets may be obtained at the Cow Palace, the Crane Box Office, 245 Powell street; Sherman, Clay & Co., 165 Kearny street, and the Paul Posz Box Office in the City of Paris.

Delivery Dates for October Time Sheets October Time Sheets should be delivered to the Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: Teachers Senior schools,

high,

October

junior high and 21, 8:00 a.m.

Twenty teaching days Adult schools

elementary

in October.

October

25, 1:00 p.m.

Clerks and Janitors October 16-31

Adult schools Other schools

October 25, 1:00 p.m. October 21, 8:00 a.m. the "Remarks Column." If

Do not write in necessary, attach memorandum to

Time

Sheet.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Architect's Drawing of the

New Fremont

NTARY

PROJECT

S C

-

:

G l

— Additions

Architect's Drawing

Elementary School

ND

Abraham

to

SAN

15

Lincoln

F

ft

A

IT

6

JS81

High School

'V *#

%\

Jt*

AD

D

1.

T

I1N5 v!

T%

-*%j-

'^<.

<

A .3

gl&m^PM A

Hjs,

*>'

«^(* N

C

Shakespeare's Plays Analyzed

The American Weekly,

the magazine

dis-

tributed with Sunday's San Francisco Examis now presenting a series of adaptations of fourteen of Shakespeare's greatest plays. The series, entitled "Beauties of Shakespeare", is authored by Dr. John Erskine, professor emeritus at Columbia University. In this series of articles, Dr. Erskine traces the historical source, outlines the plot and analyzes the main characters in these fourteen plays. Students can make use of the analyses as a highly-readable reference file of Shakespeare's works. Color paintings by Willy Pogany illustrate the text. iner,

I

L S C

WJ1 C C A

I.JW

8*4|_ N n « ft

H

1GH

SCHOOL — .— ~~j .—

Art Exhibit at 93 Grove Street The Art Exhibit on display at 93 Grove Street is made up of work done in the elemenetary schools and will be hung from October 17 through October 28.

Governing Council to Meet

The

regular meeting of the Governing

CounSan Francisco will be held on Monday, October 17, at 4:00 p.m., in the auditorium of the Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street. cil

of the Teachers' Association of

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Table for Use

in

Recording Morning-Afternoon Absence

The

following table has been prepared in to numerous requests from elementary school administrators. The first heavy line in each column underlines the amount to be deducted when a pupil is present in the morning, but absent in the afternoon. The second heavy

amount

line indicates the

to

be deducted when

a pupil is absent in the morning, but present in the afternoon. The minutes of actual attendance in school shown in the following table should not include recesses or noon intermis-

answer

SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT TABLE FOR USE IN RECORDING MORNING AND AFTERNOON ABSENCE 1949-50

GRADES

1

-

GRADE

2

200 Minute Apportionment Day

GRADES 4-12

3

200 Minute Apportionment Day

240 Minute Apportionment Day

Column A: Find the pupil's time in actual attendance in school. Column B: Enter in the register the corresponding percentage of

A 181 171 161

-

0% 0% 5%

190 180 170

151

160

141 131 121 111

150 140 130 120

101 91 81 71

110 100 90 80

61

70

51 41 31 21

-

A

B

Over 200 191 200

60

50 40

11

30 20

1

10

10% 15%

20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

45% 50% 55% 60% 65% 70% 75% 80% 85% 90% 95% 100%

0% 0% 5%

190 180 161- 170 -

160 150 131- 140 121- 130 151 141

-

111-120 101 91 81

-

110 100 90

71

-

80

61

-

70

-

-

50 40 30

11-20 10

B

0% 0% 5%

Over 240

10% 15%

229217 205193-

240 228 216 204

10% 15%

20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

192 169- 180 157- 168 145- 156 133- 144

20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

132

45% 50% 55% 60% 65%

-

45% 50% 55% 60% 65%

51-60 41 31 21

A

B

Over 200 191 -200 181 171

absence.

181

-

121

-

109

-

120 97- 108 85- 96

73-

84

61

72 60

70% 75% 80% 85% 90%

493725-

95%.

1

-

13-

70% 75% 80% 85% 90%

48 36 24

95%

12

100%

100%

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

WE CARE

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

1

GIVE

1 1

C C C

—James Denman —Guadalupe 106 Janitor — Marina 106 Janitor 106 Janitor

These vacancies

to the

will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even

may be temporarily be applied for under the seniority rule. Requests for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, superthough these

COMMUNITY CHEST

filled,

they

positions

may

still

visor of school janitors,

93 Grove Street, or

through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66 A, 916 Ortega Street.


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN OCTOBER

No. 8

Vol.-XBfr-

Community Chest Campaign Under

Way

in

California Population Estimates

San Francisco

"The Community Chest Campaign is now under way in San Francisco. Nobody needs to remind those of us engaged in Public Education its

success.

We

are too close

and youth of our community not the necessity and importance of the

to the children to realize

member

agencies of the

Community

Chest.

and

youth of San Francisco. "Because the Board of Directors of the Community Chest realized they were facing a critical situation, they insisted that Adrien Falk serve another year as president of the Community Chest. Mr. Falk did not seek nor want to serve another term. True, to the fine character that he is, he accepted because of his interest in and love for his native city and particularly the needs of those who benefit from the Chest

of the Census in its reNo. 26 has issued revised estimates of state populations as of July 1, 1948. These

estimates supersede the estimates in release P25, No. 14 of 10,031,000 total population excluding armed forces overseas and 9,894,000 civilian population.

The revised estimates of the United States and for California with increases since the census of April

1,

1940 are:

Total population excluding armed

1948 April 1, 1940 (census) Percent increase, 1940 to 1948 Tulv

1,

.

California

146,113,000

10,354,000

131,669,275

6,907,387

percent

49.9 percent

1 1

Civilian population

July 1, 1948 April 1, 1940

United States

.

.

United States

California

145,290,000

10,217,000

131,401,985

6,857,370

10.6

49.0

Percent increase, 1940-1948

For California the change in civilian populafrom April 1, 1940 to July 1, 1948 of 3,360000* is made up of: tion

Net increase

in civilian population

3,360,000

Natural increase

767,000 1,509,000

Births

Deaths

agencies.

"This past year those of us

who

are privileged

San Francisco the position where he alone,

to serve in the public schools of

again saw him in his vote, could sustain the existing Salary Schedule or modify it to give teachers and administrators who had served a number of years in our schools additional credit on the Salary Schedule for prior service conscientiously ren-

by

dered. All of know how he voted. Many of you reaped the benefits of his vote as he saw fit to cast

The Federal Bureau

lease P-25,

forces overseas

should recall, however, that the Community Chest failed of its goal last year by about 20%. This meant a curtailment in the program of all of the member agencies. From your point of view and mine, however, it affected most

"We

vitally those agencies serving the children

1948

as of July 1,

In his Supervisory Bulletin No. 6 dated October 17, and directed to certificated and noncertificated personnel of the San Francisco Public Schools on the subject of "The Community Chest," Superintendent Herbert C. Clish issued the following statement:

of the necessity for

24, 1949

it.

"President Falk is serving his last year on the Board of Education, having refused reappointment. It is also, I feel sure, his last year as President of the Community Chest.

"Because of his self-effacing attitude and true modesty he would not, I believe, approve of this bulletin if I were to clear it with him ahead of time. I would like to suggest, however, that as a

742,000

Net in-migration Net loss to armed

2,675,000

83,000

forces

and

an indication of our appreciation of he has done for the schools of San Francisco and particularly the tribute to President Falk

as

all

classroom teachers and administrators, that really extend ourselves in

the

Community Chest

an

put across

An

increased

this year.

contribution from each of us to the

Chest

Community

will be a concrete manifestation of

appreciation of

all

we

effort to

our

he has done for the schools

and particularly those who have served

so con-

scientiously in them.

"I

am

confident you will receive this message

in the spirit in

as well as

which

you are able

it is

written and respond

to do."

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools is

93 Cfrove

St.,

San Francisco

2.

California

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, October 24 the following schools: Lincoln, Marina, Doublerock NS., Jean Parker, Raphael Weill, Fairmount (Tox), Junipero Serra (Tox 100), Emerson, F. S. Key (Tox 200). Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Room 226,

Physicians will

visit

Commerce, Abraham



Mission High School.

Tuesday, October 25 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission Rm. 204, Polytechnic, Balboa, Presidio, Ridgepoint Site 2, Page-Broderick NS., Fre-

mont, Parkside (Tox 100), John Muir.

Wednesday, October 26 Physicians will Sunshine, Portola

visit

the

following schools:

(Talk 1:30 p.m.), George Washington, Girls High, Ridgepoint NS., Starr King, Andrew Jackson (Tox), Lawton (Tox), F. S.

Key (Tox

400), Redding (Tox 150).

— Lecture

and discussion for parTopic: "Your Child and His Health Problems." Co-speakers: John A. Anderson, Ph.D., M.D., Stanford University, and Mrs. Alice C. Henry, supervisor, Child Guidance Services, San Francisco Public Schools. Auditorium, Roosevelt Junior High School, Arguello Blvd., and Geary St. Auspices: Adult Education Division and other cooperative agencies. 8:00 p.m.

ents.

Thursday, October 27 Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Mission, Aptos, Lincoln, Dudley Stone (Tox), Commodore Sloat (Tox 200), Grattan (Tox 130), Parkside (Tox 150), Sunnydale

NS. Friday, October

28

Physicians will visit the following schools: Galileo, Francisco, Franklin, Alamo (Tox 200),

Cooper and Spring Valley (Tox 40), Argonne and Cabrillo (Tox 150), Marshall (Tox), Golden Gate.

Garfield. Sarah B.

Public Speaking Tournaments for Northern California At the coaches meeting in Tracy on Saturday, September 24th, the following public speaking tournament schedule for Northern California for the school year 1949-50 was approved. Notice that the tournament in Tracy on March 4, is open only to the N. F. L., schools, and winners there will compete at the State Finals in April in Bakersfield. Two debate teams

will

be selected and one from each indi-

vidual event.

November

12

11,

—San

Francisco City Col-

lege, Irving Philips, Director.

December

3

—Oakland High School Tourna-

ment.

December 9, 10 -- University of Southern California Debate League Tournament.

— Modesto High School Speech February 18 — Fresno State College High School Tournament. March 4 — Northern California N. F. .L Tournament — Tracy Union High School. — Hanford High School TournaMarch ment. March 18 — College of the Pacific Northern California Speech Tournament — Stockton. — Peter's High School, San FranApril April 15 — State Finals Bakersfield. — Ripon High April 22 School Tournament. January 21

Festival.

1 1

17,

St.

1

cisco.

at

April 27, 28, 29 - - National High School Speech Tournament, Chicago. May 12, 13 San Francisco State College High School Tournament. The dates above are definite. For details concerning each tournament, persons interested should contact the coach at the school con-



cerned.

Amendment "C" At the request of Miss Margaret L. Dunn, retired principal of the Sanchez School, the following

is

submitted:

"Teachers and others retired from the San Francisco School Department prior to July 1, 1947, are sponsoring Amendment "C" which add a moderate monthly sum to their pension allowances. will

Retired Educator Honored

The Consul General

France Jean de Lagarde recently conferred upon Mrs. Alice Wilson, former instructor of languages at George Washington High School, now retired, the "Medaille de la Reconnaisance Francaise" in gratitude of the services rendered by her to of

France.

The medal was presented to Mrs. Wilson at a special event staged in the French Library, 414 Mason

Street,

on October

6.

"Having been computed on the low salaries of former years, these pensions are totally inadequate in these days of excessively high living costs.

"The

active

teachers,

their

relatives

and

through their votes, may be the deciding factors in producing the majority necessary for the passage of this measure. friends,

"Do your 8.

part.

Go

Cast a 'Yes' on 'C

to the polls ".

on November

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Architect's Drawing

CLARK t BEUTTLER ARCHITECTS

R.O.T.C.

— New Santiago

Home

School

AUGUST I9<9

Wins Parade Trophy

Sierra

Four hundred and fifty cadets from San Francisco's high schools, led by the championship band from Lowell High, participated in the 1949 annual Columbus Day parade on October 9 and were awarded the trophy for the best marching unit in the parade.

The R.O.T.C.

brigade, which extended over was led by the cadet brigade commander from Balboa High School. Also in the van of the formation were the city colors and the massed national colors from all of the schools. Each R.O.T.C. battalion marched behind its own school flag.

Club Program

The San Francisco Bay Chapter of Sierra Club, under the auspices of the Educational Committee, will present a panel discussion on "Roads into the Wilderness How Far Mechanized?" on Tuesday evening, October 25, at 8:00 p.m., at Everett Junior High School Auditorium, Church at 16th Street.



a city block in length,

Participating in the panel discussion will be Sanford Hill, Regional Architect of the National Park Service, and Homer Crowley, regional engineer of National Park Service. The United States Forest Service will be represented by John S. Edwards, in charge of land use with

Completely equipped with new helmets and and natty uniforms, the cadets made an impressive and inspiring showing in the parade.

the responsibility of issuing permits for roads. Dr. Harold Bradley and David R. Brower will represent the Sierra Club. Dr. Edgar Wayburn, chairman of the San Francisco Bay Chapter, will act as moderator.

leggins

The Superintendent is proud of the cadets' achievement and extends to all those who participated his sincere congratulations.

"Roads into the Wilderness" terest to

Teachers and others engaged in work with

and for the handicapped will be interested to learn that the next San Francisco Chapter program meeting of the National Rehabilitation

Rooms

of

be

will

held

in

the

Recreation

Goodwill Industries, 980

Ocotber

Street at 8 p.m.,

27.

Howard

Interesting

and

informative presentations on mental hygiene

and the handicapped will be made by Dr. Genevieve Stewart, psychiatrist, and on Cardiac Problems gist.

A

social

by Dr. John McGuire, cardiolohour will follow the ensuing dis-

cussion period.

The National members

12,000

Rehabilitation Association of the one recognized national

the handicapped.

is

of vital in-

to see our wilderness

subject.

The

public

is

invited to attend this program.

Air Fair at Airport

The San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce invites all boys and girls to attend the 1949 San Francisco Air Fair at the San Francisco International Airport next Sunday, October 30, from 11:00 a.m., to 5:00 p.m. Admission

is

free.

The Air Fair

will feature

exhibits of such

famed military planes as the six-engined B-36 and the Navy's giant Constitution as well as the F9F and P-86 jet fighters. Commercial airlines will display Constellations,

is

organization which deals with the problems of all

who wish

areas preserved. This is an opportunity to hear outstanding conservation authorities discuss the

Discussion on Handicapped

Association

all

Convairs,

DC-

and double-decked Stratocruisers, and free courtesy rides will be provided .in some of these 6's

planes to

many

lucky Air Fair

visitors.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Recent Accessions in the Teachers' Professional Library LAWSHE, CHARLES H., PRINCIPLES OF PERSONNEL TESTING. N. Y., McGraw-Hill, 1948. A useful

book for those who are training personnel

workers for industry and business.

ERICKSON, CLIFFORD

E.,

A PRACTICAL

HANDBOOK FOR SCHOOL COUNSELORS. New

York, Rondal Book Co., 1949. A handbook of helpful information dealing with the elementary, secondary,

and college

levels.

MURSELL, TESTING. 2nd

JAMES ed. New

L.,

PSYCHOLOGICAL

York, Longmans, 1949.

A

sound and thorough book, written in large units, this lists and comments on approximately one hundred of the current

tests.

CLAREMONT COLLEGES. READING CON14TH YEARBOOK.

FERENCE

Claremont,

Cal.,

Claremont Curriculum Laboratory, 1949. The problems and techniques involved in reading social relationships was the theme of this annual conference.

AMERICAN BUSINESS EDUCATION YEARBOOK. GENERAL BUSINESS EDUCATION. SomSomerset Press, 1949. The sixth yearbook of the National business teachers association and the Eastern business teachers association deals with curriculum, administrative, and teaching problems in erville,

N.

J.,

Embarking on its new, popular-price policy, San Francisco Art Commission recently announced opening of the season-ticket sale for the



eight perthe 1950 municipal concert series formances to be presented at the Opera House in January.

Each will offer the full San Francisco Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Artur Rodzinski, formerly with the New York Philharmonic and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Guest artists will appear on five of the programs.

The series will offer three "pairs", on Thursday and Saturday evenings; and two single performances, on Tuesday evenings for a total of



five different

PSYCHOANALYTIC STUDY OF THE CHILD.

VOLUME

III/IV. New York, International Univer1949. An annual cumulation of papers of interest to educators as well as psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers. sities,

MABEL

L.,

TEACHING

THE

YOUNGEST. New

York, Macmillan, 1949. Written to help administrators guide the teachers of young children, this book is also of value for the parents.

JERSILD, ARTHUR T., CHILDREN'S INTERESTS AND WHAT THEY SUGGEST FOR EDUCATION. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1949. A special study made in Springfield, Mo., and

programs.

Season-ticket patrons will be offered the choice of Tuesday and Thursday, or Tuesday and Saturday combinations.

The commission's new

price-scale will range

more than half the Opera House accommodations available at $1.00, or less. Five-concert season tickets, including tax, are from $2.50 to $8.50.

from 50^

business education.

CULKIN,

1950 Municipal Concert Series at Opera House

to $1.50, plus tax, with

Harold Zellerbach, president of the commis1950 series will go far toward the achievement of two major goals the presentation of symphonic music in the Opera House at sion, said the



prices within the reach of

portant, the

employment

all

and, equally im-

of local talent as guest

artists.

The

scries:

Radford, Virginia by the staff of the Horace-MannLincoln institute of school experimentation, this has

January 5 and

real value in explaining why and how children's interests determine their learning capacity.

Shostakovich's First Sixth Symphony.

PRINCIPLES OF ELEMENOTTO, HENRY TARY EDUCATION. New York, Rinehart, cl949.

January 10: Honegger's oratorio, "King David," with Dr. Hans Leschke's 185-voice Municipal Chorus. The cast will include Howard Thurman, as narrator, and San Francisco soloists Lucine Amara, Atwater Kent prizewinner; Velna Lou King and Paul Walti.

in

T-,

An overview of the field of elementary education, this book should be helpful for teachers who wish to reexamine their own ideas and compare them with modern concepts in elementary education. COLE, LUELLA., PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENSE. 3rd ed. New York, Rinehart, 1949. The emotional, social, moral, and intellectual of adolescence are treated in this revised edition of the author's earlier work.

physical,

development

JAMES., THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. Lon-

HEMMING,

don, Longmans, 1949.

A

British presentation of the social studies, this book includes sample units used successfully in recent years.

ADAMS,

FAY.,

TEACHING CHILDREN TO

READ. New

York, Ronald, 1949. The place of reading in American life, reading readiness, reading at various grade levels and in subject fields, selecting the materials of instruction and appraising growth in reading are a few of the topics included in this text.

RUDOLF, KATHLEEN B., THE EFFECT OF READING INSTRUCTION ON ACHIEVEMENT IN EIGHTH GRADE SOCIAL STUDIES. Teachers Columbia University, 1949. The results of an experiment to determine whether special reading instructions given by social studies teachers would College,

bring worth-while results is here presented in a convincing manner that such teaching helps to develop better students.

7:

All Russian

program, including

Symphony and Tschaikowsky's

January 12 and 14: Vaughan Williams' Sixth Symphony, for the first time in San Francisco. Guestartist Wanda Krasoff, San Francisco-born pianist, will offer Symphonic Variations by Cesar Franck. January 17: All Wagner program, with Elena Nikolaidi, soloist.

January 19 and 21: Richard Strauss program, including excerpts from "Der Rosenkavalier." The cast will include Rose Bampton, Suzy Morris and San Francisco's own Dorothy Warenskjold.

Application for season tickets

now

&

at the

Symphony

Boxoffice,

may

be

made

Sherman Clay

Co.

FAULKNER,

RAY.,

York, Holt, 1949.

An

ART TODAY.

Rev. ed.

New

introduction to the fine and

functional arts.

WERNER, LORNA MENTARY SCHOOL.

S.,

SPEECH IN THE ELE-

Evanston, 111., Row, Peterson, cl947. Speech and speech correction in the various grades.

DUVALL, SYLVANUS RY. New York, Association

M.,

BEFORE YOU MAR-

Press, 1949. 101 questions

to ask yourself before you marry, which should be helpful for counselors to use with their students.


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

OCTOBER

No. 9

31, 1949

American History Awards

Junior Red Cross Conference

Deadline November 17

Scheduled for November 5

superintendent of schools, last week gave his enthusiastic endorsement to the Seventh Annual Hearst Newspapers American History Awards, announced recently in The San Francisco Examiner.

host at a Regional Conference, sponsored by the Pacific Area office of the Red Cross on Saturday, November 5. Twenty-six Chapters, within a radius of 150 miles, are invited to send dele-

Herbert

Dr.

C.

The awards, with U.

prizes totalling $7,500 in

savings bonds, are open to all students in Francisco senior high schools.

S.

San

Teacher-sponsors of the three leading local students in the test are each awarded a $100 savings bond.

The top public high school and the top parochial high school in the local examination each receive a fine set of United States historys of their own choice, or a set of encyclopedias, or audio-visual aids of the same value. Following

is

Dr. Clish's statement:

me to again endorse most Seventh Annual Hearst Newspapers' American History Awards. "In order to thoroughly appreciate the privilege which comes to one who is a citizen of the United States and to help maintain our system of government, it is absolutely essential that there be a thorough knowledge upon the part of each individual of our country's glorious history. The Hearst Newspapers' American History Awards serve a very valuable purpose in that they stimulate and encourage a greater interest in and study of the history of our "It

a pleasure for

is

enthusiastically

The San Francisco Junior Red Cross

Clish,

the

country.

"Apart from the pleasure which participants derive from participation in the competition, the material awards which come to those who win are of great and lasting value. "I am most happy, therefore, to urge partici-

may

pation in this contest upon the part of all of the students in the public high schools of San Francisco and am sure that my co-workers in each high school will do everything possible to encourage interest and participation upon the part of their students."

The purpose of the meeting is to give both students and teachers an opportunity to discuss Red Cross activities, to exchange ideas and to cordial ingain inspiration and information. vitation is extended to all teachers, principals and school administrators.

A

Roosevelt Junior High Blvds. The general morning session opens at 10:30 a.m. There will be a panel of high school speakers for the adult audience, and separate sessions for elementary students, high and junior high students, and

The meeting place School, Arguello and

is

Geary

adults.

Dr. Herbert C. Clish and John Burnside, will among the speakers for the adult group. Robert Simpson will be moderator for the ele-

be

mentary

section.

A

number

of

San Fran-

at 2:30 p.m.

Luncheon by the

large

cisco students will participate.

The Conference ends

for student delegates will be financed

Service Fund. Luncheon for adults will be available for 650. Each school has received detailed information concerning the Conference and it is hoped that many school people will avail themselves of this opportunity to learn how Red Cross serves the school. Inquiries should be directed to the Junior

Red Cross

office at

450 Gough

St.,

UNderhill

1-6000.

Art Exhibit at 93 Grove The art exhibit at 93 Grove Street is the work done by students of the High School of Commerce; Grover Neuman, instructor. It will be on display from Ocotber 31 through November 11.

November

been

17.

be

gates.

Entries in the nation-wide competition will be accepted through 11:59 p.m., Thursday,

Entry blanks are now being printed in The Examiner, and have also been sent along with other materials to each senior high school. The local History Awards examination has

will

set for Tuesday, November 22. It will be the basis for awarding 41 local prizes, and selecting five national competitors.

For further information, call the History Editor, SUtter 1-2424, extension 277.

Awards

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Precautions on Halloween

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, October 31 visit

Edison (Tox 40), John Muir, 75), Winfield Scott (Tox).

Bulletin

dated October 26, directed to all principals and teachers, relative the forthcoming Halloween observance, reads as follows: 7,

"Halloween is fast approaching and it appears because of letters the Superintendent is receiving that some children are already engaging in mischievous acts which are motivating the letters being received by the Superintendent.

the following schools: George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Everett, Burnett, Longfellow (Tox 30), Raphael Weill,

Physicians will

The Superintendent's Supervisory No.

Le Conte (Tox

am sure that you have already discussed matter with your pupils but because of the letters I have received, I would ask that great stress be laid upon the meaning of good citizen"I

this

ship, particularly

upon

the occasion of Hallo-

ween.

Tuesday, November

1

Fremont, Sheridan (Tox 20), Sherman (Tox), Sanchez (Tox 75), Argonne and Cabrillo (Tox), Emerson SSC.

in the city

Wednesday, November 2 Physicians will Sunshine, Edison

the following schools: OTR, Mission, Girls High, visit

James Denman, Geary and Frank McCoppin (Tox 40), Lawton (Tox 125), Starr King and Bryant (Tox 150), Alamo (Tox).



Lecture and discussion for par8:00 p.m. Topic: "Your Child and His Dental ents. Health." Speaker: Jack Wallace, director, Safety Educational Services, American NationCross, S. F. Chapter. Auditorium RooseHigh School. Auspices: Adult Education Division and other cooperative agencies. al

Red

velt Jr.

Thursday, November 3 Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Balboa, Horace Mann, Dudley Stone, Alvarado (Tox 60), Sunnydale NS, Spring

do not believe there

is a fair-minded adult does not want to see boys and girls have innocent fun at this season. However, when children deface personal property or conduct themselves in such a boisterous fashion that they are rude and annoying to citizens, it casts a reflection upon the school attended and also upon the home training of such children.

"I

Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission (Rm 204), Commerce, Lowell, Presidio, Brete Harte, S. B. Cooper NS., Alta Vista,

"The

who

Superintendent



Regular meeting.

Pi

Lambda Theta Luncheon-Meeting Members of Pi Lambda Theta and

Friday,

November 4

Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Galileo, Portola, Ridgepoint Site 1, Commodore Stockton, Golden Gate, Marshall, Parkside (Tox).

November 17-20 Asilomar Workshop on "The Child in His Family and Community." Location: Asilomar Conference Grounds, near Pacific Grove. Reservations: Mrs. Bartlett Heard, California Youth Authority, 215 Joslin Building, 517 Polk Street, San Francisco 2.

their

guests are invited to a luncheon-meeting in the Defenders' Room, Women's City Club, at 12:30 p.m., on Saturday, November 5. Three members will speak on "Our Summer in Western

Europe." Reservations Fillmore 6-6560.

In

Day Adult

Americanization Teachers. Marina Junior High School, Fillmore at Chestnut Streets.

it

if

schools they attend."

Valley PE. 3:45 p.m.

appreciate

will

you will, as in the past, lay stress upon the importance of wholesome fun which does not violate the rights of others and in no way casts reflection upon the citizenship training being given these boys and girls in the greatly, therefore,

may

be

made by

calling

Memoriam

MISS REGINA MILLER



Aptos September

Janitress

MRS. KATHLEEN

Jr.

13,

P.

High School 1949

SCHROEDER

—Everett

School Cafeteria Helper School

October

MISS

ANNA

Teacher

3,

Jr.

High

1949

M. ANDERSON

— Aptos

October

Jr.

High School

21, 1949

STEPHEN WILLIAMS



Music Teacher Lowell High School October 21, 1949

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Architect's Drawing

— New

ELEMENTARY

HILLCREST W. P

DAT

ARCHITECT

ts

Architect's Drawing

E.HGTVEER.

— New

Governing Council to Meet

The cil

cisco will

San Fran-

be held on Monday, November 21, at

4:00 p.m., in the auditorium of the Health Center Building, 101

Newly

Grove

Street.

elected officers for the year 1949-50

are as follows: President: Miss

ASSOCIATE

Ulloa Elementary School

All

A. Hardiman, Raphael

Weill Adult School; Vice-President: Miss Ella

Ryan, Galileo High School; Treasurer: Leon Shaff, Polytechnic High School; Secretary: Miss Constance McFarland, Girls High School.

members

Invitation

invited

to

Kappa Gamma, women teachers, are

of the Delta

national honor society for

attend the meeting of the Alpha

to be held on Thursday, November 3, at 7:30 p.m., in room 211 of the Women's City Club at 465 Post Street. "Group Processes" will be the topic for discussion.

Theta Chapter

The

Mary

SCHOOL

H.M K1CHXL1U*

Honor Society Issues

regular meeting of the Governing Coun-

of the Teachers' Association of

Hillcrest Elementary School

year 1949-1950 are as Stuart Newman, Mission High School; Vice-President, Dr. Lavone Hanna, San Francisco State College; Secretary, Margaret Holland, supervisor, Counseling and Guidance; Corresponding Secretary, Irene Kelly, retired; Treasurer, Esther Ritchie. officers for the

follows: President,

Mary

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Credential Renewals

Alumni Homecoming Day Annual Homecoming Day will be

State

celebrated

by San Francisco State College alumni on Saturday,

November

Members of the certificated staff are reminded that November 30 marks the expiration date of teaching credentials for a large

5.

number

of

There will be sorority and fraternity reunions and a WAA Tri-Sports Day with San Jose, Stanford and State during the day. The 50th Anniversary Dinner will be from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. at the Western Women's Club. This will be followed by a theater production at the Buchannan Campus and the State-Cal Aggie Football Game at the New Campus. The day will end with a dance in the Buchannan Campus Gym. Send reservations for the dinner to the San Francisco State Alumni Association at 124

teachers and administrators. Although the Personnel Office has attempted to notify those whose credentials are expiring as of that date, it may be possible that some individuals did not receive notification. Inasmuch as it is the teacher's responsibility to see to it that a valid teaching credential is on file in each local district at all times, it is suggested that each teacher examine his credential situation at this time and if necessary, institute immediate action toward the renewal of the expir-

Buchannan

ing credential. Teachers are reminded that the fee in connection with the credential application was increased from $3.00 to $4.00 effective October 1 and Money Orders or Cashier's Checks should be submitted in that amount. Teachers are invited to use the facilities of the Personnel Office in requesting the granting or renewal of credentials.

Street.

The Municpal Theatre Presents

.

.

.

Tennessee Williams' poignant drama, "The Glass Menagerie", has been chosen by the San Francisco Municipal Theatre as the second major production of its current season, to open on

Thursday evening, November 3, at the Marina Auditorium, Bay and Fillmore streets, at 8:30. "The Glass Menagerie" will be repeated on Friday and Saturday evenings, November 4 and 5, and on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings of the two weeks following. Tickets may be purchased at the theatre, the City of Paris box office, and Breuner's in Oakland.

Art Lecture at 750 Eddy There will be a lecture by Francis J. Sperisen on the cutting of stones for jewelry-making with emphasis upon special cuts used in modern jewelry design. Mr. Sperisen is one of the outstanding lapidarists and an authority and designer of special cuts for jewelry stones. All art, industrial arts, adult school art, and craft

SFCW Offers Scholarships Through the generosity of the Argosy Fund, San Francisco College for Women is able

the

to offer 2 scholarships of $200 each, to students plan to major in Spanish.

who

Application for these scholarships should be

made immediately in writing, and when possible in person, to the Dean of the San Francisco College for Women, Lone Mountain, San Francisco 18. The spring semester will open on January 26, 1950.

The

applicants will be judged according to and personal rating.

their scholastic merits

teachers and their guests are cordially invited to attend. The lecture will be held in the art workshop at 750 Eddy Street on Wednesday, November 2, at 4:00 p.m.

KALW to

Broadcast

Cow

Show made by KALW

Palace

Daily broadcasts will be

from the Grand National Livestock Exposition again this year. Remote broadcasts may be heard at 10:30 a.m., 12:45 p.m., and 1:30 p.m. daily Monday through Friday, October 31 to

November

4.

Broadcasts will feature interviews with ex-

and others on subjects of upper grade children and direct pickups of the Wednesday, November 2, Matinee show, judging and sales events. hibitors, contestants

Youth Concerts

interest

Kurt Herbert Adler, director of the Opera Chorus, will conduct the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra's Young People's Concerts during the coming season, according to Mrs. John G. Zeil of the San Francisco Musical Association. Alexander Fried will act as commentator throughout the series.

U.N. Material Available

Adler,

who

will replace

Rudolph Ganz

in the

has had a wide experience in musical education techniques both in this country and abroad. The complete schedule of this year's children's concerts will be announced at a later post,

date.

to

The Information Center

of the United Nalocated in the balcony of the City of Paris at O'Farrell and Stockton Streets, is prepared to provide interested teachers with pamphlets and documents which are supplied by the United Nations Department of Public Information. This service will be available on Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m., to 4:30 p.m., and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m., to 1:00 p.m. tions,

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

No. 10

^Hp!

"Making Democracy Work"

Week Theme

Education The following

statement has been issued by Miss Agnes Samuleson, assistant editor of the Journal of the National Education Association, calling attention to the annual observance of American Education Week throughout the nation:

"The springboard for the 29th observance of American Education Week November 6-12 is Making Democracy Work. Top billing will be given to schools and colleges and their vital role in building our American way of life. American Education Week is therefore not just another special week. It is a time to review the history, purposes, and achievements of our schools; canvass their needs and problems; sharpen citizen interest in securing necessary improvements; and strengthen home and school relationships. "This overall emphasis upon education and democracy is most timely. In a world beset with the problems of building a lasting peace, our schools and colleges face gigantic tasks in helping to prepare today's children for missions of their day. People are the backbone of our free nation. They keep our government free by accepting their civic obligations and by exercising the will to govern themselves. It is in the schools that they are taught the knowledge, skills, and loyalties of free men. They learn the ways of

democracy in "The daily

school.

topics point up the worth of the individual, educational opportunity, responsible

and safety, home and community obligations, our freedom and security, and the next decade in education. They lend themselves to Sunday programs at the churches, citizenship, health

demonstrations, radio broadcasts, newspaper features, public meetings, and other school and community events. Developments in teacher recruitment, program enrichment, audio-visual instruction, and in teaching human relations and civic education may well be reported. Discussion of the effects of swelling enrollments upon the curriculum, buildings, equipment, teacher load, and finances would be most appropriate. "Fullblown programs of action cannot be developed in one short week, but the groundwork for future developments can be laid in the form of clear understandings of pressing needs and greater concern for meeting tham promptly and

classroom

fully.

®

NOVEMBER

7,

1949

Quizdown to Feature American History The Examiner-KGO Quizdown

will feature history questions on the November 12 broadcast, in commemoration of the annual

American

American History Awards Contest sponsored by the Hearst newspapers. Questions from all elementary schools pertaining to American history will be welcome. The children whose questions are used on the program will receive Eversharp repeater pencils.

Garfield and Cleveland Schools will send confor this special Quizdown program, which will be held at the United Artists Theatre. testants

On

this

day only, Saturday, November

The Examiner-KGO Quizdown

12,

be broadcast from 9:30 to 10:00, one half-hour earlier than the usual time. Tickets are available at

The Examiner and

the

will

KGO box office for

the

pre-show and broadcast.

Schoolmasters' Annual Dinner The California Schoolmasters Club is having its annual dinner, Tuesday, November 22, at 6:15, at the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley. All men are invited. Tickets are $2.85. Carl Anderson, vice-president of the California Schoolmasters Club and principal of Polytechnic High School, has placed reservation blanks in Dr. Harold Spears' office for any who wish to at-

tend.

"The national sponsors are National EducaAssociation, American Legion, National Congress of Parents and Teachers, and the U. S. Office of Education. The American College tion

Public Relations Association is urging active cooperation by the institutions of higher learning. All of these groups have issued special bulletins and releases. For a list of the special helps which

have been made available at nominal cost to help planning committees develop their programs and enliven their projects, write direct to the National Education Association." Open house programs for parents, classroom demonstrations and special assemblies will be conducted in many of San Francisco's elementary, junior and senior high schools during the observance of American Education Week.

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Book The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, November 7 Physicians will visit the following schools:

Chinese DC, George Washington, James Denman, Burnett & Ridgepoint Site 2 (Tox), Yerba Buena NS., Sanchez (Tox 75), Washington

Yerba Buena (Tox 150), Commodore Sloat (Tox 125).

Irving,

Tuesday, November 8 Election Day. Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Mission, Aptos, Lake Merced (Tox 150), Laguna Honda (Tox 150), Redding (Tox 175, E. R. Taylor (Tox 45), Ulloa (Tox 25).

Wednesday, November 9 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Abraham Lincoln, Commerce, James Lick, Bay View (Tox), Douglas (Tox 75), F. S. Key Annex (Tox 250), Starr Kin^ (Tox 150), Bryant, (Tox 150), Geary, F. S. Key (Tox 100). Lecture and discussion for par8:00 p.m. Topic: "Your Child and Accidents." ents. Speaker: Jack Wallace, director, Safety Educational Services, American Red Cross, S. F.



High Chapter. Auditorium, Roosevelt Jr. School. Auspices: Adult Education Division and other cooperative agencies. Thursday, November 10 the following schools: Polytechnic, Presidio, Commodore Stockton NS., Longfellow (Tox 30), Sutro (Tox 10), Junipero Serra.

Physicians will

Hancock

H,

visit

Galileo,

Friday,

November

1

Armistice Day.

er:

—Meeting

of Assistant Principals'

Raphael Weill School. Guest speakDr. Harold Spears.

Monday, November 21



Regular monthly meeting. Gov4:00 p.m. erning Council, Teachers' Association of San Francisco, Auditorium Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street. Assistant Principals to

Meet

A

meeting of the Assistant Principals' Association of San Francisco will be held on Monday, November 14, at 3:45 p.m., at the Raphael Weill School.

Dr. Harold Spears, assistant superintendent of elementary schools, will be the guest speaker.

— Nov. 14-19

;ional Friends with Books" is the nationa theme for the celebration of the 1949 Book Week and the following programs are scheduled to take place during that week in the Children's Department of the San Francisco Public Library, Civic Center.

Monday, November

14,

4:00 o'clock, Book

Talk.

Tuesday, November

15,

Story Hour. Mrs. Hermine Story Teller.

4 o'clock, Special Gelder, Guest

Van

Wednesday, November 16, 4:00 o'clock, Naomi McCabe, guest speaker, author of "Cable Car Joey", published by the Stanford University Press.

Thursday, November 17, 4:00 o'clock. "Sleeppuppet show, Lettie Connell's

ing Beauty"; Puppeteers. Friday,

November

18,

4 o'clock. Film.

New

books for boys' and girls and special displays will be on exhibit during the week. The Children's Department is open Monday through Friday, 1-9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m., to 6 p.m.; closed Sunday.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System:

torial

1 1 1

C C C

106 Janitor 106 Janitor 106.1

— Paul Revere — Portola

Working Foreman Janitor



Visi-

tacion Valley

These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled,

they

may

still

be applied for under the

seniority rule.

Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93

Monday, November 14 3:45 p.m. Association.

Week

"Make

Service

Grove

Building

Street, or

through the Civil

Maintenance Union, Local

66A, 916 Ortega Street.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Community Chest Aids the Entire Community 1

With the slogan "Who Cares? Francisco's

In-Service Program

—We Do" San

Community Chest campaign,

the recre-

annual appeal for the health, welfare and ation services of the city opened several days ago.

More than

five

thousand community-minded

men and women have raising the

volunteered their help in

Chest's quota of $3,820,000.

The

funds will provide essential community services for 70 Chest agencies and the newly reactivated United Service Organizations (USO).

The Superintendent hopes to inaugurate very shortly an in-service program for the preparation of teachers of remedial reading. This group will meet for either onehalf or one full day a week. It is hoped that those who complete the program successfully may be assigned as teachers of remedial reading in our schools. Teachers who are interested in

this proare invited to communicate with the Superintendent's office by Thursday, November 10. If the number applying is too large, applicants for the first course will be chosen in the order of their date of appli-

gram

cation.

Superintendent of Schools

Holiday

in

Lieu of

November 8

At its meeting of September 20, the Board of Education adopted the following resolution:

Watt A. Long, associate superintendent of instruction, and Mayor Elmer E. Robinson discuss plans for school participation in the current

Community Chest

Campaign. Flags, posters, street car cards and many other publicity devices ask the question, "Who Cares?" which San Franciscans will answer with their contributions and pledges to their Community Chest proving that they care enough to give generously for all Red Feather services.

In announcing the official breakdown of the San Francisco Community Chest goal, Thomas G. McGuire, general campaign chairman, pointed out that by far the largest amount, $1,042,495, is earmarked for child care. Approximately 5,000 San Francisco children are cared for annually under this program in orphanages, foster homes, nursery schools and day homes.

The Chest Campaign headquarters requests that high school journalism publications aid in publicizing the campaign by news stories and editorial

comment.

Mrs. Louise Gridley to Speak The San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association will present Mrs. Louise Gridley, chairman of the California State Retirement Committee, at their next meeting on Monday, November 14. The meeting will be held at 4:00 o'clock in the Chinese Room, 465 Post Street.

Tea will be

served at 3:45 o'clock.

That pursuant to Section 2.4 of the Annual Salary Ordinance adopted by the Board of Supervisors a holiday is hereby declared for Friday, November 25, 1949, in lieu of Tuesday, November 8, 1949, General Election day. Authorization is hereby given for the employment of those non-certificated employees that the Superintendent deems necessary to carry on essential services, such employees to be paid in accordance with the Annual Salary Ordinance; and

FURTHER BE

IT

RESOLVED:

That

this

holiday of November 25, 1949, include those administrative and supervisory employees on the administrative calendar who are scheduled to work on this day; and

FURTHER BE IT RESOLVED: That authorization be and is hereby given for the closing of the central office of the Board of Education,

93 Grove Street, on Saturday, November 26, 1 949, thereby obviating the necessity for a skeleton crew on this date.

Hawaiian Dance Recital

at

YWCA

For the benefit of the World Fellowship Fund, the YWCA is presenting a Hawaiian Dance Recital on Sunday, November 13, at 2:30 p.m., in their auditorium, 620 Sutter St. Dances of the islands will be performed by Charlotte Mitchell and members of the YWCA dance classes. A cordial invitation is extended to all

who

are interested.

Tickets may be purchased at the door for 40^. For further information phone PRospect 5-6500.

)

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Recent Accessions

in

Teachers' Professional Library FLEMING, CHARLOTTE M., ADOLESCENCE, ITS SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. New York, Internathe adotional Universities Press, 1949. Dealing with group lescent in the family, with his relations with the threshold of in school, and with his problems on the maturity, this book makes use of recent research in the various fields of human sciences.

ROSENFELD, MILTON A., THE INDUSTRIAL CAFETERIA AND RESTAURANT WORKERS

River, Conn., National Foremen's cafeInstitute, cl945. A practical manual for training teria and restaurant employees.

MANUAL.

Deep

McKINNEY, HOWARD D., MUSIC AND MAN. New York, American Book Co., cl948. Music appreciation in which the place of music is interpreted the cultural background in which it developed.

TAPPAN, PAUL

W.,

by

JUVENILE DELINQUEN-

CY. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1949. A comprehensive, well-balanced, and eminently objective approach to juvenile delinquency, emphasizing the psychological and sociological factors that enter into behavior and the social work and legal approach involved in the correctional process.

BLUMENTHAL, LOUIS H., ADMINISTRATION OF GROUP WORK. New York, Association Press, 1948.

Based on both administrative and human book for executives takes full cogni-

processes, this

zance of the techniques of democracy and the dynamics of

Mental Health Society Speaker Dr. Spock,

the

individual and group behavior.

STAGNER, ROSS, PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY. 2nd ed. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1948. The viewpoint from which this completely revised edition is written is the same as the former; that the problem of the individual cannot be isolated from those of society. The divisions include: the scientific study of personality, general description of the nature and develop-

Benjamin Spock, M.D., author of the "Pocketbook of Baby and Child Care" will speak under the auspices of the Mental Health Society of Northern California on Monday, November 14, 8:00 p.m., at the Roosevelt Junior High

School, Arguello near Geary.

"Dr. Spock's willingness to talk under our auspices is a milestone for our Society and a great honor," declared Dr. Ruth A. Frary, president of the Mental Health Society of Northern California, in announcing the lecture.

"To judge by the number of telephone calls received daily at our office from P-TA members, nursery schools and individuals," Dr. Frary continued, "it looks as though every mother in San Francisco will turn out to hear the man whose book on 'Baby and Child Care' they

know

so well."

Dr. Spock is a member of the staff of the Rochester (Minnesota) Child Health Institute. His lecture on Monday, November 14, will cover a discussion of children's contrasting emotional needs at different ages.

The public is members of

Admission is 50 cents the Society who are asked to present their cards, and $1.00 for non-members. invited.

for

ment

Organization Information

ALMY, MILLIE C, CHILDREN'S EXPERIENCES PRIOR TO FIRST GRADE AND SUCCESS IN BEGINNING READING. Teachers Col-

The Superintendent has been requested to disseminate the following information regarding the California School Supervisors' Associa-

of personality, the dynamics of personality, and the determinants of personality.

lege,

Columbia University, 1949. The author's study development which shows that although the

tion,

Bay

Section:

in child

variety of reading experiences a child has before entering first grade determine his success in reading, this reading program should be planned on the basis of his experience and his future needs.

NATIONAL ELEMENTARY PRINCIPAL. THE

PUBLIC AND THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. Washington, D.C., National Education Association, 1949. The 28th yearbook of the Department of Elementary School Principals of the N.E.A. deals with the

community

relations of the principal.

WATSON, GOODWIN, YOUTH AFTER CONFLICT. New York,

Association Press, 1947. After a survey of sociological conditions following the civil and world wars, the author concludes that, while war does not of itself produce accelerated modernism, it does produce certain trends. There is a prediction of the state of young people in the 1950's.

LEAVITT, HELEN S., RECORDINGS FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. New York, Durrell, 1949. The

place of recordings in the school

program with

of records at the primary and intermediate grade levels, and in language arts, social studies and other lists

elementary subject

fields.

PROSSER, CHARLES

A.,

VOCATIONAL EDU-

CATION IN A DEMOCRACY.

Rev. ed. Chicago,

American Technical Society, 1949. The revised edition of an earlier book by Mr. Prosser and Mr. Allen, which exerted a valuable influence on vocational edition, this book by Mr. Prosser and Charles A. Quigley, should have even greater value in a world which is trying to make democracy live.

"The California School

Supervisors' Associaa professional organization interested in promoting sound educational practices and procedures for the benefit of the children. tion

is

The annual dues

of $10.00 includes

member-

ship in the 1

Association for Supervision and Curricuof the N.E.A. ($5.00)

lum Development

2) California School Supervisors' Association (State, $3.00) 3)

Bay

Section, C.S.S.A. ($2.00)

"As a result of the business meeting held in San Jose, October, 1949, an amendment to the Constitution now places the dues period from first of the year to the first of the year. Any dues paid now will be for the period of January 1, 1950 to January 1, 1951, the State Association will make up the difference. Thereafter, dues will always be collected on the first of each

the

year."

Additional information may be obtained from Mrs. Vesta L. Stockwell, 621 Carolina Street, Vallejo, or L. W. Reinecke, 429 Broadway,

Room 200, Oakland

7.

1


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN 3«l=»C Vol.

XXI

No.

NOVEMBER

1

Architect's Drawing

— John

14,

1949

A. O'Connell Vocational

and Technical

Institute

Dodge A. Reidy, City Architect

Sierra

Club Program

Delivery Dates

The Education Committee of the San FranBay Chapter of the Sierra Club will pre-

cisco

sent a program of colored movies on Wednesday, November 16, at 8:00 p.m., in the auditorium of Everett Junior High School. The first movie of the group will be of Yosemite National Park in all seasons professionally filmed by Ted Phillips. The second movie is a composite of films

by army, navy and National Park photog-

raphers of the recent eruptions of Mauna Loa on the Island of Hawaii. There are spectacular close-up shots of this volcanic mountain which rises nearly 14,000 feet above sea level. Both movies are by courtesy of National Park Service.

Anyone program.

interested

is

welcome

to attend this

November Time Sheets

November Time to

Grove

Sheets should be delivered

Payroll Department, fourth floor,

the

Street,

93

on the following dates:

Teachers Senior schools,

high,

junior

November

high

Teachers

-

Principals

and

19 days

-

assistant principals.. ..20 days

Symbol — November 25 Adult schools Clerks and

and elementary

18, 8:00 a.m.

to

be "A".

November

22, 1:00 p.m.

November November

22, 1:00 p.m.

janitors

November 16-30 Adult schools-

Other schools

18, 8:00 a.m.

.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

Noted Speakers to Appear on Panel Discussion

is

"Rheumatic Fever and the School Child" is the general topic of a panel discussion to be held on Monday, November 14, at 7:45 p.m.,

Room

Empire

in the

of the Sir Francis

Drake

Hotel.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, November 14 Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Mission, Roosevelt, Candlestick Cove, Farragut (Tox 100), Daniel Webster and I. M.

(Tox 60), Argonnc, John Muir (Tox 75), Emerson (Tox 100), Raphael Weill (Tox 100). Meeting of Assistant Principals' 3:45 p.m. Association of San Francisco. Raphael Weill School. Guest speaker: Dr. Harold Spears. Meeting of San Francisco Class4:00 p.m. Association. Speaker: Mrs. Teachers' room Scott





Louise Gridley. Chinese Room, 465 Post Street. 4:00 p.m.— Regular Meeting. San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Room 226,



Public meeting. Mental Health 8:00 p.m. Society of Northern California. Topic: "Children's Needs at Different Ages." Speaker: Di\ Benjamin Spock. Auditorium, Roosevelt Junior High School.

Tuesday, November 15 the following schools: Everett, Bret Harte, PaHeights, Jean Parker and Washington Irvvisit

Commerce, Lowell, cific

culosis

(O.T.), Sherman, Fremont and Golden Gate (Tox 50), E. R. Taylor, Lafayette (Tox 8 and PE), Balboa, Polytechnic.

ing

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Commerce (Rm. 204 Conf.), Marina, Polytechnic, James Denman, Mission NS., Visitacion Valley (Tox 30), Alamo, Hawthorne

Tox 45 ), Redding, Argonne Tox (

ents.

5

)

—Lecture

and discussion for parTopic: "Your Child and Chronic Dis-

8:00 p.m.

Health Association.

American Academy George M. Wheatley, M.D., New York City, chairman, Committee on Rheumatic

"A

Special Report of the

of Pediatrics"

Fever.

"Rheumatic Fever Diagnostic Service" Elizabeth Murphy, M.D., director, Rheumatic Fever Clinic, Children's Hospital of the East Bay; Saul J. Robinson, M.D., consulting cardiologist, Cardiac Diagnostic Center, Bureau of Child Hygiene, San Francisco Department of Public Health. "Daily Observation of Children with Special Reference to Rheumatic Fever" Herbert C. Clish, Ed.D., superintendent, San Francisco Public Schools.

"Cooperation with Community Health and Welfare Agencies" James Malcolm, M.D., health officer, Alameda County Health Department.

"Improvement of School Medical Procedures" David Van der Slice, M.D., school health consultant, California State Department of Public Health.

Summary: George M. Wheatley, M.D.

Wednesday, November 16

(

&

Topics and panel members:

'

Mission High School.

Physicians will

Co-chairmen are: Ann Purdy, M.D., chairman, Heart Division, San Francisco Tuberculosis Association; Hobart Rogers, M.D., chairman, Heart Division, Alameda County Tuber-

eases." Speaker: Dr. Lester Breslow. California State Department of Public Health. Auditor-

ium, Roosevelt Jr. High School. Auspices: Adult Education Division and other cooperative

"Hamlet" at the Larkin The Larkin Theatre, located

at Larkin and Geary Streets, announces that the photoplay "Hamlet" will be presented during the balance

November at the reduced rate of seventy-five cents for teachers and students.

of

Tickets

Physicians will visit the following schools:

Jean Parker and Washington Irving (OTR),

Commerce, Francisco, Page-Gough N S., Dudley Stone, Lincoln (Tox 10 & PE), Patrick Henry (Tox 45), Sherman (Tox 25).

be secured at the theatre box

on at 4:10 p.m., and 9:55 p.m.

film goes

in the evenings at 7:00

Monday, November 21

agencies.

Thursday, November 17

may

The afternoon

office.



4:00 p.m. Regular meeting. Governing Council, Teachers' Association of San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Center Building, 101

Grove

Street.

Lowell,

Tuesday, November 22 4:00 p.m.



First

Meeting. Association for Speaker: Mrs. Emma

Childhood Education. Friday,

November 18

the following schools: George Washington, Portola, Ridgepoint Site 2, Jefferson NS., Golden Gate, Marshall, Le Conte, Jefferson, Franklin (Tox 20).

Physicians will

visit

Plank. Sherman School. 6:15 p.m. Annual dinner. California Schoolmasters' Club. Claremont Hotel. Reservations:



Wendall M. Moore, 4243 Monterey land

19.

Blvd.,

Oak-



— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN California Teachers' Assn

Reprinted below

is

the

Code

of Ethics for

Teachers Association, adopted by the CTA State Council of Education at its annual meeting held on April

Members

of the California

1949:

9,

Believing that the main objective of Education is service to mankind through the development of the whole individual, members of the teaching profession accept these responsibilities, Responsibility to the Pupil: The first consideration of the teacher is the welfare of his pupil. He guides the pupil in his growth toward maturity, preparing him to be socially and economically competent in the school, the home and the community, and to be happy personally as a responsi-

member

of society.

Responsibility to the Parent: The teacher recognizes the concern of the parent for the child's development and is ready to share this responsibility and to cooperate with the home for the best interests of each child.

Responsibility to the Public: The teacher is in a position of public trust. He serves as trustee of the social heritage and works for the strengthening of education and for the realization of

democratic

ideals.

Responsibility to the Profession: The teacher maintains a constructive and cordial attitude, guiding those under his direction, cooperating with his associates, and respecting the authority of those in administrative positions. He helps to improve the status of the profession by developing high standards. He is aware of the values of professional organization and works for their realization.

APPLICATION OF PRINCIPLES The following applications of the preceding Code are designed to implement the interpretation of prin-

III.

To meet

the responsibility to pupils, the teacher:

Deals kindly with each child without prejudice

1.

To meet

the

Members

responsibility

to

the public, the

teacher: 1.

With an open mind, evaluates the attitudes and community in order to appreciate its

activities of the good qualities.

Takes part in the better aspects of community remembering that his pupils have first call upon his time and energy. 3. Tells the community what the schools are doing for the betterment of the American way of life. IV. To meet the responsibility to the profession, the life,

teacher: 1. Endorses the principle that the profession must accept responsibility for the conduct of its members and understands that his own conduct will be regarded

sample of the quality of the profession. Makes his professional life one of continuous growth. 3. Maintains an attitude which strengthens public respect for the teaching profession and for the school system of which he is a part. 4. Encourages young people of ability and sincerity to enter the profession as a life work. 5. Maintains active membership in professional organizations and works through them to attain the objectives which will advance the status of the proas a

2.

fession.

Exercises his right to participate in the demoprocesses which determine school policy. He recognizes that the board of education, which derives its authority from the people it serves, has placed the responsibility for the administration of school policy in the hands of the professional leaders of the school. Once policy is determined, he supports it. 6.

cratic

Follows ethical business procedures. He patronizes reputable employment agencies. b. He requests honest recommendations for himself; he gives honest recommendations for others. c. He does not underbid for a position or apply for a specific position until he knows it is vacant. 7.

a.

ciples, I.

of Ethics for

2.

THE TEACHER'S CODE

ble

Code

or partiality. him2. Helps the pupil to set up worthy ideals for patience, honesty, courtesy, and tolerance. self in3. Shows the pupil that American citizenship volves responsibilities as well as privileges. 4. Strengthens the democratic activities of the school. 5. Encourages the pupil to choose carefully and then prepare thoroughly for the vocation for which he has aptitude and opportunity. 6. Respects the confidence of a pupil; information given in confidence should be passed on only to authorized persons or agencies that are attempting to



aid the pupil.

Introduces the pupil to pleasant and wholesome of enjoying leisure time. wholesome 8. Develops in the pupil a respect for family relationships. 9. Accepts no remuneration, directly or indirectly, for tutoring or equipping members of his own classes. 10. Does not use his classroom privileges and pres7.

d.

He works for the appointment and advancement who are best qualified by ability and experi-

of those ence.

e. He keeps a legal contract unless canceled by mutual consent of the parties to the contract. f. He conducts school affairs through the established channels of the school system. 8. Acts with consideration in his contacts with fellow teachers. a. He is kind, tolerant, and loyal, and avoids petti-

and rancor. takes pride in their achievements; he is grateful for their assistance. c. He respects their confidence. d. He criticizes with discretion, knowing that only that criticism is valid which stems from a desire to improve the educational process and which is directed at issues rather than personalities. ness, jealousy b.

He

ways

to promote partisan politics, sectarian religious views, or selfish propaganda. 11. Remembering his primary responsibility to the pupil, rejects the strike as a valid means for the achievement of professional objectives. tige

meet the responsibility to parents, the teacher: Seeks cordial relationships with the home. 2. Listens to the parents' viewpoint and weighs it carefully as an aid to better understanding of the

II.

To

1.

pupil. 3.

Respects the confidence of the parents and avoids discredit them.

making remarks that might

A.C.E. to

The

Meet Nov. 22

meeting of the Association for Childhood Education will be held at 4:00 p.m., on Tuesday, November 22, at the Sherman first

School.

Emma

Plank will speak about the conMrs. dition of schools in Austria and Germany. Mrs. Plank has recently returned from an educationmission in Vienna and will illustrate her talk with colored slides. Tea will be served from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. The meeting is open to all new members and all former members and friends of the A.C.E. al

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN National Teacher Examinations to be Held on February 18 '50

History Test Entries

November 17

Close

Only four days remain before

entries close in

the big $7,500 United States savings bond prizes

American history

classic.

Already entries have been received by the Contest Editor from senior high schools throughout San Francisco. Contenders in the competition for local and national prizes topped

by a $2,000 United States savings bond award are also entering by the dozens through the entry blanks published daily in

Deadline for

all

November

17.

day,

entries

is

The Examiner. 11:59 p.m., Thurs-

In addition to forty-one local prizes awarded by The Examiner and topped by a $400 savings

bond award and forty-one national by the $2,000 bond award, there are

prizes led prizes for

instructors of the top three local winners and for the parochial and public schools whose students make best showings in the local test.

An official entry blank may be obtained from the high schools' history departments. For further information, contact History Awards Editor, The San Francisco Examiner or phone SUtter 1-2424, extension 277.

The National Teacher Examinations, prepared and administered annually by Educational Testing Service, under sponsorship of the American Council on Education, will be given at testing centers throughout the United States on Saturday, February 18, 1950. At the one-day testing session a candidate may take the Common Examinations, which include tests in General Culture, Mental Abilities and Basic Skills, and Professional Information; and one of eleven Optional Examinations, designed to demonstrate mastery of subject matter to be taught. The college which a candidate is attending or the school system in which he is seeking employment will advise him whether he must offer the National Teachers Examinations and which of the tests he should take. Application forms, and a Bulletin of Information describing registration procedure and containing sample test questions, may be obtained from

college officials, school superintendents, or from Educational Testing Service, P.

directly

O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. A completed application, accompanied by the proper examination fee, should reach the ETS office not later than January 20, 1950.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

International Relations Convention

Notice is hereby given that the following janitorial vacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: Raphael Weill 1 C 106 Janitor Francis Scott Key 1 C 106 Janitor These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency.

The annual Convention of the Northern California-Nevada International Relations Clubs is to be held this year at the San Francisco Col-

— —

Even though arily filled, they

may

still

may

be temporbe applied for under

these positions

Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil

Building

be followed by panel discussions on the following topics:

"Proposed Policy Towards

"The Far Eastern

the seniority rule.

Service

Women on November 18-19. The Convention will open with a general session at 12:30 p.m., on November 18, and will lege for

Maintenance Union, Local

66A, 916 Ortega Street.

GIVE TO THE

Satellite Nations";

Crisis";

"Regional Arrangements and Security", (At(Pacific Pact), (The relation of two to the United Nations). About 100 delegates will take part in these

lantic Pact),

these

discussions.

The Convention will have as its climax a banquet given Friday night, November 18, in the dining-hall of the San Francisco College for Women. The chief speaker will be H. H. Fisher of Stanford University who will speak on the "Cold War."

Photograph Exhibit

at

93 Grove

An

COMMUNITY CHEST

exhibit of photographs, representative of the work of students of the Samuel Gompers Trades School, will be on display on the third floor of the Central Office, 93 Grove Street,

from November 14

The

to 25.

exhibit has been arranged by Benjamin Reade, instructor in photography at Samuel

Gompers.

S*Z>*&&1Xl*tCtd£*?'

<

mi\Wi\ Vol.

XXI

NOVEMBER

No. 12

Architect's Drawing

— Home School

Unit, 44th Ave.,

and Noriega Street

Hit :.--.-

y

a

y.i

k^ooi

Dig

Architect's Drawing

— Sunset

Elementary School

21, 1949

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of S< hools 93 Grove St.. San Francisco 2, California is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Public Education Society

Annual Dinner-Meeting The annual dinner meeting of the Public Education Society will be held Tuesday, November

29, 6:00 p.m. at the City College of San Francisco (Ocean Ave. at Phelan St. near Balboa Park). The program to be presented following the dinner will be of exceptional interest.

A

Monday, November 21 schools:

Physicians will visit the following Muir H.C., Balboa, Portola, Burnett (Tox), Excelsior NS., Jefferson, Lawton, Frank

John

McCoppin, F. S. Key (Tox), Fairmount and Junipero Serra (Tox), Grattan. Regular meeting. Governing 4:00 p.m. Council of the Teachers' Association of San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Center Build-



panel of school authorities and industry representatives will discuss the problem presented by Dr. John E. W. Sterling, president of Stanford University, when he recently called attention to the differences between Method and Content in Public Education.

The

subject: "It Started with Dr. Sterling."

Physicians will visit the following schools: Pacific Heights H.C., Aptos, Abraham Lincoln.

Louis G. Conlan, president, City College of San Francisco; Dr. Howard McDonald, Los Angeles State College of Applied Arts and Sciences; Dr. Henry B. McDaniel, School of Education, Stanford University; C. T. Spivey, director of industrial relations, Columbia Steel Co.; Verne Richards, training di-

Horace Mann, Ridgepoint

rector,

ing, 101

Grove

Street.

Tuesday, November 22

Redding,

Parkside

P.E.,

Sites

1

and

Lafayette.

2

(Tox),

Laguna

Honda. 4:00 p.m. - - First meeting. Association foi Childhood Education. Speaker: Mrs. Emma Plank. Sherman School.



p.m. Annual dinner. California 6:15 Schoolmasters Club. Claremont Hotel. Reser-

Wendall M. Moore, 4243 Monterey Oakland 19.

vations: Blvd.,

November 24 & 25 Thanksgiving

6:00 p.m. tion Society.



Participants:

Bank

Dinner

America.

of

will

be served in the school cafeteria

at 6:00 p.m., sharp. ($1.75 incl. tax.) Members and friends are cordially invited to attend.

A special invitation has been extended by the Committee to members of the certificated staff of the San Francisco Unified School District. Parking will be available in the area immediately adjacent to the school cafeteria. To reach this point enter the West Campus (through the gates off Ocean Avenue, opposite Lee Avenue). Guides will be on hand.

recess.

Reservations

November 29

Annual dinner. Public EducaCity College of San Francisco.

man

may

be

made with Mrs. Nor-

Steuer, secretary, telephone

OVerland

1-

7765.

C.A.H.P.E.R. Outing

Speech Tournament Winners Northern California high schools and students placed high in finals of the first annual All-California Speech Tournament at San Francisco City College November 12. Anderson, 16-year-old speaker from Lowell, won second honors in the combined events. First place was taken by Caroline Parks, 17, of Santa Rosa. Jack

Lowell High School took top honors in allaround third. Lincoln High School captured the fourth spot.

extemporaneous speaking, deradio speaking and dramatic declamations were included in the two days of contest. Some 240 students from throughout California competed.

Such events

bate,

The

California Association for Health, PhysEducation and Recreation, San Francisco Unit, will open its 1949-1950 program of activities with a barbeque at Sigmund Stern Grove on Monday, November 28, at 6:00 p.m. ical

Miss Marie Powell, director at Folsom Playground, is chairman of the after-dinner program; the theme is "Recreation." Tickets are $1.50. They may be obtained from the chairman of any of the junior high or senior high physical education departments, or by contacting Win Perrine at Samuel Gompers or Miss Viola Beck in Ray Daugherty's office at 750 Eddy Street.

as

orators,

The panel of judges included Superior Judge Melvyn I. Cronin, Municipal Judge A. E. Weinberger and Stuart R. Ward, executive secretary of the n.mon wealth Club.

C

Opera Carmen Coming

The

Pacific

Opera Company has scheduled

a matinee performance of Carmen in the Opera House for school students on December 7, at 1:30 p.m. Tickets are quite inexpensive and reservations can be secured by calling SUtter 1-5055.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Safety Poster Contest

S.F.Green Pennant

Sponsored by A.A.A.

Campaign Renewed

School Children of California and Nevada are being invited by the California State Automobile Association to enter the sixth annual nationwide School Safety Poster contest sponsored by the American Automobile Association

and

its affiliated

and

art teachers.

Objectives of the contest are to provide force-

gans for classroom use, and to give art-inclined students an active part in the traffic safety educational program.

Ten of the first prize posters will be reproduced in color and distributed, one a month during the 1950-51 school year, to schools throughout the nation. Each poster reproduced will carry the name of its youthful designer and

name

of the student's school.

campaign on

fourth year were young officers of School Safety Patrols, leaders of the campaign among the city's school children, and representatives

its

of civic

and safety organizations. this year's campaign

Feature of

ful posters illustrating specific traffic safety slo-

the

San Francisco children

Participating in launching the

1950 contest have been sent to principals, supervisors

traffic for

goal of the Green Pennant campaign sponsored by the Call-Bulletin, was the theme of a rally held recently.

clubs.

data and entry blanks for the

Invitations,

Safety in

in non-school hours as well as in school time,

be a schools princi"safety 5 p.m.,

will

safety quiz to be given at five each week. Based on results of the quiz, pals of the five schools will select a leader" of the week, and each Friday, at traffic

the five safety leaders will be guests on "Jolly" Bill Steinke's program on Station KNBC. Each boy or girl appearing on the program will be presented with a belt, the buckle of which bears the words "Safety Leader."

Prizes totaling $2,275 are offered in the 1950 contest, including a new "open classification"

Speakers and guests at the opening rally included Dr. Herbert C. Clish, San Francisco superintendent of schools; Reverend James Brown, archdiocesan superintendent of schools; Captain Ralph Olstad, police traffic bureau; John C. Spencer, CSAA public safety department; Inspector Byron J. Getchell, supervisor of the School Safety Patrols; Mrs. J. D. Forbes, public welfare director, second district, ParentTeacher Association; Mrs. Arthur Luchetti, president, Catholic Parent-Teacher groups; and

prize of $75.

"Jolly" Bill Steinke,

Through

its

Public Safety Department, the

State Automobile Association will distribute 15,000 each of the ten posters to schools in this region.

California

The two slogans assigned to California school children are: Look Both Ways Before Crossing! Play

Away From Traffic!

The grand

prize,

awarded

to the designer of

the poster adjudged best of all entries in the contest, will be $350, intended as a one-year scholarship in an art school.

For students in the tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades, there are ten first prizes of $75 each, ten second prizes of $50, and ten third prizes of $20. Students in the elementary grades, through the ninth, will be eligible for ten first prizes of $25 each, ten second prizes of $10, and ten third prizes of $5. student who enters a poster illustrating one of the slogans assigned to his or her state is permitted to enter a second poster for the "open classification" prize of $75. In this classification the student illustrates any traffic safety slogan, either from among those assigned to the various states or one originated by the entrant. For the "open classification" the field is wide open.

Any

contest is approved by the Contest Committee of the Association of Secondary School Principals of the National Education Association. Closing date for entries is April 15, after which the entries will be placed before a Board

The

of Judges headed by Richard Lahey, Director of the School of Fine Arts, Corcoran Art Gallery, Washington, D. C.

KNBC.

Plans for the

new

Green Pennant campaign were explained by John Callahan, of the Call-Bulletin, who also introduced speakers and guests.

Days of Service



School Clerks

Principals are reminded that school clerks serve on a school term basis are employed to serve on the day schools are in session plus Institute days only. Under the 1949-50 calendar, schools will close December 16, 1949, and teachers will at-

who

tend Institute sessions on Monday and Tuesday, December 19 and 20. Therefore, school clerks employed on a school term basis are authorized to work through December 20, but will not receive pay between that date and December 31, 1949, inclusive.

Friday, November 25, the day after Thanksgiving, has been declared a holiday in lieu of Election Day, November 8. Payment will be made to school clerks for this holiday.

An

idea of the magnitude of the judges' task indicated by the fact that last year the contest attracted more than 4,700 entries, and the 1950 contest is expected to exceed this total by a big margin. is

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Tuberculosis Association

City College Players Present

Christmas Seal Appeal

Shakespearean Comedy

The San Francisco Tuberculosis

Association

43rd Annual Christmas Seal Sale here Monday, November 21, to raise funds to fight tuberculosis, heart disease and rheumatic fever. This is the association's only public apwill

open

its

peal for funds, and

its

only means of support.

New tuberculosis cases were reported at the rate of three a day and tuberculosis deaths at the rate of almost one a day in San Francisco according to Easton G. Hecker, president of the San Francisco Tuberculosis Assocciation. He pointed out that nearly every year since the founding of the association in 1908. fewer people became victims of the disease. last year,

"The eradication

of tuberculosis

is

a matter

of time that can be shortened depending upon the amount of cooperation given by all the

people," Mr. Hecker said. "Among the ways our citizens can hurry the eradication of tuberculosis are by having annual free chest X-rays and buying and using Christmas seals which make such services possible. During the past 12 months alone the San Francisco Tuberculosis Association has taken more than 90,000 chest X-rays and in many ways has taught people how to protect themselves against tuberculosis and the dangers of rheumatic fever and heart disease. Christmas seal funds are also being spent for the better education of physicians in the treatment of these diseases and in research to find specific cures.

"The size of our program next year can only be determined by the amount of Christmas Seal revenue available. Remember, the greater your support, the greater your protection from disease."

Headquarters of the San Francisco TubercuAssociation are at 604 Mission Street, telephone DOuglas 2-1104. losis

The

College Players of the City College of

San Francisco, under the direction

of Paul Elliperformances of Shakespeare's comedy, "Much Ado About Nothing," son, will present six

Theatre, main college building, beginning Thursday night, November 17, at 8:15 p.m., and continuing until November 23. performance will be given on Sunday, November 20. in the Little

NO

This is the second Shakespearean play being presented by the College Players. The first, "Twelfth Night," met with such enthusiasm from both students and the public that the College Players feel assured of the success of their forthcoming portrayal of another of the master playwright's works. Stage management, lighting, set designing, construction and painting are all handled cooperatively by the students with technical advice from Mr. Ellison. The Little Theatre has been repainted and equipped with raised seating to afford the audience a better view of the stage.

Tickets are on sale on the campus or may be obtained by writing to the City College Box Office. Ocean and Phelan Avenues, enclosing a stamped envelope and a check payable to the City College of San Francisco. General admission is 75 cents, including tax. Telephone reservations are not being accepted.

Pet Art Contest

Winners

A

black on white drawing of a boy and his pet collie recently won for a Lowell High School student, Philip Roldan, the

first prize of $100 Unlimited Art Contest. The contest was held to secure an original trade mark for its printed matter and was open to all art students in San Francisco high schools. Money for the prizes was donated by several

in the city-wide Pets

business firms.

Other

prizes

went

to

George Coutts, Abra-

ham

Lincoln High School, and Stephen Horn and Warren Fairbanks, Polytechnic High School. Judges were Artists Louis Shaw, Max

Landphere and Gene Roach.

Humor Department The

grade teacher took a look at little she was going to have trouble with him. But, as she explained arithmetic, she was pleased to note that he was paying close attention. After she had done several problems on the blackboard, she asked: first

Wilmer and feared that

"Are there any questions?"

Wilmer had one: "Where do the little numbers go when you rub them out?"

—Lejeune Globe.


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vol.

XXI

>@

No. 13

NOVEMBER

28, 1949

Evaluation of Preparateonal Status Although a copy

of the "Evaluation of Prep-

arational Status" is being mailed to each member of the certificated staff, the Superintendent is also having it printed in the Bulletin in order that every member of the certificated staff shall have it called to his attention. The Superintendent cannot stress too strongly the statement con-

tamed

m

the nrst paragraph thereof.

"Whenever a course

is

taken for college credit

the responsibility of getting the transcripts to the office of the Coordinator of Salaries rests with the individual teacher. Some teachers have not turned in transcripts for recently completed collegiate work.

must obtain a regular credential in order to qualify for advancement to the next increment period block:' „

The 1949 . 50

Schedule limits the date Sal transcripts to 30 j une if such credits are tQ count towards c i assification f or the subsequ ent school year. The only exception to this of fiH

regulation is work completed within the 60 days prior to June 30 which may, upon verification of completion of such subjects by the instructor, be given until 15 August in which to get official transcripts to this office.

"Paragraph 7.10 is as fo n ws:

of the 1949-50 Salary Sched-

ule

"The following is a quotation from Paragraph 7.06 of the 1949-50 Salary Schedule as adopted by the Board of Education of the San

m

Francisco Unified School District:

'INCREMENT PERIOD BLOCKS



For

the purpose of fostering continuous improvement in service among teachers, and as a basis of eligibility to further increments, the following requirements are established:

'From and after July 1, 1948, increment period blocks on the salary schedule shall be fixed as follows: „, ,„ ^ -rFor Classification

t

1

'In lieu of the filing of the official transcript of record for work completed within sixty days prior to June 30 of any year, a certification by

of the institution where the work the Registrar & ... ., ( that was completed may be submitted to verity the WQrk was comp e ted, which verification is subject to confirmation by receipt of the official transcript by August 15. ,

each 3 complete school years

For Classification II each 4 complete school years -

For Classification

An offidal transcript of rec0 rd of college or university work and an official record of inser vice work and courses in specialized schools shall be su b itted to verify completion of such work. All such records must be filed in the office of the Coordinator of Salaries on or before June 30 in order to qualify a teacher for classification purposes or for advancement to a higher increment block for the succeeding fiscal year. <

advancement from any particular increment period block to the next higher increment period block he shall be required to show evidence of having satisfactorily completed six semester units of acceptable work within the increment period block from which he seeks advancement. A 'In order for a teacher to qualify for

teacher referred to in Sections 7.22 or 7.23 shall not qualify for advancement to the_ next increment period block in his classification until he has shown evidence of having satisfactorily completed all of the semester units required in the present and prior period blocks. In addition, a teacher referred to in Sections 7.22 or 7. 23 who is the holder of a temporary teaching credential

,

,

,

,

.

-

,

i

A

III

each5rompkte7choolyears ' r

,

shall

newly appointed probationary teacher be placed in Classification I until he pre-

an official transcript of record oi his colege or university work. If such transcript shows t h at he has completed 30 semester hours or 60 semester hours of added preparation beyond t h e bachelor degree prior to July 1 of the school year i n w hich he is appointed an adjustment of his salary will be made during the said school year anc he shall be placed at the minimum salary in his appropriate classification. Such transcript of record must be filed within 120 davs f tn e effective date of his appointment.' sents

i

]

h^a^ r-, 194 was 57 Y ears ^ of age or over shall be exempt from study mcrement requirements regardless of years of

A

teacher

service."

who on

J ul Y

^

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN School Directories

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

Now Available

A

revised issue of the Directory of the San Francisco Public Schools is now ready for distribution and will be issued in exchange for

1948 directories at the Information Desk, Cen93 Grove Street.

tral Office, third floor,

DIRECTORIES WILL NOT BE MAILED.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS the following schools: George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, James Denman, Doublerock NS., John Muir, Long-

George

visit

and Edison (Tox 40), Emerson, ParkYerba Buena and Irving M. Scott (Tox 50), Raphael Weill, Paul Revere. Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m.

fellow side,



Federation of Teachers, Local Mission High School. Barbeque. The 6:00 p.m. sociation for Health, Physical Recreation, San Francisco Unit. Grove.



61.

Room

California As-

Education and

Sigmund Stern

Tuesday, November 29



Young George

Conte (Tox 50), Westside N.S., Lawton (Tox 40), Alamo (Tox 11 and P.E.). 8:00 p.m. Final lecture and discussion for parents. Topic: "Your Child How Do ChildParent-Teacher Relationships Affect His Health?" Speaker: Dr. Kent Zimmerman, mental health consultant, California State Department of Public Health. Auditorium: Roosevelt Junior High School. Auspices: Adult Education Division and other cooperative agencies.



(Tox), Washington Irving. Friday, December 2 Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Roosevelt, Ridgepoint Sites 1 and

Farragut (Tox 60), Daniel Webster, Mar(Tox 50), Garfield (Tox 25), Sarah B. Cooper and Spring Valley, Golden Gate. 3,

shall

Wednesday, December 7



Annual Christmas dinner. Alpha Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma. Mural

Room, Women's City Club, 465 Post Monday, December 12 4:00 p.m.

is

a

seaman

recruit

P.E.

Barbeque

at

Grove

The 1949-50 program

of

activities

of

The

California Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, San Francisco Unit, will open with a barbeque at Sigmund Stern Grove on Monday, November 28, at 6:00 p.m.

Tickets are $1.50.

from the chairman

of

They may be obtained any

of the junior or senior

high physical education departments, or by contacting Win Perrine at Samuel Gompers or Miss Viola Beck in Ray Daugherty's office at 750 Eddy Street.

Gamma Xmas

Party

of the Alpha Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma, national honor society for women teachers, will be held on Wednesday, December 7, in the Mural

The annual Christmas dinner

Room

of the

The charge

Women's City Club, at 6:45 p.m. for the dinner will be $2.75 per

person. Reservations should be made with Miss Irene Kelly, telephone SKyline 1-5444 by De-

cember

Members may bring guests. Henry is in charge of arrangeEach member is reminded to bring un1.

Mrs. Alice ments.

wrapped

gifts for

the school children of Europe.

1

Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Aptos, Everett, Lincoln, Dudley Stone (Tox 35), Alvarado (Tox 35), San Miguel

Classroom

at present

United States Naval Reserve.

in the

Delta Kappa

Wednesday, November 30 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Ridgepoint N.S., F. S. Key N.S., Le

6:45 p.m.

High School

been notified by Senator Wm. F. Knowland that he has been chosen as one of two principal appointees to enter the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis next June. senior, has

HO,

Thursday, December

Parks, Polytechnic

B.

226,

Physicians will visit the following schools: Commerce, Balboa, Horace Sherman Mann, Bret Harte, Laguna Honda, Fremont, Pacific Heights, Miraloma, Lafayette, Sheridan (Tox 55), Argonne (Tox 25), Sutro. Annual dinner-meeting. The 6:00 p.m. Public Education Society. Cafeteria of the City College of San Francisco.



Wins Appointment

Poly Student

Monday, November 28 Physicians will

Street.

— Regular meeting. San Francisco

Teachers' Association. City Club, 465 Post Street.

Women's

Posters Stimulate

Music Interest

M.

Dennis, director of music, is in receipt of information that posters aimed at stimulating children's interest in music are being made available to schools and libraries by the American Music Conference, a public service organization in Chicago. The posters are 17x22 inches and are printed in three colors.

Charles

First in the series depicts a youngster listening enraptured to music. In the background is a picture of a school orchestra and chorus. The message reads: "Yes, You Can." Other posters in the series will present other approaches to the theme that every child can benefit from musical activity in the school. The American Music Conference is located at

332 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago

Illinois.

4,

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Forums

for Adults at

The 1950 Scholastic Awards Program

Commerce High School The following series of lectures and films will be presented by the Commerce Adult High School in the Auditorium of the High School of Commerce from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., on the following evenings: Friday, Dec. 2 Harold A. Burroughs of the Santa Fe Railroad will present the following color sound film in conjunction with his program: "Along the Santa Fe Trail", "El Navajo",



"Grand Canyon."



Friday, Dec. 9 Joseph B. Haggerty of the Southern Pacific Railroad will present the following color sound films in conjunction with his program: "This Is My Railroad", "Carlsbad Caverns". Robert Peterson of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad will present: "Washington,

Shrine of American Patriotism". Thursday, Dec. 15 William L. Henderson of the Canadian Pacific Railroad will present the following color sound films in conjunction with his program: "Across Canada", "Klondike Holiday", "Happy Voyage".



Friday, Jan, 6

—Edgan

R. Jennings of the Western Pacific Railroad will present the following color sound films in conjunction with his program: "Go West To San Francisco", "The Chicago Railroad Fair", "Scenery Unlimited".

A

discussion period follows each lecture.

San Francisco Adult lectures,

is

welcome

Any

to attend these

Free of Charge.

Workshops: "How Can Health, Physical Edand Recreation Contribute to the

ucation

Whole Individual?" Speakers: Dr. Jessie F. Williams, Columbia University; Dr. O. E. Byrd, head, Hygiene Department, Stanford University. 9:15 a.m. General session. 10:45 a.m. Workshops. 12:15 p.m. Luncheon. Speaker: Dr. Byrd. 2:00 p.m. Tour of the New San Leandro

Williams;

of

Dan Farmer, Bay

Workshops: Dr. Section president,

CAHPER. Local 61 to

Meet

The

regular meeting of the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61, will be held on Monday, November 28, 4:00 p.m., at Mission High School, Room 226.

The important

nounces.

To

give recognition to outstanding creative in fine arts and photography, numerous regional awards also will be made by Scholastic

work

Magazines and the 45 leading department stores from coast to coast which are co-sponsors. Regional exhibitions of winning art entries in these stores will precede the National High School Art Exhibition in the Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, and the National Scholastic-Ansco Photography Exhibition at Rockerfeller Plaza, New York City. Entries are invited in 24 art media and nine photography classifications. The national deadline for art and photography entries is March 15; regional deadlines are earlier.

Sixteen leading newspapers are co-sponsors of the Scholastic Writing Awards, and entries may be submitted in 12 creative writing and six

journalism classifications.

Much

of the best student writing will be published in the various Scholastic Magazines Literary Cavalcade, Senior Scholastic, Junior



World Week and Practical English. winning pieces in Art and Photography

Scholastic,

Conference Plans Announced The Bay Section Conference of Health, Physical Education and Recreation will be held at San Leandro High School on Satudray, December 3. The program follows:

— — — — High School Plant. 3:00 p.m. — Summary

One hundred scholarships valued at more than $40,000 and 1,020 cash awards are among the opportunities offered in the 26th annual national Scholastic Awards for art, photography and writing open to junior and senior high school students, Scholastic Magazines an-

business of this meeting will be the President's Report of the California Federation of Teachers Convention.

Many

also will be reproduced.

national deadline for Writing Awards March 1, with an earlier deadline for regional entries. Free Rules Booklets for all Awards may be obtained from Scholastic Magazines, 7 East 12th Street, New York 3, N. Y. Scholastic Awards are cooperative undertakings in which industry, business, cultural and social organizations, universities and colleges, public, private, and parochial schools all participate. The Awards have the approval of the Committee on Contests of the National Associa-

The

entries

is

Secondary School Principals. Leading and writers serve on the judging panels

tion of artists

which make the annual awards. Last year the Scholastic Awards program presented 2,654 national honors to junior and senior high school students. One thousand and nineteen different schools in all 48 states, the District of Columbia, Alaska, the Canal Zone,

Hawaii, Canada, and the U. S. Zone of Germany shared in this recognition. Ida May Anderson, supervisor of art education, Los Angeles, and Myrtie Gifford, supervisor of art, Berkeley, Calif., are

members

of

the National Advisory Committee for the Art

and Photography Awards. Regional exhibitions are held in California in both Los Angeles, at Bullock's and in San Francisco at

The Emporium.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN A.S.C.D. Convention In

Memoriam

FRANCIS Retired Principal

E.

to be Held in

CROFTS

— Lowell High School

November

4,

EDWARD BURTON

1949

De

GROOT

Former Director of Physical Education November 12, 1949

ADA GOLDSMITH Retired teacher

— Mission High School

November

21, 1949

Public Education Society Dinner

The

Public Education Society announces that annual dinner-meeting will be held on Tuesday, November 29, at 6:00 p.m., at the City its

College of San Francisco (Cafeteria building). to

The Society has extended a special invitation members of the certificated staff of the San

Francisco Unified School District.

Reservations ($1.75 incl. tax) may be made with Mrs. Norman Steuer, secretary, OVerland 1-7765.

Denver

Denver, Colorado, February 12fourth annual convention, will be Association for Supervision and Curricu-

Meeting for

15,

in

its

The lum Development.

Dr. William C. Merringer, one of America's leading psychiatrists and general secretary of the Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kansas, will keynote the conference theme when he speaks Sunday, February 12, at 8:00 p.m., on the topic "Mental Health For Better Living."

Presented also at the first general meeting be the 1950 yearbook which carries the same title as Dr. Menninger's address. The yearbook has been prepared by the yearbook committee under the chairmanship of Caroline Tryon, assistant professor in the School of Education, University of Chicago. will

James Patton, president of the National Farmers' Union, will address the convention at its closing

ruary

noonday luncheon on Wednesday, Feb-

15.

"Meet the West," an entertainment feature planned by the local committee, will be presented at the general meeting,

February

Monday

evening,

13.

Tuesday evening, February 14, will be free group meetings and reunions with friends. So far word has been received that college alumni groups and summer workshops will hold so-

for

Association Meets Dec. 12

The

regular meeting of the San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association will be held at Women's City Club, 465 Post Street, on Monday, December 12, at 4:00 p.m. A special Christmas program with appropriate music from San Francisco State College under the direction of Mr. Frieberg, will be presented. A social period will precede the meeting. All teachers are invited to attend.

cial

meetings.

Plans are underway for meeting sometime during the convention of the following groups: Association for Student Teaching, Natoinal Association of Elementary Science Teachers, American Education Fellowship, John Dewey Society, and Delta Kappa Gamma. Since the unique characteristic of the A.S.C.D. Convention has been its study and discussion groups, approximately half the convention time will be devoted to a consideration of such problems as were recommended by the membership.

"San Franciscans United" Mrs. Eleanor Knuth, directing teacher, and Mrs. Jane Yaggy, treasurer and mother-teacher, Lake Merced Play School, will tell about the

work

of that cooperative nursery school

Franciscans

United"

over

on "San

KSFO, Monday,

November 28, 6:15-6:30 p.m. Judge Bradford Bosley, member, Mayor's Committee on Hu-

man

Relations, will be moderator.

The Lake Merced Play School, San FerWay and Ocean Avenue, is under the

nando

Marina Adult School, part San Francisco Adult Education Dept.

supervision of the of the


fHBiiiifni VOL. XXI

No. 14

«i

©

DECEMBERS, 1949

Carpenter Memorial

City College to Present

Estelle

Annua! Christmas Concert

Music Scholarships

The fifteenth annual Christmas Concert, presented by City College of San Francisco and directed by Flossita Badger, music director, will be given Thursday, December 8, at 8:30 p.m., in the college auditorium, Ocean and Phelan Avenues, President Louis G. Conlan announced yesterday.

Traditionally as old as the college itself, the concert was first given by the a Capella Choir in 1935 and with the years has grown in popularity

and recognition.

Selections of Christmas music, both serious light, will be offered by the a Capella Choir, the Men's Glee Club, Treble Clef and the

and

College

Symphony

Orchestra.

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association announces that music scholarships of $250.00 each will be available this year and next to senior high school students of vocal or

instrumental music in memory of the late Estelle Carpenter, supervisor of music. The fund was raised entirely by voluntary subscription and the project has the approval of the Superintendent's Committee on Outside Activities.

Letters giving details have already been sent by the Scholarship Committee to all senior high school principals and teachers of music.

Candidates' applications must be mailed beDecember 15, to Miss Arline E. Lynch, chairman of Scholarship Committee. Final se-

fore

As a finale, Charles Dennis, Director of MuSan Francisco Unified School District, will be guest conductor as the combined groups, sic,

lection of this year's

winner by the board of

judges will take place in January.

comprising 170 students, present the "Hallelujah Chorus" from Handel's "Messiah."

Featured soloist ,on the evening's program will be Eileen Scott, who last year gained recognition through her lead role in the college's presentation of Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro." This year, Miss Scott was chosen to sing the role of Micaela in the Pacific Opera Company's production of Bizet's "Carmen."

Other

soloists

from the

college

Opera Work-

shop include Adele Lee, George Saunders, Jean Bonaccorsi, and Irene Boullet. Assisting Miss

Meyer M. Cahn,

in the production are orchestra director; Gertrude

Badger

Norgard, Treble Clef; Harold Cunningham, Men's Glee; Robert Morton and John French. Representatives of the ten college music organizations which include 700 members, recently formed a Music Guild and are acting as cosponsors of the concert. Admission is free.

Pediculosis Recognized as Illness

The California Department of Health has recently submitted technical medical opinions and evidence to the State Department of Education which makes it appear that if impetigo, scabies, and ringworm are considered as illness for crediting absence due to illness, pediculosis should likewise be considered as illness.

Therefore, as of the beginning of the fourth school month, November 28, 1949, pediculosis may be classified as illness and credited as absence due to illness in pupil attendance accounting

when

verified.

It is requested that a record be kept of the incidence of pediculosis in the respective schools for the duration of the current school year 1949-50.

School Directories

A

Elementary Principals Attention!

Any elementary

principal

anticipating en-

Now Available

revised issue of the Directory of the

Francisco Public Schools

and

will

is

now ready

be issued in exchange for Cen-

rollment increases or decreases for the spring

tribution

term should make an appointment to discuss classification and teacher personnel with Mrs.

1948 directories at the Information Desk,

Alta Harris not later than December

16, 1949.

San

for dis-

tral Office, third floor,

93 Grove Street.

DIRECTORIES WILL NOT BE MAILED.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Special Bailer Performance

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Physicians will visit the following schools: Raphael Weill HC, Abraham Lincoln, Poly-

and Burnett Laguna-Golden Gate NS., Sanchez (Tox 40), Emerson, John Muir, Commodore

technic, Marina, Ridgepoint Site 2

(Tox),

Sloat (Tox).

Tuesday, December 6 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sherman HC, Everett Room 204, Lowell, Pre-

Ridgepoint Site 1, Laguna Honda and Ulloa (Tox 40), Francisco OT, Redding (Tox), E. R. Taylor (Tox 45), Sarah B. Cooper, Daniel Webster, Sanchez SSC. sidio,

Wednesday, December 7 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Mission, Roosevelt, Bret Harte Annex, F. S. Key NS., Starr King (Tox 150),

— Annual Christmas dinner. Alpha

6:45 p.m.

Thcta Chapter

of Delta

at 2:30 o'clock at the

War Memorial Opera

House.

Sponsored by the Children's Theater AssoTschaikowsky's "Nutcracker Suite" will

ciation,

Committees from both the Children's Theater Association and the San Francisco Ballet Guild are arranging the program. Mrs. Edward Goldie and Mrs. James Bodrero are in charge of advance ticket sales, and they are being assisted by Mesdames Chapin Hunt, Lloyd Thomas, Gerald Stratford, Francis Hughes, Janet Lyon Scates, Roberto Escamilla, Wendell Witter, James Paramore, Earle Douglas and Paul McComish. Participating in the performance will be a large corps de ballet with a number of soloists and a symphony orchestra under the direction of Fritz Berens. The performance will mark the return to the San Francisco Ballet Company of Jocelyn Vollmar, who has been appearing in the East with the New York Civic Ballet. Sharing leading roles with her will be Celina Cummings, Rosalie Prosch, Joan Vickcrs, Jimmy Hicks and

Roland Vasquez. General ticket

Kappa Gamma. Mural

Room, Women's City Club, 465

ages are invited to attend a

all

grand Christmas performance of the San Francisco Ballet on the day after Christmas

be presented.

Monday, December 5

Hillcrest.

Students of special

Post Street.

1

at the

sales will

Sherman-Clay box

begin on December office.

Thursday, December 8 Physicians will Francisco r

visit

the

following schools:

OTR

Commerce, Roosevelt, Argonne NS, Dudley Stone, San Miguel, Sutro (Tox), Gough.



Regular meeting. Day Adult 3:45 p.m. Teachers. Marina Adult Americanization School, Fillmore at Chestnut Street.



Meeting and Christmas Party. Council of San Francisco Schoolwomen. French Room, Sir Francisc Drake Hotel. 4:00 p.m.

Friday,

December 9



December 10

12:30 p.m. Luncheon. Pi Lambda Theta Christmas luncheon. Defender's Room, Women's City Club, 465 Post Street.

Monday, December 12 4:00 p.m.

— Regular meeting. San Francisco

Classroom

Teachers' Association. City Club, 465 Post Street.

All members of the certificated staff are invited to furnish contributions during the school year to the San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin which they think would be of interest to other members of the teaching profession.

Copy intended for publication in the Bulletin should be mailed or delivered in sufficient time to reach the Superintendent's office by 12 o'clock noon of the Tuesday preceding the Monday

Physicians will visit the following schools: George Washington, Francisco, Candlestick Cove, Alamo, Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Golden Gate, Parkside.

Saturday,

"Bulletin" Deadline

Women's

of publication.

This "deadline"

necessary to insure delivery on the following Monday mornings. Administrators, teachers and organization secretaries are requested to make a special note of this "deadline." is

of the bulletins to the schools

must be signed and should be typeand should not contain more than 200 words to insure publication. Articles announcing courses should be cleared through Watt A. Long, associate superintendent Articles

written, doublespaced,

of instruction, prior to submission to the Super-

intendent's

office.

Tuesday, December 13

8:00 p.m.

Aim

is

—Discussion. Topic: "Your School's

Your

ciation for

Child's Welfare." Auspices: Asso-

Childhood Education and Mental

Health Society. Roosevelt Junior High School.

Music Bulletin Being Prepared

The Music Bulletin will be published in December. Send any items to Mrs. Nelle Griffis, 750 Eddy Street, before December 9.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Young People's Concerts to Open December 10

Educational Programs for Children The Radio Listeners of Northern California have agreed to consider a plan for co-operation with KALW, the public school FM educational station, by providing it with recommendations on commercial radio programs suitable for children. A delegation of Radio Listeners, headed by Mrs. Walter C. Fell, president, visited KALW, housed at the Samuel Gompers Trade School, on November 28, and was addressed by K. L. Dragoo, program director of the station. In inviting the Radio Listeners co-operation monthly publishes Mr. Dragoo said that a list of programs recommended for children and would welcome the Radio Listeners' col-

KALW

lective opinion.

Mr. Dragoo urged family-unit radio listen"Have the listening on a casual basis but make it inconvenient for little Johnny to be some place else when the listening time for a chosen program comes around," he said. As a means of debunking radio murder shockers, Mr. Dragoo suggested parents take their

The most outstanding

series in the history of

San Francisco Symphony's Young People's Concerts will open in the Opera House Saturday morning, December 10, at 10:30 o'clock, under the leadership of Kurt Herbert Adler, the

with Alexander Fried, The Examiner's music critic, as commentator. Five concerts, combining educational and entertainment values, make up the series which will continue monthly throughout the music season.

For the first concert, Adler has announced a program featuring Antonio Sotomayor as artist-illustrator in a performance of "Polka and Fugue," from Weinberger's opera "Shvanda, the Bagpipe Player."

ing.

children to a mystery broadcast in order that the youngsters may see the sound effects props, such as a well-filled sack producing the "thud" of a dead body.

He

by

told the

Radio

Listeners' delegation.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janitorial vacancies exist in the San Francisco School System:

1

A

Single tickets for all five Young People's Concerts are now on sale at the Symphony Box Office, Sherman, Clay.

C G C

— Franklin 106 Janitor — John Muir 106 Janitor — Bay View 106 Janitor

be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Lea-

These vacancies

will

supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building

vell,

Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

In

Memoriam

IDA

E.



SHAW

Grant Elementary Retired principal School

November

to Meet December 8 The Council of San Francisco Schoolwomen will hold its December meeting and Christmas

Schoolwomen

children.

More than 400 people trained at KALW are now employed in the radio field, Mr. Dragoo

1

plays the First Movement of minor. Grieg's Piano Concerto in

Deane Spaulding

also cautioned against "solitary listening"

to the radio

1

In addition to symphonic music, of the old and contemporary schools, the youthful audience will hear a soloist of its own age when Rae

25,

1949

Party in the French Room of the Sir Francis Drake Hotel on Thursday, December 8, at 4:00 p.m.

An

enjoyable program has been prepared. will be Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of schools.

The "Guest Speaker"

All administrative women and secondary schoolwomen are cordially invited to attend.

Tea will be Phone

ORdway

served.

reservations to: 3-0357, or Elsie

Margaret L. Dunn,

M. Schou, WAlnut

1-8550.

Washington Students Winners Gerhard Lowenthal, a George Washington High School student, was awarded a gold statuette at the recent San Francisco State College state-wide radio announcing contest, in which he achieved first place honors.

Another Washingtonian, Ida Hirsch, was awarded a plaque and a radio for placing first in the "I Speak for Democracy" contest, sponsored by the San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce locally, and the National Junior

Chamber

of

Commerce

nationally.

Both of these students are for their achievements.

to

be congratulated

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

JOIN

JAN. 16-31

fujfit fnfiwit/fo

Paresis THE

MARCH OF

THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR

DIMES

INFANTILE PARALYSIS

Concert Tickets Available Today

A.C.E. Schedules Discussion Association for Childhood Education

The

sponsoring a joint meeting with the Mental

Health Society on December in the Roosevelt Junior

be

five

13, at 8:00 p.m.,

High School. There

will

persons on the platform to present the

and to discuss the following topic: "Your School's Aim is Your Child's Welfare"— The Public School Cares About and Fosters the Mental Health of Your Child. Association will present the following

group of experts in their own ants

at

that time: Dr.

pediatrics,

fields as discuss-

Ernst Eolff, chief of

Mt. Zion Hospital; John Roberts,

coordinator, Child Welfare, San Francisco Unified

School District; Mrs. Kenneth MacDonald,

educational chairman, Second District P.-T.A.;

Mrs.

Mary Ryan,

Muir School; Mrs.

sixth grade

teacher,

John

Beatrice Nestor, teacher and

grade counselor, Portola Junior High School. is open to all who are no admission charge.

This meeting

There

is

cert series to be presented

Art Commission

will

open Monday, December

5.

facts about

The

Single-ticket sale for the 1950 municipal conby the San Francisco

is

interested.

Each of the eight performances to be given Opera House during the month of January will offer the full San Francisco Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Artur Rodzinski. The world-famous conductor was formerly with the New York Philharmonic and at the

the Chicago

Symphony

Orchestra.

Embarking on its new, popular-price policy, the Art Commission announced that tickets will sell for 60*, 90*, $1.20 and $1.80, including tax. Tickets are available at Sherman Clay & Co., in San Francisco and Oakland.

The 1950 concert

series

will

offer

three

on Thursday and Saturday evenings, and two single performances, on Tuesday eve"pairs,"

nings

— for a

total of five different

programs.

Harold L. Zellerbach, president of the Commission, said the series will go far toward the achievement of two major goals: presentation of symphonic music in the Opera House at prices within the reach of all and, equally important,

employment

of local talent as guest

artists.

Christmas Luncheon Planned The Pi Lambda Theta Christmas luncheon will be held at the Women's City Club, San Francisco, Defenders' Room at 12:30 p.m., Saturday, December 10. Mrs. Emma Plank will speak on "Pi Lambda Theta's Cheer in Vienna." Members may make reservations by calling WEst 1-4148.

Meeting Date Announced Because of the Christmas recess intervening, the next meeting of the Teachers' Association of San Francisco will be held on Monday, January 16, 1950, according to an announcement received from Miss Constance McFarland, Association secretary.



BULLETIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS ^m=mc VOL. XXI

DECEMBER

No. 15

12,

1949

Winter Quarter Courses at Stanford University Stanford University's School of Education announces that the following courses will be conducted in the late afternoon, evening and on Saturdays for educational workers during the Winter Quarter 1949-50:

SeaMM 4

REGISTRATION PROCEDURE Registration dates for educational workers are: Winter Quarter: January 3 through Saturday Noon January 7. Teachers in the vicinity who plan to take part-time courses must have been admitted to the University prior to December 1, 1949. Complete admission credentials must be filed at the Registrar's Office by December 1. Consult the Registrar's Office for details. All students will follow the procedure outlined below in registering for this work. 1. Secure your registration booklet in the Registrar's Office, Administration Building. Inform the clerk that you wish to register for special classse for educational

C^

^UjudhC.

Superintendent of Schools.

workers.

Proceed to the School of Education for signature and approval of the program you have planned to 2.

take.

Call at the Office of the School of Education, 20, first floor, and leave your No. 5 card from the registration booklet and receive certain departmental record blanks. 4. Secure and file a class card for each of the courses to be taken. 5. Have fees adjusted to unit basis at the Registrar's Office, and pay fees at Cashier's Office. 6. Return the registration booklet, signed, to the Registrar's Office. 3.

Room

TUITION AND CREDITS A maximum registration of

6 quarter units will be allowed full-time educational workers. The minimum tuition payment is for 4 units of credit.

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 6 units

$85.00 Tuition (including incidental fees) for 5 units 75.00

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 4 units

This scale applies only to full-time em-

ployed educational workers.

Monday 123— Public p.m., Rm. 6.

Law— (3)

Breyer,

M

7-10

— Educational Testing and Evaluation — Rm. M 7-10 224 — Organization and Administration Bartky, M 7-10 Rm. mentary Schools — Quillen, 311 — International Understandings — 151

(3)

p.m.,

Curtis,

53.

of Ele-

p.m.,

(3)

2.

(3)

MW 4-5:30, Rm. 56.

— Educational Psychology — Humphreys, TTh p.m., Rm. 350c — Advanced Graduate Students Seminar 1.15

(4)

7-9

2.

T

Teachers high and elementary Dec. 16, 8:00 a.m. Teachers 14 days Principals and assistant principals 21 days Dec. 16, 1:00 p.m. Adult schools Senior

junior

high,

schools

Clerks and Janitors December 16-30

Adult schools Other schools

p.m. Dec. 27, 8:00 a.m.

...Dec. 27, 1:00

— History Education — W 222 — Secondary School Administration — Odell, W Rm. Arts Evaluation Seminar — 451s — Master 100

Rm.

4-6,

Rm.

(3) Porter,

of

7-10,

2.

of

W 7-10, Rm. 53.

Staff,

(3)

6.

(3)

Thursday

— Seminar T 350a — Master

in General School Administration 7-10, Rm. 6 or 56. of Arts Seminar (3) Curtis, Th

—322

(2-5) Odell,

4-6,

Rm.



56.

Saturday

Tuesday

(0) Quillen,

delivered Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: the

to

7-10,

School

December Time Sheets

December Time Sheets should be

Wednesday 65.00

NOTE:

Delivery Dates for

78.

— Audio Visual Education — 225 — School Plant Planning — 141

9-12,

Rm. 4 &

(3)

(3)

S9-12, Rm.

Iverson, S

6.

MacConnell,

2.

Instruction begins Wednesday, January 4.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Data on Science Supplies

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

Harold Spears,

assistant superintendent, calls the attention of principals of elementary schools the following information relative to "Science Supplies": to

"Very soon you will receive a primary science your primary classes. It consists of a magnet, magnifying glass, glass prism, and a kit for use in

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, December 12 Physicians will visit the following schools: James Lick, Francisco, Bay View PE, Excelsior, NS, Fremont, John Muir (Tox 40), Emerson (Tox 40), Raphael Weill (Tox 80), Parkside.



Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Classroom Teachers' Association. Women's City Club, 465 Post Street.

Tuesday, December 13 Physicians will visit the following schools: Everett, Marina, Page-Broderick NS, Bryant, Grant OT, E. R. Taylor, Daniel Webster and (Tox 45), Sherman-Gough (Tox I. M. Scott (Tox 3 and PE), Sanchez (SLafayette 40),

SC). 4:00 p.m. cation.

— Public meeting.

Fourth

floor,

Board

of

Edu-

93 Grove Street.

Wednesday, December 14 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, James Denman, James Lick, Bay View (Tox 45), Westside NS, Marshall, John Geary, Hawthorne (Tox 25), Columbus, F. S.

Key.

Thursday, December 15 Physicians will visit the following schools: Grant OTR, Balboa, Presidio, Lincoln (Tox 15 and PE), Patrick Henry (Tox 40), Ulloa, Argonne (Tox 6 and PE). Friday,

December 19 and 20 Institute sessions.

December 17

The Junior League of San Francisco will present a ballet preview for children on December 17 in the Peacock Court of the Mark Hopkins Hotel, at 10:30 a.m. The San Francisco Ballet School, under the direction of Willam Christensen, will provide a lecture demonstration of steps

and

excerpts

from

"The Nutcracker

Suite." No admission fee is charged, are invited to bring their children.

Local 61 (AFL) to

"Also to be delivered soon is a science chest the intermediate grades. It will contain items listed on a separate sheet that accompanies the chest. Kindly check the contents and report any discrepancies to the warehouse. The test tubes, test tube support, and the magnetic compass will arrive at a later time. Do not report them missing. For your convenience the list of contents is subdivided into chest areas that should make for easier identification of the equipment. It should be well to post the list of contents on the inside cover of the chest. for

"The contents of the kit and chest are correlated with activities in the three Science Teaching Guides and also with the State Science Textbook

"When

Series.

science items in the chest or kit need

replacing, they can be ordered from an Elementary Science Requisition Form which you will receive before the end of the fall term.

"An in-service training course in the use of the intermediate-grades science equipment will be offered during the spring. Plans for this instruction will be announced at a later date."

Attendance Records Audited

December 16

Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, James Denman, Ridgepoint Site 2, Edison NS, Alamo, Franklin (Tox 20), Hancock, Visitacion Valley.

Ballet Preview

medicine dropper in a transparent plastic container. Other equipment used in teaching primary science can be brought from home.

and parents

Meet Today

The regular meeting of the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61, will be held on Monday, December 12, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 226, at Mission High School.

T. H. Batelle, field representative for the Division of Public School Administration, State of California, has rendered his first report on the audit of San Francisco Unified School District attendance records. The report is most gratifying in that no major violation of Education Code procedures was noted.

The following suggestions, however, were made in a sufficient number of instances to justify repeating 1.

them for

all

schools:

All register entries should be recorded in

ink within five days after the close of the school

month. 2.

Original signatures only are acceptable on Rubber stamps or initials do

verification cards.

not constitute verification. 3.

Individual pupil record cards should be

totaled each month and a total cards at the end of the year.

made

of all

The Superintendent is pleased with the San Francisco schools' adherence to Education Code requirements and the consistent accuracy reported by the State field representative.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Christmas Seal Appeal

Students Participate in National History Test

Now Under Way "Fight rheumatic fever, one of the most serious threats to our school children," Dr. Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of San Francisco's Public Schools, urged yesterday.

"The Christmas

Seals

you buy from the San

Francisco Tuberculosis Association support the disease and rheumatic fever as well as tuberculosis," Dr. Clish continued. "There are approximately 200 cases of acute rheumatic fever each year among our school children. There are more than a thousand children in school who have had rheumatic fever and may have it again with resulting dam-

campaign against heart

age to their hearts.

"The San Francisco Tuberculosis Association has carried on a continuous three way campaign to combat this disease, through education of the medical profession, of allied professional groups, and of the public. It supports much needed research in heart disease and rheumatic fever and provides other services for cardiac and tuberculosis patients.

"During the past three years we have developed a health education program here in our San Francisco schools. Teachers have been educated and encouraged to be observant of the health of the pupils and to co-operate closely with the school physician and school nurse towards the early discovery of disease symptoms.

"The Tuberculosis Association has

at all times

assisted us in the futherance of this

and

program

ber

6.

They took

the national examination in the seventh annual Hearst Newspapers American History Awards. At the same time, in major cities across the Nation, top high school history talent took the test which will determine America's No. 1 high school history scholar and serve as the basis for national American History Awards including $2,000, $1,000 and $500 in United States saving bonds. The San Francisco students won the right to compete nationally in a local History Awards examination in which the record-breaking total of 800 students from San Francisco senior high schools competed.

The San Francisco History Awards team

in the schools.

Noel de Nevers, St. Ignatius, first place local winner; James Thomas Enright, St. Ignatius, second; Beverly Chan, Galileo, third; Lawrence Rabinowitz, Lowell, fourth, and Leonard M.

Rodney, George Washington, fifth. The examination on December 6 was administered by Pat Cadigan of the San Francisco Civil Service Commission. Results of the national test will be announced in The Examiner following the Christmas school holiday.

MARCH OF DIMES

"As a safeguard against our children becoming victims of tuberculosis, I would also like to recommend that every adult obtain a free chest X-ray, another Christmas Seal service. Every case of tuberculosis comes from an existing case and with children it is usually a matter of being exposed to an adult, probably in the home, who has tuberculosis but does not know it. Your support of the Christmas Seal campaign in San Francisco will help toward the control of tuberculosis, rheumatic fever and heart disease."

Quizdown Broadcast Change The Examiner-KGO Quizdown

is

now

being

broadcast from Studio "A", Radio City, at a

new time

— 10:30

to

1 1

:00 a.m.

After a three-week Christmas recess, effective

from December 17 through 31, Quizdown will resume next year at this new location and hour.

A

limited

at the

number

KGO

tor's office at

of tickets are

still

available

and the Quizdown EdiThe Examiner for the broadcasts.

box

office

in-

cluded:

program

has, through the years, developed the anti-

tuberculosis

San Francisco's five best high school history students measured their knowledge and ability against the Nation's best last Tuesday, Decem-

JANUARY

16-31

-

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Boys' Club Extends

Recent Accessions in the Teachers' Professional Library THOMPSON, CARL O. Keys to Teaching

Invitation to Tableau Ele-

mentary School Music. Minneapolis, Schmitt, 1949. A practical approach to the problems of teaching music in the elementary school with value for

all

teachers.

McNEMAR, QUINN.

Psychological Statistics.

New

York, Wiley, 1949. This covers, in logical order, all the statistical techniques, except factor analysis, that are frequently useful in psychological research.

THORNDIKE, ROBERT L. Personnel Selection, Test and Measurement Techniques. New York, Wiley, 1949. A critical study of the techniques necessary to a successful program of personnel selection. This book tells how to develop good tests, how to apply them efficiently,

and how

to interpret

them accurately.

A

Study of Functional Reading. COBB, JACOB E. Nashville, Tenn., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1948. This investigation deals with the ability of sixth grade children to read functionally. The subjects were 1,115 children in 8 southern and southwestern states in both rural and urban schools.

WHITAKER, JOE

R. Geography in School and College. Nashville, Tenn., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1948. Essays on geography and related fields.

SYMONDS, PERCIVAL M. The dynamics of Parent-Child Relationships. New York, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1949. Counselors, child guidance and parental education teachers will find this book dealing with varieties of parent-child relationships particularly valuable.

KONOPKA, GISELA. Therapeutic Group Work With Children. Minnesota, University of Minnesota Press, 1949. The successful group guidance work with a group of delinquent boys, and with a group of emotionally disturbed adolescent girls in a child guidance clinic as related in this volume has real value for teachers

and counselors.

L. Children in Conflict. New York, International Universities Press, 1949. Case histories of children with emotional problems, this is the record of twelve years psychoanalytic practice written for parents and teachers to explain the main rules of emotional development.

SANDS, LESTER

B.

Secondary Schools.

functional text designed to help students make the transition from student to teacher, this will help the new teacher to refresh her memory on some of the important principles of teaching.

LASSERS, LEON. 8 Keys

to Normal Speech and Child Adjustment. Salem, Ore., State Department of Education, 1949. An associate professor of speech and hearing education at San Francisco State College has written this practical manual on speech problems.

Modern Education and Human Values, Volume II. Pittsburgh, Pa., University of Pittsburgh, 1948. Education: the dream and the reality, by Edward Weeks; The person and the mind of man in modern education, by Reinhold Niebuhr; Education and cultural understanding by George N. Shuster; Recent educational developments in England by Sir Richard Livingstone; and Adult education in England by the same lecturer are the lectures included in this volume. Gentlemen.

Personality plus, and Pretty, please, herself a teen-ager, has written this sprightly guide for the high school boy which should answer most of his questions on etiquette.

EDWARD

Francisco. "It

a tableau,

is

marvelously

"The Lord's Last Supper"

set in a little theatre built for the

purpose. The tableau has been done in life size imported handcarved historical figures. It is finely lighted, and accompanied by a story which will thrill and touch your heart, and which you will remember for many years to come.

"We would like you to see this deeply touching tableau if you can possibly do so on Wednesday, December 14, through Sunday, December 18, the hours when it is open being 3:00 to 5:00 p.m., and 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. "We

believe this will

permanent attractions

become one of the great San Francisco, not only

of

own people, but for all of the visitors to the city. It is located at the Beach in the very center of George Whitney's Playland."

for our

Evaluation of Transcripts

The

State

Department

of Education has ad-

memorandum

to

Ward M.

Nichols, personnel coordinator, relative "Evaluation of Transcripts":

"The demand for credentials usually tapers some extent during the months of December through March. During this interval the off to

An Introduction to Teaching New York, Harper, 1949. A

DALY, SHEILA JOHN, Blondes Prefer New York, Dodd, 1949. The author of

"The San Francisco Boys' Club extends to you and your teaching staff an invitation to see one of the most remarkable and beautiful attractions which has ever been presented in San

dressed the following

RAMBERT, MADELEINE

in

The Superintendent is in receipt of the following letter from David M. Botsford, president of the San Francisco Boys' Club Inc.:

VOLTMER, F. The Organization and Administration of Physical Education. 2nd ed. New York, Appleton/Century, 1949. Written to help the teacher in the field and the administrator this volume approaches the subject of physical education from the education rather than the health or exercise aspects.

Credentials Office

is

better equipped to take

care of questions concerning credentials and evaluations in terms of the requirements for

We shall appreciate it very much if inform the personnel under your supervision to forward their requests for evaluacredentials.

you

will

tion

now

rather than wait until just prior to the

plans

summer school. Applicants receivnow will have ample time to for summer school. School adminis-

trators will

have a better knowledge of the can-

beginning of

ing evaluations

make

didates' credential possibilities before contracts

are signed for the following school year.

Any-

thing you can do to encourage your personnel to present their inquiries

months

will help to

during these winter

render better service to our

teachers.

"Complete

official

transcripts of all college

training should be submitted by those request-

ing evaluations."

.

<^a*&&fixzsnc
BULLETIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 3^=»f VOL. XXI

©

No. 16

Kindergarten and

First

JANUARY

3,

1950

Grade

Class Size Approved At the December 20 .Board

of

Education

meeting, the following formula for kindergarten and first grade class size was approved, effective with the beginning of the new term:

Kindergarten

The

school shall be assigned one teacher When a class exceeds 30, a second session must be formed. When the school has only enough children for one session, the teacher shall spend the other half day performing instructional duties as may be outlined by the principal and approved by the Assistant Superintendent in charge of elementary schools, or the teacher may be assigned for the other half day to a kindergarten group in a neighboring school. (

up

1

)

to 55 children enrolled.

(2)

A

(3)

Three teachers

Superintendent of Schools.

second teacher is to be assigned when the enrollment reaches 55. shall

be assigned at 112

enrollment.

Design Course Opens January 12

(4) In the case of the need of more than 3 teachers, the formula above shall be applied.

Grade

The

The Marian Hartwell School of Design announces a course in basic design directly related to be given to crafts-textiles, ceramics, jewelry in the Spring semester on Thursday afternoons, 4 30 to 6 30, opening January 12. Also a lecture course upon increasingly important phases of composition in contemporory painting; their re-



1

basis of classification for grade

1

shall

be 25 pupils.

:

Where the change to 25 pupils in grade one means a need for more teachers, the principals of such schools Harris at once.

should report same to Mrs.

:

lationship

any principal thinks

room

it

impractical due to

reduce grade one in to 25, the matter should be discussed with Mrs. Harris at once.

limited

Art Courses Offered

SPEARS,

Assistant Superintendent.

Evening classes in Color and Design under Rudolph Schaeffer, beginning January 10. Approved for veterans. Classes limited, registration now open. Rudolph Schaeffer School of

Europe

In connection with the

Design, 136

Summer

St.

Anne

Street,

TUxedo

2-8388.

Session at

the San Francisco State College a Seminar-tour of Europe with college credit is being organized by Professor Alfred G. Fisk. Arrangements are being made to interview Europeon leaders, to visit war-destroyed areas, and to study general conditions. Inquiries should be directed to Mr. Fisk, San Francisco State College, San Francisco 2.

:

from 30

HAROLD

in

painting;

facilities, to

his or her school

Seminar

of

powers of expression. Wednesday evenings, 7 00 to 9 00, opening January 1 1 Telephone ORdway 3-8980. :

If

modes

established

to

their inherent

Minimum Days February

1

for Pupils

and

2 will

be

minimum

days for

pupils in the elementary and secondary schools in order to provide the teachers

time to complete their reports.

with sufficient

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools

is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

Association to Honor Music Leaders Charles M. Dennis, director

of

music in the

San Francisco Schools and national president of the Music Educators' National Conference, be one of three music teachers to be honored Sunday evening, January 8, at Marina Junior High School by the California Music Teachers' Association. will

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Tuesday, January 3 Physicians will Galileo,

visit

the following schools:

Commerce, Marina, Daniel Webster,

Bret Harte, Sarah B. Cooper, Sanchez and McKinley, (Tox 40), E. R. Taylor, Sheridan, Redding (Tox 35) Ulloa and Laguna Honda (Tox .

40)

,

Sherman, Kate Kennedy.

Wednesday, January 4 Physicians will Sunshine, George

visit

the following schools:

Washington, Girls High, James Denman, Emerson, Burnett and Ridgepoint Site II (Tox), Argonne (Tox 10). Starr King and Bryant (Tox 50), Lawton (Tox 40), Fremont, LeConte (Tox 40). Winfield Scott

(Tox

15).

Thursday, January 5

Honored with Mr. Dennis will be William Knuth, chairman of the division of creative arts of San Francisco State College and president of the California-Western Music Educators' Conference, and Samuel K. Radetsky, San Francisco piano teacher and president of the Music Teachers' Association of California. Feature of the evening will be a free concert by the San Francisco State College concert band. Elaine Damele, 19-year-old pianist, will be the soloist in George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue.

The public is invited to the Sunday evening conference and sessions on Monday at the Steinway Hall of Sherman, Clay where musical authorities will speak at the semi-annual conference of the state music teachers.

Physicians will visit the following schools: Abraham Lincoln, Lowell, Everett, Patrick

Henry, Sunnydale NS, Fairmount and Junipero Serra (Tox). Longfellow, Alamo (Tox 20)., San Miguel, Sutro (Tox 15), Edison (Tox 30). 3:45 p.m. -- Regular meeting. Day Adull Marina Adult Americanization Teachers. School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets. Friday, January

6

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Francisco, Commodore Stockton,

and

(Tox), Franklin (H), Spring Valley, Sarah B. Cooper (Tox 25), Farragut, Marshall (Tox).

Ridgepoint

Sites I

Visitacion

Valley,

II

Garfield,

Monday, January 16

cil

—Meeting

Governing CounSan FranAuditorium, Health Center Building, 101

4:00 p.m.

of the

of the Teachers' Association of

cisco.

Grove

Street.

Ludwig Altman

to

Conduct Course

Ludwig Altman, organist of the San FranSymphony and of Temple Emanu-El, will give a course (X144CD) on Chorale Preludes and Organ Sonatas for the University of Calicisco

fornia Extension. Center of the study subjects be the complete "Liturgical Year" of Bach and all of the Sonatas of Bach, Mendelssohn,

Fellowship Offered by Mills College

The

Mills College School of Education offers for an able young woman

an annual fellowship

who

has had teaching experience and is amtoward her degree of Master of Arts or Master of Education.

bitious to proceed

The fellow is expected to give twelve to eighteen hours of service to the School of Education each week. Such assistance usually consists of reading papers, planning and supervising field trips, supervising the education workshop. It is desirable that the applicants have some typing skill or be willing to attain such skill in a summer session prior to her enrollment at Mills College: The stipend covers tuition and residence during the college term; the student must meet certain other college fees to the extent of about $50. Applicants must hold a bachelor's degree with an undergraduate grade average of at least "B". Teaching experience may be in either elementary or secondary schools, or both. Applications may be secured by writing the Secretary of the Committee on Fellowships, Mills College, Oakland 13, California and must be filed bv March 15, 1950.

will

Hindemith.

The course will be held in the organ loft of Temple Emanu-El, on Arguello and Lake Streets, on Monday evenings at 7:30 p.m., beginning on January 16. Upper division course, two

units; fee $18.00.

Governing Council to Meet The next meeting of the Governing Council of the Teachers' Association of San Francisco will be held on Monday, January 16, in the Auditorium of the Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street, at 4 p.m.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

A

Tribute to An Outstanding Educator Death, on December

7,

Art Commission Announces 1950 Concert Series

1949, brought to a

close the career of a great educator. ces Mooney, regarded by many as

Mrs. Franone of the

outstanding teachers in San Francisco's history, on her retirement in 1935 had spent 52 years in active service, 16 of them as principal of the

Hawthorne Elementary School. "Fanny" Mooney was born in Oakland and educated for her profession at San Jose State Normal School. Attractive, of lively wit, and possessing a bright sense of humor, she endeared all, especially to her fellow-teachers

The 1950 Concert Series of the San Francisco Art Commission opens at the San Francisco Opera House on the evening of Thursday, January 5. It is comprised of eight concerts, three of which will have identical programs on Thursday and Saturday nights and two singles to be held respectively on two consecutive Tuesdays, January 10 and 17. Conductor Artur Rodzinski has been engaged by the Art Commission for the entire January series.

herself to

whom

"she loved and underfighter for better working conditions in the teaching profession, and labored on the state and local fronts to establish teacher tenure and teacher pensions. Her last effort was on behalf of the ballot proposition "C", which increased the monthly pensions of retired city employees.

and the children stood". She was a

The City of San Francisco owes an incalculto "Fanny" able debt to a great personality, Mooney, loyal citizen, devoted teacher, valiant



gentlewoman. Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

1 1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

C C C C C C C C C

—Lakeside —Ridgepoint 102.1 Janitress —Visitacion Valley 106 Janitor — Visitacion Valley 106 Janitor— Balboa 106 Janitor — James Denman 106 Janitor — San Miguel 106 Janitor — Lincoln Elementary 106 Janitor — Fairmount 102.1 Janitress

102.1 Janitress

These vacancies

will

3

be held open for a period

of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled,

may

still be applied for under the seniority Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

they

rule.

"Attitudes Toward Shakespeare" San Francisco's Lowell High School cooperated this fall in a study conducted by the School of Education of Stanford University concerned with "Moving Attitudes with Moving Pictures." An article by that name appears on page 446 of the December, 1949, issue of Educational Screen. This interesting article discusses ways and means of developing more favorable atti-

Featuring the San Francisco

Symphony Or-

and, on January 10, the Municipal Chorus, Hans Leschke, director, the Art Commission has contracted for ten soloists who will appear respectively on all the programs except on the opening pair of Thursday, January 5 and Saturday, January 7. chestra

Six of these soloists have been selected from

among the most talented local young artists. One of these is pianist Wanda Krasoff of Berkeley, who will play Cesar Franck's "Symphonic Variations" on the second pair of concerts, Thursday, January 12 and Saturday, January 14. The other local soloists are singers and include baritone Patrick McVey, who hails originally from Colorado but who has made his home in the Bay region in recent years; Lu-

Amara, an Atwater Kent prize winner who made her formal debut in San Francisco barely two years ago with marked success; Dorothy

cine

Warenskjold, soprano, of whom critics say that "she has everything it takes." Paul Walti, tenor, and Velna Lou King, contralto, who were heard in May of 1949 during the Spring festival presented by the San Francisco Art Commission in Honegger's "King David," will be featured again in a performance of the same work, scheduled for Tuesday, January 10. Soloists coming from afar include the Greek contralto Elena Nikolaidi, who made her sensational New York debut in January of this year. She will be given a fine opportunity to display her talent in San Francisco when she sings in a mixed program of Verdi, Mahler and Wagner on Tuesday, January 17; Suzy Morris, Rose Bampton and Francis Bible, who will be heard

a program entirely devoted to Richard Strauss in excerpts from Salome and Der Rosenkavalier. This program is slated for the last pair of the season, on Thursday, January 19 in

and Saturday, January

21.

The opening pair, January 5 and 7 is devoted to Russian music, including Glinka, Shostakovich and Tschaikowsky.

among students in regard to Shakespearean Drama. Copies of the magazine are avail-

The Art Commission is originating with the January Concert Series a new low-price policy with seats at the San Francisco Opera House selling at 600, 900, $1.20 and $1.80, including

able in the Teachers' Professional Library.

tax.

tudes

j

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Age Computation Table As of February

1,

1950

This table is to be used in determining the age of each pupil to the nearest month, to be entered in the general record of the State Register. It is not to be used in determining the ages for kindergarten and first grade entrance.

The

latest dates of birth for

admission of kindergarten and

first

grade pupils during the school

year 1949-50 are:

KINDERGARTEN SECOND TERM

August

(Spring 1950)

1944 1943 1942| 1941

Date of Birth

1945

Jan. 1-Jan. Jan. 16-Feb. 15.. Feb. 16-Mar. 15. Mar. 16-Apr. 15

5-1

6-1

5-0 4-11

4-9 4-8 4-7 4-6 4-5 4-4 4-3 4-2

6-0 5-11 5-10 5-9 5-8 5-7 5-6 5-5 5-4 5-3 5-2

4-1

5-1

15....

Apr. 16-May 15. May 16-June 15. June 16- July 15. July 16-Aug. 15.

Aug. 16-Sept. 15 Sept. 16-Oct. 15.

Oct. 16-Nov. 15. Nov. 16-Dec. 15. Dec. 16-Dec. 31.

INSTRUCTIONS:

4-10

7-1

8-1

7-0

8-0

6-11

7-11

6-10 6-9

7-10

GRADE

FIRST August

1945

1940| 1939

1,

1938 19371

il-1 11-0

6-8 6-7 6-6 6-5 6-4 6-3 6-2

7-9 7-8 7-7 7-6 7-5 7-4 7-3 7-2

8-10 8-9 8-8 8-7 8-6 8-5 8-4 8-3 8-2

9-10 9-9 9-8 9-7 9-6 9-5 9-4 9-3 9-2

10-10 10-9 10-8 10-7 10-6

6-1

7-1

8-1

9-1

10-1

DATE OF BIRTH June Feb.

11-10 11-9 11-8 11-7 11-6

10-5 11-5 10-4 11-4 10-3 |ll-3 10-2 |ll-2 11-1

12-10) 13-10 14-10 12-9 113-9 14-9 12-8 13-8 14-8 1

12-7 12-6 12-5 12-4 12-3 12-2 12-1

113-7

113-6 |13-5 1

13-4

|13-3 j

1

13-2 13-1

9 years, 7 6 years,

1944

In computing ages to accompany the results of 14 or February 21, add one month.

tests

GREENOUGH,

HORATIO. Form and Function. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1947. Form must follow function and one of the foremost leaders in that idea is as modern today as when he first expressed his principles of art three generations ago. Greenough's remarks on art, as edited by Harold A. Small offer sound advice to practitioners of all the

left.

will

months months

administered the week of February

Recent Accessions in the Teachers' Professional Library NOAR. GERTRUDE. Freedom to Live and

Learn. Philadelphia, Franklin, 1948. Based on the experiences of a junior high school faculty in the unit approach to teaching, this presents the techniques which they have found successful over a period of ten years.

In

Memoriam

ROBERT Instructor

B.

PARKER

— City College

of

San Francisco

July 29, 1949

FRANCES AGNES CATHERINE

MOONEY Retired Principal

— Hawthorne School

arts.

DUNBAR, FLANDERS. Your Child's Mind and New York, Random, 1949. The author of Mind

December

6,

1949

Body.

and Body

from her vast experience as a physiand as the leading authority in America on psychosomatic medicine, a guide unique cian,

as

offers,

a mother

in the field of child care. It is clear; it is simple; it is direct and to the point; it is, above all, notable for its common sense.

MRS.

VELMA LYON

General Clerk Stenographer Administrative Offices

December

7,



1949

BOSSING, NELSON

L. Principles of Secondary Education. New York, Prentice-Hall, 1949. Destined for the prospective teacher, the large group of educational workers in the field wishing to become up to date on developments in the field, and the laymen wishing to become better informed on the nature of the modern secondary school, this book should prove useful to all.

14-7 14-6 14-5 14-4 14-3 14-2 14-1

CHRONOLOGICAL AGE

29, 1940 6,

1944

12-1 13-1 114-1 15-1 9-0 10-0 12-0 13-0 |14-0 15-0 8-11 9-11 10-11 11-11 12-11[113-11 14-11 10-1

9-1

Locate the date of pupil's birth in the Date of Birth column at the Find the year of birth at the top. The pupil's age in years and months be found in the space where the two columns meet.

EXAMPLES:

NOTE:

1,

JOSEPHINE M. SAUNDERS Retired Principal

December

— Edison School 15,

1949

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN 3m=f*, VOL. XXI

JANUARY

No. 17

JOIN

JAN. 16-31

THE

fujfit [nfiuit/fe Paralyses

MARCH OF

THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR

DIMES

INFANTILE PARALYSIS

Withholding Tax Statements

Death Valley Expeditions on Sierra Club Program

to be Distributed Withholding tax statements

will

be sent to

the schools for distribution to their personnel

on or about January 17, 1950. Included in the statements will be earnings and tax withheld on all warrants released to the individual from January

1949 through December 31, 1949.

1,

This means that for certificated personnel the warrants for December, 1948 (released January

2,

1949) through November, 1949 (released

December

5,

1949) will be included. For non-

certificated personnel,

warrants dated Decem-

ber 31, 1948 through December

15,

1949 will

be included.

Upon

Dr. A. T.

they should be compared with the statements

with each warrant. If the Accounts,

Bawden and

from the College

J. H. Jonte and Stockton

Professor

of the Pacific

College will present a program of unusual inSan Francisco Bay Chapter of Sierra Club on Tuesday evening, January 10 at 8:00 p.m., at Everett Junior High School, covering their many spring expeditions into Death Valley. They will present their panoramic views, desert flora and fauna close-ups, and their ideas on the human relations necessary to win the West.

terest for the

Each year, this springtime pilgrimage, sponsored by the College of the Pacific attracts scientists and adventurers alike; many consider this

receipt of Withholding tax statements

of earnings received

1950

9,

caravan expedition into Death Valley one

of the best organized,

most

self-sufficient,

and

informed treks for naturalists and laymen alike. Dr. Bawden has been president of Stockton is a chemist by choice. Professor Jonte on the science faculties of both the College of the Pacific and Stockton College, is also a

totals differ, contact the Division of

College,

93 Grove Street, and accounts will be checked.

is

Luncheon Date Announced

chemist.

be present at a luncheon to be held at the Commonwealth Club in the Palace Hotel on Friday,

This outstanding program is made available by the Educational Committee of the San Francisco Bay Chapter of Sierra Club and anyone

February

interested

The

Dr.

teachers of the

3,

Andrew

will

be the guest speak-

"What

We Want

from

Reservations should be

Local 61 to

invited to attend.

made

at Polytechnic

in

advance with

High School.

Meet Today

The San Francisco Federation Local 61,

Schools."

Leon Shaff

is

Holt, president of the National

His subject will be

Our

are invited to

at 12 noon.

Education Association, er.

Bay Area

will

day, January

hold 9, at

its

4:00 p.m., in

Mission High School.

of Teachers,

regular meeting,

Room

Mon-

226, at

6

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

New

Films Available

The

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, January 9 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, George Washington, Marina, Burnett, Yerba Buena NS., Raphael Weill, Fairmount, Jefferson, Glen Park. Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Room 226, Mission High School. Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Classroom Teachers' Association. Clubrooms, 465 Post Street.





Tuesday, January 10 Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco, George Washington, Polytechnic, Aptos, Pacific Heights, Bret Harte, Potrero Terrace NS., Sheridan, Bryant, Sarah B. Coop-

John Muir, Douglas, Washington Irving. Public meeting. Board of Edu4:00 p.m. cation. Fourth floor, 93 Grove Street.

er,



Wednesday, January

1

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Commerce, Roosevelt, Andrew Jackson, Candlestick, Alamo, Lawton, Winfield Scott, Emerson, Starr King.

Thursday, January 12 Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Abraham Lincoln, Horace Mann, Arsronne, Ulloa, Dudley Stone, Bay View CWC, Paul Revere (Tox 35), Alvarado.

new films on English are now from the Audio Visual Department

following

is

available

located at 750

Eddy

Street:

How to Write Your Term Paper. 1948. Sound film. 10 minutes. 371.3-MS2 JH SH. A high school boy prepares to write a term paper by making a checklist of things to do and possible topics for the paper. He uses library facilities and direct observation to gather information, organizes it by means of an outline and reserves favorable comment on finished paper. Building An Outline. 1948. Sound film. 10 minutes. 371.3MS3 JH SH. A contrasting picture of two boys

who prepare

reports for history class, one in an orfashion by preparing an outline and taking notes, the other in a haphazard unsuccessful approach.

derly

Punctuation: Mark Your Meaning. 1948. Sound 10 minutes. 421-MS2 El JH SH. George has trouble making the class editor understand his story about a marionette show until they help him punctuate it correctly. The actual marionettes illustrate all the possible meanings of each sentence and finally the correct meaning, after the editors put in the needed punctuation and explain the rules to George. film.

New

films

on Physical Education and Health

available:

Joan Avoids A Cold. 1941. Sound film. 10 minutes. 616.2-MS2 El JH. Comparison of careless George of poor health habits with sister Joan who is careful to follow all health rules at home and school. Stresses importance of washing hands before eating and other such health precautions, and of protecting the body against cold weather.

11

Kidneys, Ureter And Bladder. 1947. Sound film. minutes. 611-MS1 SH C. Structure and function.

Human Throat. 1947. Sound film. 12 MS2 SH C. Anatomy and functioning

minutes. 611of the throat as a passage for air and food, its defense mechanisms and how both air and food are diverted into their proper channels.

Friday, January 13 Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Everett, Madison, Ridgepoint Site 2, Jefferson NS, Franklin (Tox 20 & PE), Visitacion Valley, Daniel Webster, Golden Gate, Jean Parker.

Monday, January 16



Meeting of the Teachers' AssoSan Francisco. Auditorium, Raphael Weill School, Buchanan and O'Farrell Streets. 4:00 p.m.

ciation of

Saturday, January 21



12:30 p.m. Luncheon. Pi Lamba Theta. Defenders' Room, Women's City Club, 465 Post Street.

Assn. to Meet January

1

The Teachers'

Association of San Francisco hold its January 16 meeting at 4:00 p.m., in the auditorium of the RAPHAEL WEILL SCHOOL, Buchanan and O'Farrell Streets, instead of the auditorium of the Health Center

Our

Sound film. 11 minutes. 611.9Construction and function both as a weight carrier and as a means of locomotion. Feet.

MS1 SH

1948.

C.

Human Skin. 1947. Sound film. 12 minutes. 612.7MS1 SH C. Construction and function. How it profrom our environment and regulates the temof our bodies. Importance of care and cleanliness in preserving the natural beauty and tects us

perature

health of the skin.

Human Hair. 1948. Sound film. 11 minutes. 612.7MS2 SH C. Description of the hair as being part of the

skin,

showing

its

analogous

development

and

growth.

Nine Basic Functional Systems Of The Body. 1948. Sound film. 11 minutes. 612-MS2 SH C. The principal and basic constituents of the human system are set forth as follows: skeletal; muscular; excretory; circulatory; nervous; sensory; digestive; lymphatic; endocrine.

will

Building, as previously announced.

How The

Respiratory

System Functions.

SH

Sound

11 minutes. 612. 2-MS1 C. Anatomy, mechanism of respiration and voice sounds are portrayed. The intake of oxygen and the output of carbon difilm.

oxide from the blood are shown.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Corrections

in

School Directory

make

Musical Notes the follow-

Three concerts make up the second week's

ing corrections in the September 1949 Directory of the San Francisco Public Schools:

musical fare in the current Art Commission

Office secretaries will kindly

— Galileo High School ORdway 3-1701 Principal — Ras Johnson — Everett Junior High School Page KLondike 2-2122 Principal — Marion Page 24 — Junipero Serra School Page 26 — Marshall School Principal —Rose M. Lagomarsino Delete Page 30 — Sunnydale Annex Page 31 — Commerce Adult High School Lamp Principal —Dr. Chas. Organizations Page 43 — Directory Northern California Guidance Association — Meets and Spring — Miss Sarah Helen twice year Page 11

E.

13 Asst.

Chester..

Asst.

J.

of Professional

a

in Fall

Brown, Lux College, 2450

-

17th Street, President.

Notice is hereby given that the following janvacancies exist in the San Francisco School System:

1

1

G C C

106 Janitor

106 Janitor

— John Swett — Polytechnic — James Lick

102.1 Janitress

be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may- still be applied for under

These vacancies

will

the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega~Street.

The San Francisco Chapter of Junior Red Cross at 450 Gough Street, has a very fine alon the manufacture of

The Red Cross

Howard Thurman,

Dr.

as narrator, will

be fea-

tured in the "King David" performance. pair of concerts of the season

silk.

and 14, and will program the first San Franperformance of Vaughan Williams' "Sixth Symphony." The other major offering will be Cesar Franck's "Symphonic Variations" with Wanda Krasoff, brilliant young East Bay pian12

ist,

as soloist.

Peter and the

A

series of

Wolf

cut-paper illustrations inspired by

children listening to the story of "Peter and the

Wolf" will be on display at 93 Grove Street January 13. These illustrations are freely cut by 3rd and 4th grade pupils of the Geary School, Mrs. Hadis Ekoos, teacher.

until

members

will

enjoy seeing them.

Assn. Announces Meeting

The

states:

"This album was received from an elementary school in Japan. Evidently, an unnamed class in a San Francisco elementary school wrote to Japan requesting such material and the Japanese school has answered through existing Junior Red Cross channels set up for such

regular membership meeting of the San

Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association will

be held in the club rooms, 465 Post Street, on

Monday, January

9, at

4:00 p.m.

exchange. "If the teacher will please call UNderhill 1-6000, the Junior Red Cross will be happy to deliver the album."

In

HELEN Pi

Lambda Theta Luncheon Members of Pi Lambda Theta and

is

cisco

Staff

Album Being Held by Red Cross

bum

January 10, will include the first San Francisco performance of the great religious work, "Stabat Mater," by the Polish composer Szymanowski, together with Honegger's oratorio, "King David." The latter requires the participation of the San Francisco Municipal Chorus under the direction of Hans Leschke. Four soloists chosen from among the finest available young talent in California, and

scheduled for Thursday and Saturday, January

itorial

1

for Tuesday,

The second

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Opera House. The pro-

concert season at the

gram

Memoriam A.

their

guests are invited to attend the Public Affairs

Committee Luncheon to be held Saturday, January 21, in the Defenders' Room, Women's City Club, San Francisco, at 12:30 p.m. Dr. Lucy Stein will be the speaker at this joint meeting of Northern California Alumnae and San Jose Alumnae Chapters.

Retired art teacher

O'MALLEY

— Lowell High School

December

25,

1949

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN "Bulletin" Deadline

Scholarships Available

Renewal

of

its

program

of 36 scholarships

academic year at nine public universities has been announced by Standard

for the 1950-51

Oil

Company

The

of California.

scholarships

were inaugurated last fall to promote future American leadership in democracy. Four undergraduate awards, for $500 each,

All members of the certificated staff are invited to furnish contributions during the school year to the San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin which they think would be of interest to

members of the teaching profession. Copy intended for publication in the Bulletin

other

are to be available at the universities of Alaska,

should be mailed or delivered in sufficient time to reach the Superintendent's office by 12 o'clock noon of the Tuesday preceding the

Arizona, California (two at Berkeley and two

Monday

Los Angeles), Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. They will be awarded, one each, to the four undergraduate classes. Thus, it will be possible

at

although competition

college years,

annual

his four

throughout

for one student to qualify

is

on an

basis.

Selection of the winners, as before, will be entirely in the

Standard

hands of the

again

is

chosen primarily future leadership.

be granted to

on

the

Only

men

universities,

suggesting

or

that

basis

restriction

women

they

but be

of

potential

is

that they

regardless

of

necessary to insure delivery on the following Monday mornings. Administrators, teachers and organization secretaries are requested to make a special note of this "deadline."

must be signed and should be typeand should not contain more than 200 words to insure publication. Articles announcing courses should be cleared through Watt A. Long, associate superintendArticles

written, doublespaced

ent of instruction, prior to submission to the

Superintendent's

Skating Vanities

1

and

office.

Open

Jan. 17

"Skating Vanities of 1950," the eighth an-

Pupils

minimum days for pupils in the elementary and secondary schools in order to provide the teachers with sufficient February

is

of the bulletins to the schools

course of study, race or creed.

Minimum Days for

of publication.

This "deadline"

2 will be

time to complete their reports.

nual edition of the $1,000,000 spectacle, will appear in San Francisco at the Civic Auditorium for six days, beginning Tuesday, January 17.

Presented on its own special sound-proof masonite surface, the roller-skating pageant is said to be completely

MARCH OF DIMES

its

new, and more lavish in

colorful costumes, brilliant lighting effects

and massive scenes than ever before. Star of the large company is Gloria Nord, master of acrobatic dancing on skates. The "Skating Vanities" will have eight performances, nightly at 8:30 from January 17

through

f

IFANTILE 1RALYSIS

22.

Music Educators to Meet The Bay Section of the California Music Educators Association will hold

its second meeting term in Stockton, California, on Saturday, January 14. Demonstration and discussion sec-

of the

and general music, and audio-visual aids will be held during the morning and afternoon. Following the educations in instrumental, choral,

WmB§M

m JANUARY

16-31

tional meetings, there will be programs of choral and instrumental music in the afternoon and evening, commemorating the 200th anniversary of the death of Johann Sebastian Bach. Social activities include an afternoon tea and an evening banquet. Wesley Morgan, of the College of

the Pacific,

is

in charge of arrangements.

"

8

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN 3«=»e VOL. XXI

No.

JANUARY

1

16,

1950

Counselor Reports on Guidance Follow-up

Levison Succeeds Falk on Board of Education John G. Levison, nominated by Mayor Elmer Robinson and approved by the voters of San Francisco at last November's election, was seated as a commissioner of education at the Board of E.

Education meeting of Tuesday, January

10.

Glenn

I.

Newhouse, vocational counselor and

High School, the author of an article entitled "How Successful Is Veteran Counseling?" in the December 1949 issue of California Journal of Secondary industrial arts teacher at Galileo is

Mr. Levison, an insurance broker, succeeds to the vacancy created by the "retirement" of Adrien J. Falk. In a recent article the San Francisco News

Education.

commented

Veterans Counseling Center by Mr. Newhouse.

as follows:

Superintendent of Schools Herbert C. Clish probably voiced the opinion of thousands of San Franciscans recently when he said: "the citizens of this city are losing one of the most outstanding Board of Education members in America. We can truthfully say to Adrien Falk, 'Well done, thou good and faithful servant.'

Serial

Numbers Requested

cipals to the following: serial

number

in the

summary

of the research

made

at the

For example, ninety-three percent of the respondents stated that they still considered counseling worthwhile twenty months after advisement. Eighty-seven percent of the group responding were in training, had completed training, or were employed in either the original or in a

secondary objective considered during their interviews with a counselor.

Dr. Harold Spears, assistant superintendent, calls the attention of all elementary school prin-

"The

Counselors and teachers in the San Francisco School Department will find particular interest

of the miscroscope in the

must be sent to Miss Anita Reed in the Accounting Department at 93 Grove Street. Look for the serial number on the under side of the base of the microscope. Be sure to mention the name of the school. A post card

The report of the Veterans emphasized the great necessity that complete testing and counseling be made available to youth while they still have time and opportunity to take advantage of the information acquired.

science chest

will do.

Thank

you."

Time Sheets January Time Sheets should be delivered to the Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: Delivery Dates for January

Teachers Library Assn. to

Meet

Senior

The Library

Association of California, Northern Section, will hold a dinner meeting on Saturday, January 21, at 6:30 o'clock, at Cock O'

The Walk, 1437 Harrison

Oakland. Speaker will be Beatrice Griffiths, author of American Me. Reservations may be made by January 20, ($2.50). Mail to Miss Quail Hawkins, 1404 Glendale Avenue, Berkeley. Street,

high,

schools

junior -

high and elementary .January 23, 8:00 a.m.

2 1 teaching days in January.

Adult schools

January

24, 1:00p.m.

Clerks and Janitors

January 16-31 Adult schools Other schools

January January

24, 1:00 p.m. 23, 8:00 a.m.

Work

Schedule for Clerks 3, 1950 is the midterm recess, and schools will be closed. Clerks employed on a full time basis shall work on that day, and clerks employed to serve on a school term basis, whether elementary, junior high, or senior high, may work if the principal desires their services. February

1950 Officers Elected by Board Bert W. Levit and Mrs. Richard N. Nason, Jr., commissioners of education, were unanimously elected president and vice-president respectively of the Board of Education at its meeting of Tuesday, January 10.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

ancisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year

The San is

Scholarship Achievement

Award

F

from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, January 16 Physicians will visit the following schools: Abraham Lincoln, Polytechnic, James Lick,

Bayview, Fairmount (Tox 15), Argonne (Tox S. Key, Raphael Weill, Frank

6 and P.E.), F.

McCoppin.



Meeting of the Teachers' AssoSan Francisco. Auditorium, Raphael Weill School, Buchanan and O'Farrell Streets. 4:00 p.m.

To George Washington High A letter has been received by O. I. Schmaelprincipal of George Washington High School, from Dr. Hiram Edwards, director, Relations with Schools, University of California announcing that the University of California takes pleasure in awarding a Certificate of Scholarship Achievement to George Washington High School for the outstanding work done by that high school's graduates who entered the University of California, Berkeley, in the year 1948-1949. The Berkeley awards are based upon the combined grade point averages of the freshmen who entered the Berkeley campus from the accredited high schools of the State of Calizle,

fornia.

ciation of

Tuesday, January 17 Physicians will visit the following schools: Aptos, Presidio, James Denman, Ridgepoint Site 1, Page-Broderick NS., Cabrillo, Lafayette, Pacific Heights, Sunshine Health.



Lecture. General Topic: "Youth 7:30 p.m. and Marriage Today." Sub-topic: "Love, Are You Ready For It?" Speaker: Carlos Lastrucci, Ph.D., associate professor, San Francisco State College. Auspices: Adult Education Division. Location: YMCA, 220 Golden Gate Avenue.

Wednesday, January 18

Fremont.

7:45 p.m. "Let's Talk

— Round

tabic discussion. Topic:

About Speech." Auspices:

San

Francisco Chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association. Place: 1680 Mission Street.

Thursday, January 19 Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco, Galileo, Horace Mann, Everett, James Denman (OTR), Commodore Scott (NS), Dudley Stone, Washington Irving, Garfield.

Friday, January

20

Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Roosevelt, E. R. Taylor, Bret Harte, Laguna Honda, Parkside, Daniel Webster, Marshall.



6:30 p.m. Association of

Dinner-meeting. California,

The Library

Northern Section.

Cock O' The Walk, 1437 Harrison

Street.

Wednesday, January 25 3:30 p.m.

— Annual UNESCO meeting. As-

sociation for Childhood Education. California

Club.

V

George Washington High School, San Franwith Berkeley High School for first Division I. This is an outstanding achievement and a real distinction for any school to obtain. cisco, tied

place

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Balboa, Marina, Le Conte, Franklin (health), Redding (Tox 10 and P.E.), Winfield Scott,

For the purpose of granting these awards the high schools are divided into 5 groups. The Division I refers to large accredited public high schools sending more than 40 freshmen to the University. This is the most difficult award to obtain as the competition is the greatest. Division II is for large high schools sending 10-40 freshmen. Division III refers to medium size public high schools sending 4 or more freshmen. Division IV is for small high schools sending 2 or more freshmen, and Division is for accredited private high schools sending 2 or more freshmen to the University.

in

A

representative from the University of California will present this award at a special assembly to the student body of George Washington High School. It

might be recalled that the High School of

Commerce won

the certificate for Division II three years ago, and Abraham Lincoln won the Division II award last year. Tamalpais Union High School, Mill Valley won Division II this year.

Authorities at the University of California is the first time a San Francisco High School has won Division I honors. Berkeley High School has won the Division I award every time but once since 1941. Congratulations are in order to the faculty and student body of George Washington High School. state that this

Milk Carriers Available

The

Division of Supplies has received an adshipment of wooden milk carriers built to accommodate one dozen bottles of milk. A number of these were distributed last fall. ditional

Principals who are interested in receiving an additional supply of these carriers may send a General Requisition to the Division of Supplies.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Additional

New

Musical Notes

Films

The following new films on "Business Education" are now available from the Audio- Visual Department, 750 Eddy Street: Duties of a Secretary. 1947. Sound film. 30 minutes. SH C Tr. Duties of a secretary, beyond routine typing, dramatized. Includes learning the organization of the files, not interrupting dictation, remembering enclosures, keeping all information confidential, being tactful with customers, etc.

651.3-MS1.

Secretary Takes Dictation. 1947. Sound film. 10 minutes. 651.3-MS2. SH C. Practices in taking dictation in a business office. Duties of a secretary. 10 minBuilding Typing Skill. 1948. Sound utes. 652-MS4. SH. George realizes he must increase his typing skill. Film shows him as he learns to relax, to maintain equal stroking power, hold arms and hands quiet, keep eye on copy, practice good posture and get best possible results from his typewriter. film.

1948. Sound film. 10 minutes. 652follows carefully planned preliminary operations in getting ready to type. Jane goes at it haphazardly but learns later to practice George's

Ready to Type. MS5. SH. George methods.

Two

concerts of great interest to students will

be given by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the week of January 22. The first Youth Concert of a series of four for secondary school students of the Bay Area will be played at 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 24, in the Op,era House. An interesting program featuring oboe soloist Merrill Remington has been selected by Kurt Herbert Adler, who will direct the concert. Mr. Remington began his instrumental study at Polytechnic High School.

Mr. Adler

Young

will conduct the second of the People's series for elementary pupils on

Saturday morning, January 28. Music

critics.,

educators and children alike were enthusiastic over the initial concert in December. Program study material, compiled by Mr. Adler and

Alexander Fried, commentator,

will

be distribu-

ted to schools shortly. Seats for both concerts can be reserved at the

Symphony Box

Office.

Biology Course Offered University of California Extension is offering under the auspices of the California Science Teachers Association a special, review 104AB, consisting of course entitled, Biology recent advances in various biological fields.

The

X

be given by evenings Tuesday on professors C. U. eleven from 7-9 o'clock beginning January 1 7, in Room 2093, Life Sciences Building on the Berkeley campus of the University of California. Lectures and demonstrations covering the following topantibodies, antigens, and allerics will be given gies; vitamins; hormones; parasitology; proto-

A

total of fifteen lectures will

:

zoology; virus; cancer; experimental embryology; photosynthesis; bloodf actors induced mutations; evolution; eugenics; sex education in

Exchange Positions Available

The Personnel Office has recently received information of the following positions available on an exchange basis. Teachers who are interested in them may secure more complete information by contacting that office. Honolulu: Husband and wife. Husband teaches Band, wife teaches Social Studies and English. Exchange for both positions or for

Band

position only.

Honolulu Teacher of French. Los Angeles Elementary schools. :

:

;

high schools.

Teachers may enroll at 540 Powell Street before January 17. The fee is $20 and the credit is

2 units.

New

Lecture Series Announced

The Marina Adult School announces a series and discussions for young men and

of lectures

women on "Youth and Marriage Today" The

beginspeaker

ning on Tuesday, January is Dr. Carlos Lastrucci, associate professor, San Francisco State College. His topic is "Love Are You Ready For It?" Meetings will be held each Tuesday evening through March 21 at the Y.M.C.A., 220 Golden Gate Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. 17.

first

Article by Librarian

The January 1950 issue of the National League for Woman's Service Magazine contains an interesting article entitled "The Happiest Days of Your Life," the prize winning story in the recent National League for Woman's Service short story contest, written by Catherine Davis, senior librarian at George Washington High School.

A copy of the publication is on Teachers' Professional Library, 750

file



This series is a public service of San Francisco Public Schools and, therefore, there is no admission charge. For further details, call WAlnut 1-2707.

In

Memoriam

EVELYN PRAEGER Secretary Office of the Superintendent

January

9,

1950

in the

Eddy

St.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN The Municipal Theatre Presents "Amphitryon

38",

Jean

.

.

Giradoux'

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

.

genial

fantasy of gods and men, San Francisco Municipal Theatre's third major production this season, opens Thursday, January 19, at the Marina Auditorium, Bay and Fillmore Streets, at 8.30.

cast of

The Municipal Theatre production

be

will

on Friday and Saturday evenings, January 20 and 21, and on the same three evenings of the two following weeks. For those who do not hold season tickets, seats are available at the Theatre, the City of Paris box office and at Breuner's in Oakland. repeated

A.C.E. Meeting January 25

The

1 1 1

Municipal Theatre Players, under the direction of Bess Whitcomb, is headed by Claire Schwartz in the role of Alkmena. Jim Ash will play General Amphitryon, Bill McNabb is cast as Jupiter, Bill Witt as his son Mercury, Gordon Shaw as Sosie, servant to Amphitryon, and Phyllis Lewicwi as Leda. The sets and costumes are from original designs by James MacAndrew, and the costumes are being executed by Beatrix Perry of the Theatre staff.

The

Notice is hereby given that the following janvacancies exist in the San Francisco School System:

itorial

Association for Childhood Education will

1 1

1

_ C 106 Janitor — Gough — C 106 Janitor — Balboa — C 106 Janitor — Abraham Lincoln — C 106 Janitor — McKinley — C 102.1 Janitress — Cabrillo — C 102.1 Janitress — Alamo

These vacancies

will

be held open for a period

of fifteen days except in case of emergency.

Even though these arily filled, they

may

still

the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local

66 A, 916 Ortega Street.

Round Table Discussion The San Francisco Chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association will hold a round table discussion on the topic: "Let's Talk About Speech" at its Center, 1680 Mission Street, on 7:45 p.m.

annual UNESCO meeting on Wednesday, January 25, at 3 30 p.m., at the California

January

Club.

Francisco State College.

hold

18, at

its

:

The program Mrs. the

may be temporbe applied for under

positions

will

Dr.

be:

Leon

Lassers,

Discussants will be: Dr. Florence

will include:

Howard Thurman, who

UNESCO

Moderator

on Oc-

will report

conference held in Paris in

which she attended; also Dr. Grace Morley McCann of the San Francisco Museum of Art; and Mrs. Elizabeth Rosenberg, State A.C.E., chairman for UNESCO. The UNESCO Quintet will present a group of musical numtober,

San

M. Hender-

son, Veterans Administration, Mrs.

Katharine

San Francisco Unified School District, Miss Helen Hannigan, University of California Hospital staff, and Dr. Gerald B. O'Connor. Sutter,

All interested are invited to attend.

bers.

Day

to

Day Substitutes

Parents and P.-T.A. representatives are in-

With the onset of the rainy number of day to day

vited to attend.

ditional

season,

an ad-

substitutes will

be required in both the elementary and second-

Mental Health Conference

ary divisions. Teachers

who have

or can secure

Mental Health

regular California teaching credentials are in-

Society of Northern California will be held at

vited to submit applications to the Personnel

The annual conference

of the

Asilomar on January 28 and

The afternoon

29.

on January 28 will on "Living at MidCentury" also section meetings on "Childhood and Youth," "Men and Women," "The Midlde Years," and "Old Age." session

consist of a panel discussion

Section and general meetings will conclude the conference

Reservations office,

Office, 93

Grove

ent teaching staff

on January

may

be

29.

made with the Society's HEmlock 1-2943.

1095 Market Street,

and

it is

Street.

Members

may know

of our pres-

such individuals,

of

suggested that they invite them to con-

tact the Personnel Office with a

view to under-

taking day to day substitute work.

Teachers

who

will require

fication are not desired. It

is

emergency certihoped that as a

result of the distribution of this information

may

we

be able to secure an adequate number of

regularly teachers.

certificated

day

to

day substitute

9

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

No.

JANUARY

1

New

Quizdown Programs Resume on Saturdays

Lecture Series on Teacher-Parent Relations The Marina Adult School announces a of

which

is

series

on

"Teacher-Parent Relations," being offered by the Adult Education

lectures

23, 1950

The Examiner-KGO Quizdown its new 1950 season,

derway on

public schools

is

its

well un-

opening

program having featured Daniel

Webster and Edison Schools, with Rudy Vallee

Division of San Francisco Public Schools and San Francisco State College in co-operation with San Francisco Council of Co-operative Nursery Schools. While this course may be taken for college credit, the series is open to the general public free of charge if no credit is

Marshall and Franklin Schools will meet on the January 28 Quizdown, to vie for the complete set of the World Books, a new prize this year, and the Rand McNally Cosmopolitan

desired.

World

The

lecture

first

on Monday, January

23, will S. Coffey, assistant pro-

be given by Dr. Hubert fessor of psychology, University of California. His topic for this meeting will be "Principles of Group Dynamics." Further discussion of this topic will be continued through the next three meetings on January 30, February 6, and February 20. (There will be no lecture on Lincoln's .Birthday Holiday, February 13.)

The

lectures

will

Junior High School Streets)

from 7:30

be held at the Marina (Chestnut and Fillmore

to 9:30 p.m., in

Room

This fifteen-session course will be of particuand nurseryschool employees. Others who are interested free.

to

any or

all

of these lectures tuition-

Those who are interested or

eligible for

college credit, should apply to the Registrar, San Francisco State College.

For further information, telephone WAlnut 1-2707.

Courses

Recreation

in

State College announces the following courses in receration, beginning

February 6:



Rec. 278 Recreational Surveys and Planning (2 units) Saturdays, 8 to 10 a.m. Frederic Burk 109. Instructors: Conrad, Cranford. Rec. 277

—Recreation

in

Atlas.

Questions are now being received for Quizdown programs. They must be submitted on the official blanks available at the Quizdown Editor's office in The Examiner. For a question used, the child receives an Eversharp repeater pencil. Any number of questions may be submitted by any one child or any class. Questions should be based on the fourth, fifth or sixth grade course of study and should be of general interest. They are reviewed by a committee of teachers before being used on the air.

254.

lar interest to parents, teachers,

may come

as guest star.

Public Education

(2 units) Saturdays, 10 a.m., to 12 noon. Instructors: Cranford, Conrad.

Audio-Visual Articles

There are several articles in the Audio-Visual field which may be of interest to primary teachers in the last issue of the magazine See and Hear. This month the magazine has the heading Primary Grade Review. One paper entitled

"The Elementary

Principal's

Responsi-

an Audio-Visual Program" offers suggestions to principals and teachers for the organization of instructional materials and their use. Other suggestive titles are: "Learning to Read through Films"; "Round the World with Filmstrips". There is also a helpful list of films and filmstrips for the primary grades. Copies of the magazine are in the Teachers Library, bility for

750

Eddy

Street.

DeMartini to Central Office

Upon recommendation

of the Superintend-

Recreation

(2 units).

Board of Education at its meeting of January 10 approved the assignment of Armand DeMartini, teacher, Abraham Lincoln High

For detailed information communicate with Director, Recreation Curriculum, San Francisco State College, 124 Buchanan Street.

School, to the office of the Superintendent of Schools to perform such duties as shall be assigned by the Superintendent.

Rec.

299

—Individual

ent, the

Study

in

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2. California is

March

Now

of

in

Dimes Campaign

Full

Swing

Superintendent Herbert C. Clish in his Supervisory Bulletin No. 9, dated January 13, 1950, calls the attention of principals and teachers of elementary and secondary schools to the current March of Dimes appeal:

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, January 23 Physicians will visit the following schools:

"The March of Dimes campaign will open on Monday, January 16. As during former years, the public schools of San Francisco, with the

George Washington, Roosevelt, Burnett, Laguna-G.G. N.S., Frank McCoppin, Raphael Weill, Marshall (Tox 30), Guadalupe, Edison. Regular meeting. Elementary 3:45 p.m. Assistant Principals' Association. Raphael Weill

approval of the Board of Education, will assist campaign also has the wholehearted approval of the parent-teacher groups in our city.

School. Course: "Teacher-Parent Re7:30 p.m. lations." Sub-topic: "Principles of Group Dynamics." Speaker: Hubert S. Coffey, Ph.D., asst. prof, of psychology, University of California. Auspices: Adult Education Division and

of the





affiliated

agencies.

Room

254,

Marina Junior

High School.

"The need for funds this year upon the part San Francisco Chapter of the National

Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, Inc. is even crucial than during former years. Because

more

of the increase in the incidence of polio cases

the funds of our local chapter were exhausted and an additional grant had to be secured from the National Foundation. "All of us

Tuesday, January 24 Physicians will visit the following schools: Abraham Lincoln, Aptos, Patrick Henry OT, Bay View, Cabrillo, Sanchez, Sheridan, Lafavette, Sunshine Health. Public meeting. Board of Edu7:30 p.m. cation. Fourth floor, 93 Grove Street. Lecture. General topic: "Youth 7:30 p.m. and Marriage Today." Sub-topic: "Dating What Should You Do About It?" Speaker: Robert P. Rankin, B.D., University of California. Auspices: Adult Education Division and Galileo,

— —

affiliated

in this drive. This

agencies.



YMCA,

220 Golden Gate

know from

reading,

and some

of

our group from bitter experience, how costly the treatment of such cases proves to be. Those of us connected with the public schools are interested in this campaign because of the fact that so many children are stricken with the disease.

"During this past school year a student at George Washington High School was stricken. This so

moved her

classmates that they sought

and were given permission to collect funds among their own group to contribute in her name to the emergency campaign. Of course, none of us connected with the schools or none

March of Dimes campaign want pressure placed upon the children to contribute to the campaign. It has been so planned that embarrassment need be caused no child. Every child, however, should be given the opportunity to contribute if he wishes to do so and should be told of the importance of the campaign in order that he may carry the story to his home. "In order that you may have some case studies to present to your pupils if you wish to do so and to relate to adults in discussing the campaign with them, the Superintendent forwarded some case histories of polio cases from of those connected with the

Avenue.

Wednesday, January 25 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine. Commerce, Girls High, James Lick, Commodore Stockton OT, Ridgepoint Site 3, Mission NS, Starr King, Lawton, Hillcrest, Spring Valley, Excelsior. 3:30 p.m. Annual meeting. Association for Childhood Education. California Club.



UNESCO

Thursday, January 26 Physicians will visit the following schools: Samuel Gompers, Lowell, Presidio, Patrick Henry OTR, Page-Gough NS, Dudley Stone, San Miguel, Farragut, Grattan, Glen Park, Francis Scott Key, Alvarado.

Friday, January

27

Physicians will visit the following schools: Raphael Weill HC, George Washington, Balboa, Everett, Commodore Stockton OTR,

Ridgepoint Site 2, Laguna Honda, Sunnyside. Junipero Serra, Monroe, Parkside.

the files of our own chapter. The Superintendent is confident that our San Francisco Public Schools will, as in the past, meet the challenge of this

tions

campaign."

Committee. Commonwealth Club, Palace

Hotel.

Sunday, February 5 initiation and tea. Alpha Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma. Honoring new members. Residence: 299 Maywood 3:30 p.m.

Friday, February 3 12:00 noon. Luncheon honoring Dr. Andrew Holt, president, N.E.A. Teachers' Organiza-

Drive.

— Annual

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Mrs. Evelyn Praeger Passes The many friends and co-workers of Mrs. Evelyn Praeger, secretary to the Superintendent, were saddened to learn of her sudden death on Monday, January 9. Mrs. Praeger joined the School Department in 1943 and was appointed secretary to the Superintendent in 1944.

An

editorial apearing in

San Francisco News

titled

a recent issue of the "Evelyn Praeger, A

Fine Public Servant," expresses the sentiments of all those

who knew

her.

"Evelyn Praeger, you might say, was one of the 'little people' of our city government. She held no high office; her name was not widely

known among

the general public. But, as secof schools, Mrs. Praeger, in her quiet way, did as much as any top official to keep the wheels of retary to the

San Francisco superintendent

Teacher Residence Requirements Teachers should be reminded that all employees of the San Francisco Unified School District are required to reside within the city limits of San Francisco. Permission to live outside the city may be granted for health reasons or because of difficulties in securing adequate housing. In order to receive such permission, however, the teacher must make application therefor each year. When illness is used as the reason for the request, a doctor's certificate must accompany the teacher's request.

Permission, when granted, extends for the period of the current school year only and this permission must be renewed from year to year in order to be valid.

No assurance can be given concerning permanent residence in the suburbs of San Francisco.

government moving smoothly. "Mrs. Praeger served as secretry to two superintendents, Curtis Warren and Herbert C. Clish. For each she worked with fine loyalty, and with ability and efficiency that did much to help him discharge the difficult duties of his office. As a good secretary, she handled callers with infinite patience, tact, kindness and good cheer. .But she did not try to insulate the superintendent from the public; she saw to it that matters of importance reached his attention without delay. She worked hard and long at her She was a splendid secretary, but she was more than that; she was a strong right arm of the superintend-

job, giving it her fullest energies.

Additional Janitorial Vacancies Notice is hereby given that the following janvacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: itorial

1

1

C C

106 Janitor 106 Janitor

— Excelsior — Guadalupe.

These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency.

Even though

may be temporbe applied for under

these positions

arily filled, they

may

still

the seniority rule.

Request for transfer should be made, in writ-

ent of schools.

ing, to Stanley

"Untimely death took Evelyn Praeger this week. The School Department has lost one of its best and best-loved workers. The public has lost one of its finest public servants."

janitors, 93

Service

R. Leavell, supervisor of school Street, or through the Civil Building Maintenance Union, Local

Grove

66A, 916 Ortega

Street.

Art Exhibit at 93 Grove Street N.E.A. President

Coming

The

Teachers' Organizations Committee have completed plans for the luncheon honoring Dr. Andrew Holt, president of the National Education Association, at 12 noon on Friday, February 3, at the Palace Hotel.

The co-chairmen: Dr. A.

J.

Cloud and Miss

Mary Sweeney, announce

that Bay Area educators have been invited by the Commonwealth Club of California to be present at the luncheon.

Reservations should be made promptly with Leon Shaff, Polytechnic High School. A check for $2.25 should be sent with the reservation.

Elem. Asst. Principals to

The

Meet

regular meeting of the Elementary Assistant Principals' Association will be held in the Library of the Raphael Weill School, on Monday, January 23, at 3:45 p.m.

The work on display at 93 Grove Street was done by art students of Mrs. Clara Bass and Miss Margaret Chase of Lowell High School. The exhibition will be hung until January 27.

In

Memoriam

GRACE Retired teacher



September

JOSEPH

TOBIN

A.

Pacific Heights School 2,

1949

McSWEGAN

Watchman, Warehouse (Hearst Building) December 24, 1949

CHARLES EVERSON Janitor

— Gough School

January

6,

1950

!

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

New

Films

—Secondary

Recent Accessions

Schools

The following new films for secondary schools are available from the Audio- Visual Department, 750 Eddy Street: Productivity, Key to Plenty. 1949 Sound film. 20 minutes. 338-MS2. SH C. An analysis of American production and consumption. Produced in cooperation with the

Twentieth Century Fund.

Economic Risks. minutes. 368-MS2. JH SH.

Sound

1947.

Sharing

Bill,

film.

10

a high school boy,

loses his bike through theft. This loss illustrates the economic risk which all people face, and ensuing action illustrates aspects of property and life insurance and the principle of sharing economic risks.

Protection. 1948. Sound film. 10 minutes. C. The buying habits of two families are contrasted showing how the White's bought on price and appearance alone while the King's took advantage of the wealth of information put out by the government and other sources for consumer protection.

Consumer

JH SH

339.4-MS2.

Sound

—Teachers'

school.

Corle, Edwin. The Royal Highway. Bobbs-Merrill, 1949. The story of El Camino Real, now U. S. 101 in a lively and fascinating account.

Rothney, John W. Counseling the Individual Student. Sloane, 1949. Stressing the importance of sound judgment in interpreting the information received, this book on individual counseling presents criteria and procedures to be used.

McKown, Harry

C. Audio-Visual Aids to Instruc-

McGraw-Hill, 1949. A completely revised edition of this encylopedic and practical handbook on visual aids. tion.

2nd

ed.

Loyd

Teaching Spanish Speaking New Mexico Press, 1948. Although the emphasis is on the Mexican population of the Southwest, the value of this book to any teacher Tireman,

S.

10 minutes. 336.2-MS1. JH SH. United States Federal system of taxation. Outlines personal and corporation income

Children. University of

taxes and taxes on luxuries and special services, and the many ways in which tax money is used for the benefit of the people.

of bilingual children should be great.

Federal Taxation.

Cabrillo Students

1948.

film.

Win

In the recent State Contest conducted by the Latham Foundation, Mary Anderson, High 6 Grade, Cabrillo School, was announced the winner on the subject: "Do Pen Friendships Between Students of Different Countries Help to

Promote World Peace?" The award was

Twenty

Library

Saltzberg, Geraldine. Our Teachers Mould Our Nation's Future. MacMillan, 1949. This offers practical advice for high school teachers on classroom problems, habit training and community-teacher cooperation. Actual case histories illustrate some of the ways in which the principles stressed can be utilized in the

Hoppock, Robert. Group Guidance; Principles, Techniques, Evaluation. McGraw-Hill, 1949. In this new text of group guidance, one of the leading authorities tells the beginner what to do and how to do it. The author considers problems of orientation, educational guidance, and vocational guidance, presenting material tested in his classes at New York University and revised in the light of his classroom experience. Pearson, Gerald H. Emotional Disorders of Children. Norton, 1949. A case book on child psychiatry by one of the authors of "Emotional Problems of Living" and "Common Neuroses of Children and Adults".

Dollars.

class a Certificate of Award was Norene Sibell. Fellow students and their teacher, Mrs. Beatrice Brown, are proud of this achievement.

In the same

received by

Congratulations

List of Films Distributed

The Audio-Visual Department

is

in process

an alphabetical listand filmstrips, added to its

of sending to each school

by title, of films collection since issuance of the catalog in the

ing,

is suggested that for convenience these pages be attached to the catalog, since it was supplied with Acco fasteners.

Placement Test to be Held February 8

A placement test will be administered Wednesday, February 8, at 8:30 a.m., at the Bureau of Research, third floor, 93 Grove Street, for pupils of junior high school level who have entered without adequate transcripts of record. Pupils of grades 6, 7 and 8 who have failed or for other reasons have not completed their grades are, upon recommendation of their principal, eligible to take this test. Principals are requested to send in the names of such pupils to the Bureau of Research in advance.

Fall, 1949. It

Delta Kappa

Gamma

Change in Address The Sacramento offices Initiation

of Delta Kappa honor society for women teachers, will hold its annual initiation to be followed by a tea in honor of the new members on Sunday afternoon, February 5, at 3:30 p.m., at the home of Mrs. Signe Ahnstedt, 299 Maywood Drive. Reservations should be made by February 1 with Miss Irene Kelly, telephone SKyline 1-5444. Miss Helen Davis is in charge of the program.

The Alpha Theta Chapter

Gamma,

national

of Child

of the State Bureau Care Services and the State Bureau of

Health, P.E., & Recreation should be addressed in the future as follows: 918j/2 J Street, Sac-

ramento

14.

A.A.S.A. Elects President Superintendent Warren T. White, Dallas, Texas, was recently elected president of the American Association of School Administrators.

He

takes office

March

15, 1950.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

JANUARY

No. 19-A

25, 1950

In-Service This bulletin has been prepared to acquaint San Francisco teachers with the educational courses offered by the universities and colleges

diate value in their application to classroom teaching. All of the listed offerings will provide teachers with an opportunity to secure valid

in or near the city. In addition to these offerings by the institutions of higher learning, the

salary increment credits and also implement the program of curriculum development.

courses and seminars sponsored by the San Francisco Unified School District, the San Francisco State College, and the City College of San Francisco are given. The jointly sponsored courses are of imme-

Registration in these courses is entirely opEnrollment is limited to not more than two courses in one semester. Since some of the classes will be limited as to size, registration should be prompt and final.

tional.

Jointly Sponsored Courses San Francisco State College and the San Francisco Unified School

The

jointly sponsored courses will carry col-

lege undergraduate and in some instances graduate credit or in-service training credit. College credit may be earned by registering, pay-

ing the fee of $3.00 per semester unit, and fulthe requirements of San Francisco State In-service training credits may be College. earned without the payment of a fee. All members of the certificated staff registering for inservice training credits will be expected to fulattendfill the same work requirements and ance as that required of students in the same course who are taking the work for college credit. Classes will start Wednesday. February 15, 1950. filling

PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN PE-158. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS, Kindergarten-3rd Grade. Attention in this course will be given to appropriate activities for kindergarten and primary children, rhythmics, folk dancing, mimetics, games, posture training. Also, a review of the recent literature in the field will be required. Florence Hale Stephenson, Professor of Physical Education, San Francisco State College; Mrs. Mary Mannelli, Miss Viola Beck, San Francisco Public Schools. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. Girls High School. Class limited to 40. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Extension 221, for pre-registration.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN PE-159. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS, 4-5-6-7-8 The purpose of this course is to provide teachers of the intermediate and upper grade pupils with training in appropriate activities for their work with children; rhythmics, folkdancing, mimetics, games, posture training. Grades.

District

Also a review of the recent literature in the field will be required. Florence Hale Stephenson, Professor of Physical Education, San Francisco State College; Mrs. Mary Mannelli, Miss Narda Schuldt, San Francisco Public Schools. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Girls High School. Class limited to 40. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Extension 221, for pre-registration.

ED.

152.

VISUAL AIDS IN THE CLASS-

ROOM. A

study of the function of visual aids in the learning process. Attention will be given to the

management

of the visual

program,

in-

cluding the selection of materials and the use of equipment. Dr. Morris Williams. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m., starting February 15, 1950, and Thursday, 4-6 p.m., starting February 16, 1950. Auditorium, Girls High School, Registration limited to 50 each class. For preregistration, write Dr. Williams, 750 Eddy St.

ED.

273.

TIONS.

SEMINAR IN HUMAN RELA-

seminar, opportunities will be offered for the study of group relations in the school, of the individual and his personal adjustment, and also the adjustment of the school curriculum to meet the needs of the child. The work in this seminar will be focused on actual classroom situations where the participants will endeavor to discover ways and means of improving human relations in the schools. Dr. Fred Wilhelms, Associate Professor of Education, San Francisco State College; Miss Mar-

In

this

garet Heaton, Curriculum Consultant in Human Relations, San Francisco Public Schools, and staff. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Girls High School.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

ART

304.

WORKSHOP

IN ARTS

AND

For teachers and administrators of grades kindergarten through 3rd. The aim of this course is to give elementary teachers an understanding of child growth and development in art and methods for releasing the

CRAFTS.

child's creative

ability.

Specific

attention will

techniques for handling finger painting, poster painting, chalk, firing clay, and papier mache. Herbert Simon. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 1950. Room 16, Edison School. Class 15, limited to 25. Pre-registration required. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Extension 221.

be given

ART

to

375.

WORKSHOP

IN

ARTS AND

CRAFTS. For teachers and administrators of grades 4 through 6. The aim of this course is to give elementary teachers an understanding growth and development in art and methods for releasing the child's creative abilof child

attention will be given to techhandling finger painting, poster painting, water color, chalk, firing clay, and papier mache. Susan B. Irwin. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. Room 27, Sanchez School. Class limited ity.

Specific

niques

Pre-registration required. Call 3-4680, Extension 221.

to 25. hill

for

UNder-

377-B. WEAVING. For teachers of 7th and 8th grades, junior and senior high art teachers and elementary teachers having met Prerequisite, Art pre-requisite requirements. 377 or equivalent. Advanced weaving with emphasis on design, directed by the material and the process. Katherine Geary. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. Room 19, Sanchez School. Class limited to 18. Pre-registration required. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Extension 221.

ED. 272. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. This seminar is designed to implement the curriculum development in health education at the junior and senior high school level. Dr. Margaret Leonard. 2 semester units. Wednes1950.

ED. 272A. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS.

ERS.

Prerequisite Ed. 272A. This seminar is designed to implement the work initiated by the California Health Education Project which was set up on a trial basis in one of the San Miss Ethel Francisco elementary schools. Mealey. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. Girls High School.

ED. 370G.

This is an introductory seminar for teachers who have had no previous experience with the California Health Education Project. Miss Ethel Mealey. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Girls High School.

SCIENCE IN THE INTEGRA-

TED PROGRAM.

For Kindergarten Primary

Teachers. Emphasis will be given to the use of the new kindergarten-primary science guides for teachers and the use of science supplies in the teaching of science. Miss Ramona Galeno. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting 15, 1950. Girls High School. Class limited to 40. Pre-registration required. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Ext. 260, Dr. Steig.

February

ED. 370G.

SCIENCE IN THE INTEGRA-

TED PROGRAM.

For Grades 4-5-6. Empha-

be given to the use of the new fourth, fifth and sixth grade science guide and the use of materials and equipment in simple demonstration in the teaching of science. J. A. Perino, Head of the Science Department, Polytechnic High School. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Polytechnic sis

will

High School. Class

limited to 25. Pre-registra-

tion required. Call

UNderhill 3-4680, Ext. 260,

Dr. Steig.

ED. 315A. READING, GUIDANCE IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. This course will

ART

day, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, San Francisco State College, Annex A5.

ED. 272B. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACH-

include

a review of outstanding books

from children's

literature in the various sub-

ject fields of the

also

designed to

elementary curriculum. acquaint

wide reading, with instructional

how

program.

teachers,

they

may

Special

It is

through

enrich the

emphasis

will

be given to methods of presenting books to the children in groups and as individuals, and on

ways of encouraging the use of books other than textbooks in the various subject fields. Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Director of Texts

and

Libraries.

2

semester units.

4-6 p. m., starting February 15,

Wednesday, 1950.

Girls

High School.

THIRD GRADE SOCIAL STUDIES. work-study group

ways

in

will

This

be concerned with the

which the third grade materials are

being used, and the production of a teacher's

manual Miss

to

accompany each type

Mary McCarthy,

of material.

Supervisor of Elemen-

tary Education. 2 semester units. Wednesday,

4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Sanchez School,

Work

Center.

Enrollment limited to

30 third grade teachers. Call Dr. Spears'

UNderhill 3-4680 for pre-registration.

office,

SAN FRANCISCC PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN University

San Franc,'sco (Cont'd)

:rcA-

merInstruction

Monday, Februar ancj

begins

1950. Registration will be February 7, 8 ;hool 8:30 a. m.-4 p. m., and later registration Dj, 2

made on February 13 and 14 by paying fee. Students who were not in attendai ERS the fall semester, 1949, must make appli mas-

of student teaching organization. Inservice or University graduate credit. 2 semes-

praisal

meets by arrangement with the Coordinator of Student Teachers, University ter units. Class

San Francisco.

of

EDUC.

250

SEMINAR IN BUSINESS

EDUCATION.

Problems in secondary-school business courses. Group discussion and individual work. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m.

through the Graduate Division for adn curor re-admission niza165 Business Education in Secondary S( ;acn EDUC. X280 OF Monday, 7-9 p. m. Mr. Spencer. the EDUCATION. SEMINAR. 2 semester units. 20 IB History of Education. Seminar apSaturday 10:00 a. m.-Noon. nesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Mosier 212 Analysis of Difficulties in Readin|CO College for Language Arts. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 oon and Saturday Courses mary 26 and 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dr. Buswell. Classes are open to women only 216B Educational Psychology. Seir 30, 1950 Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Educ. Psych. S\ND 6. A READING COURSE. 2 Experimental Education. Thu.d to 217 semester units. Saturday, 10:50 a. m. -12:30 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Gilbert. : hool p. m.

PROBLEMS

ADULT

Women



FRENCH

224B School Curriculum. Seminar,

.

2

227 Problems in Curriculum Develop Saturday, 10-12. Dr. Parker. OF 230B Elementary Education. Seminar, ance day, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Barnett. hpler 232B The Elementary School Currii a t ur Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. B

THE Univer !nizaDep irten Late Afternoon, Ev nesRegistration will take place on Febn ltucjy 3, 1950, at 7:00 p. m. ; and classe nter

and

commence Monday, February classes are

open

to both

6,

MATHEMATICS

"etter

day, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Parker.

195i

rcj a

men and womer

CULUS. a.

m.-12:30

p.

m.

SONG INTERPRETATION THE ELEMENTARY GRADES. Me-

MUSIC IN

INTEGRAL CAL-

9b.

2 or 3 semester units. Saturday, 10:50

42b.

thods of presenting songs and collateral musi-

upper elementary grades. Tuesdays and Thursdays,

cal activities in the

semester units. 3:40-4:30 p. m. 2

PSYCHOLOGY 114. RATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. A study of the principal powers of human being. Special emphasis will be placed upon the practical application to man's life. 2 semester units. Saturday. 10:50 a. m.12:30 p. m. the

PSYCHOLOGY

y

GUIDANCE.

PRINCIPLES OF

169.

See Education 169.

EDUC. 112 ADOLESCENT PSYC OGY. A study of the principal characti]ege of San Francisco of the adolescent with special reference struction in the secondary schools. 2 se units.

Tuesday, 7:30-9:20

EDUC.

119

p.

DDS. lani-

m.

TESTS, MEASUREMElS San

EVALUATION.

Standard

tests;

;hn to

pri:

yings underlying test construction; practice in and scoring tests and interpreting tests P^1111 improvement of instruction. 2 semester San

Wednesday, 7:30-9:20

p.

luate

m.

bru125 AUDIO-VISUAL San introduction to the use of visual aids in the teaching process. 2 se ING units. Wednesday, 7:30-9:20 p. m.

ED

EDUC. TION. An

HYG

rere-

170 EDUCATIONAL 11 be Problems of health for students and te; anizhealth education and services in the riate school; the role of the teacher in health ian j tices of the pupil. 2 semester units. Thi see7:30-9:20 p.m. dier,

EDUC.

EDUC.

139.

PROBLEMS IN ELE units

TARY EDUCATION.

The appraisal m.. thods and the attaining of objecives in r Colelementary education; the characterisi <

ART

CAL

311-A.

CERAMIC PRO-

BASIC

CESSES. For elementary

teachers and administrators. Bowls and figurines and other small objects executed in firing clay. Includes basic

hand

processes, glazing,

and

firing.

Roy Walker.

semester units, undergraduate credit, Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. City College of San Francisco, Room 10E. Class limited to 30. Pre-registration required. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Extension 221. 2

ART

311-B. CERAMICS. For teachers of 7th and 8th grades, junior and senior high art teachers and elementary teachers having met pre-requisite requirements. Prerequisite, Art 376 or Ed. 311, or equivalent. Advanced ceramics with emphasis on design directed by the material. Advanced hand processes, glazing, and firing. Roy Walker. 2 semester units, undergraduate credit, Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February Francisco,

16,

Room

registration

1950.

required.

Extension 221.

City College of San

10E. Class limited to 30. Pre-

Call UNderhill

3-4680,

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

ART

304.

WORKSHOP

IN ARTS

AND

For teachers and administrators of through 3rd. The aim of kindergarten grades this course is to give elementary teachers an understanding of child growth and development in art and methods for releasing the

CRAFTS.

child's creative ability.

Specific attention will

techniques for handling finger painting, poster painting, chalk, firing clay, and papier mache. Herbert Simon. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 1950. Room 16, Edison School. Class 15, limited to 25. Pre-registration required. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Extension 221.

be given

ART

to

375.

WORKSHOP

IN

ARTS AND

CRAFTS. For teachers and administrators of grades 4 through 6. The aim of this course is to give elementary teachers an understanding growth and development in art and methods for releasing the child's creative abilof child

attention will be given to techniques for handling finger painting, poster painting, water color, chalk, firing clay, and papier mache. Susan B. Irwin. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. Room 27, Sanchez School. Class limited to 25. Pre-registration required. Call UNderity.

hill

Specific

ART

377-B. WEAVING. For teachers of 7th and 8th grades, junior and senior high art teachers and elementary teachers having met Prerequisite, Art pre-requisite requirements. 377 or equivalent. Advanced weaving with emphasis on design, directed by the material and the process. Katherine Geary. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. Room 19, Sanchez School. Class limited to 18. Pre-registration required. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Extension 221.

ED. 272. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. This seminar is designed to implement the curriculum development in health education at the junior and senior high school level. Dr. Margaret Leonard. 2 semester units. Wednes1950.

ED. 272A. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS.

ERS. Prerequisite Ed. 272A. This seminar is designed to implement the work initiated by the California Health Education Project which was set up on a trial basis in one of the San Miss Ethel Francisco elementary schools. Mealey. 2 semester units. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. Girls High School. ED. 370G.

This is an introductory seminar for teachers who have had no previous experience with the California Health Education Project. Miss Ethel Mealey. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Girls High School.

SCIENCE IN THE INTEGRA-

TED PROGRAM.

For Kindergarten Primary

Teachers. Emphasis will be given to the use of the new kindergarten-primary science guides for teachers and the use of science supplies in the teaching of science. Miss Ramona Galeno. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Girls High School. Class limited

to

required.

Pre-registration

40.

UNderhill 3-4680, Ext. 260, Dr.

ED. 370G.

Call

Steig.

SCIENCE IN THE INTEGRA-

TED PROGRAM. sis

For Grades 4-5-6. Emphabe given to the use of the new fourth, and sixth grade science guide and the use

will

fifth

of materials and equipment in simple demonstration in the teaching of science. J. A. Perino, Head of the Science Department, Polytechnic

High School.

2 semester units. Wednesday, 4-6 m., starting February 15, 1950. Polytechnic High School. Class limited to 25. Pre-registration required. Call UNderhill 3-4680, Ext. 260, Dr. Steig. p.

ED. 315A. READING, GUIDANCE IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. This course will

3-4680, Extension 221.

day, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, San Francisco State College, Annex A5.

ED. 272B. SEMINAR IN HEALTH EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACH-

include

a review of outstanding books

from children's

literature in the various sub-

ject fields of the

also

designed

to

elementary curriculum. acquaint

wide reading, with instructional

how

program.

teachers,

they

may

Special

It

is

through

enrich the

emphasis

will

be given to methods of presenting books to the children in groups and as individuals, and on

ways

of encouraging the use of books other than textbooks in the various subject fields. Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Director of Texts

and

Libraries.

2

semester units.

4-6 p. m., starting February

15,

Wednesday, 1950.

Girls

High School.

THIRD GRADE SOCIAL STUDIES. work-study group

ways

in

will

This

be concerned with the

which the third grade materials are

being used, and the production of a teacher's

manual Miss

to

accompany each type

Mary McCarthy,

of material.

Supervisor of Elemen-

tary Education. 2 semester units. Wednesday,

4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. Sanchez School,

Work

Center.

Enrollment limited to

30 third grade teachers. Call Dr. Spears'

UNderhill 3-4680 for pre-registration.

office,

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

SAN FRANCISCO PUBL IC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

University of California, Berkeley

University of San Francisco (Cont'd)

EDUC. 240b. SECONDARY EDUCATION. SEMINAR. Current problems in Amei

School of Education begins Monday, February 13, 1950. Registration will be February 7, 8 and 9, 8:30 a. m.-4 p. m., and later registration may be made on February 13 and 14 by paying a $2 Instruction

Students who were not in attendance in the fall semester, 1949, must make application through the Graduate Division for admission fee.

or re-admission.

165 Business Education in Secondary Schools. Monday, 7-9 p. m. Mr. Spencer. 201

B History

of Education. Seminar.

Wed-

nesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Mosier. 212 Analysis of Difficulties in Reading

Language Arts. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30

p.

and m.

Dr. Buswell.

216B Educational Psychology. Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Educ. Psych. Staff. Experimental Education. Thursday, 217 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Gilbert. 224B School Curriculum. Seminar. Thursday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Parker. 227 Problems in Curriculum Development. Saturday, 10-12. Dr. Parker. 230B Elementary Education. Seminar. Monday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Barnett. 232B The Elementary School Curriculum. Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Russell.

233B Supervision Thursday, 7:30-9:30 234B Supervision

Elementary Education. p. m. Dr. Kyte. of Elementary Education. Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Kyte. 240B Educational Administration. Seminar. Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Morphet, Reller, of

ican secondary education. Individual study and group discussion of problems in secondary school organization, instruction and curriculum. 2

tion and implementation of the student teaching program; problems concerned with the evaluation of student teaching and the ap-

Monday, February

6,

1950.

All

open to both men and women. EDUC. 112 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY. A study of the principal characteristics classes are

of the adolescent with special reference to instruction in the secondary schools. 2 semester units.

Tuesday, 7:30-9:20

p.

m.

EDUC. 119 TESTS, MEASUREMENTS & EVALUATION. Standard tests; principles underlying test construction; practice in giving and scoring tests and interpreting tests for the

improvement of instruction. 2 semester Wednesday, 7:30-9:20 p. m.

units.

EDUC.

125 AUDIO- VISUAL EDUCAintroduction to the use of audiovisual aids in the teaching process. 2 semester

TION. An units.

Wednesday, 7:30-9:20

p.

m.

EDUC. 170 EDUCATIONAL HYGIENE. Problems of health for students and teachers; health education and services in the public school; the role of the teacher in health practices of the pupil. 2 semester units. Thursday

7:30-9:20

p.m.

EDUC.

139.

PROBLEMS

TARY EDUCATION. thods and

elementary

IN ELEMEN-

The appraisal of meattaining of objecives in modern education; the characteristics of

th<

units.

Monday, 7:30-9:20

p.

EDUCATION

employment and

classification

of certificated employees, including certification; right to dis-

miss certified employees under tenure laws; liability of school districts and personal liability of certificated employees for personal injuries to pupils. 2 semester units. Thursday, 7:30-9:20 p.

m.

EDUC. 206b PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION SEMINAR. Conflicting opinions on education;

modern

schools of educational thought. Reports and discussions. 2 semester units Monday, 7:30-9:20 p. m.

EDUC. 212b. PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION. An examination of the psychological bases of educational theory and practice; individual differences in

mental

nature-nurture controversy, mental development; conditions and motivation. 2 semester units Thursday 7:30-9:20 p. m. ability,

perception

and

Problems in secondary-school business courses. Group discussion and individual work. 2 semester units. Thursday 4-6 p. m.

EDUC. X280 PROBLEMS OF ADULT

EDUCATION. SEMINAR. Saturday 10:00

2 semester units

m.-Noon.

a.

Women

Late Afternoon and Saturday Courses Registration January 26 and 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m Classes begin Monday, January 30, 1950 —Classes are open to



EDUCATION

140.

THE TEACHER AND

ADMINISTRATION.

Teaching

as related to

the organization and administration of a school system. A course leading to the teacher's better appreciation of administrative problems. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4:00-5:40 p. m.

EDUCATION

PRINCIPLES

169.

GUIDANCE. A

and administration of the kindergarten and its techniques. 2 semester units. Wednesday, 4:00-5:40 p. m.

ENGLISH 117. SHAKESPEARE. A study of a few selected plays according to the interests of the group. 2 semester units. Saturday, 9:00-10:40

m.

a.

FRENCH semester

women only A READING COURSE.

6.

Saturday,

units.

10:50

MATHEMATICS CULUS.

9b.

INTEGRAL CAL-

2 or 3 semester units. Saturday

1050

m.-12:30p. m.

a.

MUSIC

42b. SONG INTERPRETATION THE ELEMENTARY GRADES. Me-

IN

thods of presenting songs and collateral musical

activities in

the upper elementary grades.

semester units. 3:40-4:30 p. m. 2

Tuesdays

and

Thursdays

PSYCHOLOGY 114. RATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. A study of the principal powers of

the human being. Special emphasis will be placed upon the practical application to man's life. 2 semester units, Saturday. 10:50 a m12:30 p. m.

PSYCHOLOGY GUIDANCE.

169.

PRINCIPLES OF

See Education 169.

City College of San Francisco

ART 303. ELEMENTARY MECHANICAL DRAWING CONTENT AND METHODS. This course cal

is

drawing

designed for teachers of mechanithe secondary schools of San

in

Francisco. Particular attention will be given to the use of the American Standard Drawings

and Drafting Room Practice in curriculum content. C. J. Aggeler, City College of San Francisco. 2 semester units (undergraduate credit).

Wednesday, 4-6

ary 15, 1950.

Room

3,

m., starting FebruCity College of San

p.

Francisco.

ENG. 305. MECHANICAL DRAWING CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. A prereEd. 303 or Ed. 304. Attenion will be given to the developing of objectives, organizing course content and selection of appropriate materials for classroom use, for a new mechanical drawing curriculum to be used in the secondary schools of San Francisco. C. J. Aggeler, Citv College of San Francisco. 2 semester units (undergraduate credit). Thursday, 4-6 p restarting February 16, 1950. Room 3, City Colquisite:

lege of

San Francisco.

2

m.-12:30

a.

m.

p.

OF

survey of current guidance practices, the aims, techniques and simpler types of organization. 2 semester units. Saturday, 9:00-10:40 a. m.

tion

EDUC. 195 LAW. This course covers the legal aspects of public school administration; the relationship of the school to the state; the formation of school districts; the legal liabilities and limitations of boards of education and of administrative officers; the

'

SEMINAR IN BUSINESS

250

EDUCATION.

San Francisco College for

EDUCATION 192. PRINCIPLES OF THE KINDERGARTEN. A study of the organiza-

m.

San Francisco.

EDUC.

ter teachers engaged in the supervision of currently assigned student teachers. The organiza-

244 Problems in Schoolhousing. Friday, 7:309:30 p. m. Dr. Morphet, Reller. 248B Educational Administration. Saturday. 9-11 a. m. Dr. Reller, Peterson. 249.B School Surveys. Saturday, 11-12. Dr. Reller, Peterson. 258B Social Studies Education. Seminar. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Michaelis. 260B Student Personnel Work. Seminar. Thursday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Brayfield. 264 Organization and Administration of Student Personnel Services. Saturday, 10-12. Dr. Brayfield. 270B Secondary Education. Seminar. Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Lund. 272B Secondary School Curriculum: Techniques of Curriculum Making. Tuesday 7:309:30 p. m. Dr. Parker. 273 Supervision in Secondary Schools. Thursday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. Dr. Lund.

/

commence

of

EDUC. 299 SUPERVISING TEACHERS SEMINAR. Open to supervising, critic, or mas-

Peterson.

children, individual differences and grouping; particular supervisory problems. 2 semester

ter units. Class meets by arrangement with the Coordinator of Student Teachers, Umverah

semester units.

University of San Francisco Department of Education Late Afternoon, Evening anid Saturday Morning Classes Registration will take place on February 2 and 3, 1950, at 7:00 p. m., and classes will

^.^.^

praisal of tudcnt teaching service or University graduate credit. 2 semes-

ART

311-A.

BASIC

CERAMIC PRO-

CESSES. For elementary

teachers and administrators. Bowls and figurines and other small objects executed in firing clay. Includes basic hand processes, glazing, and firing. Roy Walker. 2 semester units, undergraduate credit. Wednesday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 15, 1950. City College of San Francisco, Room I0E. Class limited to 30. Pre-rcgist ration required. Call UNdcrhill 3-4680, Extension 221,

ART

311-B. CERAMICS. For teachers of 7th and 8th grades, junior and senior high art teachers and elementary teachers having met pre-rccjuisite requirements, Prerequisite, Art 376 or Ed. 311, or equivalent. Advanced ceramics with emphasis on design directed by the

material.

and

Advanced hand

Roy Walker.

firing.

processes,

glazing,

2 semester units,

undergraduate credit. Thursday, 4-6 p. m., starting February 16, 1950. City College of San Francisco,

Room

rcgistration

10E. Class limited to 30. Pre-

required.

Extension 221.

Call

UNdcrhill 3-4680,

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

BULLETIN AN FHANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

San Francisco State College (Cont'd)

San Francisco State College

Educ 221— Advanced Problems

Late Afternoon and Evening Classes

Spring Semester

and 9. Registration will be February 7 8 13. Students may February start will Classes five semester units at enroll (or a maximum of unit. per of ?3 a charge 173A— Block Printing (1 unit)

MWt,

Art

AB

4:10-5 p. m., Green, Bus 117B— Business Law (3 units) 4.10-5 p. m., Schneider, 207. 1.

MWF,

1

950

Educ 395

paired Vision (4 units)

Educ 397—Teaching

plus 2 hours arranged, 4:10-5 p. m., and Rhode, FB 208.

MW,

Braille

— MWF, —Elementary French

MWF, 4:10-5

p.

(2 units) 110.

French

units)

AA8. North America

Political

Thought

(3

MWF, 1

1



MWF,

White, A210.

191— Parent-Child Relationships AA7. units) M, 4:10-5:50 p. m., Mcsser, Educ 220— Survey of Physical Defects Educ

(2

Brenn, H3A. units)

Curriculum

239A—Elementary

MW,

(3

H2B.

6:30-8 p. m., Rockerick,

Educ 240— Public School Organization (3 units) MW, 4:10-5:25 p. m., Murphy, FB109. Educ 243 State and County Administration FB (3 units) TTh, 4:10-5:25 p. m., Murphy,



109.

Educ 247

—Supervision

and Curriculum

the Secondary School, 3 units. p.

m., Wilhclms,

TTh,

in

4:10-5:25

207.

Educ 291—Advanced Problems

in CurriculBuilding for Mentally Retarded Children (3 units) MW, 4:10-5:25 p. m., Rothstein. Educ 319— Language Arts in the Elementary School (2 units) W, 4:10-5:50 p. m., McCullough, Girls High School.

um

320A

Reading p.

—Analysis

Difficulties,

and

Correction of 3 units. MW, 4:10-5:25

m., E. Monroe, 216.

—Elementary

324

Educ

M,

(2 units)

School

Arithmetic

4:10-5:50 p. m., Dawson,

H3A.



Educ 362 Advanced Speech Correction (2 Th, 4:10-5:50 p. m., Lassers, FB 110. Educ 371— Driver Education (2 units) Th, p.

m., plus lab by arrangement Sat-

urday mornings, Swetl School.

Moore and Spencer, John

Educ 37511 Language Development for Reading for Deaf Children (4 units) MW, 4:10-5:50

Edur

p. 1

m., Pitlenger,

FB

1

17D.

Teaching Cerebral Palsied Children 13 units) M, 4:10-5:50 p. m., plus clinic hour arranged, Brenn, F.B 114. '.la !

TTh,



MW,

Chrisman, FB 207. Psych 208B Seminar in Clinical Study of the Problem Child (2 units) M, 7-9 p.m., Sheviakov; M, 4:10-6 p.m., Sheviakov; M, 4:106 p.m., Cooper; W, 4:10-6 p.m., Cooper. AB2 (Enrollment by permission of instructor). Psych 208B— Seminar in Clinical Study of the Problem Child (2 units) W, 4:10-6 p. m., Stewart (Enrollment by permission of instruc-



tor). 1

— Elementary

Russian

(3

MWF,

units)

4:10-5 p. m., Proctor, AA9. Soc 156— Social Control (3 units) 4:10-5 p. m., Lastrucci, A110. Speech 10-110— Workshop in Public Discussion and Debate (1 unit) T, 4:10-6 p. m.,

MWF,

Bushnell,

AB

2.

239— Studies

in Theater Practice (3 10. units) F, 4:10-6:30 p. m., Miller, Bus 101 Sources and Uses of Business In-

Speech

AA



formation (2 units) 208.

W,

7:15-9 p. m., W'alsh,



Bus 117A Business Law (3 units) TTh, 5:45-7 p. in., 208. Business 134 Corporation Finance and In5:45-7 p. m., Tomvestment (3 units)



MW,

asevich, 208.

Bus 183— Marketing

units)

4:10-5:50

of the

4:10-5 p. m., A108. Music 81 fntroduction to Music in the Ele4:10-5:30 p. m., mentary School (3 units)

Russian

H2B.

Educ 265— Seminar in Counseling and Guidance (3 units) TTh, 4:10-5:25 p. m., Lindgren,

Educ

—Home Nursing and Care

4-104

Sick (2 units)

(3 arranged, units) T, 4:10-5:30 plus clinic hours

Educ

Hyg

p.

(3 units)

MW,

5:45-7

m., 207.

Bus 192— Export Procedures 7:15-9

Bus

m., 207. 193 Import

p.

— —

Marketing

7:15-9 p. m., 208. Econ 115 Economic

and

(2 (2

units)

Political

quences of World War II (3 units) 7 p. in., Tucker, 207.



units)

W, T,

Conse-

TTh,

5:45-

Econ 191 Economics of Underdeveloped Areas (2 units) M, 7:15-9 p. m., Tomasevich, 208.

—School Finance and Business AdM,

ministration (3 units) phy, FB 109.

pervision (4 units) 208.

Educ

M,

6:30-9 p. m.,

6:30-9 p. m., Linn,

Work

Secondary

in

W,

6:30-9 p. m.,

109.

—Administration

of Special Education (2 units) Cain, FB 110.

(2 units)

W,

7-8:40 p. m.,

in

110.

p.

Clinical in rection (1-6 units) M, 7-8:40 p. m., and hours arranged, Lassers and Holtzman, 209.



Educ 372 Methods of Teaching Speech (Lip) Reading to the Hard-of-Hearing Child (3 units)

Educ 378B— Teaching Elementary Deaf Children

to

Pittenger,

FB

(2

units)

W,

Subject*

7-8:40

p.

Crafts

to the

,„

114.



Educ 393 Teaching Arts and Handicapped (2 units) M, 7-8:40 A123. French



109 Scientific 5:10-6 p. m., AA6.

p. in.. Brenn

Reading

(3

units)



Govt 139 Post War Europe (2 units) T. 7:15-9 p. m., Tomasevich, World Affairs Coun-

T, 6:30-9

p.

Health Educ 200— Problems in Health Education (2 units) V/, 7-9 p. m., dcGhetaldi, 203.

194—The Far East in the 20th Ccntuiy M, 7:15-9 p. m.. Treutlcin, 207. Math 11A Intermediate Algebra (3 units]

Hist

and Supervision

—Seminar Special Education (3 m., Cain, FB M, 7-8:40 Speech CorMethods Educ 364— Educ 295

units)

7-9:30 p. m., Pittenger FB

114.

cil.

Educ 281—The Blind in Society T, 7-8:40 p. m., Henderson, FB 109. Educ 294

FB

M.

dren (3 units)

MWF,

260B—Field

Murphy, FB

Mur-

in Elementary Su-

School Supervision (4 units)

4:10-5 p. m., F. Cave, 215. Economic and Social History of the Hist 4:10-5 p. m., G. United States (3 units) units)

Educ 242

Educ 260A—Field Work (3

of (3 4:10-5 p. m., Darneal, A125.

115—Recent

Govt

(3

T,

m., Berkeley,

—Geology

134

MWF,

units)

Guntcr

Educ 160— Education of Exceptional ChilFB dren (2 units) M, 4:10-5:50 p. m., Gain,

4:10-5:50 p. m.,

4:10-5:50 p. m., Henderson, FB Eng 56 Survey of English Literature 4:10-5 p. m., AA6. units)

Geol (2 units)

Im-

of Children with

Henderson, H3B.

units)

Th

—Education

1

Educ 133-233— Evaluation in Education (3

TTh, 4:10-5:25 p. m., H1A. Educ 152—Audio- Visual Education



Teaching

in

the Cerebral Palsied Child (3 units) T, 6:308:30 p. m., plus clinic hour arranged, Brenn, F.B 208.

m., Pittenger, F.B 110.

Educ 376B— Speech Training

for

(2 units)

MWF,



5:10-6



p.

m.,

J.

Wilson,

A

1

15.

Rec 174 Recreation Programs (2 7-9 p. m., Cranford, 203.

—Elementary Russian m., Proctor, AA9. 152 Education — Audio-Visual Educ m., FB Saturday, 9-11:30 Educ 204 — Trends and

units) T.

Russian 2

MWF,

5:10-6

(3

units)

p.

a.

(2 units)

208.

Issues

in

Modern

Education (3 units) Saturday, 9-11:30

Deaf Chil-

Hanna, Kendall, Merritt, Wilhclms,

Notes

208.

a.

m.

4

v

7

0'

>V

PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN VOL. XXI

No. 21

C^^[email protected]

FEBRUARY

6,

1950

Carpenter Memorial

Classification Reports for

Estelle

Elementary School

Scholarship

Principals of elementary schools are reminded that the Classification Reports for Elementary Schools are to be submitted to the Bureau of Personnel twice each term, in accordance with the following instructions which are quoted on the back of the blank:

Following the auditions on Friday, January 13, in the Mission High School Little Theater, the winner of the first annual scholarship of $250.00, sponsored by the San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association in memory of the late Estelle Carpenter, was announced. She is Miss Ardith Blue Hawks, soprano, of Polytechnic High School. The adjudicators were: Dr. William E. Knuth of San Francisco State College, Miss Flossita Badger of City College of San Francisco and Miss Eileen Fealy, concert pianist. The Scholarship Committee included: Miss Arline E. Lynch, chairman; Miss Isabelle Becker, Miss Frances Kelly and Mrs. Cecilia

At the close of the term the report should on the Monday following the close of the schools for the term and should record the actual number of pupils who will be with each teacher during the next term based upon the actual number of pupils enrolled in the school at the time the report is made. Under remarks, report opposite each class listed the number of "a.

be

filed

additional pupils who are expected at the beginning of the new term, as specified by the rules of the Board of Education. This report shall be sent in duplicate." "b. At the beginning of the new term, the report should be made on the second Friday and should record the actual conditions of that date. This report shall be sent in quadrupli-

cate." It should be noted that much of the usefulness of the classification report submitted at the end of the term is lost if this form is delayed in

transmittal and principals, therefore are urged to see that it is submitted promptly.

Awarded

Sullivan.

The entire group of thirteen candidates for the scholarship displayed unusual talent and were a credit to the music work of the city schools, but both judges and auditors were in choosing Miss Hawks, who displayed outstanding musical promise in her in-

unanimous

terpretation of "Un Bel Di" from "Madame Butterfly." Another scholarship will be offered next year in music by the San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association.

Rule on Professional Organizations In regard to the solicitation of membership professional organizations, Superintendent Herbert C. Clish calls attention to the following regulation adopted by the Board of Education at its meeting September 14, 1937:

in

"Sounds of San Francisco"

A new

sound record, "Sounds of San Franbeen delivered this week to elementary schools for use with third grade social studies booklets. These records are unbreakable, plastic "Dura-Flex" records with fourteen

cisco", has

typical

San Francisco sounds.

The sound record was recorded by KALW and initially used at the December elementary institute in a field

demonstration lesson by the Win-

Scott group.

The Visual Aids Department or KALW will be happy to help teachers in utilization problems.

A

display of the processing of the sound rec-

ord has been on exhibit at the Central Office for the past week.

Rule No. 74c: Membership in Professional Organizations: Teachers and all other employees of the Board Education shall have complete freedom in selecting the professional organizations which they may wish to join, without coercion of any kind from any administrative officer or other school employee. 2. Whatever courtesies are extended to any teacher organization in the schools shall be fully and unreservedly extended to all teacher organizations. The use of any coercion or pressure by any 3. 1.

of

principal or other administrative officer or other school employee to influence any teacher to join or refrain from joining any organization shall be deemed to be unprofessional conduct. 4.

The Superintendent

of

Schools shall

call

at-

tention to this rule at the beginning of each school term by means of a notice in the Superintendent's Bulletin.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, February 6 Spring semester resumes. Physicians will visit the following schools:

Paul Revere, Commerce, Burnett, Longfellow,

McKinley, Sunshine.



Social Hygiene Insti9:00 a.m.-9:30 p.m. tute presented by the San Francisco Social Hygiene Association, Crystal Hall, Hotel Whit-

comb.



Regular meeting. San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Room 226, Mission High School. Course. "Teacher-Parent Re7:30 p.m. lations." Sub-topic: "Principles of Group Dynamics (Contd.) Speaker: Hubert S. Coffey, Ph.D. Auspices: Adult Education Division and



affiliated

High

agencies.

Room

254,

Marina Junior

School.

Tuesday, February 7 Physicians will visit the following schools: Grant, Commerce, Ridgepoint 1, Bryant, Lafayette, Douglas, McKinley (Contact C.) Public business meeting. Board 7:30 p.m. of Education. Fourth floor, 93 Grove Street. 7:30 p.m. Lecture. "Youth and Marriage

— —

— What

Should You About It?" Speaker: Richard A. Koch,

Today." Sub-topic: "Sex

Know

M.D., Department of Public Health. Auspices: Adult Education Division. YMCA, 220 Golden Gate Avenue.

Wednesday, February 8 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Starr King, Commerce, Irving M. Scott, Candlesick, Franklin, Hawthorne, Excelsior,

School Lists Due February 21 The principal of each school will send to the Bureau of Attendance not later than February 21, 1950, the complete enrollment by classes as of February 16, 1950, on the class list forms supplied by the Bureau. (Please notify the Bureau of Attendance or the school's supervisor of attendance the number of class list forms required.

Arrange lists alphabetically, and type or write plainly in ink. Do not use nicknames. If a teacher has more than one grade, list them separately. In listing the addresses of Chinese pupils, give the floor and room number in addition to the street address; also both American and Chinese names. List complete addresses for children living in the projects building, sec-



and apartment numbers. For children living in apartment houses, rooming houses, and hotels, list apartment or room number. The list should contain only the names of the tion,

children who are actually enrolled in the class. In order to keep records correct, any child who returns to school after February 16 or enters after that date should be reported to the Bureau of Attendance at once either by a transfer, if he has one, or by an Entered Without Transfer slip.

The central files of the Bureau of Attendance now located at 750 Eddy Street, Room 301.

are

Existing Janitorial

Vacancy

hereby given that the following janitorial vacancy exists in the San Francisco School System: 1 CI 06 Janitor Yerba Buena. This vacancy will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though this position may be temporarily filled, it may still be applied for under the Notice

is



.

seniority rule.

Request for transfer should be made, in writ-

Fremont.

Thursday, February 9 Physicians will visit the following schools: F. S. Key, Argonne NS., Dudley Stone. 3:45 p.m. Regular meeting. Day Adult Americanization Teachers. Marina Adult School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets.

Fairmount, Commerce,

ing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school

janitors or through the Civil Service Building

Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.



Friday, February 10 Physicians will visit the following schools: Laguna Honda HC, Jefferson, Bret Harte, Hancock, Golden Gate, Junipero Serra.

Monday, February 13 Observance

of Lincoln's Birthday.

Tuesday, February 14 8:00 p.m.

ism



A



Discussion. Subject: "Alcohol-

Social

A

Hygiene Institute

Hygiene institute presented by the San Francisco Social Hygiene Association and co-sponsored by affiliated organizations, will be Social

held in the Crystal Hall of the Hotel

on February

Day

Whitcomb

6.

Session: 9 a.m., to 5 p.m.;

Luncheon: 12

noon; Evening Session: 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Further information and a complete program may be obtained by telephoning the Association SUtter 1-3282.

Major Health Problem." Auspices:

San Francisco Chapter, Mental Health Society of Northern California. Co-chairmen: Wm. M. Weiner, M.D., Percy P. Poliak, M.D. Speaker:

Nathan Adler, non-members:

psychologist. 35p.

School Auditorium.

Members:

Roosevelt

Junior

free;

High

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Adult Education Division The Volunteer Bureau is a newcomer

to the

adult program. Cosponsored by the Community Chest and the Junior League, the Bureau serves over 100 community agencies by recruiting and training volunteers for community service and supervising them while on the job. The Bureau is located in Room 204 at Galileo High School. For further information call Mrs. Hilda Penn, Volunteer Bureau director, at TUxedo 5-6574.

For Veterans the Adult Education Division in cooperation with the Veterans Administration, and vocational guidance offers educational through a series of integrated tests and interviews administered by a staff of trained counselors. Call the Veterans' Counseling Center, TUxedo 5-6707, for further in formation. Elementary and high school courses especially designed for veterans, some of them of a speed-up nature, are offered at the Commerce Adult High School, MArket 1-2230.

The Municipal Theater provides the community with a theater of high professional qualthat will give to the interested student both a progressive and comprehensive classroom training and an opportunity for practical experience. The dramatic school has courses for the professionally interested as well as for those who are interested in the theater as a leisure-time acity

tivity. Call the Municipal Theater office at Marina Adult School, JOrdan 7-7700, for further information.

The Americanization Program offers the foreign-born a chance to read and write the English language as well as providing him with the necessary training to qualify for citizenship. An especially large day program, in adddition to evening classes, is offered in this field. Through the cooperation of the United States Office of Immigration and Naturalization and the courts, competency issued by Americanization teachers of the adult schools are accepted from candidates for citizenship in lieu of public certificates of

Driver Education Classes furnish adults interested in learning to drive an automobile with an opportunity for practical classroom and behindthe-wheel instruction. For information in this regard, call Mission Adult School, 4899.

Accredited High School

many men and women

Work

in this

HEmlock

is

1-

to

make

its

immediate

"Registration of Minor" blanks should contain the following information, if available: the

number

of the birth certificate, the place and date of birth as stated thereon, and a signed statement that the teacher has seen the birth

no birth certificate is obtainable, a hospital certificate may be used instead. If such birth verification is not readily available, however, "Registration of Minor" blanks are not to be delayed but are to be sent in immediately. certificate. If

In order for a child to be entered in the kindergarten his birthdate must be not later than August 1, 1945. All entrants to the first grade must have been born on or before August 1, 1944.

P.-T.A. Fellowships for Teachers

Ten fellowships of $750 each will be awarded by the California Congress of Parents and Teachers to train teachers, during the 1950-51 school year, for work with children who are physically handicapped, who have cerebral palsy, speech defects, are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or partially blind.

The

grants will finance a year's training in of Special Education at San Francisco State College. They carry an obligation to teach for two years, immediately following study, in California public schools. the

Department

summer session loans of $100 be available for courses in teaching of the deaf or hard of hearing which may be taken at any accredited school in the United States. In addition, 10 will

Further information is available from the California Congress of Parents and Teachers at 608 Occidental Life Building, 1115 S. Broad-

way, Los Angeles

community who

1-2230.

Courses in Practical Nursing give training, including class instruction and supervised hospital practice, to those preparing for work in this field.

Bureau

check of ages.

15.

offered the

wish to complete their high school education or make up credit deficiencies. Commerce Adult High School specializes in this type of training and is accredited to the University of California. Educational counselors at the school advise on necessary courses. For further information

MArket

possible for the

each

examination.

call

Birthdate Information Required In order that birthdates may be checked immediately, principals are requested to send at orice to the Bureau of Attendance at 750 Eddy Street "Registration of Minor" blanks for all pupils entering the kindergarten and 1A grades. If the parent does not fill out one of these, the teacher should prepare the blank from data on the permanent card. Only in this way will it be

Cosponsored by the nurses' organizations,

Needed The Sunshine School is in need

Special Typewriters

of a

few

Great Primer Typewriters. If

this

any elementary school has a typewriter of kind that is not in use notify the Division

of Supplies, 93 hospitals,

Grove

Street.

and unions, these

classes

one school year and are designed

meet the

requirements established by various For further information, call Marina

certificate states.

extend for to

Adult School, WAlnut 1-2707.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Pupil Accounting in Secondary Schools

As part of a program which has for its purpose the establishment of a uniform method of pupil accounting throughout the state, members of the State Department of Education met with the staff of the Bureau of Research to discuss procedures. All forms in current use have been

approved.

meet State Code requirements

In order to is

essential that all absence

it

data be posted daily

and such postings be summarized monthly on the individual pupil's attendance record. It is further required that uniform symbols be employed in recording entries. The Bureau of Research will send to the respective schools a bulletin giving detailed procedures for pupil ac-

Films

following films and filmstrips are availuse by schools during Brotherhood Week, February 19 to 24, from the AudioVisual Department, 750 Eddy Street: Live In. Sound film. 10 minutes. 172-MS1.

I

Family Teamwork. Sound

Q173-MS2. Patty Garman,

Little

film. Color.

16 minutes.

Helper. Sound film. Color.

173-MS2.

12 minutes.

Immigration. Sound

film.

film. 8

minutes. 173-

film. 7

minutes. 177-

10 minutes. 325.73-MS1.

the People. Filmstrip. 341.1-FS2.

We Go

to School.

Sound

film. 10

minutes. 371-MS6.

Our Shrinking World. Sound film. 10 minutes. 380MS3. Teen Age Farm Hand. Sound film. Color. 12 minutes. 63 1.1 -MSI.

Airplane Changes the minutes. 912-MS2.

World Map. Sound

Ancient World Inheritance. Sound

film.

film.

10

10

min-

913-MS1. Day With English Children. Sound film. 10 minutes. 914.2-MS2. People of Western China. Sound film. 1 1 minutes. 915.1-MS2. Peoples of Canada. Sound film. 20 minutes. Q917.1-

utes.

MS1. Tina, a Girl of Mexico. Sound film.

16 minutes.

Q917.2-MS5. Jack's Visit to Costa Rica. Sound film. 10 minutes. 917.28-MS1. Americans All. Sound film. 25 minutes. Q918-MS3. Montevideo People. Sound film. 20 minutes. 918.9-

MS2. Story of Dr. Carver. Sound film. 10 minutes. 921-

MS3. Navajo Children. Sound

film.

10 minutes.

970.1-

MS2. Children of Mexico, etc.

Many Lands

Series;

i.

e.

Children of

On

loan to the department for that week only, therefore to be booked on a daily basis, to be called for and returned by school. Don't Be

A

Boundary

Sucker. Sound film. 20 minutes.

Lines.

and management. All workshops

will

run

San Francisco State College

will grant col-

completing the

San Francisco Unified School

District

grant increment credit for teachers completing the course, and the American Red Cross will award Red Cross certificates.

The first meeting will be held Tuesday evening, February 14, 7:00 p.m. at Crystal Plunge, 775

Lombard Street, near Columbus Avenue. who have taken this work within

Teachers

the last three years must select their work from the new units in order to receive increment credit.

You and Your Family. Sound MS4. You and Your Friends. Sound MS1. We,

tation

simultaneously, each for a 10-week period.

will

Filmstrips Available

for

House

professional

of

Pacific Coast. This year the Clinic will be divided into four interest groups, or workshops; coaching of competitive swimming and div( 1 ) ing; (2) methods of teaching swimming, diving and life saving; (3) summer camp waterfront leadership; (4) swimming pool operation, sani-

course.

The

able

and swimming, will be held at Crystal Plunge every Tuesday night for a 10-week period beginning February 14. Instruction will be given by some of the outstanding swimming and coaching talent on the

embryo teachers and coaches

lege credit for those successfully

counting in secondary schools.



Advanced Aquatic Clinic The Clinic, designed for

Sound

film. 10

minutes.

Left

Without Transfers

In order that an immediate check-up of all pupils who have left school may be made, principals are asked to give to their Supervisors of Attendance, not later than February 21, a Left Without Transfer slip for every child who was on the school roll on February 2, but who has not registered this term. Throughout the term all pupils who leave school for any reason without taking a transfer to another school should be immediately reported to the supervisor of attendance as Left Without Transfer. Before reporting these pupils as Left Without Transfer they should be checked as carefully as possible by the school, and when reported, the Left Without Transfer should have as much information as possible for the supervisor of attendance. Please note that these are not to be mailed to the Bureau of Attendance, as formerly. They will be picked up by the supervisors of attend-

Dr. Overstreet to

Speak

"Ourselves and Our Community" will be the topic of a free lecture to be given by Dr. Harry A. Overstreet, psychologist and author, cosponsored by the Marina Adult School and the Volunteer Bureau of San Francisco in the Marina Auditorium on February 6, at 8:00 p.m. In view of the prominence of Dr. Overstreet, and the problem of large attendance at this lecture, those intending to be present are requested to come early.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN No. 22

VOL. XXI

Tournament

San Francisco high school students will compete for five prizes totaling $450 in U. S. Savings Bonds. Similar awards will be made to the five highest placing college students. Junior high school competitors will shoot for a top prize of $100 and three secondary prizes of $75, $50 and $25. Instructors of champions in each of the three local divisions will be presented a $100 bond for their excellence in coaching the winner. Closing date for entry of individual school

champions has been set for noon, April 14. Names of entrants must be sent to: Tournament of Orators, The Call-Bulletin, 860 Howard St.,

San Francisco 19, Calif. Only one change has been made

in the rules for the 1950 competition. The "grace" period allowed a speaker has been increased from thirty

seconds to one minute.

The change was made to assist contestants when speaking in a strange auditorium where their timing is often not exact. In past tournaments, speakers have been penalized for extending over the thirty second period.

Dates for interscholastic finals have been set and 20 with the San Francisco citywide finals following by a week. The Call-Bulletin will sponsor all local competition.

at April 17, 18, 19

Rules for the Tournament of Orators, honoring James Madison.

The tournament

rolled high school

and

open to regularly encollege students. Gradu-

is

ate students are ineligible.

The speech must be

and limited

to

must be delivered without reference

to

original

six minutes. 3.

It

notes. 4.

of the text.

The

6.

Past national winners of the Hearst Tourn-

use of microphones

of Orators

immediate

is

prohibited.

and Hearst employees and

relatives are ineligible.

S.

A. Erickson, radio chairman Second

will go to Seattle March 3 and 4 meet with teachers, audio-visual directors, broadcasters and listener groups in an extensive two-day conclave, studying the problems of radio and television broadcasting. The meetings, held under the auspices of the Western Radio-Television Conference, have been planned for exchange of progressive ideas and information by professionals and non-pro-

P-TA,

to

fessionals

concerned with both the presentation television programs.

and reception of radio and

Sessions will be held at the University of Washington's Adult Education Center in downtown Seattle, with conferees in attendance from the entire Pacific area. In addition, there will be meetings for members of the Association for Education by Radio, the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, and the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System.

Problems scheduled for discussion in the twoday session include the inter-relation of radio, television and the press; broadcasts available for educational use; the art of listening and viewing;

creating

a

successful

public-service

program; and the question of what gives a pro-

gram

interest.

will be exhibits of radio, television and recording equipment.

There

Membership

in the Western Radio-Television open to all persons interested in the use of radio and television as social instruments for education and the public enlightenment. Information may be obtained from K. L. Dragoo, program director, KALW at ATwater 2-6042, or by writing to Edwin H. Adams, 1950 Conference Chairman, Radio Hall, University of Washington, Seattle 5.

Conference

is

7. Violation of rules on failure to appear are cause for disqualification.

Where

a contestant

is

disqualified or can-

not appear, the student next in to the

5.

their

Mrs. District

8.

Quoted passages may not exceed one-third

ament

1950



James Madison, fourth president of the United States and the "Father of the Constitution," will be the subject for the eighth annual Hearst Newspapers Tournament of Orators.

2.

14,

Radio Conference in Seattle March 3 and 4

of Oratory

1.

FEBRUARY

<§)

line

may

tournament director for the right

to

apply

com-

pete.

Procedure and judges for high school semiand for high school finals will be designated by The Call-Bulletin. 9.

finals

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Time Sheets February Time Sheets should be delivered to the Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: Delivery Dates for February

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools

is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

Senior high, junior high and elementary February 17, 8:00 a.m. 17 days Teachers

schools

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Tuesday, February 14 Physicians will visit the following schools: George Washington, Aptos, Daniel Webster, Hunters Point No. 1, S. B. Cooper NS., Sutro, S. B. Cooper, £. R. Taylor, Lafayette. Regular business meeting. Board 7:30 p.m.



of Education. Fourth floor, 93 Open to public.



Grove

Street.

Lecture. "Youth and Marriage." 7:30 p.m. How Do You Attain Sub-topic: "Security It?" Speaker: Dorothy Westby-Gibson, YMCA.

8:00 p.m.



A



YMCA,

220 Golden

Discussion. Subject: "Alcohol-

Major Health Problem." Speaker:

Nathan Adler,

psychologist. Auspices:

Health Society of Northern California. bers: free;

non-members

35j£.

Mental

Mem-

Roosevelt Junior

High School Auditorium.

Wednesday, February 15 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Abraham Lincoln, Hawthorne, StanKing, Bret Harte Annex, Westside NS., Redding.



Meeting of the San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Teachers Central Council. Place: 465 Post Street.

Thursday, February 16 Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Lowell, Portola, Commodore Stockton NS., Frank McCoppin, Cleveland, Argonne, Grattan, Ulloa.

Friday, February 17 Physicians will visit the following schools: Raphael Weill HO, Galileo, Roosevelt, Franklin, Junipero Serra, Bay View, Page-Brod. NS., Parkside, Jefferson, Pacific Heights.

Monday, February 20



Course. "Teacher-Parent Re7:30 p.m. lations." Sub-topic: "Principles of Group Dynamics (Contd.) Speaker: Hubert S. Coffey, Ph.D., University of California. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Marina Junior High School. 4:00 p.m. Meeting of the Governing Council of the Teachers' Association of San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Center Bldg., 101



Grove

Principals and assistant principals 18 days (Symbol Feb. 3 to be "A") February 23, 1:00 p.m. Adult schools

Clerks and janitors

February 16-28 Adult schools

February 23, 1:00 p.m. February 23, 8:00 a.m.

Other schools



Adult Education Division. Gate Avenue. ism

Teachers

"Free Armchair Cruises" The second and third of a series of free programs featuring "Armchair Cruises' will be presented by the Commerce Adult High School in its auditorium commencing at 7:30 p.m., on the following evenings:



Friday, Feb. 17 "Shortest Way Home," an entertaining travel tour in technicolor of the scenic and historic points of interest of AmerAfrica's only republic is porica. "Liberia" trayed in color and sound. "Crucible of Speed" the story of auto racing since 1911 with a portrayal of the 1946 Indianapolis race in color and sound.







"Mr. Bell," a fascinating Friday, Feb. 24 story of the life of Graham Bell. "Rehearsal" a backstage story of Ezio Pinza, Blanche Thebom, and Donald Vorhees. "The Bell Telephone Hour," and "Fun with Science." This is a don't miss evening.



Admission

Young

A

is

free, the public

is

invited.

People's Concerts

meeting

for teachers representing the People's Concerts in each of the elementary schools has been called for Thursday, February 16, 4:00 p.m., at the Dudley Stone School auditorium. This meeting is called to discuss with Mr. Adler, Mr. Fried, and officers of the Young People's Concert's committee the use of study material and general promotion of the concerts. The meeting is open to others who wish to attend.

Young

Registration of

Minor Blanks

Street.

In

Memoriam

Josephine Marshall Hopkins Teacher Hancock Health School January 29, 1950



Principals are reminded that Registration of Minor blanks should be sent to the Bureau of Attendance at 750 Eddy Street as soon as possible throughout the term for all kindergarten and first grade pupils, and for all pupils who are new entrants to the city schools from out of town.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Attendance Data Required

Films and Filmstrips

In order that absent pupils may be checked immediately and transfers and left without transfer pupils be followed up speedily, principals are reminded that they should complete the following Bureau of Attendance forms which will be picked up by Supervisors of Attendance:

The following films and filmstrips are suggested by the Audio-Visual Department, 750 Eddy Street, for use in English classes. (Note: Brief synopses and grade level notations may be found in the Audio-Visual Catalog. All Aboard the Punctuation Express Series.

1.

Transfer blanks. It

transfers presented

imperative that

is

all

by incoming pupils be en-

2.

3.

Entered Without Transfer blanks for who have no transfers. all

all

who

leave without transfer, or for deaths. 4.

Change

of Address slips as soon as children

move. 5.

name

is

of

Name

slips

421-FS3.

Filmstrip.

Quotation

as soon as child's

changed.

Marks.

421-FS4.

Filmstrip.

59

Color.

frames.

Building minutes.

An

Outline. 371.3-MS3.

Sound

10

film.

Building Your Vocabulary. 428.3-MS2. Sound

film.

10 minutes.

Cover

Change

Dash.

Color. 46 frames.

pupils

Left Without Transfer blanks for

and

Semi-Colon

Colon,

dorsed.

new

The Comma. 421-FS1. Filmstrip. Color. 3 strips. The Apostrophe. 421-FS2. Filmstrip. Color. 35 frames.

Q655-MS1. Sound

to Cover.

Do Words

film.

20 minutes.

Ever Fool You? 428.3-MS1. Sound

film.

10 minutes.

Note that these are not Bureau of Attendance, but

to be mailed to the will

be picked up by

the Supervisors of Attendance.

England, Background of Literature. 914.2-MS1. Sound film. Color. 1 1 minutes. Everyday Courtesy. 395-MS6. Sound film. 10 minutes.

United Nations Student Contest The Committee on Outside Activities of the Board of Education has given its approval to participation by pupils of San Francisco's secondary schools in the 24th Annual United Nations Student Contest sponsored by the American Association for the United Nations and the National Broadcasting

Company.

will be held on March 31 be based on information available in a study kit, including "The U. N. Story" (a history of the background and first four years of the United Nations) and the United Nations Charter. The National Broadcasting Company will feature regular broadcasts on the subject

The examination

and

will

of the

Sound

In addition to national prizes of a trip to and cash Europe, university scholarships awards, cash prizes totalling $75.00 will be given for the best papers in the Northern California area.

Further information

may be obtained

through

Heads

to

—Wed.,

Feb.

film.

10 minutes.

to

Your Term Paper.

Write

371.3-MS2.

minutes. 11

minutes.

Q822.3-MS1. Sound film. 18 minutes. Your Library. 020-MS1. Sound film. 10 min-

Julius Caesar.

Know utes.

Making the 10 minutes.

Most

of School.

Punctuation: Mark film. 10 minutes.

Your

371.8-MS1. Sound

Meaning.

film.

421-MS2.

Sound

Scotland,

Sound

Background

film. Color. 11

of

Literature.

9 14.1 -MSI.

minutes.

Spelling Is Easy. 421-MS1. Sound film. Color. 10 minutes. Story That Couldn't Be Told. (Freedom of the Press) Sound film. 40 minutes. .

of

Two

Times Goes

Cities. Fiction.

Sound

film.

40 minutes.

to Press. 070-FS1. Filmstrip. 27 frames.

Treasure Island. Fiction. We Discover the Dictionary. 423-MS1. Sound

film.

10 minutes.

Under Fairy Tales and

many

filmstrips

Folklore in the catalog are

on the primary and elementary

such as: Pecos Bill Becomes a Cowboy. 396-FS6. Filmstrip. Color. 26 frames. Mother Goose Nursery Rhymes. 398-FS2. Filmstrip. Color. 24 frames. The Pied Piper. 398-FS11. Filmstrip. Color. 26

level,

frames.

Meet

Meetings for all heads of departments in physical education will be held as follows: 3:45 p.m.

371.3-MS1. Sound

to Study. 371.3-FS1. Filmstrip. 68 frames.

Journalism. 670-MS1. Sound film.

listed

the regional office of the American Association for the United Nations, 68 Post Street, San Francisco 4, EXbrook 2-6342.

to Study.

film. 10

Tale

United Nations.

P.E. Dept.

How How How

15— High

School

Women. 3:45 p.m.— Thurs., Feb. 16— Jr. High School Women. 3:45 p.m.— Fri., Feb. 17— Jr. High School

Art Exhibit at 750 Eddy Street collection of fifty-three student sketches from twenty-four states and Alpaintings and aska is on display in the Department of Art

A

Education, 750

Eddy

Street, until

February

17.

— High School

with the Interjointly sponsored Program Art national School by the American Junior Red Cross and the National Art Education Association. Teachers,

All meetings are scheduled to be held in Room 207, 750 Eddy Street.

students and their friends are cordially invited to see this display daily to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Men. 3:45 p.m.

— Mon.,

Feb. 20

Men.

The

exhibit

is

in connection

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Slidefilms Available

Musical Notes

The following sound slide films on Driver and Safety Education are available from the Audio- Visual Department, 750 Eddy Street. Since these are sound filmstrips they require both a 33/3 rpm phonograph and a filmstrip

Announcement has been received that the renowned San Carlo Opera Company will appear in the San Francisco Opera House from

projector:

Are Your Feet Killing You? 614.8-FSS10. Sound slidefilm with record. 114 frames. Portrayal of America's growing pedestrian problem. Uses case histories to

demonstrate walking hazards. Explains correct pro-

cedures.

For You and Yours. 613.8-FSS11. Sound slidefilm with record. 141 frames. Urgent appeal to get behind the National Safety Council and other safety organizations to stop the waste of human life caused by accidents. Won the 1946 award of National Committee for films for Safety.

Testing the Drunken Driver. 629.213-FSS1. Sound slidefilm with record. 100 frames. How scientific tests are being used in drunken driving cases. Traffic Jam Ahead. 629.2 13-FSS2. Sound slidefilm with record. 96 frames. Stresses need for action by traffic officials and citizens in order to reduce accidents on streets and highways.

may

Films which

also

be useful in Safety

Education Classes. Behind the Wheel. Q629.213-MS7. Sound

film.

30

minutes.

Night and Bad Weather Driving. 629.213-MS6.

Sound

629.2 13-MS5.

Sound

minutes.

1 1

Where Mileage

Begins.

Q621.3-MS1. Sound

film.

22 minutes. It's

Up

to

You. Q629.213-MS4. Sound

film.

20

minutes.

Screw Drivers and Screw Jays. 629.13-MS1. Sound film. 12

minutes.

When You film. 10

tinees.

The San Carlo Company, famed and only permanent touring company here or abroad, is now on its 38th transcontinental tour. "La Traviata," which opens and closes the series, is one of three operas to be repeated during the 11-day run. Others will be "Carmen"

and "Madame Butterfly." The announced schedule

Thursday,

— with Lucia Evangelista

in the title

remembered

for his re-

cent successes with the Pacific Opera in the part of Alfredo Germont.

Company,

March role,

2

and David

"Aida"

Poleri,

— Friday,

Mostyn Thomas

March

— with

3

Baritone

as special guest artist.

"Madame Butterfly" — Saturday, March 4 — with famed Hizi Koyke the part Cio Cio San. — "Carmen" — matinee Sunday, March of

in

Are a Pedestrian. 614.8-MS1. Sound

minutes.

with much heralded Mezzo-Soprano Martha Larrimore in the role of Carmen and Tenor John Cortay in that of Don Jose, and the San Carlo Ballet.

"La Boheme"

— Sunday evening, March

with the new San Carlo

part of Mimi and Tenor of Rudolfo.



eliminations for the Thirteenth Annual National High School Oratorical Contest, sponsored by the American Legion, will be held on Friday, February 17, in Room 212, Veterans Building, at 8:00 p.m. Parents, teachers and pupils are invited to attend. local

— —

Monday, March 6 "CavalRusticana" and "I Pagliacci" double bill Tuesday, March 7; "Faust Wednesday, March 8; a repeat of "Carmen" Thursday, March 9; "Barber of Seville" Friday, March Saturday, March 11; a 10; "II Trovatore" repeat of "Madame Butterfly" Sunday mat"Rigoletto"

Oratorical Contest Eliminations

5

Mina

Cravi, in the David Poleri in that

star,

leria

The

follows:

— opening night,

"La Traviata"

5

film. 11 minutes.

Problems of City Driving. film.

Thursday, March 2, through Sunday, March 12, for a total of 13 performances, including 11 evening performances and two Sunday ma-

— —



— —

March 1 2 and for the closing Sunday evening, March 12, a repeat of "La Traviata" featuring again Lucia Evangelista and David Pol-

inee,

;

eri.

Sierra

Club Program

Photokromes of the U. S. Army's expedition Mt. McKinley in 1942 will be shown by Einar Nilsson of the Sierra Club on Tuesday, February 14, at 8:00 p.m., at the Everett Junior to

High School auditorium. This expedition was the occasion for testing of arctic equipment for use by the army. Mr. Nilsson will particularly touch on snow camping under severe conditions. These are superb pictures taken on North America's highest peak. The program is open to the public

without charge.

Carlo Moresco, young Italian conductor, will be in the' pit for all 13 performances. Mario Valle is stage director. The San Carlo Ballet will feature Lydia Arlova, premier dansuese, and Lucien Prideaux, premier danseur.

Dr. Louise

Cobb

to

Speak

Dr. Louise Cobb, University of California, Berkeley, will be guest speaker at the Northern California Alumnae Chapter of Pi Lambda Theta luncheon next Saturday in the Defenders' Room, Women's City Club, San Franciscor at 12:30. Her topic is "South America on Foot and Wing." Pi Lambda Thetans in this area are invited to attend.


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN z/s^tk, VOL. XXI

School

Naming Contest

New

for

FEBRUARY

No. 23

Grand National Junior

1

F.

S.

Livestock Exposition

Schools

superintendent of schools, addressed the following memorandum to elementary and junior high school principals relative to the "School Naming Contest." Dr.

Herbert

C.

Clish,

"A contest, sponsored jointly by the Board of Education and the San Francisco Call-Bulletin, to select names for thirteen new public schools has already been announced in the local press.

Here are the will

particulars as to

how

the contest

be conducted.

"Names

will

be selected for eleven elementary

and two junior high schools. "Only elementary school students (for the contest, grades 1 through 6) will compete in naming elementary schools and only junior high school students (grades 7 through 9) will comschools

pete in the junior high school division.

"Each name submitted will be accompanied by an essay, not to exceed 250 words, setting forth the reasons for selection of that particular

name. "Students will be limited to only one entry in the contest.

"Teachers should be encouraged (instructed) make this a class project. They should explain the contest to the students and then set a date and period when the essays will be completed as a class project. This will eliminate any outside help in the preparation of the actual written essay. Students should, however, be encouraged to enlist the aid of their parents in doing research on likely names. "It would be well if teachers would review names of persons prominent in San Francisco to

and California history. Names for which schools are not now named. "No screening or prejudging should be done at the school level. All essays will be judged by a citizens' committee. No entry should be eliminated by individual school principals.

"When all essays are completed at a school, the principal should see that they are mailed or delivered to: School Naming Contest, The Call-Bulletin, 860 Howard Street, San Francisco 19, Calif. "Deadline for entries has

set for

Satur-

March 4. But principals are encouraged to deliver entries as soon as they are completed. "The Call-Bulletin will provide entry blanks of the official rules.

The

entry blanks

—Show

San Francisco school students will again have an opportunity to meet the boys and girls from the rural areas of the Western states when the Fourth Annual Grand National JUNIOR Livestock Exposition and Arena Show is held at the San Francisco-San Mateo Cow Palace, April 1-6.

Planned again to be held during the Easter vacation, city youths will see the fine livestock which the Future Farmers of America and 4-H Club members will exhibit at this annual classic. More than a thousand youngsters are expected to trail more than 3,000 animals including beef and dairy cattle, sheep and swine into the huge Visitacion Valley pavilion. Special events that will give a greater opportunity for an interchange of experience between city and rural youth are now being planned with the cooperation of the public and parochial school systems in both San Francisco and outlying counties and the various Parent-Teacher organizations. Five spectacular arena performances, afternoon and evening, Saturday, April 1 and Sunday, April 2 with a final performance Monday evening, April 3 will feature the championship finals of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association. Six-man teams from ten leading

Western

colleges

and

universities will

compete

Cow

Palace event. The Grand National JUNIOR Livestock Exposition has the full approval of the San Francisco Unified School District and the cooperation of all principals and teachers is urged in bringing the livestock classic to the attention of student bodies.

in the

Governing Council to Meet The next meeting of the Governing Council of The Teachers Association of San Francisco be held in the auditorium of the Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street, on Monday, February 20, at 4:00 p.m. will

contain space for the student's essay to be written on the blank. "Any further inquiries or questions may be directed to Mr. John T. Callahan, School Naming Contest Director, at The Call-Bulletin, 860 will

been

day,

and copies

20, 1950

Howard

Street.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN P.-T.A. Fellowship-Loans

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of S< hools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

ceptional Children.

San Francisco State College has been authorby the California State Department of Education to grant Special Secondary Credentials

ized

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Physicians will visit the following schools:

George Washington, Frank McCoppin, Francisco .B, James Lick B, Candlestick Cove, Guadalupe, Visitacion Valley, Fairmount, Raphael Weill, McKinley. Meeting of the Governing Coun4:00 p.m. cil of the Teachers Association of San Francisco. 101 Auditorium, Health Center Building, Grove Street. Course. "Teacher-Parent Rela7:30 p.m.





Group Dynam-

Speaker: Hubert S. Coffey, Ph.D., Univ. of California. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Marina Junior High

ics."

School.

Tuesday, February 21 Physicians will visit the following schools: Commerce, Balboa, Aptos B, Pacific Heights, Horace Mann, Potrero Ter. NS., Cabrillo, John .Taylor, Gough. Muir, Lafayette, E.

R

— Lecture. "Youth and Marriage." "Engagement — When Are You

Ready For It?" Speaker: Robert

1.

Correction of Speech Defects;

Presidio,

7:30 p.m. Sub-topic:

Mentally Retarded; 2. 3. Teaching Lip the Hard of Hearing Child;4. Deaf;

in the following fields:

Monday, February 20

tions." Sub-topic: "Principles of

San Francisco State College has been designated as the training institution for recipients of California Congress of Parents and Teachers Fellowships for the training of teachers of Ex-

P.

Rankin,

B.D. Auspices: Adult Education Division. CA, 220 Golden Gate Avenue.

YM-

Reading 5.

to

Partially Sighted; 6. Blind.

A complete program is also offered to prepare teachers of the physically handicapped including the cerebral palsied. San Francisco State College is now prepared Master of Arts degree to properly qualified students who wish to specialize in any of the fields of Education of Exceptional Children in which California credentials are offered, as well as the physically handicapped and cereto offer the

bral palsied.

Catalogs and further information concerning program may be secured by writing to: Leo F. Cain, director, Program for Exceptional Children, San Francisco State College, San Francisco 2, California. this

Etiquette Films and Filmstrips

The following able

Eddy

films and filmstrips are availfrom the Audio-Visual Department, 750

Street:

How Do You Do?

Sound

film.

20 minutes. Q395-

MS3. Sound film. 10 minutes. 395-MS5. Everyday Courtesy. Sound film. 10 minutes. 395Introductions.

Wednesday, February 22 George Washington's Birthday

—Schools

not

in session.

Thursday, February 23 Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Polytechnic, Marina B, Ulloa, Jame Denman B, Sunnydale NS, Farragut, Cleveland, Argonne, Golden Gate, George Peabody.

Friday, February

24

Physicians will visit the following schools:

Raphael Weill HC, Abraham Lincoln, Presidio B, Parkside, Roosevelt B, Ridgepoint No. 2, Jefferson NS, Lawton, Jefferson, Sarah B. Cooper, Monroe, Junipero Serra. "Armchair Cruise." "Mr. Bell, 7:30 p.m. birth of the telephone and life of Alexander



Graham

"Rehearsal" a backstage story of Hour with Ezio Pinza, Blanche and Donald Vorhees. "The Telephone

Bell.

the Telephone

Thebom

Hour" presenting Films.

Auspices:

Josef

Hofman

Adult

Commerce Adult High torium.

as guest soloist.

Education School.

Division, Place: Audi-

MS6. You and Your Friends. Sound film. 7 minutes. 177MS1. You and Your Family. Sound film. 8 minutes. 173MS4. How to be Well Groomed. Sound film. 10 minutes. 646.7-MS2. School Spirit. Filmstrip. 36 frames. 395-FS1. As Others See You. Filmstrip. 33 frames. 613-FS7. Table Talk. Filmstrip. 37 frames. 642-FS2. Home Ground. Filmstrip. 37 frames. 173-FS1. Stepping Out. Filmstrip. 43 frames. 395-FS2.

Meetings for

New

All teachers

appointed

this

Elementary Teachers

and long-term substitutes newly term to the elementary schools

are directed to reserve

Wednesday afternoons

for orientation meetings

Central Office.

on March School.

first

to

be called by the

meeting

will take place

1950, at 4 p.m., at the Sanchez

1,

The

The

dates of subsequent meetings will

be announced

later.

Attendance

is

required.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Bicycle Safety

16mm

of Police, Michael E. Mitchell, requests that teachers call the attention of their students to the following regula-

Teachers of Audio-Visual and Physical Education classes may be interested in the free sports film library provided for schools, clubs and veterans' organizations throughout northern California by The San Francisco Examiner.

San Francisco's Chief

tions regarding bicycle safety:

Bicycles are a popular means of travel and recreation and every bicycle rider wants to keep

on having more and more fun with his bicycle. But bicycle riding on busy streets is very dangerous and the rider must obey traffic laws and constantly exercise care and caution for his own safety. Collisions between automobiles and bicycles generally result in serious injury to the cyclists.

Below are some

of the laws governing opera-

tion of bicycles:

SAN FRANCISCO TRAFFIC CODE Sec. 4. Places bicycle's laws.

Must

Sec. 96.

NOT

under motor vehicle operating

on sidewalks. (Except

ride

at

driveways.) Sec. 97.

One

ride to a bicycle.

Sec. 98. Cyclist

must not cling

to

moving

under motor vehicle oper-

must travel on right side of road. Sec. 510. Cyclists must observe basic speed laws, i.e. 15 MPH in school zones and uncontrolled intersecSec. 525. Cyclists

tions.

Sec.

476.

Cyclists. must

comply with

STOP-GO

signals.

Sec. 577. Cyclists

must stop

at arterial

STOP

signs.

Sec. 550. Cyclists must surrender the right-of-way to vehicles already into intersection. Sec. 560. Cyclists

must observe pedestrian's

right-

of-way.

must give required slowing, turning and/or stopping.

Sec. 544. Cyclists

when

hand

signals

Sec. 622. Bicycle must have front light and rear light or reflector which can be seen from a distance of 300 feet if bicycle is used during the dark hours.

Bicycle Safety Clubs stressing safe Bicycle Riding are being activated in San Francisco Schools. The California State Automobile Association

is

supplying

literature as well as

much

of the necessary safety

membership cards and club

charters.

Considerable headway has been made in the matter of traffic safety, especially in the case of juveniles. However, there is room for improvement. Therefore, your attention is respectfully called to the fact that

of 16mm. sound motion picnow: "1949 World Series"; "1948 World Series"; "1946 World Series"; "Play Ball, Son"; "Swing King"; "Pitching Stars of Baseball"; "Batting Stars of Baseball"; "Double Play Kings of Baseball"; "1949 Basketball Thrills"; "Practice Makes Champions"; "1949 Football Thrills"; "1948 Football Parade"; "19-

Here

SAFETY EDUCATION

BEGINS IN THE HOME.

Local 61 Dinner-Meeting

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61, dinner-meeting honoring John Eklund, National A. F. T. president, will be held on Saturday, February 25, at 6:30 p.m., at the Riviera Restaurant. $2.50 per person. Members and guests are invited. Make reservations with call

DElaware 3-3460.

the

list

47 Touchdown Thrills"; "Offensive Football"; "Sports Thrills of Year"; "1948 Winter Olympics"; "Spills & Thrills"; "Golf Magic"; "1947 Hearst Regatta"; "1948 Hearst Regatta"; "19-

49 Hearst Regatta":

These films range from 10 to 40 minutes in length and may be booked by calling The Examiner, SUtter 1-2424, local 276.

Helen Heffernan Scholarship A scholarship established by the California School Supervisors Association in recognition of in education. The purposes of the Scholarship are: (1) to recruit qualified persons into the field of supervision and, (2) to encourage supervisors to engage in graduate study.

Helen Heffernan's leadership

A gift in the amount of three hundred dollars ($300.00) is to be awarded annually. A loan, not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00), is to be available in addition to the gift. The loan is to be paid back without interest over a four-year period. Full-time graduate students or persons contemplating graduate work interested in applying for the Helen Heffernan Scholarship should write to the Scholarship Committee of the California School Supervisors Association for application forms. Applications must be received not later than April 1, 1950.

Address requests for application forms to: Secretary, California School Supervisors Association, c/o Kern County Superintendent of Schools, 1103 Golden State

Oreon Keeslar,

Highway, Bakersfield, California. Prep Basketball Tourney

The Tournament

of Basketball

Champions

March 9, 10 and 11, it was announced yesterday. The tourney was originally scheduled for March 2, 3 and 4, but was moved to accommodate leagues will

members or

is

tures available

vehicles.

CALIFORNIA VEHICLE CODE Sec. 452. Places bicycles ating laws.

Sound Films Available

be held in San Francisco on

which would still be in session on that date. To date, champions of the following leagues have been invited: San Francisco's Academic Athletic Assn., Oakland, Alameda county, both the A and B divisions of the Coast Counties, Contra Costa and the Big Five.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN C.T.A. Election Dates The California Teachers Association election elect

to

seven delegates

the

to

Bay Section

Council and nominate two representatives to the State Council will be held on Monday and Tuesday, February 27 and 28. The election will be held in each school on February 28, except evening schools, the Central Office and the City College of San Francisco.

Those who have qualified

to

run

are:

Bay

Section Delegates (vote for seven) Marguerite E. Connolly, teacher, James Denman Jr. High School; Nellie M. Foley, asst. prin., San Miguel School; Mary A. Hardiman, teacher, Marina Adult School; Genevieve Jordan, teacher, Jefferson School; Constance M. McFarland, teacher, Girls High School; Ida Richartz, teacher, Winfield Scott School; John F. Scudder, teachSchool; Jeanne er, Abraham Lincoln High Sutherland, teacher, Ulloa School; and John William Welch, teacher, Polytechnic High School.

For State Council Representatives (vote for two) Oscar E. Anderson, coordinator, City College of San Francisco; and Sylvester L. Kelly, asst. prin., James Lick Jr. High School.

Planning and Development Course Planning and Development in the San Francisco Bay Area (X-137AB.)

A course of special interest to secondary school teachers, planning commissioners, engineers, community leaders and social workers, which covers the problems in planning for the physical, economic, and social development of the San Francisco Bay area. Special emphasis will be given to the planning process as applied in the physical organization of the area and in the development of

its

economy and

its

social

Subject matter will include: planning as a technique; influence of geography on the pattern of settlement in the Bay area; historical development; population; economy; water problems; energy resources; sanitation; utilization of land; transportation in relation to land use. The second and continuing part of this course will be presented at a later date. Given in cooperation with Department of City and Regional Planning. Instructor: Mr. Mel Scott, Writer and Community Planner. services.

This course will start on Wednesday, March 1950, and will meet each Wednesday evening for 15 weeks from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in room 405 at 540 Powell Street, San Francisco. Fee 1,

$18.

Existing Janitorial

Vacancy

is hereby given that the following janivacancy exists in the San Francisco

Notice torial

School System: 1

C

106 Janitor



The San Francisco

F. S.

Key

This vacancy will be held open for a period

Even though it

may

may be temporarily be applied for under the

this position still

Association for Childhood present a Fashion Show and Luncheon on March 11, at 12:30 o'clock, at the California Club.

Education

of fifteen days except in case of emergency.

filled,

A.C.E. Fashion Show-Luncheon will

San Francisco school teachers will be the models. Joseph Magnin is providing an excellent selection of clothes.

seniority rule.

Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school

Grove Street, or through the Civil Building Maintenance Union, Local 66 A, 916 Ortega Street.

janitors, 93

Service

This event is sponsored by the Bay Section A.C.E., to send Mrs. Elnamae Olsen, Bay Section president, to the National Convention in North Carolina.

Teachers and their friends who wish to atmay send their reservations to Mrs. Marjorie Sauder, 1231 - 26th Avenue, San Frantend

Tickets are $2.00.

cisco.

Mexico-Guatemala

Tour

An educational tour of Mexico and Guatemala will be conducted this summer by Dr. Juan B- Rael of 574 Lasuen Street, Stanford University.

Cordoba,

Mexico

The

tour

will

Cuernavaca, City,

Morelia,

include Acapulco,

Fortin,

Guadalajara,

Orizaba,

Puebla, Taxco, Tehuacan,

Toluca,

Patzcuaro,

Uruapan

and the new valcano of Paricutin. Cost from Los Angeles and return: July 14-30, $350; July 14-August 11, $520; Automobile tour from

Mexico City 7-30, $325.

Juan

to

For

B. Rael.

Guatemala and details, write or

return, August phone Professor

Miss Calcagno Coming to Opera House

The San Carlo Opera Company will give a season of 13 performances in the War Memorial Opera House, beginning March 2.

Among

the artists appearing with the comMiss Lorraine Calcagno, mezzo soprano. Miss Calcagno will be heard in "Madam But-

pany

is

"Faust", "Rigoletto", and "Carmen". a native of San Francisco, a graduate of Galileo High School, City College of San Francisco, and Holy Names. Previous to her engagement by the San Carlo, she appeared with the San Francisco Opera Company. terfly",

She

is

.

?iiLiiiiiiiiiiiffii FEBRUARY

No. 24

VOL. XXI

Week

Press Club Scholarships

Public Schools

Available to Students

Dates Announced

The Press Club of San Francisco announces that for the fifth year it will offer $1000 in four scholarships for high school seniors in Northern California. Students from San Francisco schools have been invited to participate. Four scholarships, each for $250, will be awarded for the best news story, news feature story, news picture and radio news commentary. Contest rules are described in a poster sent to each high school. Press

Club Journalism contests conducted

during the past four years in cooperation with high school journalism advisors have been high-

Many

students have been inspired to greater journalistic achievements as a result of these contests in addition to those winners receiving the scholarships for continuation of

ly successful.

their studies.

Entries close on April 17, 1950, and awards be made at the Junior Gang Luncheon to be held at the Press Club on Saturday, April will

29, 1950.

The week

of April 24 to 28, 1950, has been

designated as

The

27, 1950

SCHOOLS WEEK. PUBLIC SCHOOLS WEEK

PU.BLIC

success of

year was due to the long term planning of principals and teachers. It is not too early to begin plans for this year. last

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

WEEK

affords every of the staff a most unusual opportunity to acquaint the public with the many excellent

member

educational activities in the public schools in which the boys and girls of San Francisco are engaged throughout the year.

The

interest of the public

is

amply manifested

who visit the schools and also the demand for speakers by service clubs, lodges and community groups. number

in the large

of parents

Lloyd Luckman of the City College of San Francisco, chairman of the speakers' bureau, will solicit the principals, assistant principals and teachers to assist by giving talks on the activities of the public schools to various community groups.

Conditions of award:

Open to all students who are registered

of journalism of senior in regularly organized classes in journalism in public, parochial and private high schools of Northern California. (a)

standing

(b) Entrants must be capable of meeting university entrance requirements. (c) All entries must be submitted through the school's Journalism Advisor and should contain:

2.

Name Name

3.

Date

4.

Classification

1.

5.

of school.

of graduation.

(News, Feature, Photo, or Radio )

Signature of Journalism Advisor.

In the case of news and feature stories, each entry must be supported by not more than six additional clippings of any type indicating the consistent calibre of the student's work. (e) In the photography competition, one photographic print and the clipping of the picture as it appeared in the paper must be submitted. Negatives will be required only from winners. Do not send negatives with original copies. (f) Only one entry in each category (totaling four) may be entered from each school. (g) All entries must be postmarked not later than midnight April 17, 1950. (h) Awards will be made at the Press Club Junior (d)

.

The judges

reserve the right to withhold the any category if the material submitted is deemed not to meet standards of excellence, or to make such subsequent awards as may be authorized. (k) Winning entries will be retained in the Press Club archives. Other entries will be returned only if accompanied by stamped, self-addressed envelope. (j)

Award

of student.

News Commentary

Gang_ Dinner (luncheon.) ±o_ be. held- at the Club rooms in San Francisco on Saturday, April 29, 1950. (i) The Press Club committee on Junior Activities will award scholarships to Senior Universities or Colleges of the winner's choice in amounts of $250, payable to the registrar, for the entry which is judged superior in each classification. in

Senior students are defined as members of the ( 1 ) graduating class of January, 1950 or June 1950, provided that the entry submitted shall have been written prior to graduation.

(m) All entries must have originally appeared in a school newspaper edited by journalism students and financed by the school student body. Any reprints

which may appear later in community newspapers edited by professionals may be submitted as supporting evidence but, in the interests of uniform judging, decisions will be based upon original publication in the school newspaper. Publication of radio news commentary in school paper is not required.

Journalism advisors are requested to this information to their students.

nounce

an-

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

Training Series for Volunteer Leadership The Marina Adult School

sponsoring a

is

series of lectures entitled "Principles of

Group

Leadership" for volunteer leaders of community and YW, Girl Scouts, groups, such as Camp Fire Girls, and others. The meetings will be conducted by Miss Gloria Swicegood at the Central Y.M.C.A., 220 Golden Gate Avenue, on Monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. On February Inside and 27, the topic will be "The Leader Out." The topics for the balance of the series

YM

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, February 27 Physicians will

the following schools:

visit

George Washington, Presidio G, Portola G, Bret Harte, Ulloa, Parkside, Grattan, Yerba Buena, Francis Scott Key, Kate Kennedy. Course. "Teacher-Parent Rela7:30 p.m. tions." Sub-topic: "Parent Counseling." Speaker: Robert S. Stewart, Ph.D., San Francisco State College. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Marina Junior High



School.

Tuesday, February 28 Physicians will

the following

visit

schools:

Commerce, Marina G, Horace Mann G, Washington Irving, Ridgepoint Presidio, Galileo,

Visitacion Valley Annex, John Muir,

No. 1, Sanchez, Alta Vista.





will be:

"The 'Two-to-Eights'

Ball'."

Miss Swicegood is well known as a group leader and physical education instructor. She is currently teaching in the Physical Education Division of the City College of San Francisco. This series is a service of the San Francisco Public Schools and is, therefore, tuition-free. For further information, call WAlnut 1-2707.

More "Armchair Cruises" Commerce Adult High

YMCA,

be

220 Golden Gate Avenue.

Wednesday, March

1

OT

Physicians will visit the following schools: Galileo, Francisco G, James Denman G, George Peabody, Franklin, Dudley Stone, Cleveland, Paul Revere.

Commerce,

Friday,

March 3

visit

the

following

schools:

Raphael Weill. George Washington, Balboa, Aptos G, Junipero Serra OTR, Bay View, Laguna Honda, Jefferson, Marshall, Monroe. Saturday,

9:30 a.m.

its



dent Wilson to Hawaii, Guam, China and Japan. "Cruise to West Indies", a cruise of the Cunard White Star Queen to the West Indies and Caribbean. All in sound and color. Friday, March 10 "Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons", also "Highway to Hawaii" and "Skyway to Yosemite". All in sound and color. Friday, March 17 "Bridging San Francisco



Bay", actual on-the-spot pictures of the building of this great bridge. "Orchids to Mr. Jordan", a story in steel starring Otto Krueger with music by Al Columbo ... a technicolor production. "Steel Man's Servant". This is a Hollywood program with the steel mill as a



background. Music is

is

by Robert Armbruster;

in technicolor.

— Spring meeting. California AssoCubberly Hall,

Monday, March 6

nomics

in

Wednesday, March 1 "Dream and a Memory", an armchair cruise in color of the Presi-

the film

March 4

ciation of Teachers of English. Stanford University.



General meeting. Home Ecoteachers. Room 226, Mission High

4:00 p.m.

presented

School announces "Armchair Cruises" will auditorium commencing



Thursday, March 2

Physicians will

that the following free at 7:30 p.m.

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Balboa, Girls High, James Lick G, Junipero Serra 400, Annex 3, Mission NS, Le Conte, Irving M. Scott, Hawthorne, Spring Valley, Sunnyside.

Most





Lecture. "Youth and Marriage." 7:30 p.m. What Is the Spiritual Sub-topic: "Wedding Meaning to You?" Panel: Rev. Reynold Best, chairman, Rev. Richard Fitch and Rabbi Sol White. Auspices: Adult Education Division.



Whom We

Often Forget;" "Between Nine and Twelve;" "Between Thirteen and Twenty-Three;" "FamSocial Recily Fun;" "Special Events Parties reation;" "Reprise 'With Mirror and Crystal

Home Economics Meeting A general meeting of all home teachers will be held on Monday, 4:00 p.m., in Room 226 of Mission

School.

Saturday,

Tuesday, March 7 7:30 p.m. Meeting of the Board tion. Fourth floor, 93 Grove Street.



Luncheon of

Educa-

Childhood Clay Street.

March

economics

March

6, at

High School.

1

fashion show. Association for Education. California Club, 1750 -

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Young Children's Art Show When the second annual Young Children's Art Show, co-sponsored by the Twin Peaks Mothers Club and The News, opened last Saturday morning, visitors were able to see 145 paintings and drawings. They were the work of San Francisco children, ranging in age from 2 to 12. The selection jury consisting of Artists Meta Hendel, Ralph Chesse and George Post, Educators Susan Irwin and Mayo Bryce, and Artist-Sculptor Ruth Cravath Wakefield was unable to keep the





choices

down

'

to 75 because "the quality of the

work was so much finer than we anticipated" and thus selected 145, "the absolute minimum we could accept without doing some of the fine young artists a great injustice." The show was held at the Lucien Labaudt Art Gallery, 1407 Gough Street. Children whose work was exhibited and the schools they attended are: Melvin Acevedo, Garfield; David Adams, Frank McCoppin; Alice Anderson, Edison; Michael Andrakin, Alvarado; Robin Ashley, Pre-School; David Bar-

Town

School; Carolin Bosh, Twin Peaks; Judith Benet, Twin Peaks; Peter Benet, Pre-School; Bruce Bennett, Madison; Gail Bentson, Edison; Richard Blair, Edison; Kenneth Bogdan, Argonne. nett,

Jeannette Bottoms, Twin Peaks; Linda Briggs, Twin Peaks; Janice Brower, Starr King; Dennis Bryant, Hawthorne; Barbara Burrus, Edison; Gerald Butler, Sanchez; Richard Campbell, Bayview; Tommy Cefalu, Sherman School; Carole Chandler, Edison; David Chapman, Yerba Buena; Jerilyn Cheim, Madison; Elizabeth Cheng, Spring Valley; Keth Clemens, Lawton; Jeanne Currie, Edison.

Leo Davis, Starr King; Betsy Margaret Davis, Geary; Kenneth Dawson, Edison; Edward De Cassio, Bayview; John Didlott, Edison; Neal Didriksen, Grattan; Dorothy Dierke, Edison; Susan Dow, Redding; Frank Dykes, Edison; James Eldridge, Edison; Vic-

Twin Peaks; Elizabeth Farr, Twin Peaks; Twin Peaks. Douglas Finley, Commodore Sloat; Nancy Fitzsimmons, Geary; Peter Fong, Jean Parker; Lamont

Charles

E. Barker Passes Funeral services for Charles E. Barker, 55, director of the San Francisco public schools' industrial arts division for the last 15 years, were held at 1 1 :45 a.m. Monday, February 20, from Halsted & Co., 1123 Sutter Sreet. Mr. Barker died February 17 at Notre Dame Hospital following a brief illness. Mr. Barker was born in Pittsburgh and came here 25 years ago to teach mechanical drawing at Balboa High School. He was a member of the Islam Temple of the Shrine, Olive Lodge of Masons in New York and Mohawk Valley Bodies of Scottish Rite, also in New York.

Brotherhood

Week

Observed

More than 50 San

Francisco elementary and high schools last week observed American Brotherhood Week.

The week was commemorated in classrooms, home rooms, forums, assemblies and in school plays, according to Dr.

Watt Long,

associate

superintendent of schools. "It is an accepted fact that no child is born with prejudice or intolerance in his heart these things are taught," Dr. Long said. "If love and a sense of brotherhood is the natural attitude in his home, in school and on the playground, he will enter community life ready to find the worth of people as individuals, not according to religion, race or economic



privilege."

Dr. Long is head of the educational committee for the National Conference of Christians

and Jews here, sponsors

of the yearly observ-

ance.

toria Farr,

Judith Fine,

Foster, Geary; John French, lace Gang, Lafayette; Noel

Marina Playschool; Wal-

Gansz, Sheridan; Hilda Ganzales, Madison; Robert Gillardo, Edison; Lee Goldblatt, Twin Peaks; Richard Grabowski, Twin Peaks; Jack Grissim, Madison; Sylvia Haber, Argonne; Lee Haddick, Starr King. Judith Hansen, Lake Merced; Cecelia Haskins, Yerba Buena; Mary Beth Hellman, Marina Playschool; Dennis Hendrickson, Edison; Margaret Hick-

man, Madison; Ronald Higby,

Commodore

Henry Horn, Jean P»rker; Andrew

Sloat; Innes, Madison;

Karl Jacobs, Town School; Joann Jacobson, Alvarado; Simone Jensen, Alvarado; Sonjia Johansen, West Portal; Arlene Johns, Douglas; Kay Kaufman, Geary; Margaret Kickman, Madison; Douglas King, Town School; Beryl Knauth, St. Luke's Nursery; John Kollen, Lafayette.

Sally Kuhn, Grant School; Scott Lambert, Town School; Beirne Larue, Lafayette; Larry Lee, Redding; Judy Leino, Sunnyside; Lorin Lewis, Geary; John Marth, Jefferson; Sandra Malcolm, Edison; Michael Manodot, Bayview; Aileen Mariani, Twin Peaks: Bette Mariani, Twin Peaks; Carol Marsala, Bayview; Ronald Martin, Farragut; Delois McCoy, Golden Gate; Barbara Mendiola, Edison; Knut Michael Miller, Fred Burk Kindergarten; Mike Miller, Fred Burk

Kindergarten.

Kayoko Mochida,

Starr

King; Hiroka Mochida,

Next Board Meeting March 7 The next meeting of the Board of Education will be held on Tuesday, March 7, in the Board's meeting room on the fouth floor of 93 Grove Street.

The

public

is

invited to attend.

Starr King; Paul Neu, Bayview; Dolores Ortiz, Edison; Robert Poe, Starr King; Gordon Pomeroy, Bayview; Ray Potter, Sherman; Roberta Potter, Edison; Chris Randrup, Edison; Ndirn Rasmussen, Geary; Daniel Rein, Marina Playschool; Dennis Roberts, Edison; Claudia R. Robinson, Monroe; Jennie Rodriguez, Edison; Peter Samuelsen, Douglas; Jean Scafidi, Farragut; Susan Scow, Grattan. Roberta Segura, Edison; Margaret Sexton, Edison; Mannfried Shives, Bayview; Stephen Situm, Bayview; Tania Skrabak, Farragut; Robert Smith, Starr King; Judy Soanes, Douglas; Gloria Sorelle, Edison; Tony Springs, Commodore Sloat; Kendra Lee Stoecker, Visitacion Valley; Margaret Sweeney, Guadalupe. Joan Tashara, Edison; Terry Treat, Geary; Barbara Vidal, Starr King; Jane Vieth, Commodore Sloat; Annie Wong, Lafayette; Margaret Washington, Madison; Stephen Watkins, Yerba Buena; Judy Welling, Marshall; Ronald Williams, Geary; Carolyn Wilson, Sunnvside; Robin Wright, Edison; Lisa Young, Marina Playschool: Carl Zachrisson, Town School; Claudia Zahnd, Edison.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

New

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

In-Service Course

instructional materials for use in high school civic classes is the purpose of an in-service course, intended primarily for

The preparation

of

but open to other interto begin on March 1.

social studies teachers

ested teachers, which at 4:00 p.m., at Girls

The group

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

High

C C

1

is

1

106 Janitor 106 Janitor

— Commodore Stockton — City College

School.

after familiarizing itself at first

hand with San Francisco's municipal government, will plan material for publication late this Spring or early next Fall. Leading the group will be Clarence Leal of Polytechnic High School, who has done research in this field, and Dr. Wilhelms of San Francisco State College, who has had wide experience in the preparation and publication of classroom in-

These vacancies

will

be held open for a period

of fifteen days except in case of emergency.

Even

may

be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

though

these

positions

structional materials.

The class will meet for fifteen weekly twohour sessions and will carry in-service credit or, for those who wish to pay the tuition fee, State College credit. Heads of social studies departments and civics teachers are particularly urged to attend.

Teachers of English to Meet

Members

of the certificated staff are invited

Spring meeting of the California Association of Teachers of English to be held at Cubberly Hall, Stanford University, on March 4, at to the

9:30 a.m. Girl

Scout Sabbath

Demonstrations of the teaching of English on elementary and secondary levels will be made by Mrs. Joanna Stokes, Dr. Fannie Shaftel and Don Brown of Stanford University. the

Girl Scout Sabbath will be observed at ple

Tem-

Emanu-El on Saturday morning, March

4.

Girl Scouts of all denominations are invited to attend. The services begin at 10:30 a.m. However, Girl Scouts who plan to attend in uniform are requested to meet in the Temple Court at 10:00 a.m., to form the procession.

Emanu-El and Lake

is

a

George Washington High School, 32nd Avenue and Anza Street, San Francisco.

located at Argucllo Boulevard

Street.

A.C.E. "Fashion

The Stanford Women's Club

of

San Francisco

scholarship of $345 a year to be awarded a San Francisco girl attending or just entering Stanford University. The scholarship is given as a gift to the holder, free from financial obligation. Interested applicants should apply to: Mrs. Raymond Byler, Secretary to the Scholarship Committee, Stanford, California. a

"Fashion Time" comes for A.C.E. on SaturMarch 11, at the California Club, 1750 Clay St. Proceeds are to be used to send a Bay Area delegate to the National A.C.E. Conference at Ashville, North Carolina in April. Representatives in schools are now taking reservations for this Spring fashion show and luncheon. Tables are being assigned as paid reservations come in.

Lowell Student

Prep Basketball Tourney

The Tournament

of Basketball

will

be held in San Francisco on

and

11, it

Champions

March

9,

10

was announced yesterday. The tour-

ney was originally scheduled for

March

2,

3

and 4, but was moved to accommodate leagues which would still be in session on that date.

To

date,

champions

of the following leagues

have been invited: San Francisco's Academic Athletic Assn., Oakland, Alameda county, both the

A

and B

divisions of the

Coast Counties,

Contra Costa and the Big Five.

Time"

day,

Stanford Scholarship Available

announces

reservations may be made by sendcheck for $1.25 to Miss Edith Garin,

Luncheon ing

Wins

Leland Levy, 15, a Lowell High School sophomore, won the San Francisco district competition for the American Legion-sponsored annual national high school oratorical contest February 18.

He

will

compete against winners of other The State winner

trict contests in the State.

go to the national

dis-

will

finals in Indianapolis.

Six speakers, each discussing a different phase U. S. Constitution, were judged by Al Graf, American Legion county council comof the

mander; Superior Judge Daniel R. Shoemaker, and Municipal Judges Charles Peery and John Molinari.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

MARCH

No. 25

American Red Cross Drive Under Way

Junior Livestock Exposition Plans Nearing Completion

The 1950 American Red Cross fund drive opened last Monday. In San Francisco as well as throughout the nation volunteers began calling on homes, offices and factories in an effort to raise $67,000,000 to carry on the humanitarian

work

The

of the

Red Cross

for another year.

goal for San Francisco is $959,000. The will extend for a period of thirty-

campaign

Special events during the Grand National Livestock Exposition and Arena Show in which San Francisco school students will participate have been announced by Porter Sesnon, first vice president of the No. 1-A District Agricultural Association, sponsor of the annual Cow Palace livestock classic, and Junior

JUNIOR

Show chairman.

On

three days.

campaign, summed up in the slogan "All May Help," was stressed again yesterday with a reminder from Garrett McEnerney II, San Francisco Chapter chairman and former member of the Board of Education, that no donation is too small. San Francisco's quota is the bare minimum the local chapter needs to maintain its program of disaster relief and, because of the large con-

The

1950

6,

spirit of this year's

centration of military hospitals, of aid to veterans and servicemen.

many

Saturday morning, March

4,

a pre-expo-

sition press

conference was held in the down-

town

of the Association for junior

office

senior high school

bers

newspaper

and journalism

editors, staff

instructors.

and

mem-

Mr. Sesnon was

interviewed by the group concerning plans for the livestock exhibition in which Future Farmers of America and 4-H Club members from California and other Western states will participate. He told of plans for the gala arena

show which

will feature the

championship

of the National Intercollegiate

Rodeo

finals

Associa-

During the Junior Livetock Exposition, the annual Youth Round Table will be held. The date on which 52 young San Francisco leaders selected through the San Francisco Youth Association will meet with an equal number of leaders from the two rural groups for a discussion of their mutual problems will be tion.

Classroom Space Needed Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of been asked by the Bureau of Census of the United States Government for permission to use sixteen classrooms for a period of one Dr.

schools, has

week— March

27 to 31, from 9:00 a.m., to 4:00 p.m., for the purpose of instructing census personnel in various sections of San Francisco in their duties in connection with the forthcoming national census.

The need is urgent. However, it is realized that because of high enrollment in many areas, space is limited.

To date, two schools, i.e., Galileo and Balboa High, have rearranged their daily schedules in order to permit useage of three rooms. The balance now needed thirteen rooms.



Principals of elementary, junior

and senior

high schools, who can make arrangements, without inconveniencing students and school procedure, are requested to telephone the Central Office, UNderhill 3-4680 (Richard Michael Skain) if they can make available room or

rooms

in their schools to

sus training

program.

accommodate

the cen-

Monday, April

3.

Grand National Junior Show which have been announced by the Cow Palace manTicket prices for the

Livestock Exposition and Arena

agement are

in

keeping with the low admission

prices that are standard practice for this event.

General admission to grounds and Arena Show with 8500 choice seats available, will be $1.50 including tax. In addition there will be a limited

number

of reserved seats at $2.00

and box

seats

For children under 12, a 60-cent admission including tax, or 30 cents to grounds and 30 cents to the Arena Show, will be charged. at $2.50.

Youth from 12 to 18, when in groups of 10 or more and accompanied by an adult supervisor will also

be admitted for the 60 cent price.

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of S< hools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Elementary School Register Procedure Outlined The spring semester calendar for the seventh month has only 15 days, which cover a period of three continuous weeks. On the space customarily used for the fourth week draw a diagonal line across the entire week, writing on the line

"15-day month.

The

Monday, March 6

eighth month on the other hand is a twenty day month with a week of Easter vaca-

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, F. S. Key, James Lick B, Candlestick Cove, Raphael Weill, Glen Park, Parkside, McKinley.

weekly spaces since each calendar day must be accounted for.

Garfield,



General meeting of all home economics teachers. Room 226, Mission High 4:00 p.m.

School.



Course. "Teacher-Parent Re7:30 p.m. Sub-topic: "Discipline at Home and at School in the Preschool Years." Speaker: Robert S. Stewart, Ph.D. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Marina lations."

tion intervening. It will, therefore, require five

be advisable, therefore, to conclude month on page 18 of the register, then turn to page 20 and start the eighth month which fill, after the Easter vacation is accounted for, continue on page 21 for one week. The summary, therefore, will be on page 21 and names need not be rewritten on the page. This will allow page 22 for the ninth month and page 23 for the tenth month. It

will

the seventh

Junior High School.

Tuesday, March 7 Physicians will visit the following schools: Pacific Heights, Abraham Lincoln, Sherman, George Washington, Portola B, Horace Mann B, Ridgepoint No. 2, Visitacion Valley Annex, John Muir, Cabrillo, Bryant, Lafayette, Presidio

(Contact

classes.)

— Public meeting. Board of Edu93 Grove cation. Fourth 7:30 p.m. — Lecture. "Youth and Marriage Today." Sub-topic: "Honeymoon — How Can 7:30 p.m.

Street.

floor,

You Achieve

Sexual

Harmony?"

Speaker:

Max-

A.C.E. Fashion Show-Luncheon Plans have been completed for the Fashion to be presented by The Association for Childhood Education. It will be held on Saturday, March 11, 12:30 p.m., at the California Club. The committee states "Come and see our lovely San Francisco teachers model

Show-Luncheon

from Joseph Magnin's." For reservations, contact school A.C.E representative, or Marjorie Sauder, 1231 - 26th Ave. clothes

Tickets are $2.00.

well Thebaut, M.D. Auspices: Adult Education Division. Place: 220 Golden Gate Ave.

YMCA:

Lowell, Junipero Serra, Galileo, E. R. Taylor, Roosevelt B, Hunters Point No. 1, Laguna

Wednesday, March 8 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Presidio, Emerson, Polytechnic, Marina B, Alamo, Bret Harte Annex, F. S. Key NS., West Portal, Fremont, Columbus.

Thursday, March 9 Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco B, Commerce, Grattan, Lowell, Patrick Henry, George Peabody, Page-Gough NS., San Miguel, Golden Gate, Edison. 3:45 p.m.



Americanization

Regular meeting. Teachers.

Day Adult

Marina

Adult

Honda, Lawton, Madison, Saturday,

Streets.

Friday,

March 10

Physicians will visit the following schools: Raphael Weill HC, Commodore Stockton,

1

Monday, March 13



4:00 p.m. Regular meeting. San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association. Guest speaker: Joseph Alioto, commissioner of education. Chinese Room, Women's City Club, 465 Post Street.



Recreation, San Francisco Unit. Choral room, James Lick Junior High School, 25th and Noc

March



12:30 p.m. Fashion Show-Luncheon. The Association for Childhood Education. California Club.

School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets. 7:45 p.m. General meeting. California Association for Health, Physical Education and

Jefferson.

Tuesday, March 14 8:00

p.m. — Lecture.

Topic: "The Psychol-

ogy Racket" (Quacks and Healers in Psychiatry.) Speaker: Norman Reider, M.D., Mt. Zion Hospital and University of California. Auspices: S. F. Chapter, Mental Health Society of Northern California. Auditorium, Roosevelt Members, Junior High School. Admission free: non-members, 35(£.







SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Adult Education Division to Present Noted Speaker

"Tale of Two Cities" at Municipal Theatre

Mortimer J. Adler, prominent educator, speaker and author, will deliver a series of lectures in San Francisco under the auspices of the

novel of the French Revolution,

Great Books Foundation and the Adult Education of the San Francisco public schools. Three lectures, free of charge and open to the public, will be presented, as follows:

Monday, March 13: "The Existence Marina High School Auditorium. Wednesday, March

March

17:

God"

"Free Will" Roosevelt

of

Jr.

law

of historical

more popular than

fiction

this story of

Scenes of

colorful

whose

affairs became indoomed French aristomounting tension mark the prog-

drama, climaxed by an exciting and of the Revolutionary

representation

Tribunal in the Paris of 1793. In the Municipal Theatre production, James

Richards has the part of Sidney Carton, Richard cast as Charles Darnay, erstwhile arisRaul Castellanos as the peasant-traitor, Defarge, Michael Lovgren as Lucie Manette, and Francine Noresco as Mimi. The sets are designed by William Martin, and the costumes by Walter Mahoney. Sybil Siegel is acting as

Ulrich

is

tocrat,

assistant director.

"A Tale

of

Two

18,

The

on and

Cities" will be repeated

Friday and Saturday evenings,

Aptitude and Personality Tests

have been

Sidney Carton,

volved with those of a

Chicago

gether with his chief, Chancellor Hutchins, he has upheld a position somewhat opposed to that of the "progressive educators." Through books, articles, and lectures, as well as through his formal academic work, he has helped to direct attention to certain deficiencies in the American school system and to the necessity for radical reform. But his radicalism is dedicated to the rediscovery of tradition; the point he has made year in and year out is that few Americans have read, and fewer still know how to read, the srreat books.

Two

as

ress of the

in

of

directed

crat.

at the University of

"A Tale

by the San Francisco Municipal

its next major production, and by Barbara Horder, will open on Thursday evening, March 16, at the Marina Auditorium, Bay and Fillmore Streets, at 8:30.

Theatre

of the philosophy

1930, Mortimer Adler has been in the very thick and center of current educational controversies. To-

of

Cities", chosen

the English barrister

High Auditorium. Since he became professor

dramatization of Charles Dickens' stirring

Few works

"The Immortality High Auditorium.

15:

the Soul" Roosevelt Jr.

Friday,

of

A

March

17

and on Thursday, Friday and Saturday eve-

nings of the two weeks following. Tickets

may

Guidance Counselling at the San Francisco College for Women announces that on Saturday, March 11, a battery of tests will be administered at the College on Lone Mountain, 2400 - 2800 Turk Street. This service is for women preferably between the ages of sixteen (16) and twenty-five (25). Vocational aptitude, personality, and prognosis tests for special abilities such as art and music, will be

be purchased at the Theatre or City of Paris

the tests of the registration is not required, but the time schedule, as indicated, will be strictly held to.

Francisco.

given.

Office of

Individual tests or

all

program may be taken; advance







— — 3:00 — Mechanical reasoning; 3:45

P.M.: 1:00 Space Relations (Shows aptitude for certain kinds of work) 1:45 Numeri;

cal ability;

Language usage. Music

tests will

or Breuner's in Oakland.

California Conservation

Week Week, March

California Conservation 14, will

7

The theme for this year The People's Business."

is

"Conservation

In

Memoriam

M. LILY LOVE Retired teacher



Pacific Heights School

February

12,

E.

1950

BARKER

Director, Industrial Arts

Administrative Offices

be given individually throughout the day whenever the student is not occupied with another test. tests will

to

be observed in the public schools of San

CHARLES be given twice: at 9 a.m., and

3 p.m.

Art

offices



8:30 Clerical speed and accuracy 9:00 Abstract reasoning (helpful in determining- college -aptitude); -10:00 Verbal Personality test. reasoning; 11:15

A.M.:

test;

box

February

17,

1950

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

In keeping with the centennial spirit, the library of the San Francisco College for Women is planning an exhibit of Californiana and rare manuscripts and books in the Spanish language. The exhibit will be on display in the College Library from 3 to 5 o'clock from March 7 to 15, and from 7 to 9 on the evenings of March 10, 11,

and

12.

Among

the exhibits will be valuable material John T. Doyle in the famous "Pious

used by

in Educational Measurement The American Educational Research Association offers a Fellowship in Educational Measurement, made possible by a grant from World Book Company. The person selected will pursue

Fellowship

Exhibit of Rare Books

Fund" case, as well as the copy of Doyle's book, Some Accounts of the Pious Fund of California, to Archbishop Alemany. Also, a History of California by Saverio Clavigero, published in Venice in 1789 (a copy of this

which he presented

book has been on display in the Library of Congress exhibit, Nov. 1949 -Feb. 1950). In the Hispanic collection there are,

among

40 MSS, Legal Documents of the Inauisition in Mexico, 1604-1799; an interesting illustrated manuscript containing a petition presented to King PhiliD III by Francesco de Contreras in Valladolid, 1614. Also, an exhibit of Spanish printing from 1587 to the present; an interesting collection of works on the Spanish ballads and folklore, including those of Professor

graduate studies at either the predoctoral or post doctoral level, in the field of educational measurement at an institution of his choice in the metropolitan New York area. He will in addition receive

Duration of Fellowship. The Fellowship is for a period of one year, and is renewable for a second year at the discretion of the Fellowship Award Committee of the American Educational Research Association.

awarded

Applications

others,

Aurelio

M.

Epinosa.

friends.

the

school

year

15, 1950.

1950-51

For ad-

information telephone the .Bureau of Research, UNderhill 3-4680.

ditional

School Library Assn. Convention

The School Library Association

of California hold its tenth annual state convention in San Francisco on March 11 and 12 at the Sir Francis Drake Hotel. Guest speaker at the luncheon on Saturday will be Dr. Lawrence Clark Powell, librarian of the University of California at Los Angeles, and president of the California Library Association. His topic will be "Some Great California Book Collectors."

At the breakfast on Sunday morning Miss Helen Hcffcrnan of the State Department of Education will speak on "The School Librarian and the California Framework of Education."

The

public

is

cordially invited to attend.

economies

Monday, March 6, at Room 226 of Mission High School.

teachers will be held on

4:00 p.m., in

for

must be received by March

will

Besides, the exhibit has been singularly enriched by gifts received from the Spanish Embassy in Washington, from the Consul General of Spain in S. F., Senor Bernardo Rolland. from the Consul General of Venezuela, Senor Jorge Luciani, from the Consul General of Mexico, Senor Edmundo Gonzales, and rare volumes given to the College from time to time by

Home Economics Meeting A general meeting of all home

the benefits of a systematic

program of practical experience in test research and development in the Division of Test Research and Service of World Book Company and other testing agencies.

Commissioner Alioto to Speak The San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association will present Joseph Alioto, commissioner of education, as guest speaker at their

CAHPER

Meeting March 9

The

California Association for Health, PhysEducation and Recreation, San Francisco Unit, will hold its second general meeting on Thursday, March 9, at 7:45 p.m., in the Choral

ical

room at James Lick Junior High School, 25th and Noe Streets.

On the program for the evening will be Dr. William Iverson, Stanford University, who will present "Techniques of Using Visual Aids," and Dr.

Harry Zion,

who

will discuss

also of Stanford University,

"Recent Trends in the Field of

Health Education."

next regular meeting, Monday, March 13. The meeting will be held at 4:00 p.m., in the Chinese Room, Women's City Club, 465 Post Street.

Vocal selections will be given by Miss Ardith Blue Hawks, winner of the Estelle Carpenter Scholarship. All teachers are invited to attend this meetTea will be served at 3:45 o'clock.

ing.

Board to Meet March 7

The next meeting

of the Board of Education be held on Tuesday, March 7, at 7:30 p.m., the Board's meeting room, fourth floor, 93

will

in

Grove

Street.

The

public

is

invited to attend.

'

t4jO0'

VOL. XXI

MARCH

No. 26

San Francisco Hosts CLE. A. Convention March 24 & 25

Mission High Student on Press Program

San Francisco, Convention Headquarters of the West, welcomes the Annual Convention of the California Industrial Education Associa-

High School student was

Friday and Saturday, March 24 and 25. Unusual interest has been shown in the coming gathering of teachers and administrators in the fields of Industrial Arts and Vocational Education not only by the membership, but by civic and commercial groups as well. Galileo High School, through R. E. Johnson, principal, is playing host to the Convention in its deliberations, in its extensive commercial exhibits, and in the inspirational general sessions and section meetings. Prominent speakers will include B. O. Wilson, superintendent of schools, Contra Costa County; C. J. Haggerty, secretary-treasurer of the California State Federation of Labor; and Dr. John Bartky, dean, School of Education, those who are actively engaged in the fields of Industrial Arts and Vocational Education this Convention is a "must". For all those friends who are interested or whose type of work meshes with this field of endeavor, the CLE. A. extends a hearty welcome. Reservations are being taken for the Friday evening banquet through Harry M. Krytzer, 750 Eddy Street, UNderhill 3-4680, ext. 223. This affair will be held at the Bellevue Hotel, 6:30 p.m. with B. O. Wilson, the featured speaker. Cost is $2.50 per plate.

For

all

Spring Dinner

in New York City last week and took part in

the

March

11

broad-

cast of a round-table discussion at Colum-

bia University on the topic "Is A Free Press

Necessary

to

a Free

Nation?" Miss Azzolini,

edi-

tor of Mission High's

"West Wing" was named

best student representative of San

I

Francisco by the

'

School Department a fortnight ago.

Accompanying Miss

Angie Azzolini

New York

was

Azzolini on her trip to her journalism instructor, Betty

Marcus.

Council of San Francisco

Women

San Francisco Schoolwomen will hold its next meeting on Wednesday, March 15, in the French Room, of the the Sir Francis Drake Hotel. Program: Reports of Committees; Guest

The Council

of

Speaker; Tea Service. For Reservations please phone Margaret Dunn, 970 Chestnut St., OR. 3-0357, or Elsie M. Schou, 2090 Pacific Ave., WA. 1-8550.

Announced

The

regular Spring dinner meeting of the San Francisco Association of Field Administrators will be held on Wednesday evening, March 15, at 6:30 o'clock in the Regency Room of the Huntington Hotel. Members should make reservations with Miss Mary Brady, Raphael Weill School, before March 14.

Warehouse Inventory As a warehouse inventory is to be taken on April 1st, no deliveries will be made by the warehouse to the schools from March 20 through March 31, 1950, except in dire emergencies.

1950

Angie Azzolini, seventeen year old Mission

tion,

Stanford University.

13,

Prominent Educator to Speak Mortimer J. Adler, prominent educator, speaker and author, will deliver a series of lectures in San Francisco under the auspices of the Great Books Foundation and the Adult Education of the San Francisco public schools. Three lectures, free of charge and open to the public, will be presented at 8:00 p.m., as follows:

Monday, March 13: "The Existence of God" Marina Junior High School Auditorium. Wednesday. March 15: "The Immortality of the Soul" Roosevelt Jr. High Auditorium. Friday,

March

High Auditorium.

17:

"Free Will" Roosevelt

Jr.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Cogswell's 63rd Anniversary

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, March 13 Physicians will visit the following schools: Presidio, Mission, Balboa, Hawthorne, Ulloa, Burnett, Garfield, Laguna-GG NS., Fremont, Commodore Sloat, F. S. Key, Edison. Regular meeting, San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Classroom Teachers' Association. Guest speaker: Joseph Alioto, commissioner of education. Chinese Room, Women's City Club, 465 Post



Street.

— Course.

"Teacher-Parent RelaMaintaining Effective Leadership." Speaker: Frances S. Miller, advisor, S. F. Council of Cooperative Nursery Schools. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affilia7:30 p.m.

tions." Sub-topic:

Marina Junior High School.

ted agencies.

Tuesday, March 14 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Aptos G, Sherman, E. R. Taylor, Hunters Point Site 2, S.B. Cooper, Lafayette, Sanchez. Lecture. "Youth and Marriage 7:30 p.m. Today." Sub-topic: "Marriage What Personal Adjustments Must You Make?" Speaker: William Bellamy, M.D. Auspices: Adult Education Division. Place: YMCA, 220 Golden Gate Ave.





Wednesday, March 15 Physicians' staff meeting at 101 318, 9:30 a.m.

Grove

Street,

Thursday, March 16 Physicians will visit the following schools: Commerce, Lowell, Everett G, Paul Revere, Washington Irving OT, Franklin, George Pea-

body, Argonne.

Physicians will

March 17

visit

the following schools:

Raphael Weill HC, Lowell, Galileo. Marina, Presidio G, Marshall Vac 75, Ridgepoint No. 1, Francisco, Laguna Honda, Sheridan, Lawton,

Daniel Webster, Guadalupe, Jefferson. 7:30 p.m. "Armchair Cruise." Topic: Bridging San Francisco Bay" and other films. Aus-



Adult Education Division. Auditorium, High School of Commerce.

pices:

Monday, March 20



4:00 p.m. Meeting of the Governing Council of the Teachers' Association of San Francisco.

Auditorium, Health Center Building, 101

Grove

Street.

On

Thursday, March

evening,

is

16,

both afternoon and the graduates

Home Coming day for

and former students of the college. On Friday morning, March 17, the regular FOUNDERS' DAY exercises will be hcfd by the student body in the college auditorium. At this assembly some of the members of the Board of Trustees will be present as well as two or three former students, who will make short addresses.

On

Friday afternoon and evening the college hold its annual Open House to give parents of students now in attendance, prospective employers, prospective high school graduates and will

and the interested public an opportunity to inspect the departments of the college and the work of the their parents, school counselors,

students. The college

is located at 26th and Folsom San Francisco. The college charges no tuition and is open to qualified high school graduates for two year courses in electronic, mechanical, and structural engineering.

Streets in

Examinations on U.

One to

S.

Constitution

methods whereby teachers seeking secure or renew certain teaching credentials of the

may

satisfy the requirements with respect to the U. S. Constitution is to pass "a satisfactory examination on the provisions and principles of the Constitution of the United States in a junior college, college or university of recog" nized merit. County superintendents arc no longer author.

Room

Friday,

During he week of March 13 Cogswell Polytechnical College will observe the 63rd anniversary of the founding of the college.

.

to administer such examinations except with respect to certain provisional (not emergency) credentials. Arrangements have now been completed with the City College of San Francisco to administer a test on the U. S. Constitution at such intervals as may be established by the college. Teachers who wish to take this examination are requested to call Dr. F. G. Marsh, Coordinator of the Division of Student Welfare telephone JU. 7-7272. Arrangements may be made with Dr. Marsh concerning the administration of this examination.

ized



Elem. Asst. Principals' Assn.

The regular meeting of the Elementary Assistant Principals' Association will be held in the library of Raphael Weill School on Monday, March 13, at 4:00 p.m. This meeting will be held in conjunction with the one called by Miss Margaret Holland, Supervisor of Guidance, for Elementary Assistant Principals at the same time and place.

Refreshments

will

be served at 3:45 pm.

7

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Stanford University Courses Spring Quarter 1950

News

F.

S.

Spelling

Bee Scheduled

Stanford University's School of Education announces that late afternoon, evening and Saturday classes will be conducted for educational workers during the Spring 1950 Quarter:

These courses are available for part-time by teachers and others regularly employed in educational work, who live suffi-

The San Francisco News has sent announcements for their Twenty-third Annual Spelling Bee to the participating schools. In San Francisco the contest is limited to 7th and 8th grades of junior high schools and the 7th and 8th grades of elementary schools. The San

registration

Francisco County Finals will be held at Marina Junior High School at 8:00 p.m., on Tuesday,

ciently close to the University. Insofar as possibe encouraged to relate their

March

ble, students will

study to the professional problems with which they are concerned in their present positions. Part of the work for advanced degrees may be met by this type of study. Registration dates for educational workers are: Spring Quarter: April 3 through Saturday, April

8.

Teachers in the vicinity who plan to take part-time courses must have been admitted to the University prior to March 1, 1950. Complete admission credentials must be filed at the Registrar's Office by March 1. Consult the Registrar's Office for details. All students will follow the procedure outlined below in register-

28"

Master

will

lists

be sent

as

usual

to

the

by the Bureau of Research. It must be kept in mind that this list is for practice only and that the words in the County Finals and in the Western California Bee may be selected from other lists As soon as the finalists from each school are selected, the names of the school champion and the runner up should be sent to the Bureau of Research as well as the San Francisco News. respective schools

.

The News and time

also wishes to

of

day the

be notified of the date be held in the

finals will

respective schools.

ing for this work.

Guidance Association Meeting A meeting of the San Francisco Group,

Secure your registration booklet in the Registrar's Office, Administration Building. Inform the clerk that you wish to register for special classes for educational workers.

Guidance Association will be held on Tuesday, March 14, at 7:30 p.m., in the Music Auditorium of Polytechnic High School. Speaker: Dr. Hubert Coffey, department of

Proceed to the School of Education for advisor's signature and approval of the program you have planned to take.

psychology, University of California. Topic: "Further Implications of Socio-drama for Guid-

1.

2.

Cali-

fornia

ance Workers."

No

Interested persons invited.

Call at the General Office of the School of Education, Room 20, First Floor, secure the Dean's signature and complete certain depart-

admission.

3.

— Philosophy Physical e55. 302 — Community Programs

259

of

mental record blanks.

M7-10

Secure and file a class card for Independent Study, Thesis and Dissertation.

M7-10

Education (3) Nixon

in

4.

Health Ed. (3) Zion

376.

312— Political Democracy

(3)

Quillen

MW4-5:30

c53.. 5.

Have

fees

adjusted to unit basis at the

and pay Office in Encina Hall. Registrar's

Office:

fees

at Cashier's

A maximum

registration of six (6) quarter units will be allowed full-time educational workers. The minimum tuition payment is for 4 units

of credit.

Tuition (including incidental fees) ...$85.00

— W7-10 451S — Master Arts Evaluation Seminar

dcll/Bartky

This scale applies only to full-time

Monday:

— General

M7-10 e2

School Supervision

(3)

el

of

(4) Staff

e53.

Thursday: 226— School Finance

&

Business (3) Odell

Th7-10

—Master Arts Research Seminar Curtis — Pre-Internship Seminar dhr 350c — Advanced Graduate Students Seminar

Th7-10 350b

of

(3)

e53.

(3) Gillette

e55. (0)

65.00

employed educational workers. 240

118—Educational Hygiene (4) Byrd W7-10 & 1 dhr e2. 322 Seminar in General School Admin. (3) O-

350a

75.00

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 4 units

Elementary School (3) Shaf-

r6.

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 5 units

in the

Wednesday:

W7-10

for 6 units

dell



T7-10 e35.

tcl

6. Return the registration booklet, signed, to the Registrar's Office.

NOTE:

Tuesday: 183 Reading

Bartsky/O-

Quillen Th4-6 e78.

Saturday: 110 Educational Sociology (4) Grambs S9-12 e2. 220 Community Relations in Education (3) MacConnell S9-12 e6. 243 Secondary School Curriculum (3) Gillette S9-12 e63.

— — —

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Annual Inspection of

Art Exhibit at Portsmouth Plaza

School Buildings

Children of San Francisco's elementary classes are doing an outstanding piece of work through the art media after their excursions to Portsmouth Plaza, according to Edward V. Borup, teacher in charge of the "Plaza" pro-

gram.

The following schools, and names of pupils from each school now have their work on display in the Museum building at Portsmouth Plaza:



Robert Fulton, Helen Martin, Gary 1. ALAMO Moore, Milinda Webster, John Fulton. Joann Lewis. 2. BAYVIEW



3. 4. 5.

JOHN MUIR— Juli

Brita Staiger.

HANCOCK—Barbara Crivello, Jan. Kittredgc. GLEN PARK— Richard Crawford, Donald Bell,

Douglas Smith, Paula Beavin, Michael Kersnar. 6. 7.

FRANK McCOPPIN— Ronald Pierce. TWIN PEAKS — Tommy Briggs,

Marilyn

Wojeik.

Social Security for Teachers

Charles H. Shreve, regional director of FedOld Age and Survivors' Insurance, will address the meeting of Local 61 at Mission

eral

High School, Rm. 226, Monday, March 13, 4:00 p.m. Mr. Shreve's subject will be "H. R. 6000." a bill now before the U. S. Senate providing for the extension of Social Security to many new groups, including teachers. .Because of his official position,

Mr. Shreve cannot make

a brief for or against this bill. He will summarize the provisions of the bill as they now stand, from the factual point of view. Since many teachers have expressed interest in the proposed legislation, this meeting of the

Federation of Teachers has been opened

to

non-members. All teachers are cordially invited to attend and ask questions pertinent to the effect passage of the bill would have on our local pension system.

Youth

—Adult Conference

"What Youth Expects from Education" will be one of the four discussion topics at the Youth-Adult Conference to be held at Mission High School on Saturday, March 18. The conference will be from 10:00 a.m., to 4:00 p.m., and is sponsored jointly by the San Francisco Youth Association and the Group Work and Recreation Council of the Community Chest. The general theme of the conference is "Youth Looks at San Francisco." The other topics to be discussed are: "Choosing a Job How to Get It." "How to Improve Our Personal Relationships." "Causes and Cures of Community Delinquency." It is hoped by the Youth-Adult Planning Committee that many school administrators, as well as teachers, will participate in the deliberations of the conference.

Each year during the Spring Semester an examination of existing school plants is made by engineers representing the interested fire insurance companies, and a detailed report of any fire hazards that may be noted is submitted to the Superintendent of Schools. Most conditions can be remedied by better "housekeeping" and principals and janitors arc directed to examine their buildings carefully to discover possible rule violations and to apply remedial measures at once. Principals will please instruct janitors to check on the following and make written report to the assistant superintendent in charge of buildings and grounds on the result: 1. Only 15 amp. fuses to be used in branch circuits. No "jumpers" permitted in any fuse blocks. 2. Foot-warmers and enclosed radiators in corridors to be cleaned thoroughly at least once each month. 3. Tight-fitting covers must be kept on drums containing sweeping compound. 4. The accumulation of old paper, properties constructed of paper, and other similar materials constituting fire hazards is forbidden in all parts of all school buildings. 5. The use of plenum chambers and boiler rooms as storage spaces for lumber, etc. is forbidden. Children are not allowed to enter these rooms. fi. Oilv rags or waste and other similar causes of spontaneous combustion should be placed in tightly covered metal trash cans. Suitable self-closing cans have been ordered for the boiler rooms of all schools previously mentioned in the report. 7. Cover should be kept closed over hatches to attic spaces. 8. Long extension cords for lights in attic spaces, storerooms, etc. should be replaced by wire in conduit or their use discontinued. 9. Auto-call and other fire alarm systems should be kept in order at all times for instant use by pupils or teachers.

Pi

Lambda Theta Members

to

Meet

Northern California Alumnae Chapter of Pi Lambda Theta will hold a luncheon-meeting at the Women's City Club on Saturday, March 18. Marian E. Smith will give an illustrated talk on Modern Sweden. of

Existing Janitorial

Vacancy

hereby given that the following janitorial vacancy exists in the San Francisco School System: CI 06 Janitor 1 James Lick. This vacancy will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though this position may be temporarily filled, it may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Lcavell, superThese vacancies are for transfer of permanent Notice

is



Grove Street, and/or through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street, employees only.

visor of school janitors, 93

.

&'

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN MARCH

No. 27

VOL. XXI

Convenes This

California Industrial Education Association As the old saying goes "The proof of the pudding is in the eating" so will upwards of a thousand vocational and industrial arts administrators and instructors sample the rich program slated for March 24 and 25 at Galileo High School.

The

following program, as outlined by O. D. Adams, honorary vice-chairman, will give those planning to attend a general idea of the wide variety of attractions scheduled:

MARCH

24,

Congress of Delegates.

—Tour Gump's —Tour Podesta and Baldocchi p.m. —Luncheon, Galileo

9:00 a.m.

of

9:00 a.m. ing ladies.

of

12:30 School.



9:00 a.m. Registration (all day) Auditorium foyer, Galileo High School. Exhibits open for viewing, Exhibit Hall, Galileo (Be sure to get your "Ship" card) 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

High School.



10:00 a.m. Tours: San Francisco Vocational Schools, San Francisco Industrial Arts Shops, Hunters



booths

all

— p.m. — Banquet,

2:00 p.m. Meeting of the State CLE. A. Executive Council, Room 212, Galileo High School.

Bellevue Hotel, 505 Geary Street. Informal. Speaker: B. O. Wilson, superintendent of schools, Contra Costa County. Topic: "The Implications of a Framework for Public Education in California on Industrial Education." 6:30



Special Conducted Tour of direction Chinatown Squad, San

8:30 p.m.

under

for visit-

Cafeteria,

Chinatown Francisco

High

California.

— Section Meetings: — Shop Application:

Audio- Visual Aids

1950

1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Demonstrations in of new machines, processes, methods.

for visiting ladies.

Fashion Show by members of Dressmaking and Millinery Groups of the Needle Trades Classes of

tre,

Point Naval Shipyard.

Week

Dr. John Bartky, dean, School of Education, Stanford University.

1:30 p.m.

FRIDAY,

20, 1950

Little

Thea-

High School.

Galileo

Shop Safety, with Stress on Legal Aspects: Auditorium, Galileo High School. Problems in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education.

Report: Comptency of Teachers: Dr. Kermit SeeSanta Barbara State College. Project Exchange on a State-wide Basis.

feld,





Ship Program: Drawing for Prizes 3:00 p.m. Auditorium, Galileo High School. (Deposit ship cards before this hour for the drawing)

—Adjournment.

4:00 p.m.

banquet on Friday, and the luncheon at Galileo High School on Saturday, March 25, may be made with Harry M. Krytzer, 750 Eddy Street, UNderhill 3-4680, ExReservations

March

for

the

24, at the Bellevue Hotel,

tension 223.

Police Dept.

SATURDAY, MARCH

—Exhibits open 9:00 a.m. — Registration High School. 9:30 a.m. — General

8:30 a.m. p.m.

25,

1950

Delivery Dates for

March Time Sheets

for inspection until 3:00 (until

noon) Lobby, Gal-

ileo

Session,

Auditorium,

Galileo

High School. Opening of Conference: Ewart G. Johnston,

March Time Sheets should be delivered to the Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: Teachers Senior

high,

dent, California Ind. Ed. Assn.

schools

...'..

"Welcome to San Francisco": Dr. Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of San Francisco Public Schools.

Adult schools

presi-

junior

high

and

March

elementary

22, 8:00 a.m.

23 teaching days in March.

.March

24, 1:00 p.m.

"Greetings from the State Department of Education": Samuel Frick, Chief, Bureau of Trade and Industrial Education, State Department of Education.

Vocational and Industrial Arts Administrators: Wesley Smith, State Director of Voc. Education. Greetings from the N.E.A.: Miss Myrtle Gustafson.

Report

of

State

"Labor's Interest in the Framework of California Education": C. J. Haggerty, secretary-treasurer, California State Federation of Labor.

"The Place of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education in the Framework of California Education":

Clerks and Janitors

March

16-31

Adult schools

Other schools

March 24, 1:00 p.m. ....March 22, 8:00 a.m.

Teachers' March warrants will be mailed to the address designated on the list submitted to the Personnel Department during February 1950. Notify Payroll Department immediately of any change.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN C.T.A. Election Results

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

The

Teachers'

California

naunces that the

Association

an-

results of the recent election

are as follows:

Representatives to the

Bay Section Council

(2-year term): Marguerite E. Connolly, James

Denman

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

M.

Monday, March 20 Physicians will visit the following

principal; schools:

George Washington, Mission, Portola B, James Lick B, Abraham Lincoln, Bay View, Hancock H, Excelsior NS, Dudley Stone, Guadalupe, Farragut, Hawthorne, Alvarado.



Meeting of the Governing Coun4:00 p.m. of the Teachers Association of San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Center Building.

Junior High School, teacher; Nellie

Foley,

San Miguel Elementary,

assistant

Mary Hardiman, Marina

Adult,

teacher; Genevieve Jordan, Jefferson Elementary, teacher;

Ida Richartz, Winfield Scott Ele-

teacher; Jeanne Sutherland, Ulloa Elementary School, teacher; John William Welch, Polytechnic High, teacher.

mentary,

Representatives to the State Council (3-year

cil



Course. "Teacher-Parent Relap.m. tions." Sub-topic: "Values and Limitations of Films in Group Study." Speaker: Frances S. Miller, advisor, S. F. Council of Cooperative Nursery Schools. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Marina Junior High School. 7:30

term): Oscar E. Anderson, coordinator, San Francisco

City

College;

James Lick Junior High,

Sylvester

L.

Kelly,

assistant principal.

Round Table Discussion

A

round table discussion on "Geriatrics and Aging Population" will be presented by San Francisco Chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association on Thursday, March 30, at 7:45 p.m., at the Goodwill Industries of San Francisco, 980 Howard Street. Moderator: Miss Ruth Newhall; Discussants: Harold Belloc, William J. Kerr, M.D., and Dr. the Problems of the

Tuesday, March 21 Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Lowell, James Denman, Horace Mann B, Pacific Heights, Bret Harte, Washington Irving OT, Cabrillo, John Muir, Sanchez, Daniel Webster, Douglas, Presidio (Contact Classes.)

Milton Chernin.



7:30 p.m. Lecture. "Youth and Marriage Today." Sub-topic: "Home Do You Build A Happy One?" Speaker: Henry C. Schumacher, M.D. Auspices: Adult Education Division.

YMCA,



How

Teachers and others interested are invited to attend.

220 Golden Gate Ave. Calif. Educational

Wednesday, March 22

The annual meeting

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Presidio, Lowell, Aptos B, Winfield Scott, Abraham Lincoln OTR, Candlestick

Cove, Emerson, West Portal, Alamo, Fremont, Francis Scott Key.

Thursday, March 23 Physicians will visit the following schools: Longfellow, George Washington, James Denman B, Patrick Henry, Washington Irving OTR, Commodore Stockton NS, Fairmount, Cleveland.

March 24

Physicians will visit the following schools: Raphael Weill, Presidio B, Glen Park, Visitacion Valley, Ridgepoint No. 2, Sarah B. Cooper,

Lagunda Honda, Golden Gate, Marshall,

Jeffer-

of the California

Educa-

be held at San Jose State College Saturday, March 25. Registration will begin at 8:45 a.m. General meetings and section meetings will be held from 9:30 a.m. until 4:45 p.m. Dr. Edgar L. Morphet, professor of education, University of California, will speak at the general meeting on "Research Development in School Administration." For further details on the program and luncheon reservations phone Dr. Lillie L. Bowman, UNtional

Research Association

will

derhill 3-4680.

Delta Friday,

Research Assn. Meets

Kappa

Gamma

Meeting

The next meeting of the Alpha Theta ChapDelta Kappa Gamma will be held on

ter of

Wednesday, April

12, at 465 Post Street at 7:30 p.m. Plans for the program and tea, on May 21, for the Future Teachers of America

groups will be discussed.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN P.-T.A. Endorses Grand

San Francisco's Annual

National Junior Exposition

Junior Gang Luncheon

Unanimous approval of the San FranciscoSan Mateo Cow Palace Grand National Junior Livestock Exposition and Arena Show was voted by the Second District, California Congress of Parents and Teachers at the regular monthly meeting of delegates and officers held at Girls High School, February 28. In expressing their interest in the annual agricultural classic, the Parent-Teacher group agreed to send material on the Junior Grand National to all of their units and include it as a discussion item at meetings throughout the coming month. In cooperation with the elementary school teachers of the public schools, a letter project will be carried out by the PTA in their plan of cooperation with the Cow Palace annual Spring show. Teachers have been notified of this plan by Dr. Harold Spears, assistant superintendent.

The Fourth Annual Grand National Junior Livestock Exposition and Arena Show will be held at the Cow Palace during the Easter vacation week, April 1-6. More than 1,000 rural youth of the Future Farmers of America and 4-H Clubs will exhibit their livestock projects. With the assistance of the PTA, groups of city youth will attend the exposition and meet their country cousins. Five gala performances will be the highlights of the opening weekend with trick riding and roping, Western comedy acts, greased pig and calf scrambles, a precision drill team and the championship finals of the National Intercollegiate

Rodeo

Association.

Among

the special activities planned particularly for city and rural groups to meet will be the Youth Round Table, an annual get together of representatives from the San Francisco Youth Association and the two exhibiting organizations, Future Farmers of America and 4-H Clubs. The meeting which will be held on Monday, April 3, will be preceded by a tour of the exhibits by all members.

Tuesday evening, April 4, a city-country will be held at San Francisco City College. Music for the event will be furnished

dance

through the cooperation of the Musicians Union, Local 6 and entertainment will be provided by City College groups. Invitations for city boys and girls are being extended through the San Francisco Youth Association.

Two queens will reign over the Junior Grand National. A representative from the youthful exhibitors will be selected as Livestock Queen while a San Franciscan will serve as rodeo queen. The judging will take place on Saturday morning before the opening performance and the queens will ride in the Grand Enrty.

Senior high school students in northern California are being invited to attend round table discussions in journalism as

an added feature of

the Press Club of San Francisco's annual Junior

Gang Luncheon,

April 29. Four $250 scholar-

ships for outstanding examples of news writing, feature writing, photography and radio news

be awarded at the Luncheon, Leo C. Lee, club president, announced today. script preparation will

The seminars, to be conducted by outstanding San Francisco radio and newsmen, will be divided into four groups, paralleling the classifications of competition in the scholarship contest.

Three Pulitzer prize winners and the winner of the Eddie McQuade Memorial Award are among the writers who will participate.

The seminar on News Writing will be conducted by Bill Best, United Press; Will Stevens, Examiner and Clint Mosher, Examiner, winner of the McQuade award. Conducting the seminar on Feature Writing be Herb Caen, Examiner; Bill Burkhardt, News and two Pulitzer Prize winners, Jack S. McDowell, Call-Bulletin and Stanton Dela-

will

plane, Chronicle.

Photography

will

be covered by Eddie Mur-

phy, News; Harry Coleman, International News Pictures and Joe Rosenthal, Chronicle who won a Pulitzer prize for his Iwo Jima flag raising picture.

Radio Script writing will be conducted by Grant Holcomb, Jr., KCBS; John Thompson, KNBC and Gil Thomas, KGO. Students attending the seminar and luncheon will have an opportunity to hear these leaders in press and radio discuss their work and answer questions presented by the journalism students.

Age-Grade Survey Requested For the first time in many years we are invited to participate in a statewide age-grade survey. The date has been set for March 31, so that the totals may be used in lieu of the usual count of active enrollments as of that date. Mimeographed forms for the teachers of grades 1 to 8 inclusive have been sent to the respective schools, giving instructions. Teachers of health special classes other than ungraded will also out forms for each half grade.

and fill

Summary sheets for principals will follow. In summarizing the sheets sent to the teachers it is important to make a separate tally sheet for each half grade instructed. For further information phone the Bureau of Research.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

PREPARE NOW for

THE OBSERVANEE of

Week

Public Schools

APRIL 24 TO

Regional Conference Announced

The Delta Kappa Bay Area will hold a

Gamma

Early Books on Exhibit

Chapters of the

regional conference

9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., on Saturday,

from

March

25,

Women's City Club, 2315 Durant Avenue. In the morning members may at-

at the Berkeley

tend any one of four discussion groups:

(1)

Unesco, (2) Recruitment, (3) Legislation, or (4) Public Relations. Luncheon will begin at 12:15 p.m. All

members

28

are urged to attend this

"Children's Books of Yesterday," the Good Housekeeping collection of children's books mainly of the 18th and 19th century, will be on display in the foyer of the San Francisco Public Library, Civic Center, until March 22. This exhibit, circulated under the auspices of the American Federation of Arts, covers an interesting range from the first English translation of John Calvin's "Catechism," 1556, to a

Cruikshank illustrated copy of "John Gilpin's Ride " about 1845.

conference. In

Memoriam

MRS. LOUISE STEINER O'CONNOR



Warehouse Inventory As a warehouse inventory April

1st,

warehouse

no to

deliveries will

the

schools

is

to

be taken on

made by from March be

the

20

through March 31, 1950, except in dire emergencies.

Teacher Lafayette School February 26, 1950

HUNTER

N.

EWELL

—Abraham Lincoln High School

Bookkeeper

January

28, 1950


VOL. XXI

MARCH

No. 28

31st Annual Observance of Public Schools Week

27, 1950

Elementary School Teacher Examinations

Plans for Statewide observance of the 31st

Annual Public Schools Week, April 24 ihiough 29, are now being made by educators, public officials and fraternal organizations. Theme of the observance, selected by the State Committee, headed by George D. Gavin of San Francisco, is: Public Schools Week "Democracy In Action." Chairman Gavin urged cooperation of civic, fraternal and educational groups, and attendance at school activities during the week by parents and friends. " "There is need for 'Democracy in Action,' said Gavin. "The rights of men are being threatened throughout the world and nowhere is there a clearer demonstration of democracy than in



The Board of Education at its meeting of March 21, 1950, approved the proposal made by Superintendent Clish for selection of elementary school teachers.

Written examination will be held at 9:00 a.m., 5 at the High School of Commerce, Van Ness and Hayes Streets, San Francisco. On request, applicants will also be given appointments to appear before interviewing committees during the first two weeks in April.

on April 4 and

the daily classes of our public schools. All citizens should make the effort to observe this process that is one of the fundamentals of our

Those interested are requested to apply to the Personnel Office of the San Francisco Unified School District, 93 Grove Street, for detailed instructions concerning applications for elementary positions. Applicants must not be over 35 years of age and will be required to hold, or be able to secure by the end of summer session 1950, a regular California Credential qualifying them to teach in an elementary school.

American way of life." Chairman Gavin succeeds Charles Albert Adams, a San Francisco attorney, who was one

Next

men who inspired observance of Public Schools Week more than 30 years ago. During the many years he served as chairman, he em-

next issue of the Superintendent's Bulletin will

of the

phasized the importance of school work to the welfare of the nation. Representative California organizations have been among the first to offer their support to aid in the observance of the 31st Annual Public

Chairman Gavin announced. Mrs. Patricia Luhr, president of the California Congress of Parents and Schools Week, April 24 through 29,

Because of Easter Vacation intervening, the be published on Monday, April

10.

eration of Labor, the California Medical Association

and other groups.

Chairman

of the

San Francisco observance

is

Claude Fountain. Schools participation chairman will be Ralph

Teachers, Inc., said:

Annual Public Schools Week proa personal opportunity for parents and

"The

Bulletin to be Issued April 10

31st

Kauer,

a

member

of the faculty of

Abraham

citizens

Lincoln High School. In line with information contained in Superintendent Herbert C. Clish's

of California."

nated to

vides

to observe the democratic practices part of classroom work in the schools a that are

Mrs. Luhr urged schools

schools

in

week

their

parents

to

— Democracy

Public Schools

Week

visit

during

to observe first-hand the

"The Public School

The

all

community

the

public

work

of

in Action."

observance also has

been endorsed by the California Department the American Legion, the California State Fed-

of

supervisory letter, Mr.

Kauer has been

desig-

San Francisco Unified School District and the Public Schools Week Committee in organizing and planning the forthcoming assist the

observance. Principals are requested to send outlines of tentative

programs direct Grove

331, third floor, 93

March

27.

to

Mr. Kauer,

Room

Street, not later

than

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Diploma Applications

Life

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

The Commission on Credentials of the State Department of Education has called attention to the fact that they have had some difficulty in the handling of the fees submitted with the

application for

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, March 27 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, James Lick, James Denman G, Longfellow, Commodore Stockton, Yerba Buena NS., Fremont Tox., Lincoln Tox., Visitacion Valley,

Monroe HI, Alvarado. 4:00 p.m.

— Regular meeting. San Francisco

Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Room 226, Mission High School. Course. "Teacher-Parent Rela7:30 p.m.



"Sex Education in the Preschool Years." Spearker: Eleanor Topalian, parent education leader, Marina Jr. High. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Place: Marina Jr. High School. tions." Sub-topic:

life

diplomas.

This office has accepted United States Postal Notes and has forwarded them to Sacramento in advance of the transmittal of the recommendations. Because these notes expire in 60 days, the State Controller requires that they be in his office 30 days before expiration. The necessity of clearing these notes through the Commission on Credentials within 30 days of date of issue unnecessarily increases the

work

of the

credential office.

Applicants for life diplomas, therefore, are requested not to submit postal notes in payment of the necessary fees, but to use only money orders, cashier's checks, or certified checks. The fee for the life diploma, as for other teaching credentials,

is

$4.00.

Tuesday, March 28 Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Laguna Honda, James Denman, Sutro, Pacific Heights, Sarah B- Cooper, Edison NS., Lafayette Tox., Alta Vista, Emerson Tox., Sanchez HI., Monroe HII.

Wednesday, March 29 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Portola, Girls High, James Lick G, Hawthorne, Irving M. Scott, Golden Gate Tox.

Thursday, March 30 the following schools: George Washington, Balboa, Everett, Horace

Physicians will

Mann

visit

G, Grattan, Hancock H, Franklin Tox.,

Dudley Stone, Edison.



7:45 p.m. Round table discussion. Topic: "Geriatrics and the Problems of the Aging Population." Presented by San Francisco Chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association. Place: Goodwill Industries of San Francisco, 980

Howard

"Schoolcast" from The Plaza

Dwight Newton's weekly "Schoolcast" program will be presented direct from "the little school house at Portsmouth Plaza" on Monday, 3. A group of elementary grade children from Miss Vivian Green's class at Miraloma School will be Mr. Newton's special guests on

April

this occasion.

This date will mark the anniversary in recognition of the original school house which stood

on the Plaza one-hundred and two years ago. It

was on the morning

Thomas Douglas,

of April 3, 1848, that

teacher) opened the doors of California's First Public School House here in San Francisco. (first

The "Schoolcast" program will be presented over station at 11:30 a.m., to 11:45 a.m., April 3.

KGO

Street.

Friday,

March 31

Spelling

Physicians will visit the following schools: Roosevelt, Portola G, Parkside, Francisco G, Jefferson NS, Golden Gate, Jefferson, Sheridan.

Tournament Announced

Senior high school students, not wishing to be outdone by the junior high schools, have expressed a desire for their

Report on Secondary Institute The secondary staff will be interested to know that a group of their fellow teachers has volun-

The

of

recent

spelling contest.

tests

spelling conscious. Principals are asked to an-

teered to take the task of pulling together the problems and suggestions contained in the reports from the recorders of the 36 groups who participated in the secondary institute. composite report will be prepared by these teachers

nounce

and mimeographed for general distribution and use in the secondary schools and also by the central staff.

the final tournament.

A

own

show that high school students are becoming more and more results

to their respective student bodies that, during the week beginning May 15, tourna-

ments

will

be held. Station

KALW

has offered

cooperation in the school contests as well as in will

supply spelling

time to time.

The Bureau

lists

of Research and suggestions from

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Women

College for

F.

S.

Livestock Exposition

To meet

the challenge offered the educational world by the ever increasing demand for higher degrees, the San Francisco College for Women at Turk St. and Parker Ave. is now offering the Master of Arts degree in education, English,

and

history.

Graduate courses were offered as early

in

English

as 1945

and history

when

the College

became the first institution of higher education in San Francisco to be accredited by the State Board of Education to offer such courses as part of the program for obtaining the secondary time the College has of graduate offerings as an immediate preparation for the present expansion into graduate work. Since

steadily increased

that

its

number

In accordance with its policy of building slowly but steadily on an ever widening foundation of strong upper-division preparation, the San Francisco College for Women determined to limit graduate work for the time being to the three fields of English, education, and history. The members of the committees set up in each of these departments all have their Ph.D. degrees. In March Mother Natalie White was appointed dean of the Graduate Division.

Graduate work satisfactorily completed at will be recognized by the University the of California and by Stanford Universtiy towards the Ph.D. degree. It will also be recognized by the State Board of Education for credential purposes.

SFCW

The

MA.

first

will

Red Ryder,

"the West's famous fighting cowheadline in person the spectacular Arena Show which ushers in the 1950 Grand National Junior Livestock Exposition in the San Francisco Cow Palace April 1.

boy"

will

Announcement

In the fall semester of 1949, the College organized a Graduate Council with the purpose of formulating plans and regulations for the graduate program. A long period of remote preparation had already preceded the organization of this Council.

credential.

Grand National

Jr.

Offers Master of Arts Degrees

applicants

for

candidacy to the

begin their work in the

Summer

Ses-

which opens this year on June 26. The usual undergraduate courses in all fields will also be offered during this six week session and during the four week post-session immediately sion

who metes

exposition.

In keeping with the cooperative nature of the the nation's greatest animal classic for youth, the services of Red Ryder were made available

by

his radio sponsor, the

Langendorf Baking

Company. The famous cowboy

of the radio waves will headline a brilliant cast of hard riding and roping features to make the Arena Show at this year's big Spring Cow Palace classic one of the most spectacular bills ever presented in the huge pavilion. The Arena Shows will be held matinee and evening, Saturday and Sunday, April 1 and 2 and Monday evening, April 3.

In addition to Red Ryder, there will be such and roping artists of the movies and television shows as Buff Brady, Vern Goodrich, Edith Happy, Sharon and Shirley Lucas. The Moore Family and their cantankerous mule, "Beeswax," will be the third professional feature on the program. Beeswax has convulsed millions of spectators at rodeos and roundups all over the West. riding

Headline buckaroo feature will be the official 1950 Championship Finals of the National Intercollegiate which will bring six-man fully accredited teams from the seven top ranking colleges and universities in the rodeo league.

Another spectacular feature will be the Shongehon Drill Team, 20 girls from the Cressmount-Mills College Riding School to perform their celebrated

mounted

that of the world famous lice troop.

drill

fashioned after

Canadian Royal Po-

To round

following.

summer school and the graduate division will be sent to each school within the next two weeks. Note: Approved for publication by Watt A. Long, Bulletins for

associate superintendent of instruction,

that the famous radio characout justice on the Western range would headline the Junior Grand National was made today by Porter Sesnon, Chairman of the ter

SFUSD.

Exchange Position Teachers in the Secondary Division of San Francisco Schools are informed that an exchange position in the field of General Science is available in New Rochelle, New York. Teachers qualified to handle General Science classes are invited to contact the Personnel Office with respect to this position. If desired, exchange of living quarters may be arranged.

be,

out the Arena Show program will cow horse competition, calf and greased pig

scrambles and calf riding participated in by boys selected from among the 1 ,004 Future Far-

mers of America and 4-H Club Members who will exhibit 2,965 head of beef and dairy cattle, lambs and hogs during the six days of the livestock exposition.

Federation to

The

Meet

regular meeting of the San Francisco

Federation of Teachers, Local 61, will be held

on Monday, March 27, at 4:00 p.m., in 226, Mission High School.

Room

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Retirement's and Resignations

Additional "Armchair Cruises"

time of year there may be some members of the teaching staff who contemplate retirement in June, 1950. Such persons should write to the State Retirement Board, 1408 "J"

Commerce Adult High School announces that the following free "Armchair Cruises" will be

At

St.,

this

Sacramento

14, California, for the neces-

sary blanks on which to make application. These blanks are not available in San Francisco.

On

receipt of the blanks

from the State Re-

tirement Board they should be presented to the Personnel Office of this district for an official certification of service.

Applicants for retirement should go to the City Retirement Board, 460 McAllister Street to make the necessary arrangements concerning retirement from City service and pension in connection therewith.

Those persons who may contemplate resignation from the school system will assist the Personnel Office and the Instructional Divisuch resignations are submitted in the near future. Resignations received late in the year sometimes make it difficult to secure adequate replacements and in some instances may occasion unnecessary difficulties at the opening sions,

if

of school.

Death Takes Retired Principal Alice Chalmers, retired principal of Longfellow School, died March 9 at Hahnemann Hospital following an illness of several months.

Miss Chalmers had served in the San Francisco Public School system for nearly forty years she retired in 1938. In those years she won the respect and love of several generations of grade school children.

when

A

presented 7:30 p.m.

in

its

auditorium commencing









at

March 24 Philippine program Speaker will be Benigno Pidlaoan, acting counsul general of the Republic of the Philippines. A film of the Islands will be shown and an open discussion will follow. March 30 Egyptian program H. Zoulkifar, consul royal of Egypt, will be the speaker. Films of Egypt will be shown and an audience participation program

will follow.





April 13 New Zealand program Colin Bayliff, vice-consul of New Zealand, will be the speaker. Films of New Zealand will be shown and an audience discussion will follow.









Avtar K. Dar, consul April 20 India program general of India, will be the speaker. Films of India will be shown and an audience discussion will follow. Swiss program Films of Switzerland shown. Werner Greb will conduct an open forum discussion following the showing of the films. Patrick Hughs, consul May 5 Irish program general of Ireland, will be the guest speaker. Films of Ireland and an open forum discussion are on the agenda. Baron Filippo MuziMay 12 Italian program Falconi, consul general of Italy, will be the guest speaker. Films of Italy will be shown and an open April 27

will be









forum discussion will follow the talk. French program Andre Rousselet, May 1 7 vice consul of France will be guest speaker. Films of France will be shown and an open forum discussion





will follow the talk.

C.B.E.A. Convention

The State convention of the California Business Education Association will be held at the Hotel Sainte Claire, San Jose, on April 3 and Outstanding speakers have been invited to all meetings. A humorous banquet program is planned for April 3. There will also

4.

address

San Francisco and a graduate of High School and San Francisco State College, Miss Chalmers began her teaching career here in 1901. In 1912 she was made principal of the Longfellow School, where she served

be a large display of the latest business machines and the most recent textbooks and supplies. All teachers of business subjects should plan to attend these meetings. Advance reservations may be made by writing Willard J. Saun-

until her retirement.

ders,

native of

Girls'

San Jose State College.


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN 3«=i»!: VOL. XXI

APRIL

No. 29

Superintendent's Supervisory Bulletin The Superintendent wishes

Public Schools to

announce an

functioning of this position in order to bring about a greater coordination between the work in Industrial Arts on the various educational levels will be recommended to the Board of Education. Any interested staff member who has not already filed an application is invited to do so. These applications should be received in the Superintendent's office not later than Friday, April 14. Qualifications sought are: 1. Real interest in the Industrial Arts and an appreciation of their place in the field of general education. 2. Previous successful teaching experience in the field of Industrial Arts. 3. Successful experience in the field of supervision or administration of Industrial Arts, or successful experience in the field of teacher preparation, or any other type of administration or supervision will be considered in evaluating qualifications.

highly desirable that the applicant knowledge of the means of determining departmental needs. This will be considered from the standpoint of shop It is

for this position have

equipment, supplies and materials. 5. He should have some knowledge of how to proceed in the development of curriculum and indicate some ability in curriculum construction.

The candidate should

possess at least the Master's degree or be so close to it that this work will be completed within a short time. 6.

1950

Mayor Robinson Proclaims

opening for a person to fill the position in charge of industrial arts. Some changes in the

4.

10,

A

general secondary and an administrative 7. credential are essential for this position. Following the evaluation of qualifications of the various applicants, interviews will be arranged with an administrative committee.

Mayor Elmer

Week

Robinson has designated the through 29th as San Francisco Public Schools Week, Chairman Claude E. Fountain of the sponsoring committee, has announced. The Mayor's proclamation de-

week

E.

of April 24th

clared:

"The public

San Francisco afford an opportunity to acquire the education which prepares them to play their part as good citizens in our com-

each and

all

schools of

of our children

munity.

"The public schools of our City are of primary importance to San Francisco, and they deserve the fullest possible support and interest of our people.

"I call upon all our people to visit at least one public school during this week to observe

the splendid

work there being done."

The theme of the observance is: "The Public School Democracy in Action," and Dr. Her-



bert C.

Clish, superintendent of schools, has

announced that all open-house programs during the week will be keyed to this slogan. Members of the sponsoring committee are: Claude E. Fountain, chairman; Dr. Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of schools; George D. Gavin, chairman of State Committee; Chester R. MacPhee; Edward H. Redford; Gordon W. Mallatratt; Paul F. Balck and William H. Murphree.

Wardrobe and Storage Cabinets The Division of Supplies has available

a

num-

ber of teacher wardrobe cabinets and a limited supply of steel storage cabinets. Principals requiring these cabinets are requested to place requisitions with the Division of Supplies at once.

being shown at 93 Grove

Cots and Canvas Covers The warehouse has ample supplies of kindergarten cots and canvas covers. Because of a

Street are a few selections made from the San Francisco Children's Art Exhibition held last month. These paintings will be on display until

shortage of space, the Division of Supplies requests that elementary principals order sufficient to take care of their needs at once.

April 14, and will be followed by an exhibit from San Francisco City College Art Depart-

Use separate requisitions when ordering cots, but wardrobe and storage cabinets may be ordered on the same requisition.

Children's Art Exhibit

The

ment.

paintings

now

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Commerce, Portola B, Everett B, FranS. Key, Bay View, Yerba Buena, Sherman and Gough Tox 50, Commodore

cisco B, F.

Tox 120, Edison Tox 260, Grattan Tox Raphael Weill. 4:00 p.m. Meeting of the San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association. Women's City Club, 465 Post Street. 4:00 p.m. Regular Meeting. San Francisco Sloat





Room

226,

— Course.

"Teacher-Parent Rela"Concepts of the Masculine and the Feminine Role." Speaker: Bertha Mason, M.D. Marina Junior High School. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated 7:30 p.m.

tions." Sub-topic:

Tuesday, April Physicians will

visit

1

the following schools:

HC, Commerce, Mission, HorPresidio OT, Aptos G, Washing-

Pacific Heights

ace Mann B, ton Irving and Jean Parker Tox, John Muir, Hunters Point No. 1, Daniel Webster Vac, I. M. Scott 50, Laguna Honda Tox, Sanchez, Dudley Stone Tox, Visitacion Valley Annex, Twin

most distinguished children's United States during the Politi, author-artist, winner of the 1949 Caldecott Medal, as the artist of the most distinguished picture book for children published in the United States during the year. These awards are made annually by the Children's and Young People's Libraries Division of the American Library Association. Between fifty and sixty authors of the Bay Area will be guests of the Association. Price of the luncheon will be $2.25 and reservations accompanied by check must be sent to Miss Edith Garin, 2526 Lake Street, San Francisco, by Wednesday, May 3. Reservations are limited to the capacity of the dining room, therefore applications will be honored in the for

the

book published year, and Leo

order of their receipt.

Mail reservations for the luncheon ($1.50) to

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Roosevelt, Girls High, James Den-

OT, Marina

Lake Merced Tox, Candlestick, Redding Tox, West Portal Tox 160, Jefferson and Columbus Tox, Alamo Tox 15, Sunnyside. B, Emerson,

Thursday, April 13 Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Galileo, Presidio OTR, Everett B, Hancock H, Ulloa Tox, Patrick Henry Vac 40,

Alvarado Tox 200.



Regular meeting.

Day Adult

Americanization Teachers. Marina School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets. Friday, April

Physicians will

Adult

14

the following schools: Laguna Honda HC, Balboa, Andrew Jackson, Lowell OTR, Roosevelt B, Commodore Stockton Tox, Junipero Serra and Fairmount Tox 90, Candlestick, Pacific Heights Tox 115, Winfield Scott Tox 50. visit

Announced

Administrators, teachers and parents are invited to an all-day joint meeting of the Northern California Council for Exceptional Children and the International Council for Exceptional Children, East Bay and San Francisco Chapters, to be held at Concert Hall, Mills College, Oakland, on April 15. Topic: "New Horizons for Special Education

Edward Benton, 2925 Kitchener Court, Oak-

Wednesday, April 12

B, Lowell

in the

in California."

Peaks and Douglas Tox 105.

3:45 p.m.

12:00 o'clock.

Joint Meeting

agencies.

man

6, at

Medal

Monday, April 10

Federation of Teachers, Local 61. Mission High School.

May

Speakers will be Mrs. Marguerite De Angeli, author of many popular books for boys and girls and winner of the 1949 John Newbery

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

100,

Authors' Luncheon Set for May 6 The Twelfth Annual Authors' Luncheon of the California State Association of Teachers of English will be held in the Florentine Room of the Claremont Hotel, Berkeley, on Saturday,

land.

Case Work for Troubled Parents The March, 1950, issue of the journal "Social Case Work" contains an article "Case Work for Troubled Parents" which was written jointly by Alice W. Barauck, Lorna C. Brangwin, and Jeanne Hamilton. Mrs. Hamilton has been a member of the staff of the Child Guidance Services since August, 1949. This article points up the importance of considering the problems and concerns of parents as a way of helping children to a better social adjustment. Many counselors and teachers should find the article helpful and stimulating.

Classroom Teachers to Meet The next meeting of the San Francisco

Class-

room Teachers' Association will be held in the club rooms, Women's City Club, 465 Post St., at 4:00 p.m., on Monday, April 10. This will be a business meeting. Tea will be served at 3:45 p.m.

.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Head

of Junior Traffic

School

Naming Contest

Winners

Patrols Retires Inspector Bryon J. Getchell, for the last 13 years supervisor of the Police Department's Junior Traffic Patrol, retired from the San Francisco Police Department last month.

Listed

Following

is

the

names and essay

list of prize winning school writers in the recent Call-

Name the Schools Contest: ELEMENTARY DIVISION

Bulletin

ANZA: Judy Hanson, 11, 243 Vidal Drive (Lake Merced School); second, Judy Garrison, 9, 81 Blake (J. W. Geary School); third, Maxine Wedertz, 11, 703 Crescent (Paul Revere School). FATHER CRESPI: Betty and Bonnie Dittman, 11, 106 Crespi Drive (Commodore Sloat School); second, Robert Harmor, 11, Presidio of San Francisco (Winfield

Scott School).

Only

entrants.

SIR FRANCIS DRAKE: Carole

Foster,

11,

100

Orizaba (Sheridan School); second, Elissa Abaurrea, 10, 1482 Twenty-ninth Avenue (Lawton School); third, Gilbert Llacuna, 11, 219 Bradford Street (Paul Revere) EL DORADO: Marianne Meeter, 10, Letterman General Hospital (Grant School). Only entrant. PHOEBE APPERSON HEARST: Mary Anderson, 11, 588 Twenty-third Avenue (Cabrillo School); second, Judy Wright, 11, 206 Fifth Avenue (George Peabody School); third, Craig Johnson, 9, 1855 Fortieth

Avenue (Francis

JOHN McLAREN:

Scott

Phyllis

Key

School).

Adams,

10,

48 Sanchez

(McKinley School); second, Anne McCook, 12, 257 Brentwood Avenue (Commodore Sloat School);

Street third,

Kay Sugiyama,

11,

1167 O'Farrell

(Raphael

Weill School).

JOSE ORTEGA: Carol Garrison, 10, 81 Blake (John W. Geary School) second, Susan Scott, 8, 2716 Franklin (Sherman School); third, Robert Pastorino, 9, 91 Ledyard (E. R. Taylor School). JEDEDIAH SMITH: Susan Breuer, 9, 15 Moncada Way (Commodore Sloat School); second, Benjamin Fong, 11, 825 Sacramento Street (Commodore Stockton School); third, Carol Widener, 10, 1730 Hayes (Andrew Jackson School). ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON: Cleo Ma, 11, 981 McAllister (Raphael Weill School); second, Paul Schmidt, 11, 170 Marietta Drive (West Portal School); third, Adrienne Buckner, 11, 67 Forest View Drive (Commodore Sloat School). TWAIN: Marilyn Kotkas, 11, 447 Hazelwood Avenue (Sunny side School); second, Sally Pyle, 11, 120 Cambon Drive (Lake Merced School); third, Joycelyn Holmes, 10, 561 Los Palmos (West ;

Inspector Byron

A member



his star

J.

Getchell

of the force since August 27, 1917 181 Getchell assumed

number was



the post of inspector of Junior Traffic in April, 1937, when it was established under the city charter.

As the officer, in charge of "junior traffic patrolmen" who guard intersections near schools, he was responsible for a perfect safety record, according to Police Traffic Director Edward R. Pootel. "Since the junior patrolmen were created," Pootel said, "there has not been a single school child injured because of an automobile accident at a controlled intersection, where the youngsters are on duty."

Through

the Superintendent's Bulletin, Inspector Getchell desires to express his appreciation to all the school administrators, principals, teachers and students for the cooperation given him during his many years of service with the

School Safety Patrol.

MARK

Portal School).

GENERAL MARIANO VALLEJO:

Donald Crose, 463 Tenth Avenue (McKinley School); second, Alan Klockars, 9, 150 Conrad Street (Glen Park School); third, Larsen Svaneirk, 10, 3236 Gough Street (Sherman School). 11,

JUNIOR HIGH DIVISION LUTHER BURBANK: Martha Ortiz,

118 13, Gates Street (high eighth, Paul Revere School); second, Joan Kaufmann, 12, 2265 Broadway (high seventh, Grant School); third, Wallace Tsang, 14, 1847 Clay Street (Marina Junior High). HERBERT HOOVER: Frances Levey, 12, 1598 Thirty-fourth Avenue (Presidio Junior High) second, Frank Morgan, 13, 1460 Masonic (high eighth, Dudley Stone School); third, Richard Colman, 14, 33 Allston Way (low ninth, Lowell High). ;

Mountain Play on Tamalpais The Mountain Play Association announced today that this year's outdoor production atop Mount Tamalpais will be the Reginaldde Koven operetta, "Robin Hood", which will be given for one performance only on May 21 as the thirty-third annual Mountain Play.

Date for the second phase of the School Naming Contest has not as yet been announced. The Board of Education has indicated that another contest will be held in the future to complete the naming of the schools planned in the expansion program.

.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Foreign Teaching Service

The Department

of the

Army American De-

pendents Schools program overseas announces the need of elementary and secondary teachers for that service for the school year 1950-1951, for both the European and the Far East Commands. The salary is $3825 per year with army quarters provided at no cost.

A recruitment team will interview interested teachers in San Francisco April 14 and 15, OA.B Field Office, Room 529, Pacific Building, 821 Market

Street.

Further details can be secured

there at that time.

reasonable number of teachers may be able to secure leaves of absence for one year for this work in cases where such can be granted with-

A

out handicapping our own schools. However, application for such leave should be made in April to enable our personnel office to secure proper replacements.

"Quizdown" Resumes April 15 The Exam'ner-KGO Quizdown

Lambda Thetans

to

Meet

The Northern California Council of Pi Lambda Theta will hold an all-day meeting on the Stanford

Campus

next

Saturday,

April

15.

Helen Heffernan of the State Board of Education and Thelma Chisholm, national vice-president, will be two of the principal speakers. Registration is at 10:00 a.m., in Cubberley

The participating chapters are Upsilon, Omega, San Jose Alumnae, and Northern Cali-

Hall.

fornia

Alumnae.

Local 61 Meets

Today

The regular meeting of the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61, will be held todav, Monday, April 10, at 4:00 p.m., in Room 226, Mission High School.

Astronomy Talks

at the Public Library

Miss Leslie Lavelle, artist and amateur astronomer, will give a series of five talks on as-

tronomy for children in the Children's Room of the San Francisco Public Library, Civic Center. Each talk will be on a Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. The dates are April 12 and 26, May 10 and 24, and June 7. Star charts illus-

resume

used will receive an Eversharp pencil. is broadcast Saturday

are

The weekly program

mornings from 10:30 to 11, originating from Studio A, Radio City. Free tickets are available at The Examiner and KGO. Existing Janitorial

Vacancy

hereby given that the following ianitorial vacancy exists in the San Francisco School System: McKinley. C102.1 Janitre^.s This vacancy will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though this position may be temporarily filled, it mav be still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing to the Supervisor of School Janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street. This vacancy is for transfer of permanent employees only. Notice

is



1

Pi

will

regular program on Saturday morning, April 15, after the Easter holidays. Featured on the first program will be the Candlestick Cove and Paul Revere Schools. Questions for the Quizdown broadcasts from fourth, fifth and sixth grade pupils are welcome. They must be entered on regular Quizdown question blanks and must be signed by the classroom teacher. Children whose questions its

Science Teachers Institute Meeting The California Science Teachers Association Northern Section, will hold its Spring Institute on Saturday, April 22nd in Anderson Hall, San Francisco State College. An address on trends in science education, a panel discussion on science curriculum problems, the showing of several exceptional, new science films, and many special demonstrations in science will highlight the morning and afternoon sessions. The staffs of the elementary and secondary



schools are cordially invited.

.

.

.

THEME

.

.

trating each talk will be distributed to all attending.

Recreation leaders, camp councilors and teachers, as well as boys and girls will be interested in this new and simple approach to learning about the stars as an aid to summer camp

s4cti
work.

Miss Lavelle's work has been recognized by university astronomers and scientists. Her abstract paintings of the constellations have been exhibited in museums and libraries throughout the country.

Public Schools April 24

-

Week

23

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

No. 30

APRIL

Week Way

Adopted

Calling the attention of the citizens of San Francisco to the forthcoming annual observance of Public Schools Week, Herbert C. Clish, Superintendent of Schools, issued the following invitation:

"The week of April 24-29, 1950 has been designated as Public Schools Week. This marks the thirty-first annual observance of this event.

members

The Board of Education at its meeting of Tuesday, April 4, adopted the 1950-51 elementary, junior, senior high and Continuation schools calendar, as recommended tendent Herbert C. Clish.

The calendar

tion

time, they are extending a cordial invitation to all citizens urging them to make a special effort to visit their schools during this week at which

follows:

Days Taught

School

Month

Dates

(Tuesday) 1.

Sept. 6-Sept. 29

2.

Oct. 2-Oct. 27

18 18

Brooks Camera and Photo Supplies, Charles Brown & Sons, City of Paris, Dohrmann's, The Emporium, Hale Bros., H. Liebes and Co., Livingston Bros., Macy's, Joseph Magnin Co., Roos Bros., The San Francisco Examiner, Davis-Schonwasser Co., SchwabacherFrey Co., Shell Oil Co., and Spiro's. In these displays, the citizens of San Francisco will be encouraged to visit the public schools. In addition to the downtown displays, plans are being formulated for many special events during Public Schools Week. Under the direction of Miss Margaret Girdner and Miss Edith Bond of the Bureau of Texts and Libraries, a special exhibit emphasizing the theme "Democracy in Action" will be set up in the Children's Room of the Public Library at Larkin and McAllister Streets. Through the cooperation of Lt. Colonel Leroy B. Wilson and Captain William W. Cobb, a massed ROTC Band and Drill Team will perform during the noon hour at Union Square on Monday, April 24. This will be followed on Tuesday, April 25, at 12:00 o'clock by an Elementary School Songfest at the City Hall under the direction of Charles M. for the

week

are:

Dennis, director of music, and several of his staff members. The Child Guidance Services are having a special Open House, for teachers and administrators at 3:00 p.m., on Wednesday,

Oct. 12, Columbus

Day

(Thursday)

in Action' ".

Many of San Francisco's business establishments have pledged their cooperation in the observance of Public Schools Week. The organizations which have made display space available

Holidays Sept. 5, Institute

time they will have an opportunity to observe

'Democracy

by Superin-

CALENDAR FOR 1950-51 FALL TERM

Board of Educa-

"While the and the Superintendent of Schools are happy to have citizens visit their schools at any of the

T950

Calendar for Day Schools for 1950-51

Public Schools

Plans Under

17,

3.

Oct. 30-Nov. 22

18

4.

Nov. 27-Jan.

18

Oct. 13, Institute (Friday) Nov. 23-24, Thanksgiving Recess (Thurs. & Fri.) Dec. 18-Jan. 2,

5.

Jan. 8-Feb.

19

Feb.

5

Christmas Vacation



1

2,

Mid-Term

Recess (Friday)

91

SPRING TERM School

Month 6.

Dates

Days Taught

Feb. 5-Mar. 2

17

Holidays Feb. 12, Lincoln's

Birthday (Monday) Feb. 22, Washington's

Birthday (Thursday)

Mar. 5-Mar. 30

15

April 2-April 27 9 April 30-May 25

20 20

7.

Feb. 23, Institute (Friday) Mar. 19-23, Easter

Vacation 8.

10.

May

28- June 15

14 —

May

30, Memorial Day (Wednesday)

86 Actual days taught

177 3

Institute

180

April 26.

They

will also

sponsor a special public

program on Mental Health entitled "Some Contributions to Mental Health by the Public Schools", at 8:00 p.m., on Tuesday, April 25, at the Roosevelt Junior High School. It is also planned to have several radio and television programs from April 17 to 29.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Public Schools

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year

is

from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Week Programs

Public Schools Week programs outlining the events scheduled for the week of April 24-28, are being distributed to the schools through the regular school delivery. Principals are requested to make arrangements for the distribution of these programs to students in order that parents may be advised of the scheduled events during Public Schools Week.

Monday, April 17 Physicians will visit the following schools: John Muir H.C., Lowell, Mission, Portola G, Everett G, Polytechnic OT, Jean Parker, Ridgepoint No. 1, Garfield Tox, Starr King Tox, Visitacion Valley Tox 200, Sanchez.



Meeting of The Governing Coun4:00 p.m. of the Teachers' Association of San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Building, 101 Grove

cil

Street.

7:30 p.m.

— Course.

"Teacher-Parent Rela"Therapeutic Effects of Para Group." Speaker: Pearl L. Axel-

tions." Sub-topic:

ticipation in

professor

assistant

rod,

of

psychiatric

social

work, School of Social Welfare, University of California. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Place: Marina Junior

Delivery Dates for February

Time Sheets

April Time Sheets should be delivered to the Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street on the following dates:

Teachers: Senior high, junior high and elementary schools

.....April 21,

Teachers

8:00 a.m. 15 days

and

assistant principals 20 days April 3 to 7 incl.) Adult schools April 24, 1:00 p.m.

Principals (

Symbol" A"

Clerks and janitors:

Adult schools

Other schools

April 24, 1:00 p.m. April 21, 8:00 a.m.

Fligh School.

Tuesday, April 18 Physicians will

Sherman HC,

visit

Galileo.

the

Kindergarten Workshop

following schools:

Aptos G. Marina G,

Washington Irving, Ridi;epoint Site 2, Potrero Ter. NS., Glen Park, Alta Vista, Sanchez.

Mills College calls attention to its annual Kindergarten Workshop, July 10 to August 18. Detailed information may be secured from Mrs. Persis

Cowan,

Mills College.

Wednesday, April 19 Physicians will visit the following schoo's: Sunshine, Abraham Lincoln, James Denman G, Presidio G, Polytechnic OTR, Hawthorne, Hunters Point No. 2, Franklin, Fremont, Sheridan, Daniel Webster Tox, Geary Tox. Public meeting. Board of Educa7:30 p.m. tion, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street.



Thursday, April 20 Physicians will visit the following schools: George Washington, Lowell, Aptos G, Horace Mann G, Bryant Tox, Francisco G, Dudley Stone, Farragut, Edison.

Friday, April 21 Physicians will visit the following schools: Galileo, Balboa, Roosevelt G, Sarah B. Cooper Tox, Commodore Stockton, Candlestick Cove, Page-Broderick NS., Visitacion Valley, Madison Tox, Marshall Tox 85.

Exhibit of Engravings

An old the

exhibit of engravings over five centuries

now on display in the Max Kuhl Room at Main Public Library in the Civic Center.

is

This exhibition is a selection from the collection presented to the Public Library by Mr. and Mrs.

Moore S. Achenbach of San Francisco. The Library Department invites classes from the public schools to visit this outstanding exhibition.

Bicycle Licenses a Requisite

The Superintendent is in receipt of the following communication from Lt. John P. Meehan of the Police Juvenile Bureau regarding the necessity of boys and girls obtaining bicycle licenses:

"Our records reveal that the number of applications for bicycle licenses at this time of the year is far below that of preceding years. It is mandatory that every bicycle operated on the San Francisco bear a license for the current year. Licenses may be procured at the tax collector's office, room 105, City Hall, by submitting a bicycle license application, accompanied by fifty cents (50^) for the calendar year. Such application shall contain the make, serial number, color combination, and size of the bicycle. streets of

"Operators of bicycles not so licensed may be by the police to the Juvenile Court and their bicycles placed in storage, and any cost for such storage shall constitute a lien against such bicycle. cited

"I respectfully request that the students of the public schools be made aware of the above through your weekly bulletin or class discussion, and also suggest, as a matter of further cooperation, that unlicensed bicycles not be permitted on school grounds."

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Press Club Scholarship Award's Luncheon April 29

Memoriam

In

Thomas

O'Toole, chairman of the Annual J. Press Club Scholarship Award's Luncheon, requests that the attention of senior high school principals be called to the following communica-

BARBARA Teacher

ACHESON

K.

— Mission High School March

18,

1950

tion:

"You have probably been informed already annual Press Club Scholarship Award's luncheon. We are planning on seminars for all students and adof the innovation this year for the

visers attending the luncheon, these seminars to

be conducted by leading news and radio the Bay Area.

"Four seminars have been arranged writing, feature writing, radio script

men

in

Governing Council to Meet

The Governing Council ciation of

torium of in

news

of the Teachers Asso-

San Francisco will meet in the audithe Health Building, 101 Grove St.,

on Monday, April

17, at

4:00 p.m.

writing

and photography.

"A

reservation form has been sent to princilist the names of the students and which seminar they will attend. pals requesting that they

"The seminars

will start at eleven o'clock

and

about one hour. Registration of students and advisers will preceed the seminars, will last

have Dr. Wallace and editor of the Los Ange-

itself will

Sterling, president of Stanford University,

Agnes Underwood, les

Work

Principals of elementary schools are advised

that Miss Helen Heffernan of the State Depart-

ment

of

Education

is

very anxious to have out-

standing Social Studies Units of

Work

city

Herald-Express, as co-speakers.

of the Teachers' Guides for child development for primary

Any ried

and intermediate grades.

outstanding units which have been car-

on

elementary schools and which

in the

"Reservations should be accompanied by a check or money order at the rate of $1.50 per

principals think

person.

tion should be sent to the office of Dr.

"This will also serve as another reminder to you that entries in this year's contest must be postmarked not later than April 17, 1950.

Spears not later than

who make an

"All students

test are eligible to

submit-

ted for possibility of inclusion in revised editions

starting at ten o'clock.

"The luncheon

Request for Units of

entry in the conattend the luncheon."

Date and place: April

29,

Press Club, 449

Powell Street.

would be

suitable for publica-

May

Harold

1.

Lincoln Student Honored Cecily Aggeler, high senior student at Abra-

ham

Lincoln High School, has been selected as

one of the twenty outstanding science students in the

United States by the Bausch and

United Nations Student Contest

Company.

More than 100 Northern California Schools have notified the regional office, American Association for the United Nations, of intent to participate in the annual United Nations Stu-

talent search

In addition to regional prizes, winners have

an opportunity

to

compete

in a national

ation. First prize in that elimination

is

examina trip to

Europe of $500.

The contest is sponsored annually by the American Association for the United Nations and the National Broadcasting Company. Judges for the Northern California competition are: Rev. William J. Dunne, president of the University fo San Francisco; J. Paul Leonard, president, San Francisco State College; J. E. Wallace Sterling, president, Stanford University; lege,

Miss Aggeler entered the company's science

Lynn White,

Jr.,

president, Mills Col-

and Robert Gordon Sproul, president,

University of California.

as the representative of

week was

Lincoln

was compete for one of the five $1,800.00 scholarships to be awarded to the winners of the competition. She will appear before the scholarship committee in Rochester, N. Y., on April 28 and 29. During her High and ".hosen

dent Contest.

Lomb

stay in

a;,

last

one of the

New York

notified that she

finalists to

she will be the guest of the

University of Rochester and of the Bausch and

Lomb Company. Miss Aggeler was selected by the members of the science department of Lincoln

High

to

be

the school's representative in the competition

because of her uniformly high scholastic grades

and the promise she has shown science.

in the field of

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Fourth Anuual Vocal Festival The Fourth Annual Vocal Festival for high school soloists and small ensembles will be held in Frederick Burk Auditorium on Herman Street and Laguna. This festival is sponsored by San Francisco State College. Musical organizations of that institution will entertain the participants at luncheon, and there will also be a special

presentation of a short modern opera by the State College Opera Workshop. The festival will begin at 10:00 a.m., and continue until 4:00 p.m., on Saturday, April 29.

Amendment

of Rule

Astronomy Talks

at the Public Library

Miss Leslie Lavelle, artist and amateur astronomer, will give a series of five talks on as-

tronomy for children in the Children's Room of the San Francisco Public Library, Civic Center. Each talk will be on a Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. The dates are April 12 and 26, May 10 and 24, and June 7. Star charts illustrating each talk will be distributed to

at-

all

tending.

Recreation

leaders,

teachers, as well as boys

camp and

councilors

girls will

and

be inter-

ested in this new and simple approach to learning about the stars as an aid to summer camp

74-A

work.

At its meeting of April 4 the Board of Education amended Rule 74-A as follows: "Employees of the Board of Education shall not engage in political activities during working hours provided, however, that at any other time such employees, as American citizens, shall have the right to advocate or support such measures or candidates as they may choose."

Miss Lavelle's work has been recognized by university astronomers and scientists. Her abstract paintings of the constellations have been exhibited in museums and libraries throughout the country.

"Learn To Swim" Campaign

The American Red Cross is planning its year"Learn to Swim" campaign for the coming summer. To facilitate enrollment in the classes, the Red Cross conducts a survey each year of ly

Wardrobe and Storage Cabinets The Division of Supplies has available a number of teacher wardrobe cabinets and a limited supply of steel storage cabinets. Principals requiring these cabinets are requested to place requisitions with the Division of Supplies at once.

the school children interested in swimming.

This survey consists of each child completing a questionnaire sheet stating

would

The

requisitions

it

will

be announced at a later date

bv the Red Cross.

The warehouse has ample supplies of kindergarten cots and canvas covers. Because of a shortage of space, the Division of Supplies requests that elementary principals order sufficient to take care of their needs at once. Use separate

and where he

dates of the survey and the details con-

nected with

Cots and Canvas Covers

if

swim.

like to

when ordering

but wardrobe and storage cabinets dered on the same requisition.

may

Next Board Meeting April 19 The next meeting of the Board

of Education be held on Wednesday, April 19, at 7:30 p.m., in the Board's meeting room, fourth floor, will

cots,

be or-

93 Grove Street.

.

.

.

THEME

.

.

.

?4ctio*t'

Public Schools April 24

-

Week

29

<^£Z4v&nxz*ici4£>0'

MI!

I VOL. XXI

APRIL 24, 1950

No. 31

Special Events Planned for Public Schools

Many special events have been scheduled by Schools Participation Committee to acquaint the citizens of San Francisco with what their schools are planning to do during the Thirtyfirst Annual Observance of Public Schools Week '

—April

24-29.

In addition to the displays placed in the various department store windows in the downtown area, many of the schools have placed displays

work in their own neighborhood stores. Under the direction of Reginald Krieger of Lowell High School, the ROTG Bands of the Abraham Lincoln, Lowell, and Mission High Schools will present a concert during the noon hour at Union Square on Monday, April 24. A drill team from the Lowell High School ROTC of their

program. On Tuesday, April 25, at noon, the Glee Clubs of the Parkside, Winfield Scott, and Fairmount Elementary Schools will present a program in the rotunda of the City Hall under the direction of Charles will also

perform

at this

Dennis, director of music. On Tuesday evening, at 8:00 p.m., in the Roosevelt Junior High School, a panel, with John L. Roberts, coordinator of child welfare, as chairman, will present a discussion entitled "Some Contributions of the

M.

Public Schools To Mental Health." Edward H. Redford, coordinator, secondary education, will speak at the Advertising Club Luncheon at the Palace Hotel on Wednesday, April 26. Harold Spears, assistant superintendent in charge of elementary education will be the guest speaker at the Shrine Luncheon Club on Thursday at the Palace Hotel. On Friday evening, at 7:45 p.m., the Aptos Junior High School will present a special program at Portsmouth Plaza.

To

introduce the week, a television program featuring folk dancers from the West Portal school under the direction of Miss Alice Wass and Miss Uarda Schuldt was presented on the Les Malloy Show over KGO-TV at 5:00 p.m., on Tuesday. On Thursday, April 20, the clothing class of the Abraham Lincoln High School, under the direction of Mrs. Mary Thrasher, presented a fashion show on the Bonnie Keever Show over KRON-TV at 3:00 p.m. On Saturday, Stewart Ward presented a discussion on

"What Makes A Good Teacher" on fornia Council Table at 8:30 p.m.

Program

his Cali-

aired over

KSFO

Week

Several radio programs have been planned to further publicize this week. Watt A. Long, associate superintendent of instruction, will be interviewed by Marjorie King of at 12:45 p.m. on Monday, April 24. Also, on Monday, Ann Holden will interview Roy Minkler, teacher of the Marshall School, on at 4:00 p.m. Mrs. Kenneth MacDonald of the P.T.A., will be featured at 9:30 a.m., on the Jane

KFRC

KGO

Lee Show at KNBC on Monday. Mrs. Thelma Baxter, head counselor of Mission High School, will appear on the Jane Todd Show over KFRC at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 27. On Saturday, April 29, at 8:00 a.m., students from the Senior Goals Glass of the Lowell High School appear on with Mr. Fitts of the Social Security Office. Also, on Saturday, at 12:15 p.m., William Minette will present a special broadcast from Portsmouth Plaza. The "Jolly Bill Show" over at 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, will feature Public Schools Week, as will Dwight Newton on his Schoolcast programs over at 11:30 a.m., on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

KFRC

will

KNBC

KGO

Course

at State College

The Extension Division of San Francisco State College in cooperation with the San Francisco Bay Counties Board of Women's Officials, offers PE. el43B Officiating Team Sports (softball) beginning April 25 for six meetings (one unit.) Place: Funston Playground. Instructor: Evelyn Pellaton. Course fee: $6.00. open to any woman who is inmore about softball rules, techniques and for becoming a rated

This course

is

terested in learning officiating official.

Approved

for publication:

Watt A. Long,

associate

superintendent of instruction.

Course Enrollment Data Required All teachers

who were

enrolled for non-

collegiate credit in

Master Teacher Seminar,

San Francisco State

College, fall semester, 1949-

50, are requested to advise the Salary Evaluation Office, 93 Grove Street, of this course.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of S< hooK 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

California State Department of Educaand the University of Redlands are cosponsoring a State-wide Conference on The

The

tion

Education of Spanish-speaking Children. The three-week conference will be held June 26July 14 on the Redlands campus. Many of the approximately one million Span-

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, April 24 Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Marina B, James Denman B, Jean Parker, Excelsior NS., Frank McCoppin Tox 100, Lincoln Tox 30, Sunnyside Tox 200, Fre-

mont Tox

55,

Monroe Tox.

7:30 p.m. — Course.

"Teacher- Parent Relations." Sub-topic: "Therapeutic Effects of Participation in a Group." Speaker: Pearl L. Axelrod, assistant professor, Psychiatric Social Work, School of Social Welfare, University of California. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Place: Marina Junior High

School.

Tuesday, April 25 Physicians will visit the following schools: Presidio, Lowell, Samuel Gompers, George Washington, Portola B, Francisco, Daniel Webster, Burnett Tox 125, Raphael Weill Tox 50, Emerson Tox 50, Sanchez, Lafayette Tox 15.



Lecture. Subject: "The Mature 8:00 p.m. Speaker: Dr. Harry A. Overstreet, psychologist and author. Chairman: Adrien J. Falk. Auspices: San Francisco Chapter, Mental Health Society of Northern California. Admission free. Mission High School.

Mind."

Wednesday, April 26 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Commerce, Balboa, James Lick, Spring Valley Tox, Golden Gate Tox 40.

Thursday, April 27 Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Lowell, Everett B, Horace Mann, Pacific Heights, Hancock H, Franklin Tox, Paul Revere, Patrick Henry, John Muir Tox 100,

Longfellow Tox 100. Friday, April

Plans for Statewide

Conference Announced

28

Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Galileo, Presidio B, Le Conte, Sarah B. Cooper, Edison NS., Golden Gate.

ish-speaking people in the State of California are an economically disadvantaged group. A large number of these children attend the full eight years of elementary school without acquiring facility in the English language.

The conference

will provide administrators, teachers and community leaders with opportunities for understanding the social and cultural life of the Mexican-American people. Emphasis will be placed on the language and instructional aspects of the problem.

supervisors,

Mrs. Afton Nance, consultant in elementary education from the State Department will direct the conference. She will be assisted by Miss Helen Heffernan, assistant chief of the State Division of Instruction, Elementary Education and Mrs. Faith Smitter, consultant in Rural Community Education. Mrs. Agnes Frye, field representative in Speech Correction, will serve as special consultant. Special consultants will include Byron England, curriculum director of El Paso (Texas) City Schools; Dr. George Sanchez, professor in

Latin-American Education at the University of Texas; Dr. William Jack Stone, director of the Los Angeles County Project in Human Relations and Mrs. Sybil Richardson, coordinator of research and guidance of the Los Angeles County Schools.

Delta Kappa

Gamma

The next meeting

Meeting of Delta

Kappa Gamma

be held on Wednesday, May 3, at the Women's City Club at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Robert Stewart of San Francisco State College will address the group on "Personal and Professional Adjustment". This talk is part of the Teacher Welfare Program of Study of the Chapter. Members may bring guests. will

In

Memoriam

Class in Color

There will be a new class in color study which will be conducted personally by Rudolph Schaeffer, outstanding colorist. Evening class on Wednesday and Thursday from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., beginning May 3, and covering a period of five weeks. Registration limited to 30.

dolph Schaeffer School of Design, 136 Street. Approved for veterans for increment credit.

St.

Ru-

Anne

and recognized

MRS. CATHERINE FINNEGAN Janitress

— McKinley School

March

21,

1950

HAZEL FRANCES GIES Retired Principal

— Grant School

April 18, 1950

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Workshop

in

P.E. for

State Fair

Time

Big

Elementary Teachers

Thrill for Children

Landreth, chief, Bureau of Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation, State Department of Education, has addressed

Children will have a big time at the California State Fair in Sacramento next August 31 through September 10. They always do, because every day is children's day at the Fair. They'll be thrilled by the multitude of exhibits, the cows and pigs and chickens, and by their own special section of the Fair the Kiddie Karni-

Verne

S.

the following communication to the Superintendent of Schools:

"The State Department of Education in conjunction with the California School Supervisors' Association and the California Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation is sponsoring a workshop in physical education for the elementary classroom teacher August 21 to August 25, 1950, on the campus of the California State Polytechnic College. College extension credit will be available at a minimum cost, or teachers may attend as auditors. Board will be provided on the campus for $5.00 per week per person with two in a room; or arrangements can be made for married couples at the rate of $5.00 per person per week. Meals will be provided in cafeteria style at a maxiof $1.65 per day.



val.

Again this year a big area near the main entrance will be set aside for children, with a merry-go-round, pony rides, a thrilling scenic railway and dozens of other features. Once more the price will be scaled to juvenile size just 9 cents, including tax, for each kid's ride in the Kiddie Karnival. That makes it easy on



Dad and Mother,

too.

And, of course, there rades and bands, all for

will free,

be clowns and pathroughout the 1

"During the workshop instruction, planning and participation in elementary school physical education activities will be provided. Outstand-

big days of the State Fair, and lots of other events that won't cost the young visitor anything, from the time he enters the grounds until the grand fireworks spectacle in the evening. It's fun just to listen to the pitchmen selling their goods, and to watch the artists drawing pictures

mum

ing supervisors will lead classes in rhythms,

of other visitors.

body mechanics and posture, primary activities, and game activities for intermediate and upper grades. A period of curriculum planning and problem discussion will be provided under the direction of Ruth Abernathy, professor of Phys-

Yes, the youngsters will have a big 1 1 days California State Fair again this year. And best of all those under 12 years of age will get in free, as usual. Adults and those 12 years and over will pay only 50 cents, including tax.

Education at U.C.L.A.: Genevie Dexter, consultant of Physical Education, State Department of Education; and physical education supervisors from various counties and cities.

Sierra

at the

ical

"Additional information may be obtained by office. Reservations should be made with Vern Meacham, California State Polytechnic College, San Luis Obispo, with a $5.00 deposit for housing accommodations." writing this

File Transcripts

All transcripts

Now must be

filed

with the Salary

Evaluation Office, 93 Grove Street, before July 1 in order to count for classification credit of ensuing year.

The only

exception to this rule

is

Club Program

Members and friends of Sierra Club will be treated to an unusual program on Tuesday, April 25, 8:00 p.m., at Everett Junior High School auditorium. Dr. Robert C. Miller, director of the Academy of Sciences at Golden Gate Park, will present a travelogue, illustrated with photochromes, on the experiences of his trip to the Pacific Science Congress in New Zealand last year. Those who attend will see the native Maoris and Fijis, as well as learn about the natural resources of the Island. The

public

is

cordially invited to attend this

program.

that transcripts for courses completed within 60

days prior to June 30

August

may be

filed

not later than

Balboa Lists 10 for Achievement

15.

Ten Balboa High School

students have been compete with students from other schools in the Bank of America achievement awards. Finals for the bay area will be held May 26 at the St. Francis Hotel. Balboa students chosen to compete in zone contests are: selected to

Flat

on a Share Basis

The Superintendent has been requested

to

publish the following:

"Teacher wishes to share teacher.

On L

flat

with another

carline. Call evenings or

ends— MOntrose

4-5212."

week-

John Booker, James Christensen, LaVerne Olsen, Paul Priolo, Nancy Alessandri, Sally Parker, Shirley Brizzi, Ora Ohlander, Barbara Gehring and Roscoe Borders.

.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco

Notice torial

is

1 1 1

— —C102.1 —CI 06 Janitor—Polytechnic —C 06 Janitor—Sheridan —Sunnyside —C

be held open for a period case of emergency. Even except in days of fifteen may be temporarily filled, positions though these

These vacancies

will

be applied for under the seniority Request for transfer should be made, in still

writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of

and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only. school janitors, 93

Grove

will follow

is

being pre-

sented by the 5th-6th Grade class of Mrs. Kath-

102.1 Janitress

rule.

Buchanan and on Tuesday, May 2. Tea will

held at Raphael Weill School,

The program which

1

may

regular meeting of A.C.E. will be

be served from 3:30 to 4:00 p.m. There will be a short business meeting just at four.

Junipero Serra

Janitress

they

The next

O'Farrell Streets

School System: 1

May 2

A.C.E. Meeting

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Street,

erine

Thomas

Raphael

of

Weill.

Thirty-six

children have prepared two marionette plays

which they have arranged, written, staged, peopled and produced. One of these is their version of "Cinderella". The other is an original fairy story called "The Three Magicians". Eleven children actually work the marionettes. Twenty children form a singing chorus.

Note the date as the meeting has been postponed one week because of public schools activities.

Clean

Up

Assistance Asked

Mrs. Harry the

S.

Red Cross Reaches Goal

Curry, executive secretary of

San Francisco Women's Chamber

of

Com-

San

Francisco's

reached

quota

its

recent

last

Red Cross Drive

week.

merce, has addressed the following letter to the

Superintendent

of

Chamber's campaign

Schools, to

relative

"Clean

Up

to

the

for Centen-

rested in the coffers of the local chapter.

nial Year:"

been brought to our attention that students buying wrapped sandwiches, milk, etc., at the fountain or other food counters, discard "It has

the wrappings

and milk cartons on the sidewalk

instead of the receptacle provided for this waste. "It

Every cent of the $959,000 sought by volunthroughout a month-long drive,

teer workers,

would be appreciated

if

you would notify

your principals and request them to instruct their students to watch this careless habit. would help to keep Our City Clean. "Thanking you for your cooperation."

It

Alan J. Lowrey, fund chairman for the 1950 campaign, issued a statement thanking San Franciscans and all others who helped to make the drive a success. Declared Lowery: "This has been a rewarding and unusual From the very beginning, the interest and generosity of San Francisco has been manifest. We received many unsolicited donations accompanied by letters of personal appreciation of the Red Cross. Also, persons approached by collectors gave more promptly and generously, than in the past."

drive.

.

.

.

THEME

.

.

'Democracy,

in Public Schools April 24

-

Week

23

'SiZ^^XCl^tCtdCO' PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

No. 32

Citizens'

MAY



Committee

Praises Staff's

Claude Fountain, chairman of the Citizens' Committee for Public Schools Week, expressed his appreciation for the fine

cooperation given

committee by the teachers and administrators of the San Francisco Public Schools. Mr. Fountain stated that the one hundred percent plus effort of the school staff has helped to make this program one of the most successful obto the

servances in the thirty-one year history of the event.

The Committee felt that the numerous radio and television programs, the band concert in Union Square, the songfest in the rotunda of the City Hall, the special library exhibit in the Main Library, school assemblies, classroom demonstrations, art exhibits, displays in down-

town and neighborhood

store

windows, and

splendid work being done in the public schools of San Francisco.

Mr. Fountain

also expressed his appreciation

for the cooperation of the district officers

The thousands

of people

who responded

serve

"Democracy

Action" gave evidence

in

that they are vitally concerned in

Board of Education Meetings

May

16

is

plan to enroll in out-of-district high schools in September 1950. The hours of visiting are 9 a.m., to 12 noon.

recommended that, where possible, counfrom the lower division schools should accompany the groups to the high schools and participate in the conferences where programs are checked and plans are made for the best It is

selors

school placement of each student. Interschool Assignment Cards should be in the high schools on or before May 16. Counselors, only, are to have the cards in their possession or to transmit them to the high schools.

Work Schedule

for Clerks

who

on a school term on the days schools are in session only. Since, under the 1949-50 calendar, schools will not be in session on Monday, May 29, 1959, school clerks employed on a school term basis are not authorized to work and cannot be paid for this day. These clerks, however, will be paid for the holiday, Memorial Day, Tuesday, May 30, 1950. School clerks

basis are

employed

to

the cordial invitation, issued by the members of the Board of Education and Superintendent Herbert C. Clish, to visit their schools and ob-

High School Visiting Day

who

and

the various units of the Parent-Teachers Association who assisted in making this week a success. The Committee believed a special commendation should go to the members who volunteered their time and automobiles to transport the elementary school children to the songfest at the City Hall.

done in the schools day for the place it

day for graduates-to-be

Week

Aid During Public Schools

speakers at the various social, civic, and fraternal gatherings, did much to bring to the attention of parents and other interested citizens the

visiting

1,1950

what

is

being

youth of

to prepare the will take in this

to-

democracy.

The regular policy meeting of the Board of Education scheduled for Tuesday, May 2, 1950, at 4:00 p.m., will not be held. However, the following special meetings have been scheduled to be held in the Board of Education meeting room, 93 Grove Street: Wednesday,

May

10

— 10:00

a.m.

—for

the

purpose of conducting hearings for the dismissal of probationary teachers. Wednesday, May 10 7:30 p.m. for consideration of the building program and such other matters as may be presented by the Superintendent or come before the Board of Edu-



cation.







Thursday, May 11 7:30 p.m. for consideration of matters in connection with the 1950-51 proposed budget as recommended by the Superintendent.

serve

to serve

Exchange Position Available

The Personnel

Office has received notice that is available in Hawaii for

an exchange position

a high school teacher of mathematics.

Teachers who are interested in such an exchange position are invited to make inquiry of the Personnel Office, third floor, 93 Grove St.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Additional Forum Programs at Commerce Adult School

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of S< hools is

93 Grove

San Francisco

St.,

2,

The following series of programs will be presented by Commerce Adult High School in Commerce Auditorium, Hayes and Franklin Streets, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., on the following eve-

California

nings:

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, May

Friday,

1

the following schools: Physicians will Mission, Lowell, James Lick G, Presidio G, visit

Stockton, Bay View Tox 60, GoldMarshall, F. S. Key, Parkside. NS-, Gate en Course. "Teacher-Parent Relap.m. 7:30 Parents." "Interviewing Sub-topic: tions." social psychiatric Epstein, Barbara Speaker: worker, Mt. Zion Psychiatric Clinic. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Place: Marina Junior High School.

Commodore



May 2

Tuesday,

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Abraham Lincoln, James Denman G, Galileo G, Washington Irving, Hunters Point No. 1, S. B. Cooper NS., E. R. Taylor. Visitacion Annex Tox 8, Vac 8 and PE, Sanchez.



Regular meeting- Day Adult 3:45 p.m. Marina Adult Teachers. Americanization School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets.

Wednesday, May 3

May

5

— IRISH PROGRAM—The

Hon. Patrick Hughs, consul general of Ireland, will present films of Ireland. There will also be a forum with audience participation. Friday,

Filippo Muzi-Falconi, consul general of Italy, will present films of Italy. There will also be a forum with audience participation.



May

PROGRAM

tion.

Admission is free invited to attend.

and the public

A new study

is

opportunity for

summer

Departments

of

be offered during the

May 4

May

August

weeks session (June 26 course will be granted Humanities 143 and three units

4, 1950).

three units in

six

The

For further information write

to

Hugh

C.

Baker, San Francisco State College. Approved: Watt A. Long, associate superintendent of instruction,

SFUSD.

5

Physicians will visit the following schools: Monroe HC, Lowell, Balboa, Aptos G, Roosevelt G, Francisco, Hunters Point No. 2, San Miguel, Sheridan, Guadalupe Tox 180, Golden Gate. .

Balboa Students

Win Awards

In a contest sponsored by the San Francisco

Ad

Club, Irent Utikal of Balboa High School

was awarded

first

Victor Television File Transcripts

San Francisco

in Social Science 197.

Physicians will visit the following schools: Galileo, Commerce, Portola G, Franklin, Hancock H, Sunnydale NS, Dudley Stone, Cleveland Tox 50, John Muir, Patrick Henry.

Friday,

tour of California this

to

and

travel

made for a class summer. The class will

Marina G, James Lick G, Redding, Candlestick Cove, Columbus, Hawhtorne, Lawton, Emerson, Lake Merced, Sunnyside Tox Thursday,

cordially

being offered by the Humanities and

Physicians will visit the following Commerce, George Washington, Sunshine,

200.

is

Travel and Study of California

State College. Plans have been

Girls High,



19 INDIA R. Ahuja, consul general of India, will present a stage show and film program of both modern and ancient India. There will also be a forum discussion with audience participa-

Friday,

The Hon. M.

Social Science schools:

PROGRAM—

May 12— ITALIAN

The Hon. Baron

place, receiving

set,

an

RCA-

while seventh-spot award

a Chronograph watch, went to Nancy (Candy)

Now

must be filed with the Salary Evaluation Office, 93 Grove Street, before July All transcripts

Coolbrith, grand-neice of California's poet, Ina Coolbrith.

is

This competition, in which 40 students of A. Hummel's advanced composition classes enter-

that transcripts for courses completed within 60

ed, necessitated their writing essays of not over

1

in order to count for classification credit of

ensuing year.

The only exception

days prior to June 30

August

15.

may be

filed

to this rule

not later than

1,000 words on the subject, Affects

Our Daily

Lives."

"How

Advertising

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Prize-Winning Authors at Luncheon

Counseling Workshop at Chico

Marguerite de Angeli, winner of the 1949 Newberry Medal, and Leo Politi, winner of the 1949 Caldecott Medal, will be speakers at the Twelfth Annual Author's Luncheon, sponsored by the California Association of Teachers of English, Central Section, at the Hotel Clare mont, Berkeley, on Saturday, May 6, at 12 o'clock noon.

The second in a series of Counseling Workshops will be conducted at Chico State College, Chico, California, from June 19 through July 14, 1950. This series of Counseling Workshops is operating under a grant from the Rosenberg Foundation.

The medal winners will also autograph their winning books, copies of which will be available

In addition to lectures and discussion groups, regular courses will be offered in advanced techniques of interviewing, in counseling and diagnosis in elementary and high schools, as well as in test interpretation. Latest recording equipment will be available to students interested in improving their counseling skills.

at the luncheon.

Reservations

may

be obtained before

May

3

by sending $2-25 to Miss Edith Garin, 2526 Lake Street, San Francisco 21. Also, on May 5, at 3:00 p.m., the two medal winners will be guests at an autographing party at Macy's Book Center (fourth floor). This will afford an opportunity for the boys girls who have enjoyed their books to meet

and

these distinguished author-artists.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

— CI 06.1 — Working Foreman Janitor — High. James Denman — CI 06 — Janitor — Spring Valley. 1

Jr.

1

be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

These vacancies

Outstanding national leaders Workshop.

will

again par-

ticipate in the

The 1949 Workshop, limited to seventy stumet with marked success. The 1950 Workshop will be limited to twenty in the addents,

vanced interviewing section and sixty in the basic section. Enrollment is limited in order to assure individual attention to each student. Preference will be given to individuals who hold teaching positions, to individuals who are now engaged in counseling and to graduate students who plan to enter the counseling field in the near future.

The purpose

of the Counseling Workshop is prepare those who come in contact with children and youth to offer expert counselto better

ing assistance.

will

Creative Play at the Plaza

The Fourth Grade

students of Francisc Scott School, accompanied by their teacher, Mrs. Mildred Ayer, will present on Thursday, May 4, a creative play at Portsmouth Plaza pertaining to California's early

Key Elementary

history.

The play was written by

the children themand the scenery and costumes were also made by them. selves

May 14

Horse Show

An

admission-free horse show will be held at Golden Gate Park, Bercut Equitation Field, 41st-av and Main-dr, at 11 a.m., Mother's Day,

May

14.

Children under 17 will ride show; adults in the afternoon.

in the

morning

cisco Police

The San FranDepartment mounted unit will exe-

cute a color

drill.

Edward V. Borup, teacher-in-charge of the Portsmouth Plaza School, announces that two performances will be given by the group with Kate Kennedy, Lawton and Commodore Stockton Elementary Schools acting as the guest schools for this special event.

Wanted: An Apartment

to Sublet

A

Scouting Exposition

San Francisco Area Council, Boy Scouts of America, announce a Scouting Exposition to be held on Friday and Saturday, May 4 and 5, in the Cow Palace, Geneva Avenue near Bayshore.

Admission tained from

is

fifty cents.

Boy Scouts or

Palo Alto teaching couple, who plan to be six weeks, June 18 to August 1, request information as to the availability or possibility of subletting a teacher's apartment during that period. in

Tickets may be obat the Cow Palace.

San Francisco for

Contact Mrs. F. Hale Jackson, 736 Frenchman's Road, Stanford University, telephone DAvenport 2-3044, Palo Alto, any evening, collect.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

"A Sword

Boy Scout Exposition

House"

the

in

Sst at Fairgrounds

Municipal Theatre

at

"A Sword in the House", by Peter original prize-winning script in the

H. Keene, San Fran-

cisco Municipal Theatre's recent $500.00 play contest, will again be presented on the weekends of 4, 5, and 6 and 11, 12 and 13 at

May

Marina Auditorium, Bay and Fillmore under the direction of Leon Forbes. the

Sts.,

More than 100

Outstanding for its power, originality and awareness of Oramadic values, "A Sword in the House" was chosen from 112 entries by a judging committee composed of Kathryn Forbes, author of "I Remember Mama", Dr. Margery Bailey of Stanford University and Fred O. Harris

of the University of California

drama

de-

partment.

The play

is

built

Close to 4.000 boys will take part in the Scouting Exposition to be staged at the State Fairgrounds on May 20 by the Golden Empire Council of Boy Scouts of America. Cub packs, Scout troops and Explorer units will take part in the exposition to be held from 2 to 9 p.m.

around an atom bomb exand shows

some phase

units are expected to exhibit of scouting or to show how one of

the merit badges is earned. Boys from five Northern California counties, which make up the Golden Empire Council, will take part.

Money derived from the exposition will be used by individual troops to help pay expenses of boys who may attend the National Boy Scout Jamboree to be held at famed Valley Forge in Pennsylvania.

plosion in the City of Los Angeles,

how

seven survivors, met by chance in a wreck-

ed warehouse, react to each other and to the future, with

its

threat of continuing and un-

guessed horrors.

The

leading role of Robbie, a negro,

is

by William Payne. Others in the cast Charles Sugars, William Witt (last Mercury in "Amphitryon 38"), Bunny Iverne Gardner, Glenn Jackson and Shaw.

"A Sword

House"

in the

seen

as

Cherry,

Gordon

the fifth

is

played include

major

production of the Municipal Theatre's current season. Tickets

may

the City of Paris

be obtained at the theatre,

box

office,

and

at Breuner's in

Mountain Play Scheduled California's oldest outdoor spectacle, the annual Tamalpais Mountain Play will open Marin County's "Fun in the Sun" festivals on May 21, it was announced today by the Mountain Play Association, for thirty-three years sponsor of this world famous event.

This year's Mountain Play will be a stream"Robin Hood", the Reginald

lined version of

deKoven

operetta, from

which "Brown October

Ale" and "Oh, Promise Me" are the hit selections. San Francisco Opera Company stars Yvonne Chauvcau, Eloise Farrell and Paul Walti will sing the leading roles in this saga of the Bandit of Sherwood Forest supported by a cast of over seventy-five.

Oakland.

Education by Radio Institute A.C.E. Meeting

The next

May 2

regular meeting of A.C.E. will be

held at Raphael Weill School, O'Farrell Streets on Tuesday,

Buchanan and May 2. Tea will

be served from 3:30 to 4:00 p.m. There a short business meeting just at four.

The program which

will follow

is

will

be

being pre-

sented by the 5th-6th

Grade class of Mrs. Katherine Thomas of Raphael Weill. Thirty-six children have prepared two marionette plays which they have arranged, written, staged, peopled and produced. One of these is their

The Twentieth Institute for Education by Radio will be conducted under the auspices of The Ohio State University in Columbus from

May

4 to

The

7.

Institute for

lished in 1930 at

Education by Radio, estab-

The Ohio

State University,

is

an annual educational conference for the purpose of furthering the development of all types of educational radio programs. It operates on the belief that open-minded consideration of programs and practices by those concerned with broadcasting will lead to solutions and improvements- It welcomes all who have a stake in radio and television broadcasters, civic leaders, edu-



cators

and other interested

The other is an original "The Three Magicians".

citizens.

version of "Cinderella". fairy

story

called

Eleven children actually work the marionettes.

Twenty

children form a singing chorus.

Note the date as the meeting has been postponed one week because of public schools activities.

Course Enrollment Data Required All teachers

who were

collegiate credit in

enrolled for non-

Master Teacher Seminar,

San Francisco State College,

fall

semester, 1949-

50, are requested to advise the Salary Evaluation Office, 93 Grove Street, of this course.

'SiZ^^^^dyftoclcO'

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

®

No. 33

Americanization

Calendar of City College Adopted for 1950-51

Program

At its meeting of Tuesday, April 25, the Board of Education adopted the 1950-51 City College of San Francisco calendar for 1950-51, as recommended by Superintendent Herbert C. follows:

Month

Days Taught

Dates

1.

Sept. 5-Sept. 29

19

2.

Oct. 2-Oct. 27

18

Citizenship

Marina Adult School is

cordially invited to attend a by the Americani-

zation and Citizenship classes of the Marina Adult School. This program will be held in the

Holidays

Oct.

evening,

May 8.

The honored guests at this meeting will be hundreds of new Americans attending classes in Americanization and Citizenship. They repre-

12,

from countries all over the world. These men and women are being taught the ideals and ideas for which we think Amerisent nationalities

Columbus Day

(Thursday) Oct. 13, Institute (Friday) 3.

Oct. 30-Nov. 22

18

Nov. 23-24, Thanksgiving

4.

Nov. 27-Jan.

14

Dec. 1 1-Jan. 1, Christmas Vacation

5.

Jan. 8-Feb. 2

Recess 5

public

1950

patriotic gathering sponsored

Monday

FALL TERM School

The

at



8,

auditorium of the Marina Junior High School (Fillmore and Bay Streets) at 8:00 p.m., on

Clish.

The calendar

MAY

can Democracy stands.

The program will open with a colorful pageant shownig all those nationalities in their national costumes, to be followed by a program by these men and women consisting of national songs, music, and dances by individuals and group numbers. As part of the program several members

20

of the class will talk

on the subject

Means To Me To Become An American Citizen-" The United States Army band

"What 89

It

by a short conbetween 7:45 and 8:00 p.m., as well as rendering patriotic numbers during the program. The program will center around the idea of what it means to be an American. The principal address of the evening will be made by Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of schools. All are invited to come and see what the Public School Adult Program is doing to make everyone who comes within its gates a better and more understanding American. will lend color to the occasion

TERM

SPRING

Days Tauglit

School

Month 6.

Feb.

Dates 7-Mar.

2

cert

Holidays

Feb. 5, Mid-term Recess

15

(Monday) Feb.

6, Institute

(Tuesday) Feb. 12, Lincoln's Birth-

day (Monday) Feb. 22, Washington's Birthday (Thursday) Feb. 23, Institute (Friday) 7.

Mar. 5-Mar. 30

17

8.

Apr. 2-Apr. 27

20

9.

Apr. 30-May 25

20

May

14

10.

28-June 15

Mar.

21,

22,

Easter

It is nearing the end of the fiscal year and warehouse stock for many items is very low. Therefore, no requisitions for instructional sup-

plies will

be processed unless received in

office prior to

May

30, Memorial Day (Wednesday)

86 Actual days :aught 1

Institute

23,

Vacation

Requisition Data

175 3

178

May

this

15.

Many of the requisitions which have been received before May 15 may not be completely filled because of the shortage of materials. Principals are advised that all requisitions for instructional supplies which have not been delivered by June 1st will be automatically cancelled.

1

,

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN "Mother's Day" Broadcast

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued wee kly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of S' hools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, May 8 Physicians will

the following schools:

visit

Commerce G, George Washington, Roosevelt B, James Denman B, Marina OT, Garfield. Bay View Tox 60, Farragut Tox 100, Argonne Tox 35, Lawton, Ulloa Tox 25, Grattan Tox. Andrew Jackson 15 & PE. 4:00 p.m.



Regular meeting. Elementary

Assistant Principals' Association. Library, phael Weill School. Election of officers.

Ra-



"Mothers' Day 1950" will be the theme of a broadcast by three mothers, including a teacher, from the Lake Merced Play School, San Fernando Way and Ocean Avenue- Mrs. Georgianna Egan, Mrs. Ann Swanson and Mrs. Eleanor Knuth, the directing teacher of this cooperative nursery school, will speak on the Mothers' Day program in the San Franciscans United broadcast over KSFO, Saturday, May 13, 8:158:30 p.m. Judge Bradford Bosley will be moderator.

The responsibility of mothers in promoting mental health and training for good human relations will be stressed.

The Lake Merced Play School vision of the

under super-

Division.



Association Meets Today

The

regular meeting of the Elementary Asbe held in the library of the Raphael Weill School on Monday, May 8, at 4:00 p.m. Election of officers will take place, and refreshments will be

sistant Principals' Association will

served-

Tuesday,

May 9

Physicians will visit the following schools: Galileo G, Portola B, Jean Parker Tox, Washington Irving Tox 40, Hunters Point No. 1 Dudley Stone Tox 20 and PE, Lafayette, Sanchez Tox, McKinley Tox 50, Visitacion Annex.

Twin Peaks and Douglas Tox

Uncle Sam Says

35.

Wednesday, May 10 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Polytechnic, Girls High, Roosevelt B, James lick B, Marina OTR, F. S. Key NS., Candlestick Cove, Westside NS., West Portal Tox, Commodore Sloat Tox 50, Winfield Scott Tox, Redding Tox 35, Sheridan-

Thursday,

May

NOW IS

THE TIME TO

SAVE. BUY \U.

S.

SAVINGS BONDS

^REGULARLY 1

Physicians will visit the following schools: Abraham Lincoln, Balboa B, Horace Mann B,

Hancock H, Argonne NS, 25,

Paul Revere, Edison

Pacific Heights

Tox

50,

Tox

Alvarado Tox.

Friday, May 12 Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa B, Everett B, Commodore Stockton Tox 50, Bret Harte, Jefferson NS, Madison Tox 60,

San Miguel Tox 150, Fairmount Tox, Junipero Serra Tox 60, Raphael Weill.



Monday, May 15

4:00 p.m. Meeting of the Governing Council of the Teachers Association of San Francisco.

Auditorium, Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street.

Wednesday, May 17



8:00 p.m. Library meeting of the Northern California Mineral Society. Lecture Hall, Public Library, Civic Center.

of the

San Francisco Public Schools Adult Education



Regular membership meeting. 4:00 p.m. San Francisco Classroom Teachers AssociationClub rooms, 465 Post Street. Election of officers. Course. "Teacher-Parent Re7:30 p.m. lations." Sub-topic: "Special Problems of Cooperative Nursery Schools." Speaker: Jane Castellanos, Ph.D., instructor. Mills College. Auspices: Adult Education Division and affiliated agencies. Place: Marina Junior High School.

is

Marina Adult School, part

In this day you have to live by the And each 24 hours it ticks off means another day added to your age. Get the clock on your side by signing up now for one of the two safe, automatic plans of savings, the Payroll Savings Plan for the purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds where you work, or, if self-employed, the Bcnd-a-Month Plan where you bank. And as the clock hand swings around your money increases in value. In ten years eacii three dollars grows into four dollars. clock.

U.S. Treasury Department

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Opening of

Fall

Semester

Conservatory to Offer

F.

S.

Summer Music

Late Teachers teachers are looking forward to European tours during the coming summer. Some of the regularly scheduled tours are not due to return to this country in time for the opening day

Many

of school.

Teachers who anticipate being late for the opening of school by reason of such a foreign trip are asked to file requests for leave of absence before the close of school this spring in order that the Personnel Office and the schools may arrange to provide substitutes for the classes involved.

Summer music

Classes

classes at the

San Francisco

Conservatory of Music will run from May 8 through June 17 and from June 19 through July 29, and will include classes in music theory, performance, and literature. "Woodwind Ensemble," a class by Merrill Jordan, flutist with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, will include the interpretation and performance of woodwind, French horn, and piano ensemble literature in various combinations. Interested persons are asked to attend an organizational meeting on Monday, May 8, at 3 p.m. The class will meet Mondays and Thurs-

from 4:30

to 5:45 p.m.

Spring Book Festival

days,

Children's Spring Book Festival will be observed May 8 through May 13 at the San Francisco Public Library.

"Studies in Piano Literature," a class in performance and interpretation of works selected from various periods and composers, will be taught by Adolph Bailer, concert artists and pianist of the Alma Trio, and will meet Mondays and Wednesdays, from 3 to 4:15 p.m.

Program at the Main Children's Room, Civic Center, will feature a talk by Miss Helen Parish, author of the children's book, "At the Palace Gates", on Tuesday, May 9, at 1:30 o'clock. The third in the series of astronomy talks for children by Miss Leslie Lavelle, artist and amateur astronomer, will be held on Wednesday, May 19, at 4 o'clock. Story telling and reviews of new books will be on Friday, May 12, at 4 o'clock. Special displays will be at

Main and Branch

Libraries.

Governing Council to Meet "Matters Concerning Teaching Personnel" be discussed by Ward M. Nichols, coordin-

Hans Leschke,

director of the

Municipal Chorus,

San Francisco

will teach Oratorio, giving

works of Bach. meeting has been set for May 8 at 4 p.m. The class will meet Tuesdays and Fridays, from 4 to 5:15 p.m-

special attention this year to the

An organizational



"A Survey of Basic Theory" including eleand mentary harmony and counterpoint "Rudiments of Music," an introduction to the technique of music with practice in reading, writing, and aural recognition, will be given by Sol

Joseph,

The

a



member

of the Conservatory be given in the first and

classes will

will

faculty.

ator of personnel, at the Monday, May 15, meeting of the Governing Council of the Teachers Association of San Francisco.

second terms, respectively, and will meet Mondays and Wednesdays, from 6 to 7:45 p.m.

The meeting will be held in the auditorium of the Health Center building, 101 Grove Street. A question period will follow.

Mineral Society to Meet

The Northern

California Mineral Society in-

Library Meeting of the season on Wednesday, May 17, at 8 p.m., in the Lecture Hall of the Public Library in the Civic Center.

vites the public to its last

instructor at the San Francisco City College, will give a talk on minerals in ceramics and stones in jewelry setting.

Roy Walker,

William Smith, a professional jazz clarinetist, arranger, and composer, will present his "Workshop in Jazz Arranging" on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. The emphasis in the course will be on student arrangements for the modern band in modern jazz idiom. Instruction in

Quartet in the

will also

summer

cisco

A

sessions.

Conservatory of Music, 3435 Sacramento

Street, telephone

Way

dinner has been planned to honor the

WAlnut

The Annual Shrine San Francisco from

in

1-3496.

Coming

Economics teachers who retired in the Spring term 1949 and those who retire this Spring. Home Economics teachers, who have made arrangements to attend the dinner, are reminded to meet on Wednesday, May 17, 5:30 p.m., at the Starlite Roof of the Hotel Sir

Civic Auditorium.

Francis Drake.

Circus-

Home

Griller

be offered at the Conservatory

Persons interested in the music classes may obtain complete schedules from the San Fran-

Shrine Circus

Dinner Plans Under

chamber music by the

Circus will be presented May 25 to June 2 in the

in his Supervisory BulleNo. 20, dated April 24, called the attention of principals of elementary and secondary schools to the method of obtaining reduced rate

The Superintendent

tin

tickets for students

who

desire to attend the

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Existing Janitorial

Vacancy

hereby given that the following janitorial vacancy exists in the San Francisco School System: Notice

1

is

Wednesday,

CI 06 Janitor—Aptos.

be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though this position may be temporarily filled, it may still be applied for under the This vacancy

will

seniority rule-

Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil

Service

Building

Maintenance Union, Local

66 A, 916 Ortega Street. This vacancy

is

Board of Education Meetings Meetings of the Board of Education are scheduled as follows in the Board's meeting room, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street:

for transfer of

permanent em-

May

10

— 10:00

a.m.

—for

the

purpose of conducting hearings for the dismissal of probationary teachers.



— for

Wednesday, May 10 7:30 p.m. sideration of the building program

con-

and such other matters as may be presented by the Superintendent or come before the Board of Education.





for consider7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 11 ation of matters in connection with the 1950-51 proposed budget as recommended by the Super-

intendent.

ployees only.

Association Announces Meeting

Art Meeting Scheduled

A meeting of the Pacific Arts Association, Northern California Section, will be held on Saturday, May 13, at the Academy of Advertising Art, 740 Taylor Street. Topic: What business wants of the artist, reproduction problems and processes, preparation of students for commercial art and an overall picture of the advertising

field.

Distinguished leaders will be John

Cuddy

of

James Holbrook of Paraffine. Richard Lemen of Beaumont and Hohman Adv. Agency, Lincoln Malmquist of Foote, Cone, and Belding, Richard Stephens of Academy of Advertising Art, and Milton Monroe of the San Francisco Chronicle.

Californians, Inc.,

Counselors and teachers of art, business and advertising should not miss this important event.

The next regular membership meeting of the San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association be held in their club rooms, 465 Post Street, at 4:00 p.m., Monday, May 8. Business including election of officers will take place. will

Guest speakers will be Miss Catherine Hanrahan, attorney, who will speak briefly on the proposed reorganization of the inferior courts and Watt A. Long, associate superintendent of instruction, who will speak on teacher institutes, including the report gained from the survey of the last institute. All teachers are invited to attend.

Tea

will

be served at 3:45 p.m.

Student Winners Announced

Winning students in the Bank of America Achievement Awards Program of Zone One, which included all public high schools of San Francisco, were:

Wilson M. McClelland, Lowell, in Science

Uncle

Sam

Says

and Mathematics; John H.

Crossfield, Lowell,

in Fine Arts; Sally Parker, Balboa, Liberal Arts;

and, Robert C. Foehn, Mission, in Vocational Arts.

T

~=\

Tl INSURE

$M

YOUR

'^W\ FUTURE J WITH MY SAVINGS BOND

Four students were chosen in each of the six zones which make up the contest, and of these 24 contestants, all will receive cash awards in recognition of their achievements as students and their promise of future success and service to society.

PLAN Mental Health

to be Discussed

Miss Margaret Heaton, curriculum assistant for the San Francisco Schools, will be the speaker at a meeting sponsored by the Mental Health Society of San Francisco on May 9. The meeting will be held at 8 p.m., in Roosevelt Junior High School. Miss Heaton's subject will be "Ways of Working for Better Human Relationships in Public Schools".



PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN 3SJ=«e VOL. XXI

MAY

No. 34

May 24

The date of the annual parade and review of San Francisco's School Safety Patrols in Kezar Stadium in Golden Gate Park will be Wednesday,

May

24.

members will be assembled stadium by 1:00 p.m., and the parade Patrol

at

the

will get

under way at 1:30 p.m., marking the twentyseventh year of service to the cause of traffic safety in schools of this city.

Twelve battalions of Safety Patrol units from 130 schools, numbering more than 4,500 boys and some girls will march in the colorful parade which, each year, gives San Francisco an opportunity to pay tribute to the accident-pre-



vention achievements of

its

1950

"The Pirates of Penzance" At Mission High School

School Safety Patrol Review Set For

15,

junior citizens.

In the reviewing stand to pay honor to the Safety Patrols, will be Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, who will voice San Francisco's appreciation for the work of the Patrols. Guests of honor will include members of the Board of Education and the Police Commission; other representatives of schools and the police department; other city and county officials; and state, county and city traffic law enforcement officers; representatives of safety organizations interested in the work of the Patrols, and parents and

"The Pirates of Penzance" will be presented by the Mission High School Music Department at a matinee May 17, and at evening performances on May 18 and 19 in the school auditorium, 18th and Dolores Streets. Tickets will be on sale at the school box office an hour before curtain time. The prices are: matinee 50^, evenings 60^.

The afternoon performance 1:30,

will

and the evening performance

begin at

at

8:00

o'clock.

Mission's operettas have been presented almost annually for the past twenty-five years. Miss Isabelle Becker, choral director, and George D. Ingram, orchestra director, both of whom are noted for their successful work in past amateur productions, will direct the entire production. Sets, lighting, and costumes have been designed by the Art Department. The Home Economics Department will take charge of

making the costumes.

Former productions of the Mission Music Department have been: "The Mikado", "H. M. S. Pinafore", "The Gondoliers", and "The Yeoman of the Guard."

members. Arrangements for the parade and review this year are under the direction of Inspector Thomas B. Tracy, recently appointed by the Police Department to supervise training and

operetta has much familiar music includthe original version of "Hail, Hail, the Gangs All Here.

School Safety Patrols, succeeding Inspector Byron J. Getchell, who retired in April of this year. Assisting Inspector Tracy are Sergeant Matthew Duffy and Officers Robert Gremminger and James Hanley.

Delivery Dates for

friends of the Patrol

daily activities of the

Joseph R. Knowland, of the Public Safety of the California State Automobile Association Board of Directors, will be chairma^ of the day, and will introduce Mayor Robinson and guests of honor in the reviewing

Committee

The

ing

May Time

Sheers

May Time

Sheets should be delivered to the Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates:

Teachers: Senior high, junior high and elementary May 22, 8:00 a.m.

schools

Teachers

21 days

and

stand.

Principals

The concluding event of the program will be the presentation of merit ribbons to Patrols which have shown outstanding efficiency during the year. The merit ribbons, furnished by the California State Automobile Association,

Adult schools

(Continued on Page 3)

Other schools

assistant principals

May

22 days

22, 1:00 p.m.

Clerks and janitors:

May

16-31

Adult schools

May 22, May 22,

1:00 p.m.

8:00 a.m.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

ROTC The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

Review

in Civic

Center

At a review to be held in the Civic Center on Friday, May 19, as a part of National Defense Week, the annual Ninety-first Infantry Division Reserve awards will be presented to the winners competitive of the recently conducted

ROTC

drills.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

The review

Omar

Monday, May 15

staff of the

the following schools: Mission G, Raphael Weill, Marina G, Jean Parker, Yerba Buena NS., Candlestick Cove, Dudley Stone, Bryant Tox 40, Starr King Vac 10, Le Conte Tox 50, Patrick Henry Tox 55, Mon-

Physicians will

roe

Tox

50.

forces.

Bus Trips to Naval Shipyards



The public relations office of the Naval Shipyard, at Hunters Point, reports that a number of groups of children have been turned away because previous arrangements for the visit were not made.



Teachers wishing to include the Shipyard in a field trip, should direct a letter of request to:

of the

Street.

United States armed

visit

Meeting of the Governing CounTeachers Association of San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Center Building, 101 Grove 4:00 p.m.

cil

will be conducted before General N. Bradley, chairman of the chiefs of

Conclusion of course. "Teacher7:30 p.m. Parent Relations." Sub-topic: "Special Problems of Cooperative Nursery Schools" (Contd.) Speaker: Jane Castellanos, Ph.D. Marina Junior High School.

Tuesday,

May 16

Physicians staff meeting.

No

school

Shipyard Commander, San Francisco Naval Shipyard, San Francisco 20. Requests must be secured at least a week ahead of the visit. Arrangements cannot be cleared by telephone.

visits.

Wednesday, May 17 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, John Muir HC, Balboa, Polytechnic. Girls High, Portola G, Sunnyside, Spring Valley, Franklin, Bay View, Dudley Stone, Daniel Webster Tox 40, I. M. Scott Tox 40, Andrew Jackson, Fremont.



Library meeting of the Northern 8:00 p.m. California Mineral Society. Lecture Hall, Public Library, Civic Center.

Thursday,

May

18

Physicians will visit the following schools: George Washington, Commerce G, Presidio G, Horace Mann G, Everett OTR, Commodore Stockton NS., Patrick Henry, Dudley Stone, Ulloa, Frank McCoppin, Fairmount, Cleveland, Edison. Friday, May 19 Physicians will visit the following schools: Lowell, Balboa, Galileo G, Aptos G, Jefferson, Glen Park Tox 50, Candlestick Cove HI., E. R^ Taylor, Golden Gate, Marshall Tox 25.

"Hamlet" Coming

to U. C.

William Shakespeare's

HAMLET will climax

on May 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, and 27 in Wheeler auditorium on the Berkeley campus. All performances will begin at 7:30 p.m.

HAM-

All seats for the seven productions of are reserved and tickets may be obtained

LET

calling

Madclynne Green cert

—dances

of

at the Marines'

Mason

Streets,

—dance mime

humor and

in solo con-

satire, will

appear

Memorial Theatre, Sutter and on Saturday, May 20, at 8:30

p.m. Tickets: $1.20 and $1.80 (tax included) may be obtained by telephoning The Green Studio, SUtter 1-2203, or 1-8155: also at Sherman Clay & Co.

Movie Treat

for Pupils

Superintendent Herbert C. Clish announces that as a part of the celebration of "Movie Month" now in progress in this city, all students who present their student body cards at

the box office of designated San Francisco theatres will

The

be entitled to reduced admission

rates.

special school rate will be applicable at

major movie houses through the month of May.

rest

of the

Campus

the spring drama season at the University of California with seven performances to be staged

by

Dances of Humor and Satire

AShberry 3-6000, Local 352.

Art Exhibit at 750 Eddy Street



An exhibit of children's art kindergarten through twelfth grade will be on display in the Art Workshop at 750 Eddy Street.



The

exhibit will be on display until June

1.

Teachers, counselors and students are cordially invited to see this exhibit of art of San Francisco's school children.

)

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN School Safety Patrol Review to be Held at Kezar Stadium

Some at

of the officials

Kezar Stadium

Knowland

and

May

civic leaders who will be in the Reviewing stand for the School Safety Patrol Parade 24. Shown, left to right, at last year's review: Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, Joseph R.

of the California State

Automobile Association, Assemblyman Charles Meyers, former Patrol boy;

Chief of Police Michael E. Mitchell, Rev. James N. Brown, in charge of parochial schools; Dr. Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of schools, and Chief E. Raymond Cato, of the California Highway Patrol.

Continued from Page will

1

be presented by Chief of Police Michael E.

Mitchell, Colonel of the Patrol Regiment.

Junior High School bands will participate in the parade

and senior high school R. O. T. C.

cadets will view.

drill

the Safety Patrols for the re-

The School Safety Patrols are sponsored by the Board of Education, the Police Department, the California State Automobile Association, and Parent-Teacher groups.

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Mountain Play on May 21 Heralding the

summer

northern California's

start of

Moun-

season, the thirty-third annual

"Robin Hood" will be presented in the Mt. Tamalpais State Park Amphitheatre for one performance only on Sunday, May 21, at 2:00 p.m. Headed by Paul Walti, Yvonne Chauveau and Eloise Farrell of the San Francisco tain Play

Opera Company, the deKoven musical

version

supports a cast of one hundred.

The block long stage has been transformed Sherwood Forest hideout of the famed bandit. Under the direction of Reginald Travers, such celebrated songs as 'Oh Promise Me' into the

will be heard while Albertsen conducts the orchestra and

and 'Brown October Ale'

Howard chorus of

Navy Offers Training Program The Navy Department through

The new highway follows the scenic route of the old road, thus retaining the famous one-hundred mile view of San Francisco Bay, its cities and the sea, while special Pacific Greyhound busses to the ampitheatre will leave from San Francisco's Seventh Street Station.

facilities.

and concluding on August 18. The program will include military, academic and athletic training, and is open to non-veterans only, ages 1744. Each applicant must pass a thorough physical examination and meet the academic requirements of the Navy Department. Administrators, counselors, and teachers who have interested applicants should contact Joseph A. Amori, placement director, City College of San Francisco, JUniper 7-7272, Extension 10, who has been selected as Officer-In-Charge of the training school.

Sabbatical Leave Salaries Certificated personnel

State

Alumni

San Francisco State Alumni and 21,

from 11:00 a.m.

Francisco State College

their

on Sunday,

San Lake

to 4:00 p.m. at

New Campus

at

Merced, 19th and Holloway.

Local 61 Meets This Evening

The

bonds, in duplicate, to the Division of Accounts. The amount of the bond must cover the gross amount of salary to be earned while on leave. To insure no delay in the release of July and August warrants, the bond should be filed prior

June

Annual Recruitment Tea

The Delta Kappa Gamma annual Recruitment Tea for high school seniors who plan to enter the teaching field will be held on Sunday afternoon, May 21, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m., at the home of Miss Mabel Clay, 150 Fifth Avenue. One hundred fifty invitations have been issued to future teachers and to the head counselors

general membership meeting of the San

will

be held Monday,

the

home

of

May

15, at 7:30 p.m., at

Mrs. Iva Marie Cooper, 3940

California Street, near First Avenue.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

Liberty Bell Replica on Display Principals are advised that the Treasury

partment, U.

S.

1

De-

Savings Bonds Division, will

display a replica of the Liberty Bell in the

Noon, Saturday,

May

of the principals,

will avail themselves of the this replica of

one of

May

16,

hoped that teachers and children 20. It is

opportunity to see

this nation's historic

monu-

ments either after school or on Saturday during the period it is on display.

— 106 Janitor — City College

These vacancies

will be held open for a period days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66 A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent em-

of

Civic Center from Noon, Tuesday,

— CI 06.1

Working Foreman Janitor Lowell High School 1— CI 06 Janitor— Balboa High School 1

some

9.

of their high schools.

Francisco Federation of Teachers, Local 61,

until

anticipate being

Picnic

families are invited to a free picnic

May

who

on Sabbatical Leave of Absence during the next term and who wish to receive their monthly warrants while on leave must submit indemnity

to

All

Air Re-

fifty.

For the convenience of the thousands expected to attend this event, the State Division of Highways at a cost of over $90,000 recently completed a new boulevard direct to the theatre entrance adjoining which are ample parking

S. F.

its

serve division has initiated an eight week summer training program at the U. S. Naval Air Station, Oakland, California, beginning June 18

fifteen

ployees only.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

MAY 22,

No. 35

1

950

School Safety Patrol Review to be Held at Kezar Stadium

Merit ribbons for efficiency during the year are affixed to the

Smartly groomed, with their Sam Browne caps and other equipment refurbished under supervision of Parent-Teacher Association units, San Francisco's School Safety Patrols will pass in review on Wednesday, May 24, at Kezar Stadium. belts, overseas

Patrol units from 130 San Francisco schools begin to assemble on Kezar's field at 1 p.m., and the review will start promptly at 1:30. Music will be furnished by selected Junior High School Bands, and the marching Patrols will be accompanied by Senior High School R.O.T.C. officers who have assisted in drilling the Patrols for the review. In charge of the parade and review is Inspector Thomas B. Tracy, who was appointed by the Police Department, in April to supervise the work of the city's School Safety Patrols. He succeeded Byron J. Getchell, who retired recently after being continuously active in this work for will

twenty-seven years. Inspector Tracy, a native San Franciscan, joined the San Francisco Police Department in

1928.

flags of

He was

outstanding Safety Patrols.

first

assigned to the traffic depart-

ment, with which he served as a foot traffic officer for eighteen months. Subsequently, for a two year period, he was attached to the Headquarters Company. He then returned to the traffic department as a motorcycle officer, continuing in that capacity until his recent appointment to School Safety Patrol supervision. During the war, from May, 1943, to September, 1945, Inspector Tracy served with the Navy Shore Patrol, in San Francisco, with rank of specialist, first class. In addition to his duties with the Police Department, he was president, in 1938, of the Widows and Orphans Aid Association of the San Francisco Police Department, and is now president of the Motorcycle Officers

of California.

He

has served as a director of the

latter organization for the last three years.

Assisting Inspector Tracy in supervising the School Patrols, are Sergeant Matthew Duffy

and

Officers

Robert Gremminger and James

Hanley.

(Continued on Page 3)

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

Ernest

Cummings

J.

June

to Retire in

Ernest J. Cummings, assistant charge of secondary schools of the certificated staff of the Public in

California

last

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

this year,

NS, Ridgepoint

10

&

Tox

Site

1,

Fremont Tox

20, Visitacion Valley

Tox

20,

week by Superintendent Herbert C.

last

Clish.

55,

Mr. Cummings began his career as a teacher at Lowell High School in 1916. He went to Galileo High School in 1922, and taught there until 1936. For eight years, he was principal of the Galileo Evening

Vac

PE, Monroe.

Tuesday,

May 23

Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Galileo, Portola B, Horace Mann, Edison NS, Hunters Point No. 1 Lafayette Tox ,

30

&

PE, Geary HI, Emerson Tox 100, Kate

Kennedy Tox

25.

Wednesday, May 24 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Laguna Honda HC, Commerce, James Lick, Garfield OTR, Mission NS, Hawthorne Tox 50, Raphael Weill and Golden Gate

Tox

100,

Lawton.

Thursday, Physicians will

May 25

Ernest

Samuel Gompers, George Washington, Galileo, Aptos B, Hancock H, Page-Gough NS, John Muir Tox 50, Fairmount, Franklin Tox 10, Longfellow, McKinley.

May 26

Physicians will the following schools: Balboa, Daniel Webster, Roosevelt B, James Denman B, Le Conte, Francisco G, Page-Brod. NS., Hunters Point No. 2. visit

School.

Cummings was George Washington High School.

From 1936 principal of

until

General Meeting

The

California Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, San Francisco Unit, will hold its last general meeting for 19491950 on Tuesday, May 23, at 7:45 in the Choral Room at James Lick Junior High School.

"Standardization of the Physical Education Curriculum and Grading in the San Francisco Public Schools" will be discussed by the following panel: Mrs. Laurine Bergin, City College; Miss Florence Shearer, Washington High School; Mrs. Florence Stephenson, San Francisco State College; Roy Burkhead, San Francisco City College; Ray Daugherty, Board of

Street.

Summer

Vacation Schools

July 5 to August 11

Summer

Schools for children of elementary

and junior high school age will be conducted again this year under the auspices of the San Francisco Unified School District from July 5 to August 11 (six weeks), 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., days a week.

Ten

schools will be operated, locations to be

announced

later.

The program mer Schools

and

ence,

activities

of the

Sum-

to

social living.

Teachers interested in teaching and adminis-

Summer Schools are requested to make applications to the Bureau of Personnel immediately. trative positions in the

A

general bulletin regarding the program

and procedure to teachers

CAHPER

same

The purpose

provide opportunities for learning experiences in reading and literature, arithmetic, arts and crafts, music, natural sciis

Education; William Harkness, San Francisco

Election of officers for 1950-1951 will follow the discussion. Refreshments will be

will include the

as in previous years.

State College; Tom Heddin, Commerce High School; Ray Kaufman, San Francisco State College, and George Wolfman, Mission High School.

served.

1945, Mr.

Since 1945 to date he has been in charge of the secondary schools, with offices at 93 Grove

five

CAHPER

Cummings

J.

the following schools:

visit

Friday,

June of

according to

announcement made

Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, Abraham Lincoln, Commodore Sloat, Guadalupe, Garfield 230 OT, Francisco B, Ex-

Lincoln

Schools for the

thirty-four years,

will retire in

Monday, May 22

celsior

superintendent

and a member San Francisco

for enrolling pupils will be issued

very shortly.

William Galant, assistant principal of Francisco Junior

program

High School who supervised the

in 1949, has

trator of the 1950

gram.

been appointed adminis-

summer vacation

school pro-

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN School Safety Patrol Review Set For

Girls, also, share in this safety

program. Shown here

is

the

all-girl

unit from

May 24

Lake Merced Elementary School.

duce Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, speaker of the day, and other distinguished guests in the reviewing stand. The guests will include members of the Board of Education, Superintendent of Schools Herbert C. Clish; Reverend James N. Brown, superintendent of parochial schools, officers of Parent-Teacher groups, members of the Police Commission, Chief of Police Michael E. Mitchell, state, county and city officials, and representatives of traffic safety organizations. Following a brief tribute to the Safety Patrols

by Mayor Robinson, the twelve battalions will pass the reviewing stand on the south side of Kezar Stadium, where ample seating is provided for guests of honor, officials and spectators. At the conclusion of the march, Chief of Police Mitchell, colonel of the Patrol Regiment, will present merit ribbons to Patrol units which have shown outstanding efficiency during the year.

Sponsoring organizations which are assisting Inspector Tracy in arrangments for the review include the Board of Education, Parent-Teacher groups, the Police Department and the California State Automobile Association.

Retirement Information

The Superintendent would appreciate it if any administrators who are planning to retire or resign would inform him as soon as possible. (Continued from Page 1) At the parade, Joseph R. Knowland, chairman of the Public Safety Committee of the Cali-

This will enable those responsible for the various divisions of the school system to plan for any needed appointments or reassignments. Upon request of the individual concerned, the Superintendent will be glad to treat this information

fornia State Automobile Association, will intro-

as confidential.

Inspector

Thomas

B.

Tracy

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Photographic Exhibit at Gompers

Work Schedule The Board

Education at

of

its

meeting of

May

10 adopted the following resolution (0510S7) re work schedule:

"That pursuant to Section 2.4 of the Annual Salary Ordinance adopted by the .Board of Supervisors, it is proposed that the following holidays be declared in lieu of Tuesday, June 6, 1950, Primary Election Day:

"May

29, 1950

— for non

certificated

em-

ployes serving during the school year only.



for other non certificated "July 3, 1950 ployees of the Board of Education."

This

resolution will authorize the

em-

May

Wednesday, May 22 to 24, from 10:00 a.m., to 2:00 p.m., and from 7:00 p.m., to 9:00 p.m. is

This exhibit of 62 prize winning photographs at present being displayed throughout the

United

of

29,

States.

The prime

objective of the National High School Photographic Awards has always been to develop in the student a livelier appreciation of the

payment

salary to school term employees for

The Fourth Annual National High School Photographic Salon will be held in Room 308 of Samuel Gompers Trades School, Twenty-second and Bartlett Streets, from Monday through

American

Way

of Living, of the

can scene, and of his relation to

his

Ameri-

community

and the world.

The

display will be under the supervision of Reade, instructor in photography at Samuel Gompers Trades School.

1950.

B. A.

Work Schedule

for Clerks

School clerks employed on a school term may be retained by the principal for three working days after the closing of the spring term, to complete records and reports for that term. These employees may work for three working days preceding the opening of the fall term (August 30 and 31, September 1) to assist

Administrators, teachers, students and interested citizens are cordially invited to view this exhibit. There is no admission charge.

basis

the principal in the opening of the school year.

Summer High

School

— 1950

Binet Materials to be Returned All Binet box material, card material and books should be returned to the Bureau of Research at the close of the current term. These materials will be reissued to administrators and members of the teaching staff who have qualified for the psychometrist's credential issued by the State Department of Education.

This year the Senior High Summer School be at Balboa High School, and will operate from June 19 to August 11. will

The

principal is J. A. Perino of Polytechnic High School, who directed last year's summer high school at George Washington High School.

The

subject offerings include the usual aca-

demic subjects, industrial art, and music.

arts,

home

office of

the as-

sistant superintendent in charge of secondary schools, Ernest J. Cummings, 93 Grove Street, and at the Summer High School Office at 750

Eddy

in the Junior High School Division San Francisco Schools are informed that an exchange position in the field of Social Studies

Teachers

of is

available in Honolulu.

economics,

The teaching staff is invited to file summer high school employment applications before June 2. These are available in the

Exchange Position Available

Street.

Qualified teachers are invited to contact the Personnel Office with respect to this position.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

1

—CI 06 Janitor—Fairmount

1— C106 Janitor— City College These vacancies

(night)

whose application indicates

be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing to Stanley R. Leavell, super-

outstanding qualifications in the field of conservation education. The camp sessions will be-

visor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance

Scholarship for a Teacher

The San Francisco Bay Chapter Club

will

award a scholarship

session of the 1950 Bowl to the teacher

of the Sierra

for one

Audubon Camp

two week at Sugar

gin June 18 and run through August 26. Letters of application should be sent to Mrs. J. F. Verdi,

962 Euclid Avenue, Berkeley

8, California.

will

Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN a«=»e MAY

No. 36

VOL. XXI

Annual Spring Opera by City College Students City College of San Francisco will present

its

annual spring opera production Friday, June 2, at 8:15 p.m., in the auditorium of Everett Junior

High School, Church and 16th Streets. "The Opera Showcase," as the production this year has been titled, is being produced by Flossita Badger, opera workshop and musical director of City College. It is a presentation of performances in concert and opera form as a culmination of training in the opera and performance workshop of the College.

The first half of the Showcase will feature concert selections from grand and light opera, Miss Badger announced. These will be from Martha, Marriage of Figaro, The Medium, II Trovatore, Madam Butterfly, Samson and

Me

Kate and The Mikado. Valley," an American folk opera, composed by the late Kurt Weill, will be

Delila, Kiss

"Down

In

The

presented in its entirety as the second half of the program. This presentation of "Down In The Valley," marks the San Francisco premiere of

The Opera and Production Workshop was 1948 as an integral part of the music department curriculum of City College and since that time has successfully produced operas as: Marriage of Figaro, Naughty Marietta and The Vagabond King. instituted in

this per-

formance as a culmination of training in the opera and performance workshop, no admission will

Administrative Vacancies in Elementary Schools The Superintendent wishes to announce

that there will undoubtedly be some vacancies in the positions of principal and assistant principal in the elementary schools. The number is not known at the present time since the Superintendent has received word of only two such retirements.

members who have the

Staff

and are interested

qualifications

in these positions are invited

to send a letter of application. Those staff members who have previously filed a detailed letter of application need not go to the trouble of filing another such detailed application since their previous ones are already on file. They should, however, write a short letter explaining that they are still interested in being considered for a given type of position and should also make sure that any additional professional preparation completed by them has been recorded in their personnel records in the Bureau of Personnel.

Applicants should hold at least the Master's

Degree or be

the opera.

In keeping with the production of

29, 1950

be charged, but seats will not be held after

8:00 p.m.

so close to it that it will be completed in a very short time. Successful elementary school teaching experience will also be a prerequisite, since the Superintendent is of the opinion that nobody should be placed in an administrative authority over a classroom teacher in the elementary schools who has not from personal experience known the problems which confront the classroom teacher in the elementary school.

Any references which candidates may wish to present should be sent directly to the Superintendent of Schools. All such applications should be received

Exhibit of Rare Books, Etc.

The California Centennials Commission in conjunction with the San Francisco Public Library will present an exhibit of rare books, manuscripts, prints, cartoons, old maps, photographs, and newspapers, selected from the collections of the Library of Congress, together with documents from the National Archives and the National Gallery of Art, at the San Francisco Public Library from May 22 to June 14, 1950, inclusive. This exhibit should be of interest to teachers and pupils in the elementary and secondary schools.

June

1.

by

Following the receipt of applications,

the Superintendent will study and analyze very carefully all of the materials available relative to

each candidate. After

this

has been done,

candidates will be invited to a committee inter-

view at which time they orally

will be able to explain any information previously filed and be

given the opportunity to react to questions or

problems which

will

be presented in order to

evaluate further their qualifications for such positions.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Physical Education

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, May 29 School holiday.

Tuesday, Memorial Day.

May 30

Wednesday, May 31 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, John Muir HC, Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Roosevelt, James Lick G, Spring Valley, Bret Harte, Irving M. Scott,

Hawthorne, West

Twin

Portal, Redding, F. S.

Key,

Peaks, Excelsior.

Thursday, June

Contemporary Music

The Department

of

Fees and Credits: For both men's and women's workshops: one week $10.00, credit, two quarter units. For two weeks $14.00, credit, four quarter units. Auditor's fee $5.00. For particulars on Elementary Workshop contact Verne Landreth, Bureau of Health, Phy. Ed., & Recreation, State Department of Education. Accommodations: Dormitory rates $5.00 per person, per week, with two persons assigned to

each room. Enrollees are privileged to bring their wives families. Dormitories are set aside for family groups. Meals are available in the cafeteria at very reasonable rates.

Reservations:

For particulars and reserva-

Vern Meacham, California PolyCollege, San Luis Obispo.

tions write to

technical

June 2

Physicians will visit the following schools: Galileo, Polytechnic, Everett G, Madison, Commodore Stockton, Candlestick Cove, San Miguel, Raphael Weill, Parkside, Alamo, Marshall.

Festival of

Education and Recreation announces its 1950 summer workshop program to be held at California Polytechnical College, San Luis Obispo. Schedules: Men's Physical Education, July 31 to August 11; Women's Physical Education, August 14 to 25; Physical Education for Elementary Classroom Teachers, August 21 to 25. cal

and

1

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Lowell, Galileo, Horace Mann, Grattan, Washington Irving, McKinley, Dudley Stone, Cleveland Tox 30 & PE, George Peabody, Alvarado, Ulloa, Edison. Friday,

The

Workshop

California Association for Health, Physi-

Music

at Stanford

Uni-

Contemporary Music for Saturday and Sunday, June 3 and 4, on the campus. In addition to forums on the teaching and performing of contemporary music, there will be performances of chamber music on Saturday, featuring composers from Bay versity has scheduled a Festival of

On Sunday, evening, the Stanford Orchestra and Chorus will perform works by Parrish, Moore, and Kodaly. All the events are open to the public, and music instructors and students of San Francisco schools are cordially invited to attend. District colleges.

Lambda Theta Installs Pi Lambda Theta, national honor society for women in education, recently installed the folPi

lowing officers for the coming biennium: Mrs. Veronica T. Kuhnle, San Francisco, president; Mrs. Martha Schaller, past-president, San Francisco, first vice-president; Miss Patricia Cody, Berkeley, historian; Mrs. Isabella Robertson, Richmond, member-at-large.

Hold-over officers are: Mrs. Gladys Toomey, Oakland, second vice-president; Mrs. Edna Miller, Oakland, treasurer; Miss Evelyn Mitchell, Oakland, journal correspondent.

Young

Foresters Transcriptions

Four, fifteen minute transcriptions, are available for loan to schools. These are a new department of Agriculture, Forest Service, "Young Forester" series.

These dramatic shows follow a young man through adventures in a California Forest, pointing out conservation practices in an effective manner. It is suggested that these transcriptions might be used effectively during the last weeks of school to point up the need for summer precautions against forest fires in California.

KALW

workshop produced the "Young The Forester" series during the past year in cooperation with the U. S. Forest Service in San Francisco. The transcriptions are being made available throughout the west as a Forest Service educational aid to be used in schools. Shows are upper grade and high school level. Call at

KALW or phone ATwater 2-6042 for

loan.

Council Elects

The International Council for Exceptional Children announces that Milton Reiterman, adjustment teacher at Mission High School, was recently unanimously elected president of the Council's San Francisco chapter.

The Council invites anyone interested in the welfare and education of the exceptional child to join its organization. Contact Mr. Reiterman, Mission 7-0750.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Procedure for Enrollment Summer Vacation Schools

Recreation Department's

in

The procedure

to be followed for enrolling children in the vacation schools will be as fol-

lows:

Teachers will explain the program to the and then send home the announcement about it. (Form A) 1.

children,

2. It will then be the responsibility of the parents to ask for enrollment blanks (Form B) through the children. 3.

After receiving a request (the child's word

will suffice), teachers will please write in the

information regarding recommended reading and/or arithmetic and send the enrollment blank home for the parent's signature. then be collected by the principal and sent to the particular vacation school concerned. Allow one week from time of 4.

Enrollment blanks

receiving the literature,

will

which

in the process

is

of delivery.

In the junior high schools, the principals may determine the method of distribution and collection of enrollment blanks. Each child should receive an announcement. Enrollment blanks should be issued only on request.

General Program:

The program

will include the

same

activities

as in previous years. Children deficient in reading and/or arithmetic will be required to take these subjects if they attend the summer vacation school. These schools will also provide for learning experiences in sound living, arts and crafts, music, natural science, shop subjects, and

related activities.

Do

send children

who need and can

profit

by

help in these subjects. Do supply some pertinent data or comments to enable the summer school teacher to begin immediately on the problem. Do not recommend ungraded children for reading or arithmetic. Do not recommend any child below 7 years for reading or arithmetic. Do not use the Summer Vacation School as a threat or punishment.

Non-Academic Subjects: Do recommend all children who are doing normally well to sign up for a full activities program.

Do

the reading and arithmetic pupils that they may participate in the activities phase of the program after they have taken one period of reading and/or one period of arithmetic. tell

Summer Vacation Schools: Summer Vacation Schools

will

be conducted

Everett-Sanchez, Francisco, James Denman-San Miguel, Horace Mann, Francis Scott Key, Lafayette, Raphael Weill, Hunters Point I (formerly Ridgepoint III), and Marina. at

The Recreation Department

requests that the its 1950 Silver Tree Camp, to be conducted at the Glen Park Playground for eleven weeks during the summer vacation period, be called to the attention of school children.

following information relative

Each district is limited to one week's attendance. Dates are listed in the camp schedule below. Quota: 100 children per week. Fee: $1.75 paid to the playground director at least a week prior to the camp date. Additional information

may

be obtained by telephoning the Recreation Department, HEmlock 1-2121. The camp schedule follows: First

Junior vising

Week

—June

19-23 incl. Playgrounds: Aptos,

Museum, Ocean View, West Portal. (SuperDirector: Mrs. Margaret Edhammer)

Second Week

—June

26-30

incl.

Playgrounds: Chi-

nese, Funston, Michelangelo, North Beach, Wills. (Supervising Director: Oliver Chang)

Helen



**Third Week July 3-7 incl. Playgrounds: Beaver, Folsom, Levi Strauss, Mission, Valencia Gardens. (Supervising Director: Edwin T. Murphy) Fourth Week July 10-14 incl. Playgrounds: Bay View, Candlestick Cove, Double Rock, Gilman, Hunters Point Gym, Middle Point. (Supervising Director: Tony Patch)





Fifth Week July 17-21 incl. Playgrounds: Hamilton, Margaret S. Hayward, Hayes Valley, Julius Kahn, Presidio Heights, Westside Courts. (Supervising Director: Albert Farrell)

Week—July 24-28 incl. Playgrounds: ChanFather Crowley, Jackson, Potrero Hill, J. Rolph, Jr. (Supervising Director: Joseph Misuraca) Seventh Week July 31-Aug. 4 incl. Playgrounds: Argonne, Cabrillo, Fulton, Richmond, Rochambeau, A. J. Rossi. (Supervising Director: Miss Camilla Sixth

nel,



Lilienthal)

Reading and Arithmetic:

Camp

Tree

Silver

Week

Eighth

—Aug.

7-11 incl. Playgrounds: J. P. Sunset. (Supervising Director: Allan Sullivan) Ninth Week Aug. 14-18 incl. Playgrounds: Douglass, Noe Courts. (Supervising Director: Mrs. Margaret Edhammer) Tenth Week Aug. 21-25 incl. Playgrounds: Bernal, Crocker-Amazon, Excelsior, Guam Village, Portola, Sunnydale, Visitacion Valley. (Supervising Director: Julius DeMeyer) Eleventh Week Aug. 28-Sept. 1 incl. Playgrounds: Bernal, Ocean View, Sunnydale. (Supervising Directors: Mrs. Margaret Edhammer, Julius DeMeyer). *Glen Park will be permitted to send 5 children each week. Each camper may register for a one week period only. **On July 4 camp will be closed, so the fee for the week of

Murphy, Sigmund Stern Grove,







July 3-7

$1.40.

is

Polio Insurance

The Teachers

Premiums Association of San Francisco

announces that premiums are now due on Polio Insurance. If renewal of this policy is desired, holders are requested to make checks payable to "Business Men's Assurance Co.," and mail to Leon Shaff, 1211 -40th Ave., (SF-22) on or before June 9.

Aptos,

The cooperation

of all teachers

and adminis-

trators will be greatly appreciated. Address all regarding the program to William

inquiries

Galant,

Grove

administrator,

Street.

Vacation Schools, 93

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Vacation School Sires and Feeder Schools

San Francisco Examiner All-Free Baseball School Boys of San Francisco are in for another baseball treat this summer when The Examinstarts er's Annual All Free .Baseball School classes Monday, June 19 at Big Rec Field in

Golden Gate Park. Last year close to 6,000 youngsters took advantage of this instruction. The school is again under the direction of Oscar Vitt, head-master since its inception in 1946. Vitt was a great major league third baseman during the days of Ty Cobb at Detroit. He was also a successful big league manager. He knows his baseball and he knows how to teach

which will aid teachers and which Summer Vacation Schools their children should attend. Note that children in some schools have a choice of Vacation Schools. Proximity and transportation Following

be Joe Sprinz, ex-big league catcher and present Seals coach under Lefty O'Doul; Patty Cottrell, head baseball coach at Santa Clara University; and George Wolfman, baseball coach at Mission High School and forAssisting

him

will

mer coast league star. Members of the Seals

will

also help

from

the course of the school in

time to time during San Francisco from June 19 to 26.

This

list is

missible,

if

will get free instruction

and every-

one is eligible. Bats and balls will be furnished by The Examiner. The pupils are asked to bring their own gloves and baseball shoes, although they are not absolutely necessary. Classes will be broken up into age groups which will give every youngster a chance to per-

form before the

faculty.

At the conclusion of the school, two all star teams will be selected to compete against each other at Seals' Stadium. The two outstanding players from this game will receive all expenses paid trips to participate in the Hearst Classic in New York's famous Polo Grounds. Students

may

sign

up

for the school

now

at

playground or clip out the coupon that appears daily in The Examiner. Membership cards and schedules will be mailed to them. their nearest

That's

all

that

is

should enter into the decision.

advisory only, and deviation

is

per-

supported by a substantial reason.

Teachers are requested to inform pupils as to the address of the Vacation Schools to which

they are going.

(Upland Drive

&

Aptos Ave): Commodore

Farragut, Lake Merced, Miraloma, Parkside, Ulloa, West Portal, Aptos, Eucalyptus Ave.

Sloat,

EVERETT-SANCHEZ (17th & Church St.): Andrew Jackson, Douglas, Dudley Stone, Franklin, Grattan, John Muir, Lincoln, Marshall, McKinley, Twin Peaks, Everett, Sanchez.

FRANCISCO (Powell & Chestnut Sts.): Commodore Stockton, Garfield, Hancock, Jean Parker, Sarah B. Cooper, Spring Valley, Washington Irving, Francisco.

The school will visit Big Rec Field, Funston Park, Portola Playground and Seals Stadium. Everybody

list

facilities available

APTOS

it.

a

is

principals in determining

necessary to join.

Appreciation Expressed by Club

The Superintendent is in receipt of the following communication from the Twin Peaks Mothers' Club: "The Twin Peaks Mothers' Club wishes to thank the School Department and the teachers San Francisco Public Schools for their splendid cooperation in the Second Annual Young Children's Art Show. "We were delighted with the improvement in

of the

quality of the material offered, particularly in the older age groups. It is our hope that with your help we can next year offer the parents of

San Francisco an even more exciting show."

HORACE MANN

&

(Valencia 23rd Sts.): Alvarado, Bryant, Daniel Webster, Edison, Fairmount, Hawthorne, Irving M. Scott, Kate Kennedy, Junipero Serra, LcConte, Patrick Henry, Paul Revere, Starr King, James Lick, Horace Mann.

HUNTERS POINT I (Southridge Road & Kiska Road): Bayview, Bret Harte, Burnett, Candlestick Cove, Excelsior, E. R. Taylor, Ridgepoint I, II, Hunters Point I, II, Double Rock. JAMES DENMAN-SAN MIGUEL (Otsego & Delano Aves.): Cleveland, E. R. Taylor, Glen Park, Guadalupe, Hillcrest, Junipero Serra, Longfellow, Monroe, San Miguel, Sheridan, Sunnyside, Visitacion James Denman.

Valley, Portola,

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY

(43rd Ave.

&

Kirkham

Columbus, Dudley Stone, F. S. Key, Grattan, Laguna Honda, Lawton, Parkside, Ulloa, Jefferson. St.):

LAFAYETTE

(37th Ave. & Anza St.): Alamo, Jackson, Argonne, Cabrillo, Frank McCoppin, Geary, George Peabody, Madison, Sutro, Presidio, Roosevelt, Lafayette.

Andrew

MARINA (Fillmore & Bay Sts.): Grant, Pacific Heights Redding, Sherman, Spring Valley, Winfield Scott, Yerba Buena, Marina. RAPHAEL WEILL

(Buchanan

&

O'Farrell Sts.):

Emerson, Fremont, Golden Gate, John Muir, Pacific Heights, Redding, Roosevelt, Raphael Weill, Girls High.

A.C.E. to

Meet June 6

The next A.C.E. meeting June

Eddy

be on Tuesday, Art rooms at 750

will

6, at 4:00 p.m., in the

Street.

Mrs. Susan Irwin, aided by several children, will

demonstrate techniques of handling the

large, colored chalk as a

Punch and

wet medium.

cookies will be served from 3:30.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN 3«5mVOL. XXI

JUNE

No. 37

Summer

Session Offerings

by

State College

S.

F.

Courses in curriculum, audio-visual education, early childhood education will be presented. Demonstration elementary classrooms will be in session and will be utilized in conjunction with many of the courses. In addition to regular course offerings, some special features of the will be:

A Language Arts Conference will be held in San Francisco from June 19 to June 23 during which outstanding authorities will discuss the major problems involved in organizing and conducting language arts program in elementary and secondary schools and colleges. Participants can earn one unit of credit. A science intersession from June 12 to 24 will be offered at Fallen Leaf Lake near Lake Tahoe. Students may enroll for two semester units in courses in

the

natural

science

of

the

At Camp Sierra located on Yuba Pass near Sierra City courses in camp craft, camp leadership, and recreation activities will be offered. Students may enroll from June 10 to 25, June 26 to July 15, or July 16 to August 4. Two units of credit may be earned in the first period and three units of credit will be a maximum pro-

A

in the last

two

sessions.

in planning curriculum for early (seventh and eighth grades), es-

workshop

adolescence

pecially planned for teachers, curriculum committees, supervisors, and administrators, will be offered from June 26 to July 14 in cooperation with the California State Department of Education.

of the

National Education Assocition of the United States will be held in St. Louis from July 3 to 7.

Following

is

a schedule of activities:

Monday, July

3

—Meetings

and N.E.A. Board

of

of Directors;

Departments Meetings of

State Delegations; General Session.



Tuesday, July 4 First Representative Assembly; Meetings of Discussion Groups and Clinics; Entertainment by Classroom Teachers; Reception for President.



Wednesday, July 5 Second Representative Assembly; Meetings of Discussion Groups and Clinics; General Session.



Thursday, July 6 Third Representative AsMeetings of Discussion Groups and Clinics; Meetings of State Delegations; Life Membership Dinner; Friendship Evening (To

sembly;

meet candidates).

High

Sierra.

gram

N.E.A. Convention to be Held St. Louis, July 3 to 7 The Eighty-seventh Annual Meeting

1950

in

San Francisco State College will offer a six week summer session from June 26 to August 4 and a post session from August 7 to August 26.

summer

5,



Friday, July 7 Fourth Representative Assembly; Fifth Representative Assembly; General Session and Sixth Representative Assembly. Registration will open Sunday, July 2, and continue through Wednesday, July 5, at the Henry W. Kiel Auditorium, Fourteenth & Market Streets.

A California Centennial Tour of the Mother Lode Country will feature study on the campus combined with a tour of approximately three weeks duration

visiting missions,

mining towns,

homes and

buildings, industrial sites, farming regions, irrigation projects, principal museums of the state, and other places of historic

interest.

Off-campus workshops will be presented at Santa Rosa from June 26 to July 21 and from June 26 to August 4, and at Modesto from June 19 to July 21. These workshops are designed to assist teachers with emergency and provisional

From June 26 to August 4, special workshops in student personnel services, education for exceptional children, education for human relations, family life education, and music education (featuring utilization of the newly adopted state text, New Music Horizons) will be offered

credentials in completing requirements for regu-

in

lar credentials.

Details about the regular course offerings and special features of the summer session may be obtained by addressing the Director of Summer Sessions, San Francisco State College, 124 Bu-

Summer

session credit in the humanities and can be earned for participa-

the social sciences

tion in study tours of Europe, the Orient,

Japan.

and

San Francisco.

chanan

Street.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Scholastic Art

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, June 5 the following schools: George Washington, Polytechnic, James Denman B, Marina B, McKinley OT, Jean Parker, will

Physicians

visit

Bay View and Candlestick Cove Tox

50, Jeffer-

Grattan Tox 15, Andrew Jackson PE, Fairmount, Raphael Weill, Alvarado.

son,

This

Awards

office is in receipt of

advice that

Nancy

February 1950 graduate of Polytechnic High School, was awarded a scholarship to the Jackson-Von Ladau School of Fashion in Boston. While at Polytechnic, Nancy was a student of Mrs. Margarette Kirst.

Jair, a

Other students from San Francisco who won National Scholastic Art Awards are as follows: Dolores Nyman, Abraham Lincoln High School; Leo Valledor, Marina Junior High School; Lawrence Young, Commerce High School; Beverly Torrieri, Horace Mann School; Choy Chung, High School of Commerce, and Phillip Read, Presidio Junior High School.

Tuesday, June 6 Physicians will visit the following schools: Commerce, Balboa, Aptos B, Everett, Jean Parker and Washington Irving Tox 40, Hunters Point No. 1 Tox 30, E. R. Taylor, Dudley

Tox

Stone

Tox

15

and PE, McKinley and Sanchez Annex, Douglas.

50, Visitacion



Regular meeting. Day Adult 3:45 p.m. Marina Adult Teachers. Americanization School.

Wednesday, June 7 Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Pacific Heights HC, Fremont, Abraham Lincoln, James Lick B, Presidio B, McKinley OTR, F. S. Key, Franklin, Redding Tox

Hawthorne and Verba Buena Tox, Geary

18,

Story Festival at Art

Museum

The Golden Gate Story League

will hold a Story Festival in the San Francisco Museum of Arts on June 10 from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m.

The admission will be 15^ for children and 35^ for adults, and in the course of the program a boy and girl from the audience will be chosen as king and queen of the Festival. The following story tellers, in costume, will be on the program: Julie Neil, Natalie Carr, Alice Hutchinson, Winifred Lyon, Marjorie Sauder, and Polly

TWO

McGuire.

EYE,

A

puppet show

AND THREE

EYE)

(ONE EYE, will also

be

included on the program.

HI, Sheridan.

Thursday, June 8 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, Galileo, James Denman G, Horace Mann B, Longfellow, Washington Irving, Ulloa Tox 22 and PE, Bryant, Edison Tox 50, Patrick Henry Tox 18, Farragut, Alvarado

Tox

20.

Friday,

June 9

Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, George Washington G, Roosevelt G, Portola B, Parkside, Commodore Stockton Tox 50, Bret Harte, Guadalupe, Lawton, Daniel Webster, Irving M. Scott Tox 30, Fairmount and Junipero Serra Tox 40, Monroe HI.

Audubon Camp

of California

The Sacramento State College will grant two semester units of credit for satisfactory completion of a two weeks' session at the Audubon Camp of California. The University of California will allow two semester units of elective lower division credit for satisfactory completion of this course. There will be five two-week sesrunning from June 18 to August 26, 1950. For further information write to Mrs. Ethel Richardson, 887 Indian Rock Avenue, Berkeley 7, California, or phone LAndscape 4-4270. sions,

Organ-Symphony Concert Placement Test to be Held Sept. 8

A

placement test will be administered Friday, September 8, at 8:30 a.m., at the Bureau of Research, third floor, 93 Grove Street, for pupils of junior high school level who have entered without adequate transcripts of record. Pupils of grades 6, 7 and 8 who have failed or for other reasons have not completed their grades are,

upon recommendation

of their principal,

eligible to take this test. Principals are request-

ed

to

send in the names of recommended pupils Bureau of Research in advance.

to the

An Organ-Symphony Concert will be given on Thursday evening, June 8, commencing at 8:30 o'clock, at Temple Emanu-El. Ludwig Altman will be the organ soloist, and members of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra will be conducted by Gastone Usigli. The program will feature a complete performance of Bach's monumental "The Musical Offering." This concert is made possible by the Music Performance Trust Fund of the American Federation of Musicians.

No

Music

admission fee

is

charged.

lovers are cordially invited to attend.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Workshop

Human

Family Life Education Teachers and counselors

Workshop

interested in strengthening the quality of family life will find

San Francisco State College announces a "Workshop in Human Relations" to be con-

opportunity to consider problems brought to them by parents and students with the assistance of a well-qualified group of specialists in

ducted from June 26 to August 4. Six weeks of participation in this Workshop will give teachers an opportunity to work on particular projects needed in their school situ-

in

Family Life Education

this

in

Relations

Offered by State College

summer

at

San

Francisco State College. (Six units of graduate " credit.) (Ed. 370Q)

ations.

be of especial help to those teaching classes in the many areas which touch biology, health on home and family living and physical education, senior problems, social

Participation is limited to sixty community workers, teachers, parents, so that each person can have personal guidance from his advisor. It is unusual to have a ratio of 8 workshoppers to each staff member. About 30 places are

science, etc.

spoken for at

The workshop

will



The Workshop

includes Adolph G. Stoll, last year staff member of S. F. State Family Life Workshop and Counselor and teacher of marriage problems at the City College of San Francisco; Margaret Pritchard, M. A. Chr. of the Home Economics Dept, U. of Denver, Consultant for Family Life Workshop, U. of Denver 1948, 1949, Family Life Consultant for Secondary Workshop, U. of Chicago; Miss Gertrude Luehning, M. A., Chr. of the Home Economics Dept. S. F. State College, teacher of courses in home problems. Staff

Related Fields Experts Available: Prof. Judson T. Landis, Chr. of the Dept. of Effective Living, Michigan State College; Dr. Richard A. Koch, Chief, Div. of Venereal Diseases, S. F. Dept. of Public Health; Prof. Helen Gunter, Chr. Dept. of Audio-Visual Aid, S. F. State College, formerly with Britannica Films in Chicago; Prof. Fred. Wilhelms, Div. of Education, S. F. State College, national authority in cur-

riculum development; Prof. Harold E. Jones, Director of the Institute of Child Welfare, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Prof. Allison Davis, Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, U. of Chicago; Dr. Bertha S. Mason, prominent lecturer in family relations, mother of a family, practicing physician; Dr. William Bellamy, psychiatrist at Langley Porter Clinic.

Those desiring further information may obit by writing to the Director of Summer Session, State College, 124 Buchanan St., San tain

Francisco

2.

Classification Reports

The

revised

— Elementary

form (13-101-50)

of the classi-

elementary schools is now available in the warehouse and requisition for the new form should be made as it is to be used at the opening of school. Quadruplicate copies are required on the Monday following the second Friday of the new term.

Program

General Forums: for orientation in group dynamics, developmental tasks of children, formation of attitudes

and prejudice,

class

and caste

America, cultural, racial, and religious differences. Sometimes these forums will be lectures, sometimes films and book reviews. in

Common Concerns Groups to discuss general problems raised in the forums and the implications for school and community programs. Work Groups to help each individual develop a plan for his school or community situation. Here poeple are grouped together according to the area in which they are working and receive counsel and suggestions from those with problems similar to their own. Skill Sessions for practice in

making

socio-

grams, learning to interview, using open questions and other means of diagnosing the social needs of children, participation in role playing and socio-drama. Additional information as to staff members

and application forms may be obtained from Miss Margaret Heaton, San Francisco State College, 124

Nutrition

Buchanan

Workshop

Street.

at Stanford

General Mills is financing a Nutrition Workshop on the campus at Stanford University for a two weeks period, from August 2 1 to September 1, 1950. A limited number of scholarships are available for this workshop. Interested teachers should contact Dr. Oliver E. Byrd, professor of education and director, Department of Hygiene, School of Education, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

fication report for

Principals are reminded that duplicate copies are due on the Monday following the end of this term. Old forms may be used for these if schools have not received the revised forms.

this time.

will include these kinds of sessions:

Polyite to

West

Point

Fred Wright Jr., Polytechnic High School graduate and former football and track star, has received an appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., and will take the entrance examination on June 12, it was announced last week. Young Wright is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wright of 1288 - 11th Avenue.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Conference on Language Arts

Institute on Southeast Asia

Many outstanding national authorities in the field of English will appear before the 1930 Conference on Language Arts in the Modem School to be conducted by San Francisco State

Southeast Asia, key area in today's strained international situation, is the subject of a conference to be presented jointly by the American Association for the United Nations, the World Affairs Council of Northern California, and San Francisco State College. Special attention

College. June 19-23.

Among

the speakers encaged tor the confer-

University ot Illinois, J. DeBoer, Elementary English: Lou LaBrant. New York University; Fred T. Wilhehns. newly appointed chairman of the Division of Education and Psychology San Francisco State College: Etta Rose Bailey of the Maury School. Richmond. Virginia; Carrie Rasmussen. Longfellow School. Madison. Wisconsin: Helen Heffernan. California State Department of Education: and R. Nevitt Sanford. University ot California, and co-author of The Authoritarian Per-

ence are: John editor of

.

sonality.

Sponsored by the Language Arts and Education Divisions of

San Francisco State College,

concerned with the development of language competence the teaching of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. According to A. Eason Monroe, chairman of the Language Arts Division. "Young people of all kindergarten through college school ages need systematic instruction and guidance in the language arts for success in school and for full, productive lives as citizens in the modern the conference

is







world."

The

be given to problems ot American policy and the plan for economic aid to underdeveloped areas. General sessions and section meetings will be designed to meet the needs of administrators, curriculum coordinators, and teachers. Among the speakers will be H. H. Fisher, chairman. Hoover Institute Library. Stanford University, and Eugene Staley. research associate. Hoover Institute Library. will

The conference will be held at San Francisco State College. It will begin Thursday evening, July 20. and end Saturday noon. July 22. so that it will be feasible for persons attending

summer

sessions at

nearby colleges to partici-

pate.

further information and registration or write to Elgin Heinz, director, Institute on Southeast Asia. San Francisco State College. San Francisco 2.

For

blanks

call

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

hereby given that the following San Francisco School System: Notice

is

janitorial vacancies exist in the

entire conference will be held at Girls Streets, in San

High School, Geary and Scott

Francisco, with registration beginning at 10:00 a.m. on Monday. June 19.

One

unit of undergraduate or graduate credit being offered all participants. A registration fee of nine dollars will be charged.

is

A.A.U.W. Sponsors

The San Francisco Branch

of the

Women

is

American presenting

the San Francisco Municipal Theatre's produc-

George Bernard Shaw's "Arms and the

Man" on Wednesday

—C106 Janitor—Continuation Annex —CI 06 Janitor— Madison

These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for

Marina Auditorium. Tickets are

manent employees

The proceeds from

this

program

event are to be used of

A.A.U.W., which

hopes to ioster world peace and better understanding among nations through an exchange of students at the graduate level.

open

Request for transfer

only.

SI. 50. includ-

West

for the fellowship

rule.

should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leaveil, supervisor of school janitors. 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union. Local 66A. 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of per-

evening. June 6 at the

ing tax.

ships are

1

under the seniority Play

Association of University-

tion of

1

to both local

These fellowand foreign stu-

dents.

For information concerning tickets or fellowcontact Mrs. James Ripley. Roosevelt

ships,

Junior High, or call JU 7-4125 or Mrs. John Kloper. SEabright 1-1623. Tickets may also be obtained at the theatre door.

Point Graduate

William B. DeGraf. a Polytechnic High School graduate, is West Point's No. 1 man in the class which will graduate from the academy

June 6. While at Polytechnic. William was All-City R.O.T.C. colonel. He enlisted in the Army in 1944. and saw combat action with the 100th Infantry Division in the European theater. He was given a battlefield commission in January. 1945. by General Eisenhower, and resigned as a

first

lieutenant in 1946. to attend

West Point. During war service he was decorated with two bronze stars and the Purple Heart.

0'

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXI

JUNE

No. 38

Top Honors High School

to Balboa

Instructions for

ROTC

12,

1950

Summer

High School Students

A United States Army Board of Inspection awarded top honors to Balboa High School at the annual San Francisco citywide ROTC inspection held on May 4 at Balboa Park. Balboa received the best band award for the third year in a row. and also were awarded the trophy for

The advance enrollment for the Summer High School this year has already reached the 1900 mark. Bv the third day it is expected to

the best battalion team.

and Onondaga Avenues by 8:30 a.m. on June 19. They must bring their signed enrollment forms. The first arrivals will schedule them-

drill,

and

drill,

in physical drill.

extended order

High

schools

who

participated were Lincoln. Lowell. Washington,

and Balboa.

The

Will

all

home room

inspection group included Colonel Frank

R. Williams. Reserve Cavalry. California Corps'

School students to seat themselves in Otsego the Balboa High School Auditorium

Also explain that the "K" car goes and that the Mission Street and Alemany buses stop at Onondaga Avenue within a few blocks of the school. selves

first.

directly to Balboa,

The Summer High School girls.

Odone

Francisco: Lt. Colonel Leroy B. Wilson. Infan-

Delivery Dates for June

Military Science and Tactics,

San Francisco High Schools

ROTC.

Balboa's military unit has been trained by

Sergeant James T. Lingg, instructor.

The

top

cadet officers are Cadet Colonel Robert Nolan,

commander: Cadet Major John

executive officer: and Cadet Captain

as senior advisor in

charge of gradua-

tion.

Time Sheets

June Time Sheets should be delivered to the Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: Payroll

Captain Gail C. Mustard, instructor: Master Sergeant John P. Hoover, instructor: and First

battalion

principal will be

by Miss Eleanor Parsons as dean of Ralph Kauer as dean of boys, and Walter

assisted

Group. Sacramento. California: Lt. Colonel George E. Smith. Field Artillery, California Military District. Presidio of San Instructors

try, Professor of

remind the

teachers

Summer

)

Inspecting officers observed the competing battalions in close order

swell to 2200.

Jones,

Raymond

Bengs, Adjutant.

Revised School Directory Planned

A revised issue of the Directory of the San Francisco Public Schools will go to press prior to the reopening of schools in September. Suggested changes, corrections, or additions and bus directions will be welcomed. Changes should be indicated in writing and mailed to the Office of the Superintendent, Room No. 331, third floor, 93 Grove Street, San Francisco 2. to the text, particularly street car

The attention of organization secretaries is directed to pages 43 and 44. Officer changes should be sent in prior to the opening of school in the Fall.

Teachers: Senior high, junior high and elementary ..June 16, 8:00 a.m. 12 days Teachers Principals and assistant principals.— 22 days Show symbol "A" June 21 to 30 incL) Tune 19, 1:00 p.m. Adult schools

schools

Clerks and Janitors:

June 16-30 Adult schools Other schools

June June

22. 1:00 p.m. 22. 8:00 a.m.

—June 15 and 16

Minimum Days

The Board of Education at May 31, upon recommendation

its

meeting of

of the Superintendent, adopted the following resolution:

"RESOLVED: That

in keeping with general

custom the days of June 15 and 16 be declared minim um days in order to allow teachers and principals the time necessary to complete all records for the closing of the school year in the elementary and secondary schools."

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin

Inspector Thomas ,B. Tracy (S.F.P.D.,) supervisor of training for San Francisco's School Safety Patrols, advises that at the conclusion of the recent Annual Review at Kezar Stadium, the following efficiency awards were made:

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

first;

Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, Girls High, James Lick, Marina G, Commodore Stockton Tox 50, Candlestick

Cove, Lincoln, Fairmount, Le Conte Edison Tox, Alvarado.

Tox

30,

Tuesday, June 13 Physicians will visit the following schools:

Wednesday, June 14

Third Battalion: Miraloma and Junipero Serra tied first; Sheridan; George Peabody and Frank McCoppin tied for third; Madison and Garfield tied for fourth; Bret Harte; Yerba Buena, Guadalupe and Longfellow tied for

Redding, Sunny-

side.

Thursday, June 15

sixth.

Fourth Battalion: Commodore Sloat, Argonne, San Miguel and Lake Merced tied for first; Lafayette; Sherman; Candlestick Cove; Farragut and Le Conte tied for fifth; Starr King. Fifth Battalion:

Physicians will visit the following schools: Sunshine, Pacific Heights HC, Polytechnic, Portola, James Denman, Everett, Winfield Scott, Candlestick Cove, Franklin, Columbus,

Bryant and

West

Portal,

first;

Wm.

McKinley,

Commodore

Stockton tied for second; Hancock-Cooper and E. R. Taylor tied for third; Jean Parker and Washington Irving tied for fourth; Sanchez; Cleveland. Sixth Battalion: St. Agnes and Sacred Heart tied for first; Most Holy Redeemer; All Hallows; Corpus Christi; SS. Peter and Paul and Epiphany tied for fifth; St. Emydius and St. Mary's Chinese tied for sixth.

Minimum Day. Friday,

Second Battalion: Star of the Sea, first; St. Monica; Gabriel and Mission Dolores tied for third; St. Joseph; Morning Star and St. Peter tied for fifth; St. Thomas and St. Anthony tied for sixth. St.

for

Commerce, Aptos, Horace Mann, Presidio, Washington Irving, Ridgepoint Sites 1 and 2 Tox, S. B. Cooper NS., Daniel Webster, Lafayette, Pacific Heights, Sanchez, Starr King and Bryant Tox, Douglas.

Hillcrest,

Battalion: Alvarado and Douglas tied for Sutro; Alamo and Cabrillo tied for third; Monroe and Spring Valley tied for fourth; Franklin, Kate Kennedy and Edison tied for fifth; Excelsior. First

Monday, June 12

Key, Madison,

Awards

Patrol

issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

F. S.

Schools Presented Safety

Seventh Battalion: Marina Jr. High and Francisco High tied for first; Aptos Jr. High; Everett Jr.

June 16

Jr.

Minimum Day.

High and Horace Mann Jr. High tied for third; Presidio Jr. High; James Denman Jr. High; Roose-

Close of Spring 1950 semester.

velt Jr.

High.

Eighth Battalion: Polytechnic High, High; Galileo High; Mission High.

Wednesday, September 6 Schools reopen for the Fall semester.

Ninth Battalion: Parkside and Grant

Lawton and Laguna Honda Classification Reports

The

revised

of the classi-

elementary schools

is

now

available in the warehouse and requisition for the new form should be made as it is to be used at the opening of school. Quadruplicate copies

are required

on the Monday following the

second Friday of the

new

term.

Principals are reminded that duplicate copies are due on the Monday following the end of this term. Old forms may be used for these if schools have not received the revised forms.

Fuel Oil

for

Lowell

tied for first;

second; Zion

Lutheran; Frederic Burk and Paul Revere tied for fourth; Town; Daniel Webster.

— Elementary

form (13-101-50)

fication report for

tied

first;

—Summer Requirements

Tenth

Battalion: Jefferson and Pacific Heights tied Francis Scott Key; Dudley Stone; Grattan and Redding tied for fouth; Fairmont and Visitacion tied for fifth; J. W. Geary.

for

first;

Eleventh Battalion: first;

St.

Vincent

second; Holy

John;

St.

St.

St.

Anne and

De Paul and

St.

St.

Brigid tied for

Philip tied for

Name and

St.

James;

Elizabeth and St. Dominic

St.

Brendan

tied for third;

tied for sixth.

Twelfth Battalion: John Muir, first; Winfield Scott and Bayview tied for second; Raphael Weill and Sunnyside tied for third; Golden Gate; Hillcrest and Fremont tied for fifth; Emerson and Twin Peaks tied for sixth.

The

Division of Supplies requests that prinleave sufficient information with their janitors in the event that fuel oil must be ordered during the summer vacation the janitors will have the correct requisition number. cipals

See Division of Supplies Bulletin No. 46 of 3/7/50.

Milk Delivery Mrs. Edith

M. Murphy,

coordinator,

Home

Economics, advises that the Board of Health milk will be delivered up to and through June 14.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Summer Vacation Principals

of

School Enrollment Forms

Thanks

elementary and junior high

The

schools are requested to forward slips,

(Form

all

B), to the respective

enrollment

Summer Va-

Address them to the "Head Teachers" in charge of the particular Vacation Schools. The bulk of the enrollment slips should cation Schools.

be forwarded

this

week, either through the

school delivery or by messenger, so that the

approximate number of children planning attend may be ascertained and programs

to set

up accordingly.

Course

in

There

be a course given at the Rudolph

Schaeffer School of Design, 136 in Design

and Color.

It will

St.

Anne

St.,

be in collaboration

with Sibyl Moholy-Nagy and Martin Metal as guest instructors, beginning the last week in

September. Pre-registration service

may

be

made

at

and inincrement credit given. Approved by

any time prior

"Cable Cars"

Award Winners: Earl Abbott, Horace Mann Junior High, Grand James Guerrero, Sherman School, 1st prize, 1st classification; Judy Aldrich, Portola Junior High, 1st prize, 2nd classification; Nancy Davis, Lowell High, 1st prize, 3rd classification; Peter Lassas, George Peabody; Gerald Gilmore, Paul Revere; Mathew Miller, Frank McCoppin; Larry Irwin, Visitacion Valley; Daniel Jones, Candlestick Cove; Donna Shannon, Sutro; Peter Klock, Andrew Jackson; Sandra Catania, Bayview; Carol Bellatore, Sherman; Grady Love, Emerson; Anthony Rude, Geary; Paul Schmidt, West Portal; Robert Posey, Horace Mann Junior High; Kenneth Lee, Francisco Junior High; Wilford Low, Francisco Junior High; Carolyn Smith, James Lick Junior High; Nancy Bobitt, Lowell High; Prize;

Design and Color

will

for the

exhibit of paintings and sketches of cable cars by children of the San Francisco public and parochial schools held at The Emporium was a success. Out of 1700 entries representing 66 public schools and 3 parochial schools, 200 were selected for hanging. It is regretted that they all could not be hung. Teachers and children are most sincerely thanked for their wholehearted contribution to this community project.

to this date. University

the Veterans Administration.

Uncle

Sam

Laura Largomarsino, Lowell High; Robert Wong, High School of Commerce; Hariet Brooks, Girls High; Patrick Farsfield, St. Marks; Gerald Oldknow, Star of the Sea; Sondjai Lopez, St. Dominic; Diana Ruggeri, St.

Says

^'?~k:^o:':;^

Dominic.

Human

Relations on

KSFO

teachers workshop in human relations to be held at San Francisco State College from June 26-August 4 will be the subject of the San Franciscans United broadcast on KSFO, Saturday, June 10, 8:15-8:30 p.m. Speakers on the

The

program

will

be Miss Margaret Heaton, direc-

workshop and of the of the San Francisco Public Schools; Mrs. Lenore Underwood, deputy attorney general of California and first supreme president of B'nai B'rith Women; and Karl Justus, executive director, San Francisco tor of the State College

human

relations

Round

Table, National Conference of Chris-

program

and Jews. The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith and the National Conference of Christians and Jews are co-sponsors of the State College workshop on human relations to be attended by 60 teachers and a team of P-TA leaders from tians

In this day you have to live by the And each 24 hours it ticks off means another day added to your age. Get the clock on your side by signing up now for one of the two safe, automatic plans of savings, the Payroll Savings Plan for the purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds where you work, or, if self-employed, the Bond-a-Month Plan where you bank. And as the clock hand swings around your money increases in value. In ten years each three dollars grows into four dollars.

northern California communities.

clock.

U.S. Treasury Department

Workshop at Asilomar The California Association Central

of

Teachers of

requests that the language arts teachers of the elementary and secondary schools reserve the weekend of October 20 to 22 for the Second Annual Asilomar English,

Section,

Language Arts Workshop. Further details

Eason Monroe

of

may be secured from Dr. San Francisco State College.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Annual Attendance Reports Due

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Principals' attendance report forms have been sent to the respective schools. The attendance report for the tenth month must be brought to

janitorial vacancies exist in the

the Board Room, 93 Grove Street, at the time of filing the annual attendance report. Principals will file reports on the following days:

— p.m. 4:30 p.m. noon. Saturday, June 17 — 8:30 a.m. 12 noon. Monday, June 19—8:30 a.m. Friday, June 16

to

2

to 12

to

afternoon, June 19, will be reserved for the reconcilliation of reports where irregularities or discrepancies occur. This will permit a more rapid processing of the majority of re-

which

will

be handled routinely.

Safety Certificates Available Service Certificates for members of the School Safety Patrol units who are graduating with the close of the current term are now available at the office of the California State Automobile Association, which cooperates with the School Department and police authorities in patrol activities and organization. Principals may obtain these certificates from the Public Safety Department of the Automobile Association, 150 Van Ness Avenue, by telephoning MArket 12141.

Board of Education Meetings

The Board

of

Education

set

the following

dates for future meetings:

Wednesday, June 14, 7:30 p.m., regular meeting.

Thursday, June

15, 7:30 p.m.,

budget meet-

ing.

Place:

Grove

Board meeting room, fourth

Street.

floor,

is

—CI 06 Janitor—Sherman —CI 06 Janitor—George Washington High —CI Working Foreman Janitor—Lawton Working Foreman Janitor— Por—C 1

1

1

06.1

1

106.1

tola Jr.

Monday

ports

hereby given that the following San Francisco School System: Notice

High

will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for

These vacancies

under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

Musical Notes

The San Francisco Opera Association has announced its performances for the 1950 season. In addition to the regular subscription, five

operas will be given as a Sunday matinee group and five in a mid-week evening subscription.

The opera selected by the Opera Guild for Young People's matinees is "Madam Butterfly." The performances will be on Thursdays, October 19 and 26, at 1 o'clock. Leading artists include Albanese, Glaz, Conley or Kullman, Brownlee or Valdengo. Application blanks will be in the schools the first week of the fall term. will

93

Data Required for Classification

The

Uncle

Sam

Says

attention of

members

staff is directed to the

Page 7.10,

22,

paragraphs

which reads

"An

of the certificated

1949-50 Salary Schedule, 1

and

2,

under Section

as follows:

official transcript of

record of college or

university work and an official record of inservice work and courses in specialized schools shall be submitted to verify completion of such work. All such records must be filed in the office of the Coordinator of Salaries on or before June 30 in order to qualify a teacher for classification purposes or for advancement to a higher increment block for the succeeding fiscal year.

"In

lieu of the filing of the official transcript

work completed within sixty days prior to June 30 or any year, a certification by the Registrar of the institution where the work was completed may be submitted to verify that the work was completed, which verification is subject to confirmation by receipt of the official transcript by August 15." of record for

^

ill* i/i ^'i^ai^i

l>

0'

PUBLIC SCHOO VOL. XXII

No.

SEPTEMBER

1

6,

1950

Miss Alice Rose Power, Educational Leader, Passes

To

Miss Alice Rose Power, an educational leader in San Francisco and California for more than half a century, passed away in St. Mary's Hospital on Friday, August 25, after an extended

attention is called to the "Board of Education Policy for Safety in School

Miss Power, a native of San Francisco, was graduated from Girls High School and attended San Francisco Teachers College. She taught elementary classes at both Edison and Washington Irving Elementary Schools, serving as principal of the latter for

many

years.

Appointed to the Board of Education in 1919, she was repeatedly re-elected and served until 1933. She later served two terms on the State Board. In 1938, while directing both the Washington Irving and Yerba Buena Schools, she was appointed the public schools' representative at the Golden Gate International Exposi-

"Every pupil enrolled in a shop must pass a safety test and execute a safety pledge before he can be assigned to a program of instruction in the shop." Sufficient time should be set aside for completion of the safety instruction program before students are permitted to work with machinery and other equipment. It is the teacher's responsibility to give

adequate group and individual instruction, to inspect and approve all equipment before students are authorized to proceed with regular work in the shop.

For a complete statement of the Board Education rules and regulations relative to safety, and the teachers' and principals'

of

responsibility, please see the Safety

for

tion.

and Shop Teachers:

Shops."

illness.

Miss Power, for years a member of the San Francisco and State Boards of Education, retired in 1943 as director of the Americanization program for the San Francisco Public Schools.

Principals

Your

Guide

Shop Teachers.

Miss Power's activeness in educational affairs both San Francisco and California will cause her to be sadly missed by her many friends in the School Department as well as by numerous educational and civic organizations in which she was keenly interested. in

Placement Test To Be Held September 8

A placement test will be administered Friday, September 8, at 8:30 a.m., at the Bureau of Research, third floor, 93 Grove Street, for pupils of the junior high school level who have entered without adequate transcripts of record. Pupils of Grades 6, 7 and 8 who have failed or for other reasons have not completed their grades are, upon recommendation of their prin-

Superintendent of Schools

Board to Meet at

The Board

Commerce High

Education

of

will

hold

its

regular

policy meeting on Wednesday evening, September 6, at 7:30 p.m., in the auditorium of the

High School of Commerce, Van Ness Avenue and Hayes Street. There will be a continuation of the discussion of the curriculum at this meeting.

The

public

is

invited.

Doors open at 7:00 p.m.

cipal, eligible to take this test.

Classification Reports

— Elementary

Principals are reminded that quadruplicate copies of classification report for elementary schools are due on Monday, September 18, in the Bureau of Personnel.

Principals are requested to use the revised

form which has (7-1-50 revised.)

just

been

issued,

13-101-50

Teachers' Association Meeting

The first meeting of the San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association will be held in their club rooms, Women's City Club, 465 Post St., on Monday, September 11. This will be a business meeting. Tea will be served before the meeting. Teachers are invited to attend and participate in the business of the association.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Administrative Appointments and Transfers Approved by Board of Education

Upon recommendation of Superintendent Herbert C. Clish, the Board of Education approved the following administrative appointments and transfers: At its meeting of June 14:

Miss Alice Gerstenberg, teacher, Lawton School, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the Lawton School, vice Mrs. Gladys Leiser transferred to the principalship of the San Miguel School.

Edward H. Redford, coordinator, secondary education, appointed assistant superintendent of schools in charge of secondary education.

Miss Mary Smyth, teacher on leave, and acting assistant principal, Commodore Sloat School, transferred to the position of assistant principal, Commodore Sloat School, vice Miss Virginia Kent, transferred.

George Canrinus, general supervisor, athand intramural activities, appointed coordinator in charge of athletics and intramural activities and the recreational program on letics

school

At

facilities.

its

meeting of June 29:

Mrs. Gladys Leiser, assistant principal, Lawton School, transferred to the position of principal at San Miguel School, vice Miss Mary O'Gonnell, retired.

Miss Virginia Kent, acting principal, Grattan School (and assistant principal on leave from Commodore Sloat School) transferred to the position of principal of the Twin Peaks-Mira-

loma Schools. Mrs. Zoa M. Evans, assistant principal, Sanchez School, transferred to the position of principal of the Bryant School, vice Mrs. Mildred Colmar, transferred to the position of principal of the E. R. Taylor School, vice Miss Etta Tesmer, retired.

Miss Nellie Foley, assistant principal, San Miguel School, transferred to the position of principal of the Marshall School, vice Miss Anne Haigh, transferred to the position of

Mrs. Beatrice Brown, teacher, Cabrillo School, transferred to the position of assistant principal, Grant School, vice Miss Miriam Caro, transferred to the assistant principalship of Sunnyside School. Miss Margaret Deffterious, teacher, Ridgepoint

II, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the Ulloa School, vice Mrs. Helen Whigam transferred to the assistant principalship of the Dudley Stone School.

Mrs.

Mildred

Colmar,

principal,

Bryant

School, transferred to the principalship of the E. R. Taylor School, vice Miss Etta Tessmer, retired.

Miss Anne Haigh, principal, Marshall School, transferred to the principalship of the Winfield Scott- Yerba Buena School, vice Miss Mollie Smith, retired.

Miss Marcella O'Shaughnessy, principal Laguna Honda School, transferred to the principalship of the Sanchez School, vice Miss Alice Corbett, retired.

Buena

Miss Miriam Caro, assistant principal, Grant School, transferred to the assistant principalship of the Sunnyside School.

Mrs. Claire Ryan, assistant principal, Dudley Stone School, transferred to the position of prin-

Mrs. Helen Whigam, assistant principal, Ulloa School, transferred to the assistant principalship of the Dudley Stone School.

principal of the Winfield Scott- Yerba School, vice Miss Mollie Smith, retired.

Laguna Honda School, vice Miss O'Shaughnessy, transferred to the principalship of the Sanchez School, vice Miss cipal of the

Marcella

Alice Corbett, retired.

Miss Helen Vida, teacher, Grant School, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the Francis Scott Key School, vice Miss Mary Finigan, retired.

Herbert Simon, teacher, Sanchez School, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the Lafayette School, vice Mrs. Graff,

Emma

retired.

Roy Minkler, teacher, Marshall School, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the Lake Merced School. Miss Agatha Hogan, teacher, Grattan School, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the Junipero Serra School. Miss

Vivian

Green,

teacher,

Miraloma

School, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the San Miguel School, vice Miss Nellie Foley transferred to the principalship of the Marshall School.

Joseph B. Hill, principal, Lowell High School, transferred to the principalship of the Abraham Lincoln High School, vice Clyde W. White, retired.

Miss Edith E. Pence, principal,

Girls'

High

School, transferred to the principalship of Lowell High School, vice Joseph B. Hill, transferred.

Julian

Reinhertz, assistant principal, Junior High School, transferred position of probationary principal of High School, vice Miss Edith E. Pence, S.

Denman

James to the Girls'

trans-

ferred.

Joseph Ludwig, teacher, Horace Mann JunHigh School, appointed an assistant principal of the James Denman Junior High School,

ior

vice Julian Reinhertz, transferred.

Morris Williams, supervisor, audio visual appointed coordinator of secondary edu-

aids,

cation.

Armond DeMartini, teacher on leave, Abraham Lincoln High School, appointed a probationary assistant principal in the senior high

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Appointments school division

— Transfers and assigned

to the

Superintend-

ent's office.

Kathryn

Miss Sc]

Purvis,

transferred

i

Lafayette

teacher,

to the position oi

assistant

Sanchta School; vice Miss rincipal of the transferred. Evans,

Zoa

M.

leave, Balboa Wilbcri G. Vestnys, teacher, on transferred t" the position of su1. Sd

H jgh

pervisor,

Building

baU'onarj

sums.)

Utilization

Research

(pro-

Rathbun, assistant principal, Portola School, appointed to the position High |u»ior Industrial Arts Education. of coordinator, Jesse E.

counselor. Presidio ]. Hamrock, head High School, appointed probationary

James Junior

assistant

principal

of

Portola

School Lists Required

Attendance Bureau Data

(Contd.)

Junior

High

School.

James G. Morcna, assistant principal, Balboa High School, transferred to assistant principal of Galileo High School.

Alden W. Smith, assistant principal. Galileo High School, transferred to assistant principal

For

tin-

information of principals, teachers

and others interested the following data relative the Attendance Bureau:

is

listed

Central Tile Unit: 7511 Eddy Street, Underbill 3-4680, Phone Extensions: 333, 334, 335, Miss Rose Dcmpsey 336.



I— Galileo

High School,

Room

254:

At

its

meeting of August

to assist-

16:

—Sulro

School, Room 9: Telephone extensions: 327-328; Mrs. Esther Crites, Mrs. Alice Leal, Mrs. Marion Martin, P. D. Urrea. I'nil II

Unit III— Hawthorne School, Room 27: Telephone extensions: 329-330; Eugene Golden, Mrs. E. K. Schmidt, Miss Miriam Whitham, Kenneth Meitz, C. B. Leonard.



Balboa High School, Room 18: Unit IV Telephone extensions: 331-332; Mrs. Angela Field. Miss Arlie B. Corbet, Miss Ruth Rapken, Mrs. Mary Rossi, Mrs. Alma G. Riker.

Vista School, vice

Miss

Left Without Transfers In order that an immediate check-up of all who have left school may be made, principals are asked to give to their Supervisors of Attendance, not later than September 22nd, a Left Without Transfer slip for every child who pupils

Miss Mar,' Margaret Ryan, assistant principal. Raphael Weill School, transferred to the position of probationary principal of the Alta

Mary Cavmichael,

re-

Attendance not later than Septembei 22, 1950, the complete enrollment by classes as of September 20, 1950, on the class list forms supplied by the Bureau. (Please notify the Jiureau of Attendance or your Supervisor of Attendance the number of class list forms you will

Bureau

of

was on the school

roll

on June

16th, but

Arrange

lists

alphabetically,

1

1

In listing the addresses of Chinese pupils, give the floor and room number in addition to the street address; also both American and Chinese names. List complete addresses for children living in projects building, section, and apartment numbers. For children living in apartment houses, rooming houses, and hotels,



list

apartment or room number.

The

list should contain only the names of the children who are actually enrolled in the class. In order to keep records correct, any child who returns to school after September 20th or enters after that date should be reported to the Bureau of Attendance at once either by transfer, if he has one, or by an Entered Without Transfer

slip.

The central files of the Bureau of Attendance are located at 750 Eddy Street, Room 301.

Without Transfer. Before reporting these pupils as Left Without Transfer they should be checked as carefully as possible by the school, and when reported, the Left Without Transfer should have as much information as possible for the Supervisor of Attendance.

possible for the check of ages.

ance.

Bureau

to

make

its

immediate

"Registration of Minor" blanks should contain the following information,

number

if

available: the

of the birth certificate, the place

and

Saturday Corrective Centers

The centers for posture correction will be "pen on Saturday, September 16, and every

certificate. If

Everett

Center,

Monday, September

3:45

1,

p.m.,

high

at

Sixteenth

and Church

Wednesday, September

11:30 a.m.

Friday, September school men.

Principals arc requested to srnd to these cen-

any children reported to them by nurses or teachers as being in need of these services.

3:45 p.m., high

14, 3:4-5 p.m., jr.

high

women. 15,

3:45

All meetings will be held in

Eddy

Street,

hospital certificate

certificate

may

is

is

obtainable, a

be used instead.

If

such

not readily available, how-

ever, "Registration of

Minor" blanks arc not

to

p.m.,

Room

jr.

high

207, at 750

C

106 Janitor

— Francisco — Lake Merced. C 106 Janitor — Portola High School Jr.

—Grant Elementary School

These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Lcavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

Rule

On

Professional Organizations

In regard to the solicitation of membership in professional organizations, Superintendent Herbert C. Clish calls attention to the following regulation adopted by the Board of Educa-

In order for a child to be entered in the kin-

must be not

dergarten

his birthdate

March

1946. All entrants to the

1,

later than first

grade

must have been born on or before March 1945.

Teachers and all other employees of the Board Education shall have complete freedom in selecting the professional organizations which they may wish to join, without coercion of any kind from any administrative officer or other school employee. 2. Whatever courtesies are extended to any teacher organization in the schools shall be fully and unreservedly extended to all teacher organizations. 3. The use of any coercion or pressure by any of

principal or other school employee to refrain from joining to be unprofessional

administrative officer or other influence any teacher to join or any organization shall be deemed

conduct.

The Superintendent

of Schools shall call attention to this rule at the beginning of each school term by means of a notice in the Superintendent's Bulletin. 4.

Report on

Fall

Term Enrollment

Principals are requested to report enrollment for Friday, September 8, as follows:

Kindergarten Enrollment. First

Grade Enrollment.

Total School Enrollment including

be delayed but are to be sent in immediately.

Thursday, September school

13,

women.

school

no birth

birth verification

school men.

be open from 9 a.m., to 1 1 a.m. Girls' High School Center, at Geary and Scott Streets, will be open from 9:30 a.m., to

ters

1

102.1 Janitrcss

1.

date of birth as stated thereon, and a signed statement that the teacher has seen the birth

Physical Education Meetings

C

G

E.R.Taylor

— Hawthorne — Lafayeiie — Lake Merced

Organizations:

principalship of the Alta Vista School.

Please note that these are not to be mailed Bureau of Attendance, as formerly. They will be picked up by the Supervisors of Attend-

— Monroe

1U6 Janitor I06janito] 106 Janitor 106 Janitor 106 Janitor 106 Janitor

meeting September 14, 1937: Rule No. 74c: Membership in Professional

In order that birthdates may be checked immediately, principals are requested to send at once to the Bureau of Attendance at 750 Eddy Street "Registration of Minor" blanks for all pupils entering the kindergarten and 1A grades. If the parent docs not fill out one of these, the teacher should prepare the blank from data on the permanent card. Only in this way will it be

to the

I

C C C C C

tion at its

who

to another school should be immediately reported to the Supervisor of Attendance as Left

I

separately.

Throughout the term all pupils who leave school for any reason without taking a transfer

Streets will

I

Do

ink.

Viclor Robinson, assistant principal, Alamo School, transferred to the position of assistant principal of the Raphael Weill School, vice Miss Mary Margaret Ryan, transferred to the

cept for holidays.

1

not use nicknames, fl" a teacher has more than one grade, list them

plainly in

Birthdate Information Desired

Saturday following during the school year, ex-

I

and type or write

has not registered this term.

John Soso. teacher, Raphael Weill School, transferred to the position of acting assistant principal, Emerson School, vice Miss Margaret Watson, on leave.

Si

need.)

tired.

Mrs. Beverly Marcus, teacher, Hunters Point I. transferred to the position of probationary assistant principal, Alamo School, vice Victor Robinson, transferred.

Notice is hereby given that the following janvacancies exist in the San Francisco hool System:

itorial

I

Telephone extensions: 325-326; Miss Dorothy Milesj Leo Rooney, Mrs. Jeffic Golden, .Bruno Zachary.

Melvin Peterson, assistant principal. Abra-

ham Lincoln High School, transferred ant principal Balboa High School.

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

principal of each school will send to the

1

I'nil

Abraham Lincoln High School.

nf

The

1.

Kindergarten and First Grade. Junior and senior high schools are requested to report total school enrollment.

Enrollment data should be telephoned to the bureau of Research-— UNderhi 3-4680, on the afternoon of September 8. 1

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Flow Chart of Building Projects To

greatest time expenditure falls between the approval of final preliminary plans and final working drawings and specifications. From eight to twelve months are required at this stage. The State review may take 2/2 months. Advertising for bids takes one month and the time lapse between the award of contract and the beginning of construction may be one

The

and teachers

give principals, supervisors

an understanding of the processes associated with the planning of the new school buildings, authorized through the 1948 Bond Issue, Associate Superintendent John F. Brady has prepared a Row (hart. Here major steps of the administrative and planning processes are shown in

t

onset utive order.

month.

It will be recalled that City bonds and not Board of Education bonds have been used to

The Board of Education dite all

proper placement.

The chart docs not show time

lapses

items but in several cases two, three, four, five and six weeks pass before action is completed.

of

Building

bond

1<34s-19e.3> LOCUS



r-

anxious to expe-

There

construction as fast as possible.

Projects

r

RESPONSIBILITY

,

i

'=-

,.;';o

k™v,.„w.i..uj u u»,»

1

i

r "." ; -",\'

1

«.,,.„.

-

v^;;;:. ^'V,"-'"

*l

I.,™,

-

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1

*""

u™,^

\c*.ua««.

1



It 1

I,

f|

i

Hint Ji.w.r,..

-.'

^*,,, 'or""~'""'

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*l

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'/-... i-^;i.:

.-.,.;i'.'i',„.3 ,. ,-...

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:-

— l^'HS.nS^'' k — ^Tjxt^IZ,. 1

t

V- ".;''!;"'

\z^t:pj:zr^

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,

iL,,, M ^". i"u'',-< ,—di'^?,*,:

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SITEi

,,,

"^^^j ^"- v-t-t^^^^v ^ii^^^^^rrt.^"' -^i^^^.r,r,^^^^^^ |

|

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j*. _.

|



Many

1950 Triple "A" Football Game

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

Field

Kczar

Lincoln-Sacred Heart

16,

Kczar Washington

Galilco-St. Ignatius

19,

20, Washington-Mission 21, Balboa-Lincoln 22, Polytechnic-Comrocrci 23, Lowell-Sacred Heart 26, Balboa-Washington

...

...Washington Kczai

Washington ...Balboa

Washington Kc/ar

27, Lincoln-Galileo 28, Commerce-Lowell 29, Mission-Polytechnic 4,

...Kczar

Sacred Heart- Commerce

Kczar

....

Balboa

4, St. Ignatius-Balbo.i 5, Galileo-Mission 6,

Galileo

Polytechnic-Washington

Washington

10, Balboa-Commerce 11, Mission-Si. Ignatius II, Galileo-Sacred Heart

Balboa

Kczar Galileo

Polytechnic-Low. I! 13, Washington-Lincoln

Kczar Washington Washington Ke*ar Washington Kezar

12,

18, 19,

20, 21, 25, 26, 26, 27, 31,

Commerce-Mission Polytechnic-Lincoln

Washington-Lowell Sacred Heart-St. Ignatius Galileo-Commerce

Galileo

Kczar Washington

Polytcchnic-St. Ignatius

Sacred Heart-Washington Lowell-Balboa Galileo-Washington

Balboa

Washington Washington Kezar Kezar Kezar

Nov. 1, Lowell-St. Ignatius Nov. 2, Lincoln-CommcrciNov. 3 Miss ion -Balboa Nov. 8, Lincoln-St. Ignatius Nov. 9, Sacred Heart-Mission Nov. 10, Lowell-Galileo Nov. 11, Polytechnic-Balboa Nov. 18, Semi-final Playoffs Nov. 23, Championship Game Starting 3:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 2:00 p.m.;

times: School

Days

1



j..

<<

•.:.•.,.

.'.:.'<

..'

U.

';.,,,,,.'.

,j;,J/

J^

r

,

".'." i

:',.'.

t

"" " L:

L__

—-- ,A

L

- tJ,tMim

.

r-isasss— tSsHrrj— *e^ss> j PLANS

A

Balboa ..Washington

Kezar Kezar Kczar Sept. 3:30 p.m., Oct.

Nov. 3:00 p.m.; Holidays: Sept. and Oct. Nov. 2:00 p.m.; Semi-finals: :30 a.m., and Championship game: :00 a.m. 1

1

1

Call for Volunteers

Some 14,000 San Francisco volunteers are being recruited to raise $3,300.000— the newlyannounced Community Chest goal between



October 16 and November 17, Walter Heller, Chest Campaign Chairman, said today.

•—&.'--

Hlsss

EMtasMHsa^^Msssf^

Housewives, teachers, businessmen, students, women, union leaders, and professional workers are being asked to sign up to help the 70 Community Chest agencies get some 4/a percent more money than the Chest raised last year,

Mr. Heller

Major share

are entitled

to

educa.

foe

Pursuit of Courses of Education or Training Law 346, 78th Congress at amended {R&P R-IO035) Subsequent to 'lulv

under Public

J

25, 1951.

'

Continuous Pursuit After July 25, 1951— Teachers. It has been determined that the posi2.

tion of the veteran-teacher in respect of the

quirement for continuous pursuit of a education or training under the Act statutory delimiting dates

employment

in consecutive, succeeding school

Where

a veteran-teacher ceases to be employed in or for any school year he will not have satisfied the requirements of the regulations pertaining to the continuous pursuit of his course until completion, so far as any succeeding summer session is concerned, and he will have no right to further education or training under the years.

law.

Adult Classes Resume September 18 1

The adult classes Monday, September Persons interested

of the total— $3,008,084 will go to the agencies to maintain operations at

schools

their present level, relieve understaffed agencies,

to

and provide emergency help for persons not gible for public aid, Mr. Heller declared.

gram

eli-

be

of

after the said to be

torical aspects of the matter, that is. the long recognized practice of the members of tinteaching profession, it has been determined thai an eligible veteran who pursues a course under the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, pointing directly to a graduate degree, in a college or university during the school year 1950-1951 (or is regularly enrolled in a summer term on or before July 25, 1951) and is regularly employed as a school teacher during the school year 19511952, may be permitted to continue graduate study during successive summer sessions following employment as a teacher during successive school years and that this shaft qe deemed to be continuous pursuit of his course of educajion or training within the meaning of the governing law and regulations. It is to be understood that this determination is limited to the pursuit of graduate study only, that is, in a course leading to a graduate degree, and to situations involving consecutive summer sessions following teacher

said.



may

re-

course

unique among other classes of veteran beneficiaries. Accordingly, and only because of the his-

1

club

;ptiiFiCArioNj

who

under the Veterans Administration legislation will be concerned with this in formation which was received from the Vet. erans Administration. It is quoted from Technj Veterans Administration:

Schedule Released Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.

teachers

tional benefits

cal Bulletin 7-131, issued July 7, 1950, by

1

EOUCA-MCpHttk.

Educational Benefits For Veterans Clarified

from the

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

1

OF e[1v.'": -'V

weekly during the school year

Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

(Jet,

i44ue

1

(CUOOL &UILDIN6

is

no way to eliminate steps from the chart but time between steps is being reduced if it is consistent with good planning.

between

Flow Chart

is

issued

is

Dale

Dodge Riedy

estimates that at least 20 months are required to serve all the functions of the chart. It should be recognized that the steps on this chart are, in the main, legal requirements and that all others result from administrative necessity.

City Architect

finance the construction of the new buildings. This involves a major participation by the Bureau of Architecture in all aspects of planning. Tin reviews of the Stale Division of Architecture, the State Fire Marshal, State Industrial Bureau, The City Art Commission and Building Inspection Bureau of the City are also given their

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin

will

resume

activities on

18.

may

obtain a schedule

ol

and classes by addressing a postal card the Adult Division, San Francisco School De-

partment, 93 Grove Street. will

A

be mailed as soon as

copy

of the pro-

possible.

j9 'V

r

/y

t£C&

lUBUCMOOlS WWIN VOL. XXII

@

No. 3

SEPTEMBER

1950

18,

Crusade for Freedom Plans Announced. The Superintendent has addressed the following Supervisory Bulletin No. 5, dated September 12, to all

elementary and secondary principals forthcoming Crusade for Freedom:

relative the

"During the weeks of September 18 and Oc9, San Francisco will carry on its CRU-

tober

SADE FOR FREEDOM.

purpose is to foster a great moral crusade for freedom, faith and peace throughout the earth. All San Franciscans, including school children, will be invited to sign the signatures on the

Freedom Freedom

Its

Scroll. All of these

Scroll will be per-

in the base of the Freedom Bell in Berlin. This ten ton Freedom Bell is the Symbol of the

manently enshrined

CRUSADE FOR FREEDOM.

"In Berlin, on United Nations Day, October 24, the Freedom Bell will peal out this message of hope. Inscribed upon its rim will be 'That this World under God shall have a new birth of freedom', a paraphrase of Lincoln's words at Gettysburg. "The suggestion has been made that on next

Monday, September

18,

in the city symbolizing the start all

bells

ring for a minute or two CRUSADE. of the

FREEDOM

"The Superintendent has

discussed the

CRU-

SADE FOR FREEDOM

with the Board of Education but has not yet had formal action taken upon it. It is his belief, however, that the members of the Board will approve of participation by school children.

"Another

FREEDOM

activity of the is

to support

CRUSADE FOR

Radio Free Europe,

a 'Freedom Station' in West Germany. At the time individuals sign the Freedom Scroll there

be an opportunity for them to make such contributions as they wish to help support the Freedom Station. In the schools this should be handled in such a way that no embarrassment ill be caused any pupil who may not be able to contribute. All pupils should be allowed to sign the scroll. The Superintendent has been

city in

this fund.

"During the weeks of September 18 and Oc9, a selected group of stations will be maintained in banks and stores throughout the tober

enroll

in

the

Already a number of businessmen have agreed to have a member of their staff man these stations Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

man some of on Monday nights and Saturdays of these two weeks. The committee in charge of the FREEDOM CRUSADE would appreciate having any parents who wish to volunteer for such service any time between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. on week days, or teachers who wish to volunteer for the two Monday evenings and the two Saturdays, telephone to the headquarters of the FREEDOM CRUSADE, 1462 Market Street, Telephone UNderhill 3-3780. "Volunteers will be needed to

same

these

stations

FREEDOM SCROLL

"Copies of the signing will be sent to

all

for

of the schools."

Art Lectures Beginning September 25,

Day and Evening

Classes in Color, Design Fundamentals, Interiors, Textiles, Drawing by Rudolph Schaeffer and distinguished staff of teachers.

Lecture courses on "Art and the Humanities" by Sibyl Moholy-Nagy and "Oriental Art" by

Chingwah Lee. Study program planned tion fer

for practical applica-

and cultural enrichment. Rudolph SchaefSchool of Design, 136

St.

Anne

St.

Ex. 2-

8388.

Next Board Meeting September 20

will

assured of a sizeable sum of money which will be given anonymously by a good friend of the schools to serve as a covering contribution for pupils who cannot make any contribution to

may

order that adults

FREEDOM CRUSADE.

The next

regular business meeting of the

Board of Education will be held at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 20, in the Board of Education meeting room, 93 Grove Street.

The

Pi

public

is

invited to attend.

Lambda Theta Tea

Northern California Alumnae Chapter of Pi Lambda Theta announces a welcoming tea for new members on Saturday, September 23, from 2:30 to 5:00 o'clock, at the home of Mrs. Vivian K. Medzian, 1915 - 15th Avenue. All Pi Lambda Thetans are cordially invited to attend.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Standard School Broadcast Resumes

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

Two-hundred years of American family life and music will provide the backdrop for the twenty-third annual Standard School Broadscheduled to return to the air over 65 radio stations in the seven western states and

cast,

Alaska in September.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, September 18 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, Balboa, James Denman, Jean Parker, Marshall, Glen Park, Fremont, F. S. Key,

Farragut. 3:45 p.m.

— Meeting

of the

Elementary AsRaphael

sistant Principals' Association. Library,

Weill School. Regular monthly meeting. Gov4:00 p.m. of the Teachers Association of Council erning San Francisco. Auditorium, Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street.



Tuesday, September 19

Theme title of the series, it has been announced by the sponsors, Standard Oil Company of California, will be "Music and the American Family, 1750-1950." Attention will be given musical works of European origin which soon became a part of the American scene after their arrival in this country. American compositions also take a leading role in the 26-week music enjoyment course.

This program, which now numbers secondgeneration listeners, has become a tradition in western education broadcasting and has achieved top national recognition. Michaelis, head of Standard's radio and manager of the Standard School Broadcast, has just been awarded a citation and Award of Merit from the National Association for American Composers and Conductors "for outstanding service to American Music" for the 1949-50 course. Standard also was given a citation and special award for the program during the past year by the Institute for Education by Radio, Ohio State University. Carmen Dragon, composer-conductor, will again direct the Standard School Broadcast or-

A.

Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco, Galileo, George Washington, Aptos, Madison, Hunters Point No. 1, Dudley Stone,

Kate Kennedy, Alamo, Douglas.

Wednesday, September 20 Physicians will visit the following schools: Roosevelt, Commerce, James Lick, Andrew Jackson, Doublcrock, Raphael Weill, Ulloa, Columbus, Sunnyside. Regular business meeting. Board 7:30 p.m. of Education, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street. Open to the public.



F.

division

chestra in the series for 1950-51.

Thursday, September 21 Physicians will visit the following schools:

Samuel Gompers, Lowell, Horace Mann, Hancock H, Franklin, George Peabody, Emerson. Friday, September 22 Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Marina, Redding, Candlestick Cove, Monroe, Lafayette, Sheridan.

Schoolcast on the Air

The Examiner's Schoolcast program



is

now

tenth year of broadcasting on a new station, KYA, and at a new time, 9:30-9:45 a.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday. in

its

The unique school program, conducted by Dwight Newton, presents the current news geared to an elementary school colorful

level,

Schools are invited to participate by requesting topics and attending broadcasts, as well as through classroom discussion and individual projects.

Station

KALW, FM

Saturday Music, an organization devoted to

making good music

available to school children,

announces

another series of three concerts. They will be given at the San Francisco Museum of Art, Van Ness and McAllister, at 10:30 a.m., Saturdays, October 28, November 4, November 18. Tickets to all three may be purchased for $1.50. Programs will include music by a string quartet, organ, brass instrument ensemble, and the San Francisco Boys Chorus. Tickets may be obtained from various music stores and Mrs. Peter Saxe, 2955 Lake Street.

along with

background material.

(91.7 meg., Ch: 219), the San Francisco Public Schools System, will re-broadcast Schoolcast at 9:30-9:45 a.m., Tuesday, Thursday and Monday.

owned and operated by

Saturday Music for Children

Meetings

for

New

Elementary Teachers

All probationary and long term substitute teachers newly appointed this term to the elementary schools are directed to reserve Wednesday afternoons for orientation meetings to be called by the Central Office. The first meeting will take place on September 27 at 4 p.m. at the Sanchez School. The dates of subsequent meetings will be announced later. Attendance is re-

quired.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Mid-Century Exposition

Delivery Dates for

of Electrical Progress

September Time Sheets

Wonderland, a Mid-Century Exposition of Electrical Progress, the largest and most representative show ever held by the electrical industry in the West, will be held in the Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, September 23 through October 1, under the direction of the Northern California Electrical Bureau, it was announced yesterday by LeRoy H. Bennett, show manager. More than 100,000 persons are expected to attend the show, which will feature electrical living tomorrow, with new developments in lighting, communications, electronics, radar, Electrical

research, television, electrical apparatus, conditioning, wiring, radio, appliances, many other electrical devices.

September Time Sheets should be delivered the Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: to

TEACHERS: Senior

high,

junior

and elementary

high

Sept. 21, 8:00 a.m.

schools

19 days Principals and assistant principals .—20 days Adult schools Sept. 25, 1:00 p.m.

Teachers

CLERKS

and JANITORS:

Adult schools Other schools

Sept. 25, 1:00 p.m. Sept. 21, 8:00 a.m.

air

and

Spectacular entertainment will include scientific and atomic shows; 17 radio and television shows put on the air from the auditorium stage, Elektro, the Westinghouse mechanical man, and Sparko, his mechanical dog; Dream Gal, the Bodyless Woman; Junior, the General Electric talking refrigerator; the Ward Harris Edison Exhibition, largest private collection in the world of Edison working models and inventions, sponsored by the San Francisco Electrical Contractors Association and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and many other amazing entertainment features.

In recognition of the importance of the show, E. Robinson has proclaimed the week of September 23 as Electrical Living

Mayor Elmer Week.

Vienna Art Treasures on Exhibit

Through

the courtesy of Herbert Fleishhackthe children of the San Francisco Public Schools are invited to enjoy the Vienna Art Treasures currently exhibited at the De Young Museum in Golden Gate Park.

er, Sr.,

a rare opportunity to see some of the and exquisite workmanship of the early European artisans. Art and social studies teachers are especially urged to see the

This

is

finest of paintings

fine exhibition.

Pupils of both elementary and secondary grades accompanied by teachers or parents responsible for the groups will be admitted free of charge until the close of the Exhibit October 1st.

Board of Education rules governing class excursions will apply in the acceptance of this invitation.

Municipal Theatre Auditions General auditions for those interested in acting with the San Francisco Municipal Theatre will

be held at 7:30 p.m., on September

18,

and

19 at the theatre, Bay and Fillmore Streets in San Francisco. Those qualifying will be immediately eligible to try out for parts in major and workshop productions during the 1950-51 season. In line

with the new policy of the theatre

these auditions are held four times a year.

one

who

Through is

wishes to act this

is

invited

to

Any-

attend.

method the Municipal Theatre

building a permanent group of actors from

which

to cast all of its shows.

Elem. Asst. Principals' Assn.

A

meeting of the Elementary Assistant Prin-

cipals'

Association will be held on

September

Monday,

18, at 3:45 p.m., in the library of

the Raphael Weill School.

The Exhibit 5:00 p.m. Call

Museum the

as to

number

is

open daily from 10:00 a.m. to to inform the of arrival and

BAyview 1-2067 the day and time

of persons in the group.

Safety-Accident Course Offered Materials and Methods of Teaching General Safety and Accident Prevention (X339AB) 30 hours, 2 units.

This course is designed for elementary and secondary school teachers. Covers materials and methods for developing accident-prevention techniques for home safety, traffic safety, school safety, curricular activities, and other areas. Deals with the nature, content, and scope of a complete school safety program. First meeting for class organization in Room 302, 540 Powell Street, on September 18, at 4:15 p.m. Instructor Joseph M. Galvin. Classes will meet every Monday from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. in a more convenient location. Approved for publication by Watt A. Long, associate superintendent of instruction,

SFUSD.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Americanization and Citizenship

The day Americanization and classes are

now open

Citizenship

for registration.

The following classes will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the following locations: Alta Vista School, Hayes and Pierce Streets. Chung Wah School, 829 Stockton Street. Commodore Stockton School, Washington between Powell and Stockton. George Peabody School, 7th Ave. and Clement

Street.

High School, Geary and Scott Street. Hancock School, Filbert between Jones and Girls'

Taylor Streets.

Hawthorne School, 22nd and Shotwell. Raphael Weill Center, 1223 Buchannan St. The class at Yerba Buena School, Greenwich and Fillmore Sts. will be open from 1:00 p.m.. to 3:00 p.m.

All

classes

meet Monday through Friday,

Notice is hereby given that the following janvacancies exist in the San Francisco School System:

itorial

1

— CI 06 Janitor — Samuel Gompers Trades — CI 06 Janitor — Argonne Elementary

School 1

School.

be held open for a period of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

These vacancies

will

of fifteen days except in case

These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

inclusive.

Men and women interested in learning the English language and becoming American citizens are invited to attend these classes. Since these classes are a service of the San Francisco Public Schools, tuition is free. or

For further information call WAlnut 1-2707, come to the Marina Adult School, 3400 Fill-

more

Street.

Registration of

Minor Blanks

Principals are reminded that Registration of sent to the Bureau of Street as soon as possible throughout the term for all kindergarten and first grade pupils, and for all pupils who are new entrants to the city schools from out of town.

Minor blanks should be Attendance at 750 Eddy

Art Exhibition for Elementary Teachers

The Art Department announces an

art-craft

exhibition to be held at Sanchez School, 27, September 18 through September 29.

The show

Room

cover a visual display of the available on the elementary school term requisition, kindergarten thru eighth grade, and examples demonstrating their application. The products exhibited will include dioramas, papier mache animals and figures, woodwork, ceramics, weaving, stenciling, block printing, embroidery, puppets, masks, photograms, finger paintings, water colors, chalk, and dry tempera paintings. will

art-craft supplies

now

Principals are requested

Department concerning

to

notify the

the proposed time

Art and

date of teacher attendance.

Governing Council to Meet

The regular monthly meeting of the Governing Council of the Teachers Association of San Francisco will be held today, Monday, September 18, at 4:00 p.m., in the auditorium of the Health Center Building, 101 Grove Street. Basic Nursing Offered

San Francisco College for Women School of Nursing offers an integrated collegiate and professional program in basic nursing accredited by the California State Board of Nurse ExamIn 4J4 calendar years, students qualify Degree in Nursing, a diploma in nursing and eligibility for the R.N. examination. The College is presently affiliated with St. Joseph College of Nursing and other community health services. Pre-clinical instruction is given in a completely equipped nursing laboratory on the campus. iners.

for the B.S.

Approved: Watt A. Long, assoc, tion,

SFUSD.

supt., of instruc-

Driver Education Course

Driver Education for Secondary School Teachers (X338CD) 30 hours, 2 units. This course is designed for teachers who have completed a basic 30-hour course in Driver Education. Subjects discussed: Available materials for developing student and parent attitudes, pedestrian protection and education, liability and insurance, records and reports, traffic engineering, driving practices. Particular attention will be given to psychophysical testing devices and practice driving instruction. First meeting for class organization, Room 302, 540 Powell Street, on September 19, at 4:15 p.m. Instructor, Joseph M. Galvin. Classes will

in a

meet every Tuesday from 4:00 more convenient location.

to 6:00 p.m.

Approved for publication by Watt A. Long, associate superintendent of instruction, SFUSD.


PUBLIC SCHOO Adult Education Classes

Under

Way

last

week.

with the community in such a way as to meet the educational needs of all adults is the objective of the Adult Education Division of San Francisco's public school system. In 200 locations throughout the city, at every hour of the day and evening, classes are held to serve the people of the various neighborhoods. Thousands of adults in San Francisco learn during

To work

their leisure



for their leisure.

Parents of the community, fathers and mothers, are given an opportunity for direct training in home and family life. Adults who are planning to travel may acquire a conversational knowledge of Spanish, French, Russian, Italian, or other foreign languages. Forums and lecture series on current topics of interest are always

In shop and in studio, adults work on projects class,

Referrals to Child Guidance

The Child Guidance Services is ready to accept referrals of children with emotional and behavior problems who do not seem able to make constructive use of the facilities which the schools have to offer. Two types of service are available: consultation with any member of the school department who wishes help in understanding the particular problems of the child and case work with parents and children when the problem is serious enough to warrant contacts with the family and an individual study of the child. Because of the limited amount of staff time available to meet the needs of the San Francisco schools, principals and counselors are urged to select the cases with which they wish help as early in the semester as possible. The sooner a problem

is

recognized the easier

it is

younger children usually respond more quickly to case work help than do older to

correct;

Therefore, while service is available to children of any age who are enrolled in school, the best type of referral is usually the younger child whose problems are just beginning to

ones.

available.



home polishing stones in the lapidary fashioning mounts in the jewelry group,

for the

25, 1950

Services Invited

of over 50,000 persons for the fall term, classes of the Adult Education Division of the San Francisco Public Schools got

With an enrollment

under way

SEPTEMBER

No. 4

VOL. XXII

throwing pottery, weaving cloth, and so on. A husband and wife may join to reupholster their

emerge.

furniture or even to build a new breakfast set. Home gardening and vegetable gardening are activities in which hundreds par-

by contacting by phone or in person the Child Guidance Service worker assigned to the school. Requests for case work help, except in emergencies, should be made in writing on forms available from Child Guidance Services. The Child Guidance offices are located at the Sherman School, Green and Franklin Streets,

living

room

Photography classes are crowded. and women come together in great numbers to learn folk dancing or badminton; and women, particularly, work to develop poise and posture and confidence in personality development classes. Civil service classes and instruction in all commercial fields train and upgrade workers for San Francisco's offices. Those who wish to complete high school, or even elementary school, may do so by attending classes leading to a certification ticipate.

Men

of graduation.

In half a dozen different locations activities especially designed for adults over 60 years of age are operating enthusiastically. Elsewhere, seeing persons come together to learn to write Braille and prepare books for the blind. For the person who is interested in learning to speak to groups, to write, to act, to sail a boat, to drive a car, there is a course. In such activities as these, thousands of San

Request for consultation service

may be made

PRospect 6-3100.

In

Memoriam

MRS. CLAIRE BRIERLY Teacher

— Madison School

August

27, 1950

Francisco adults will participate this year.

(For trade and industry courses, refer to O. D. Adams, assistant superintendent, and for distributive courses refer to R. Earl Thompson, coordinator both at 93 Grove Street.)





.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLET Elem. Evaluation Program Scheduled

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California

is

The elementary

evaluation program for the

term 1950 follows:

fall

Grade

Tests

— Pintner-Cunningham or Lee-Clark Metropolitan Readiness Test. Mental MaShort Form Test Low 4 — New

Low

Tests.

1

of

Calif.

Primary S"47. California Reading, California Arithmetic, California Language. Elementary (formerly California Basic Skills turity,

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, September 25 Physicians will visit the following schools: Abraham Lincoln, Balboa, Presidio B, Jean Par-

King, Ridgepoint Site

ker, Starr

Jefferson,

Twin

1,

Tests).

Low

6

— New

Form Test of Mental MaElementary. California Reading, California Arithmetic, California Language. Elementary (formerly California Basic Skills

Fremont,

Peaks, Visitacion Valley.

Tuesday, September 26 Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco B, Marina B, Galileo, Potrero Nursery, Visitacion Annex.

Wednesday, September 27 Physicians will visit the following schools: Polytechnic, Portola, Balboa, Girls High, RoosHunters Point evelt, Pacific Heights, Lincoln,

Annex, John Muir, Lawton Vac 20

Andrew

&

8

— New California Short Form Test

of

Mental

Maturity, Intermediate. California Basic Skills, Intermediate.

Test results are due at the Bureau of Research before October 20.

Wilderness Review Program



Meeting of San Francisco Teach4:00 p.m. Central Council, 465 Post Street.

ers

Thursday, September 28 visit

Tests)

High

PE,

Jackson.

Physicians will

Calif. Short

turity,

the following schools:

Frank McCoppin, Commerce, Lowell, James Denman, Sarah B. Cooper, Franklin, Alamo, Longfellow, McKinley.

For those who enjoy the wilderness areas and are willing to forego mechanized transportation to reach them, for those who enjoy singing around a campfire after an outdoor-cooked meal, for those who look for no roads, hotels, resorts, or other features of improved vacation areas, for those the Sierra Club outings into the High Sierra hold great appeal.

Friday, September 29 Physicians will visit the following schools: Fairmount, George Washington, Mission, Commodore Stockton, Hillcrest, E. R. Taylor, Gold-

ber 26 at Everett Junior High School the Sierra Club will review with photochromes its annual

en Gate, Kate Kennedy, San Miguel.

burro

"Bulletin" Deadline

All persons interested in wilderness outings are cordially invited to attend this program.

for publication in the Bulletin should be mailed or delivered in sufficient time to reach the Superintendent's office by 12 o'-

Copy intended

of the Tuesday preceding the of publication.

day

noon

eight o'clock on

summer

outings: the traditional

High Trip, the

Mon-

trips,

Exchange Positions

The

permanent teachers is inannouncement by the Department State and the Board of Foreign Scholarships attention of

vited to the of

of opportunities for approximately 200 experi-

enced elementary and secondary school teachers

necessary to insure delivery of the bulletins to the schools on the following Monday mornings. Administrators, teachers and organization secretaries are requested to make a special note of this "deadline."

under the Program.

Articles must be signed and should be typewritten, doublespaced, and should not contain more than 200 words to insure publication.

structions

This "deadline"

Tuesday evening, Septem-

knapsack trip, and base camp, with commentary by leaders of the respective trips.

All members of the certificated staff are invited to furnish contributions during the school year to the San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin which they think would be of interest to other members of the teaching profession.

clock

At

is

announcing courses should be cleared through Watt A. Long, associate superintendent Articles

of instruction, prior to submission to the Superintendent's office.

Fulbright

Educational

Exchange

Descriptions of the program have been received in the Personnel Office, together with in-

change

concerning the application for ex-

positions.

tions are

open only

Applications for these posiuntil

October

15.

Permanent teachers are invited

to inquire at

the Personnel Office for further information

concerning these opportunities.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Some

Special Activities of the

Adult Education Division The Volunteer Bureau is a newcomer to the adult program. Cosponsored by the Community Chest and the Junior League, the Bureau serves over 100 community agencies by recruiting and training volunteers for community service and supervising them while on the job. The Bureau is located in Room 204 at Galileo High School. For further information call Mrs. Hilda Penn, Volunteer Bureau director, at TUxedo 5-6574. For Veterans the Adult Education Division, in cooperation with the Veterans Administra-

educational and vocational guidance through a series of integrated tests and interviews administered by a staff of trained counselors. Call the Veterans' Counseling Center, TUxedo 5-6507, for further information. Elementary and high school courses especially designed for veterans, some of them of a speed-up nature, are offered at the Commerce Adult High School, MArket 1-2230. tion, offers

The Municipal Theater provides the community with a theatre of high professional quality that will give to the interested student both a progressive and comprehensive classroom training and an opportunity for practical experience.

The dramatic

school has courses for the professionally interested as well as for those who are interested in the theater as a leisure-time activity.

Call the Municipal Theater office at MaJOrdan 7-7700, for further

rina Adult School, information.

The Americanization Program

offers the for-

eign-born a chance to read and write the English language as well as providing him with the necqualify for citizenship. An in addition to evening classes, is offered in this field. Through the cooperation of the United States Office of Immigration and Naturalization and the courts, certificates of competency issued by Americanization teachers of the adult schools are accepted from candidates for citizenship in lieu of public essary

training to

especially large

day program,

examination.

Driver Education Classes furnish adults interested in learning to drive an automobile with an opportunity for practical classroom and behindthe-wheel instruction. For information in this regard, call Mission Adult School, HEmlock 1-4899.

Schedule of Report Card Dates The following schedule of report card dates has been approved for the School Year 1950-51: October 20—7 Weeks First reporting period. December 1 6 Weeks Second reporting period. February 1 7 Weeks Third reporting period. March 16 6 Weeks Fourth reporting period. May 4 6 Weeks Fifth reporting period. June 15 6 Weeks Sixth reporting period.

— — — — —

Opera Company Coming

Pacific

Opera Company will present its fourth annual season of favorite operas at popular prices at the War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco, beginning November 29, it was announced by the company's manager, Jack

The

Pacific

Pisani.

The operas in the 1950 repertoire, under the musical direction of Arturo Casiglia, include "Tosca," "La Boheme," "Madame Butterfly," "Carmen," "Cavalleria Rusticana," "I Pagliacci," "Rigoletto,"

The

and "The Barber of

of

Other principals

will include

Selma Kaye,

re-engaged for "Tosca," tenor Walter Fredericks, whose talent has been recognized by a contract with the San Francisco Opera Association and who will be heard in some of his successful roles, tenor Ernest Lawrence, one of the leading tenors of the Pacific Opera Company, and baritones Francis Barnes and Kyrill Borissow.

In addition to the November season the PaOpera Company is planning out-of-town engagements, including a series of performances in Sacramento and at the Berkeley High School Community Theatre. cific

Transcription Catalog Available

A

revised transcription catalog has been

sued by

KALW.

sent to each school to the principal, library

person in charge of learning also

many men and women

Work

in this

is

offered the

community who

wish to complete their high school education or make up credit deficiencies. Commerce Adult High School specializes in this type of training and is accredited to the University of California. Educational counselors at the school advise on necessary courses. For further information call

MArket

1-2230.

Courses in Practical Nursing give training, including class instruction and supervised hospital

is-

Copies of the catalog are being

aids.

and

Copies will

be available at Visual Aids department, 750

Eddy

Street,

Teachers

Library,

and at the KALW library Gompers Trades School. Offices

Accredited High School

Seville."

"Madame

Butterfly," Tomiko Kanazawa, will, in addition, this year be heard in the part of Mimi in Puccinis "La Boheme." star

practice, to those preparing for

work

Supervisory at

Samuel

in this field.

Cosponsored by the nurses' organizations, hospitals,

and unions, these

classes

extend for one

year and are designed to meet the certificate re-

quirements established by various further information, call

WAlnut

1-2707.

states.

For

Marina Adult School,

.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Extension Courses



Existing Janitorial Vacancies

State College

Following is a list of Extension Courses offered by San Francisco State College this fall:



Ed. e370R Workshop in Education for Human Relations (2 units). (Pre-requisite: enrollment in Ed. s370R, Summer Session, 1950). Place: 1465 Masonic Avenue. Time: Saturday, 8-12 a.m. First Meeting: September 30. Instructor: Margaret Heaton. "7



Esperanto. (2 units). Place: Lang, el 10 Campus, College Hall 215. Time: Thursday, 7-9. First Meeting: September 28. Instructor: Helene Wolff. For.

Health Ed.

el72

—Health

Place: Cleveland School.

Meeting: September 21. el 66

—History

Education.

(2

units).

Time: Wednesday, 4-6. First Instructor: Ethel Mealey.

Mexico. (2 units). Place: Polytechnic High School. Time: Wednesday, 7-9. First Meeting: September 27. Instructor: Theodore TreutHist,

of

lein.



el 53 A Polytechnic

Music Place:

Music Appreciation. (2 units'. High School Music Room 171.

Time: Wednesday, 7-9. First Meeting: September Instructor: Wendell Otey.

27.



Special Problems in Psychology. (3 Psych. el99 units). (Psychological Problems in Nursing). Place: S. F. County Nurses Assn., 1155 Pine Street. Time:

Wednesday, 6:30-9:30. First Meeting: September Instructor: J. Maurice Rogers.

— CI 06 Janitor -- Balboa High School — C 06 Janitor — 93 Grove Street night — CI 06 Janitor — Lowell High School. — CI 02-1 Janitress — Grant School.

1 1 1

1

(

These vacancies

will

)

be held open for a period

of fifteen days except in case of emergency.

may be temporarily be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A. 916 Ortega Street. Even though these filled,

they

may

positions

still

These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

Additional State College Courses

Two courses in the field of speech correction are now being offered at San Francisco State College:

attention of teachers who arc interested in applying for sabbatical leave, is invited to the fact that applications for such leave must be received in the Personnel Office on or before October 1, 1950, if the teacher anticipates taking leave effective with the spring semester

The

1951.

Teachers are also reminded that the granting of sabbatical leave is based upon the merits of the individual case and subject to the approval of the Superintendent and the Board of Education. Not more than 2% of the teaching staff may be absent on sabbatical leave at any one time, nor can more than one teacher for each fifteen teachers in a particular school be gone at the same time on this type of leave.

Opera Tickets for Children

The San Francisco Opera Guild is sponsoring two student matinee performances of Madame Butterfly by Puccini. Principals will include Albanese, Valdengo, and other leading artists of the San Francisco Opera Association. These performances are scheduled on Thursdays, Oc-

October 26, at 1:00 p.m., in the War Memorial Opera House. Ticket application blanks have been distributed to schools which have purchased tickets in past years. Other -

schools interested in ordering tickets

1

(night).

20.

Sabbatical Leave Data

tober 19

Notice is hereby given that the following janvacancies exist in the San Francisco School System:

itorial

may

secure

such blanks by calling the Guild Offices in the Opera House, UNderhill 1-4008.

Advanced Speech Correction (3 4:00-6:00. Teachers working for a speech credential will need this course in corrective technique. It gives rather detailed study at an adEducation

units)

362,

Wednesday

vanced level. Education 361, Speech Correction: Basic Principles and Techniques (2 or 3 units) Thursday 4:00-6:00. Designed to help teachers understand typical speech defects among pre-school and school children, and techniques for their prevention and correction. Approved for publication by: Watt A. Long, assoc, supt., of instruction,

SFUSD.

Community Chest Coin Boxes Coin boxes for the Community Chest are being sent to all schools and principals will locate them throughout schools in much the same manner as they did last year. When the drive is over contact the Community Chest office and a representative will call at your school to collect the boxes. Comic papers will be sent on October 16 to the schools by the Community Chest and

may

be distributed to students.

Teachers' Credential Data All teachers are reminded that in order to be paid for their services, they must have on record in the Personnel Office of this school district a valid California teaching credential of an ap-

propriate type. If you have recently applied for, or secured, a credential, make certain it has been recorded.

Teachers whose credentials

November

will

30, are requested to take steps to renew their credentials.

expire on immediate

'^4Z*&&fixi*tC€4jC&'

PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN s«fi»c VOL. XXII

Business

OCTOBER

No. 5

— Education

Day

that on Noteachers of San Francisco will participate in one of the biggest and most unique projects ever conducted in this city. It is Education Day, sponsored by the Business Chamber of Commerce of San Francisco in co-

The Superintendent announces all



operation with the Board of Education. The regular institute scheduled for October 13 has

been changed to this will

in the

this later date,

provide something

way

of

an

and

it is

new and

hoped

profitable

institute.

The purpose

of this day is to acquaint teachers with the various industrial and commercial business enterprises of this city through firsthand experiences. These first-hand experiences

not be merely plant tours but also will include informal conferences with top management of the many participating companies. It is desired that through these conferences both businessmen and educators may better understand each others' contributions to the community. Teachers will gain a deeper insight into the actual needs and opportunities of the community and in turn will be able to counsel and guide their students from a more practical standpoint. By the same token, businessmen will come to understand better the objectives and associated problems confronted by the teachers. will

The program is planned for a full day, starting at 8:30 a.m., with a short general meeting at the Fox Theatre. Following this meeting the teachers will proceed to the various firms they are going to visit. The complete program and transportation procedure will be explained in a later bulletin. It should be pointed out at this time that the E Day" is not to give the teachers intent of "B a canned program, but rather to give them something in accord with their particular interests. The entire day is designed to serve teachers and it is hoped they will plan ahead in regard to



specific questions

and problems. The Chamber

Commerce and

the host companies are anticipating an active response, and they desire to present a day that is both interesting and beneof

1950

Students Join Crusade for Freedom Drive

Scheduled for Novemer 10 vember 10

2,

Thousands of students of San Francisco's schools last week pledged all-out support to The Crusade for Freedom by adding their signatures to the Freedom Scrolls. at George Washington High Tuesday took on special significance as the student body tendered official welcome to two exchange students from Germany. The youngsters, Helge Schmodde, from the British zone of occupation and Eva Gossheide, from the American zone of occupation, both 17, will study at George Washington High for one year under a State Department sponsored plan originated by the American Field Service of the

The campaign

School

last

International Scholarship organization.

On the stage at George Washington High School's inauguration of the Crusade for Freedom were Commissioner Levison, tendent,

of

Education John G.

Edward H. Redford,

assistant superin-

secondary schools, Principal O. I. Schmaelzle and Wheelock Bingham, Northern California chairman of the Crusade. They, together with approximately 2,000 students welcomed the visiting exchange students to the school as well as to the City of San Francisco. Last Friday, the student body of City College San Francisco staged a giant rally climaxing a three-day campaign for the Crusade for Freedom. In addition, the students of the elementary schools have been more than cooperative in doing their part in making the Crusade for

of

Freedom a success. The Freedom Scrolls and the Freedom Bell displayed in San Francisco last week, will become part of a permanent Freedom Shrine to be erected at West Berlin's Tempelhof Airdrome on United Nations Day, October

24.

Pent House Available Available to business or professional woman two-room pent house, beautiful view, includes tile bath and shower, in home of San Francisco teacher. ($50.00). Reached by Nos. 5 or 31 bus. Telephone: BAyview 1-6254 (evening.)

—unfurnished

ficial to all.

Questionnaires will be circulated this week, will be asked to check their choices of types of firms they would like to visit. Please

and teachers

out these questionnaires promptly and return them to the principal, as the program hinges on the desires of the teachers. fill

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN TRIBUTE TO A CALIFORNIA TEACHER The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools

is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2.

(Alice Rose Power) fit may my poor words impart, may wring and press my eager heart, That urges, urges me to rend the veil

No

tribute

Tho

California

I

Betwixt the eternal and

For

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

tho'

my

this earthly pale.

heart's devotion feels the choice,

Word impotences manacle my voice; And what I fain would sing untrammeled,

Monday, October 2 Physicians will visit the following schools: Mission, Abraham Lincoln, Roosevelt. Grattan. Mission NS., Ridgepoint NS., Ulloa, Argonne. Twin Peaks, Lafayette, John Muir.

Thins

to the

Nay more,

I

whisper of a

leafless tree.

know

I would extol

A paeaned psalm

that

if

to this

ennobled

free,

soul,

must write with angel-feathered quill Dropped from his wing on some Sierra hill. 1 needs

Tuesday, October 3 Physicians will visit the following schools: Portola, Polytechnic, Balboa, Presidio B, Portola B, Redding, Hunters Point No. 2, Aha Vista, Sanchez, Visitation Annex, Edison NS. Regular meeting. Day Adult 3:45 p.m. Marina Adult Teachers. Americanization School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets.



Wednesday, October 4 Physicians will visit the following schools: Roosevelt, Lowell, George Washington, James Denman B, Marina B, Hawthorne, Candlestick, Raphael Weill, Parkside. Bryant, Fremont.

Thursday, October 5 Physicians

will

the following schools:

visit

As hasting

to a

kindred

spirit's call,

He lightly fanned o'er spired Sequoias And dip my pen in scarlet toyon dye

Bruised from a pendant cluster hanging high.

And write

AMEN with reverent head and low

Spurred by

warm

And

all

dust

Sieved

in

gratitude's candescent glow, with flecked escholtzia gold the shade of some quaint Mission old. it

And knowing

this,

it

but remains to pray,

That her great heart, forever and a day, Live on in us, who tread a kindred road, Which she, great Argonaut, so bravely showed.

—Charles

Commerce, Everett B, Horace Mann B, Washington Irving, Daniel Webster Vac. 45,

Galileo,

Andrew

Longfellow, Alvarado,

tall,

F.

Walsh.

Jackson. Patrick Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Henry. Friday, October

6

is hereby given that the following janvacancy exists in the San Francisco

Notice

Physicians will visit the following schools: Balboa, Lowell, Aptos B, Fairmount. Grant, Jefferson, Burnett, Golden Gate.

itorial

School System: 1 CI 06 Janitor



—James

Denman

Jr.

High

School.

This vacancy will be held open for a period

Administrative Appointment Approved The Board of Education at its meeting of September 21, upon recommendation of the Superintendent, adopted the following resolution relative administrative appointments:

RESOLVED:

That

effective

September

21,

1950, E. Dalton Howatt be transferred from his position as teacher at the Marina Adult School and appointed a principal in the Adult Division of the San Francisco Unified School District subject to the usual probationary period, and assigned to the Benjamin Franklin Adult School. .

.

of fifteen days except in case of emergency.

may be temporarily be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing to Stanley R. Leavell, superEven though filled,

it

may

this position still

visor of school janitors, 93

Grove

Street,

and

through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street.

These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

Amend 1950-51

School Calendar

.

Upon recommendation

of the Superintend-

Board of Education at its meeting of September 21 adopted the following resolution amending the 1950-51 School Calendar:

ent, the

In

GRACE

Memoriam K.

Retired Teacher

GALLAGHER

—Abraham Lincoln

High School August

9,

1950

RESOLVED: That the School Calendar for 1950-51 be amended so that the Teachers' Institute shall be November 10 instead of October 13. October 13 will then be a regular day of school.

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Standard School Broadcast on Radio Station KALW

Fifth Anniversary

Two hundred years of American family life and music will provide the backdrop for the twenty-third annual Standard School Broadcast, scheduled to go back on the air over 65 radio stations in the western United States and

San Francisco's observance of the fifth anniversary of the ratification of the United Nations Charter will be held at the scene of the signing of the Charter in 1945. A full and colorful program is being planned for the evening of October 24 in the War Memorial Veterans Auditorium. Among the participants will be Governor Earl Warren, Mayor Elmer Robinson, Fred Smith, United Nations consultant and Past President of Lions International. Paul Speegle will act as master of ceremonies.

United States Charter

Alaska in September.

Theme the

title

of the series will be

"Music and

American Family, 1750-1950".

Much

attention will be given musical works European origin which became a part of the American scene after their premieres in this country, and, of course, many fine American of

compositions

will

take

leading

roles

in

the

course.

Carmen Dragon will again conduct the Standard School Broadcast Orchestra of 35 pieces, and some of the dramatic artists heard on the 1949-50 series will again appear in the cast. The

popular, "Standard School Broadcast", hour educational program may be heard by schools this year through the facilities of (91.7 M.C. Channel 219 FM) in ad-

All seats for the final program will be reserved ($1.50). Information is available at the regional office, 68 Post Street; the Unit-

AAUN

ed Nations Information Center at the City of Paris; or the office of William R. Talley, 210 Post Street,

New

YUkon

6-1476.

Course Offered

at U.S.F.

half

KALW

dition to

KN.BC.

KNBC

airs the show at 10:00-10:30 a.m.. Fridays, the show may be heard through at 2:15-2:45 p.m., on Tuesdays. This delayed broadcast will assist teachers who wish to listen

KALW

the show a second time for testing or for those teachers not able to listen to the broadcasts because of a time conflict. to

Teachers manuals may be secured for the "Standard School Broadcast", from the Standard Oil Company, Educational Department, 100 Bush Street, San Francisco or through the school's music supervisor.

Music supervisors and assist

KALW

will be glad to teachers in utilization of this learning aid.

Junior Achievement Transcription

of

This electrical transcription will be aired on Tuesday, October 3, over (91.7 Channel 219, FM) once each hour, on the hour at 10.00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 12:00 Noon, 1:00

course:

Bus. Educ. 250 (2 units) Seminar in Business Education. Problems in Secondary School business courses. This will include group discussion and individual work calling for independent research by the student. Thursday, 4-5:45 p.m. First class

meets October

Approved

MC

and 2:00 p.m. Senior High Schools or may hear this program using the new "Educator", Freed-Eisemann AM-FM classroom radio receivers supplied to each school.

January Music Festival Dimitri Mitropoulos, celebrated conductor of

New York

Philharmonic Symphony Orchesconduct eight concerts with the San Francisco Symphony during the San Francisco Art Commission's January Music Festival at the War Memorial Opera House. the

tra, will

concerts will be spaced from January 1 Harold Zellerbach, Art Commission president, and famed guest soloists will to 27, according to

appear with Mitropoulous on each program. Soloists include Blanche Thebom, Nathan Rubin, Oscar Levant and others.

A

major highlight of the

turing Miss trid

Senior high schools, in rotation, to give principals an opportunity to use this data over a central public address system or with selected groups.

be a con-

Thebom

as

"Clymnestra" and As-

Varney

in the title role. Charlotte Boerner, Ligeti and Walter Fredericks will be

heard in supporting

being sent to

series will

cert version of Richart Strauss' "Elektra," fea-

Desire

is

Watt A. Long, assoc,

SFUSD.

others

electrical transcription

5.

for publication by:

supt., of instruction,

p.m.

An

San Francisco announces

The

Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of schools, and Richards A. F. Ballou, executive director of Junior Achievement of San Francisco, Inc., have recorded an eight-minute discussion of the Junior Achievement Program.

KALW

The University opening of a new

The

roles.

series will consist of five concerts, three

which

will be repeated. Season tickets for the events range from $2.50 to $8.50. Reservations will be by season ticket only, starting Monday, October 2. Address San Francisco Art

of

five

Commission, Symphony Box Office, Sherman and Clay, 165 Kearny Street. San Francisco.

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN

New

Schedule of Forums for Adults Released

Films in the

Audio-Visual Department Sound film. 20 minutes. and routine of a middle class Chinese professor. Reflects

1949.

Family.

Peiping

Q915.1-MS5. Daily

lives

Peiping family of a straightened circumstances of 1948 although the film carefully excludes evidence of existence outside the walls of the family home. El JH SH.

1947. Sound film. 22 minutes. Q9 1 4. 4-MS4Fr. Description of natural beauties, farming, wine-making, chief towns. French spoken is unusuallv clear, slow and well enunciated. French III on. SH C Adult. What Is A City? 1950. Sound film. 10 minutes. 323.35-MS3. Explains the location and growth of cities in terms of the needs of the people. Elementary.

La Champagne.

Pacific Island. 1949. Sound film. 18 minutes. Q919Life of the natives on Marshall Islands, showing typical coral islands in the Pacific area. 6th grade on.

MS1.

We Make

Butter.

637-MS8. The dren

who

10 minutes.

1949. Sound experiences of a small group of chilfilm.

learn

how

to

make

butter. Primary.

The Mycological third

Wednesday

is

of each

every

in the Horti-

cultural Building at City College of

San Fran-

cisco. It

is

almost time to go out on interesting

mushroom hunts

that will give satisfaction to

the mycophagist, the artist, the ast

and the lover

camera enthusi-

mushrooms and studied with a practical and experienced members. is

a non-profit society

give

to

a

good knowledge

and

which aims

ditional information

about

the

wild

Francisco's

hills

Fe R. R. Program "Carlsbad







October — San Francisco Stock Exchange — Tuesday, "Romance and History Securities" — Arnold Grunigen, — Film "Super Inch" — Forum. Friday, October 6 — New Zealand Night — Hon. 3

of

Jr.,

of

New

New

Zealand. Films of









Friday, October 13 French Night Hon. Jean de Lagarde, consul general of France Films of France, songs and dances of French people, forum.





Tuesday, October 17 San Francisco Stock Exchange "Securities Markets" Carl Schick, San Francisco Stock Exchange; "Financial Statements" Charles C. Clarke, Davis, Skaggs & Co.









Friday, October 20 Argentine Night Hon. Jose Saravis, consul general of Argentina, films and forum on Argentina.

R.



gerald,

Dean Witter

&

may

obtain ad-

by telephoning Salvatore

Billed, JUniper 7-8271, or writing him boa High School.

at Bal-

ExFitz-

Co.

—Spanish Night—The Hon. Spain — Films Spain, open October 31 —Trans World Night — Tuesday, "Flight Sun," "Flight New York." Friday, November Mr. —Japanese Night— Japanese Overseas Agency — Films Japan, open October

Friday,

Mr. Hcrce, consul forum discussion.

27

of

of

Airlines

to

3

persons

forests. Interested

— Santa

Caverns," "El Navajo." Friday, September 29 Korea Night Hon. Young Han Choo, consul general of Korea Films of Korea and open forum. ("Cry of a Nation")

to

mushrooms inhabiting San



of Pueblo," "Let's See Chicago,"



shall be collected, identified

This society



Tuesday, October 24 San Francisco Stock change "Current Economic Outlook," Philip J.

of the outdoors.

Species of edible and poisonous

group of

September 26

— Tuesday, "Land



now meeting month



Friday, September 22 Philippine Night Dr. Jose Imperial, counsul general of Philippines Film, dances, music of Philippine people. S.

Tuesday, October 10 San Francisco Stock Exchange Securities Available for Investment Carl Schick, San Francisco Stock Exchange.

Society of San Francisco,

spring,

last

nings:

Colin Baliss, consul of Zealand, open forum.

Mycological Society Meetings

organized

The following lectures and programs will be presented by Commerce Adult High School in auditorium. Hayes and Franklin Streets, its from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. on the following eve-

Nisi-

bori,

of

forum

discussion.

Tuesday, November

Eddy

— Films

comes from

7

—American

The above programs pices of the

They

Can Co.

—R.

L.

of Alaska: also a look at where our food and its preparation for you.

are given under the aus-

San Francisco Board

of Education.

are free to the public.

Blood Donors Needed

Three hundred blood donors daily are needed meet San Francisco's quota for American wounded in Korea, according to Sydney Walton, chairman of the Armed Forces Blood Procurement Committee of the Red Cross. to

Every night an with

its

Army

plane leaves for

Tokyo

life-saving cargo of

blood given today will

whole blood. Your save an American life in

Korea tomorrow. Call the Red Cross or Irwin Memorial Blood Bank, JOrdan 7-6400, for an appointment.

Atomic Bomb Data Available Copies of the Examiner's Schoolcast recent

program on atomic bomb defense are now

avail-

able for use in schools.

The Schoolcast script, prepared by Dwight Newton and based on The Examiner's atomic

bomb

defense plan published recently,

is

de-

signed for classroom discussion.

The Examiner will provide copies of the program for use in classrooms upon request.

J

t<&nct4iC
PUBLIC SCHOOLS VOL. XXII

NOVEMBER

No. 13

27, 1950

French Centennial Celebration Under

Way

Elaborate plans are under way by the French Centennial Committee of San Francisco to com-

Uncle Sam Says

of achievement by French pioneers in California. The celebration will extend through November 30. Highlighting the French Centennial will be a historical exhibition to be held during November at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor. The period to be covered is from 1850

memorate one hundred years

BUY U.S.

AVINGS BONDS REGULARLY

SECURITY PUTS A SMILE ON THE MCE OF ALL

to 1906.

All phases of French activity will be illustrated. This includes the earliest documents and historical objects concerning the history of the French Church, the French Hospital and the

French newspapers. Earliest available items of the Gold Rush Days will be on display, having to do with pioneers in the fields of medicine, viticulture, horticulture, industry, commerce, crafts and trades. A special stress will be placed upon the French artists and writers who worked in California between 1850 and 1906. The French who distinguished themselves in the theater and in music in California during those years will also be commemorated. French Ambassador to Washington, Henri is honorary chairman of the committee

Bonnet,

and

will

come west

dent at large editor of the

President

member

is

of

is

for the celebration. Presi-

the historian Gilbert Chinard,

French American Review. Acting Dr. Raoul H. Blanquie, an active the California Historical Society,

long interested in the part played by the French in the history of our State. In charge of research

Jehanne BieCentenFrench inspired the try-Salinger who on the her book nial by the publication of CentenFrench in California entitled "Notre

and the committee's secretary

aire."

The

treasurer

is

American

circles in

All information

active in

and questions

historical

rected

the

to

well-

French

relative to the

exhibition should be di-

French Centennial Committee

care of the French Library, 414

San Francisco.

Vayssie,

San Francisco.

November

Buying U.

Mason

Street,

S.

Savings Bonds

is

the

know to stop worrying about money. And if you persist in worrying, after starting to pile up money the sure, automatic way, the only worry you'll have is how best to spend it when you start cashing in best

way

I

At that time you

after ten years.

will receive an extra crisp ten dollar bill for every thirty dollars you in-

vest today. tunity.

Now

is

your great oppor-

Your government offers two great plans, both of them automatic and both profitable. They are the Payroll Savings Plan where you work, or, if self-employed, the Bond-a-

Month Plan at your bank. If you can sign up for a $37.50 bond each month they'll grow to $4,998 in 10 years* V.S. Treasury Department

is

Rene

known hotelman and very

>V AMERICANS

City College Library Grows City College of San Francisco library was increased by 664 volumes, including a set of nearly two dozen books relating to World War I donated by Dr. A. J. Cloud, president emeritus, Clement Skrabak, librarian stated recently.

Books are usually donated by members of the faculty, students, industries, various government agencies, or persons with an interest in college welfare. Books, pamphlets, and periodicals arrive

almost daily, Skrabak added.

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, November 27 Physicians will

visit

the following

schools:

Golden Gate OT., Cleveland, Commerce, MisHC, sion, James Denman B., Pacific Heights ArMuir, No. John Ridgepoint 1, Hillcrest, gonne, Alta Vista, Andrew Jackson. Science Demonstration Meeting. 4:00 p.m. Childhood Education. Third for Association



Grove

Floor, 93

Street.

Book by Educator "The Great Adventure

of Pedagogy' with our students in the School of Education here until the copies we posses are practically falling to pieces. Actually, we lent one to a student in New Guinea and lost it for a while but eventually recovered

visit

the following

schools:

Golden Gate OTR., Girls High, Redding, Polytechnic, George Washington, Aptos B-, Fremont, Junipero Serra, Bay View, Emerson, Sheridan Vac. 20., Argonne NS., F. S. Key Vac. 45. Meeting of the Educational 3:45 p.m.



Council. Office of the floor, 93 Grove Street.

Superintendent,

third

and the Philippines

"Goofus" New

Paul Revere, Alamo.

Friday,

December

1

Physicians will visit the following schools:

Fairmount, George Washington, James Den-

man

B.,

Presidio

B.,

Commodore

Name

Stockton,

Club Program Club of the San Francisco Col-

Italian

Women will present its annual entertainment on Wednesday evening, November 29, at 8:15 o'clock. The program will be given in the college auditorium and will consist of an lege for

exhibit of Italian art ware and costumes, displayed by members of the Club. Italian folk songs and dances will enliven the performance.

The program

Mary

is under the direction of Miss Bianchi, Miss Marjorie Petersen and Miss

Stephanie Alioto.

Roosevelt.

Christmas Seal Sale

Gold

— Testimonial Dinner

Room of

for

JC Hat

The hat was named by Ted McHale, City College student, who took first place honors in the hat-naming contest. The winning name was chosen from among those listed by students and McHale was given a Goofus for his efforts.

Daniel Webster, Candlestick Cove, Laguna-G. Gate NS., Jefferson, Glen Park, Sunnyside, 6:00

for

from Australia."

City College of San Francisco version of the style hat for California junior colleges in a state-wide hat-naming contest, Beverly Jank, associated student vice-president, said yesterday.

The

Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco, Portola B., Lowell, Aptos B., Horace Mann, Sarah B. Cooper, Franklin, Laguna 50.,

as well as

"Goofus" was the name bestowed upon the

Italian

Thursday, November 30

Honda Vac.

have a big department and students from New Zealand, Ceylon, Malaya

to us

new

Wednesday, November 29 Physicians will

We

come

Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco OT., Presidio G., .Balboa, Commerce, Everett B., Redding, Sunshine H., Hunters Point No. 2, Dudley Stone, Sherman, Sutro, Mission, Polytechnic SSC.

Pedagogy," written

ture

it.

Tuesday, November 28

of

by Clara Wilson Sanderson, member of the faculty of Marina Junior High School, as a practical guide to help teachers and practice teachers has just gone into its second edition. Among many commendatory adoptions of this book as a text in Teachers' Colleges the most outstanding was received recently by the author from Dr. George S. Browne who is Dean of the Faculty of Education of the Univerity of Melbourne. "We have used the book, 'The Great Adven-

Mike Voyne.

the Fairmount Hotel.

The 44th annual Christmas

Seal Sale of the

San Francisco Tuberculosis Association in progress. This

Wednesday, December 6



6:00 p.m. Fall semester dinner-meeting. San Francisco School Field Administrators. City

is

now

the Association's only public appeal for funds and its only source of revenue to carry on its year-around program of discovery and prevention of tuberculosis. is

College.

Thursday, December 7 Annual Christmas Dinner. Al-

7:00 p.m.

pha Theta



of Delta

Kappa Gamma. 3075

-

19th

4:00 p.m.



1

Annual Christmas Tea. San

Association.

Wednesday, December 13



Avenue.

Monday, December

Francisco Classroom Teachers' Chinese Room, 465 Post Street.

4:00 p.m. Annual Christmas Party. Council of San Francisco Women. Sir Francis Drake Hotel.

— SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Stanford University Offers Winter Quarter Courses

Chest Campaign Extended In San Francisco

Stanford University's School of Education announces that the following late afternoon, evening and Saturday classes for educational workers will be conducted during the Winter Quarter 1950-51: These courses are available for part-time registration by teachers and others regularly employed in educational work, who live suffici-

San Francisco's Community Chest and Military Services campaign went into an overtime period this week with extension of the drive on a postcard mandate of 1100 volunteer leaders who requested more time to push the drive over the top. Because the campaign stood 25 percent short of the $3,400,000 goal at end of the scheduled campaign period Friday (Nov. 17), the group, section and unit chairmen of the five campaign divisions were polled by mail to get their views on lengthening the campaign. Returns showed them overwhelmingly in favor of the extension. "This is not a clean-up period," Campaign Chairman Mr. Heller emphasized. "It is a lenghtening of the regular campaign period, and it is aimed at big money. cannot leave the city's vital health, welfare and recreational agencies stranded in poverty in a period when the increasing shift toward a war economy is uprooting families and creating new emergen-

ently close to the University. Insofar as possible, students will be encouraged to relate their study to the professional problems with which they are concerned in their present positions. Part of the work for advanced degrees may be met

by

type of study.

this

REGISTRATION PROCEDURE Registration dates for educational workers are: Winter Quarter: January 3 through January 6. Teachers in the vicinity who plan to take part-time courses must have been admitted to the University prior to November 1, 1950. Complete credentials must be filed at the Registrar's Office by November 1, 1950.

Consult the Registrar's Office for details. All students procedure outlined below in registering

will follow the for this work.

Secure registration booklet in the Registrar's 1. Office, Administration Building. Inform the clerk that you wish to register for special classes for educational

We

We cannot back down on our pledge to supply urgently needed USO-type services for cies.

the

armed

forces."

workers.

"Bulletin" Deadline

Proceed to the School of Education for advisor's signature and approval of the program it is planned to

All members of the certificated staff are invited to furnish contributions during the school year to the San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin which they think would be of interest to other members of the teaching professions. Copy intended for publication in the Bulletin should be mailed or delivered in sufficient time to reach the Superintendent's office by 12 o'clock noon of the Tuesday preceding the Monday of publication. This "deadline" is necessary to insure delivery of the bulletins to the schools on the following Monday mornings. Administrators, teachers and organization secretaries are requested to make a special not of this "deadline." Articles must be signed and should be type-

2.

Call at the General Office of the School of EduRoom 20, First Floor, secure the Dean's signature and complete certain departmental record 3.

cation,

blanks. 4. Secure and file a class card for Independent Study, Thesis and Dissertation. Registrar s 5. Have fees adjusted to unit basis at the Office: and pay fees at Cashier's Office in Encina

Hall. 6.

Return the registration booklet, signed,

to the

Registrar's Office.

TUITION AND CREDITS A maximum registration of will

six (6) quarter units be allowed full-time educational workers. The

minimum

tuition

payment

is

for 3 units of credit.

Tuition (including incidental fees) for 6 units. $90.00 Tuition (including incidental fees) for 5 units 80.00 Tuition (including incidental fees) for 4 units 70.00 Tuition (including incidental fees) for 3 units 60.00 .

NOTE:

This scale applies only to full-time em-

written, doublespaced,

more than 200 words

Articles announcing courses should be cleared through Watt A. Long, associate superintendent of instruction, prior to submission to the Super-

intendent's office.

ployed educational workers.

Monday 123—Public Rm. 6.

School

Law— (3)

Breyer,

M

of

35. in 7-10.

Shaftel (3)

(3)

of

2.

in

(2-5) Bartky/Odell

W

17.

Thursday 224 tary

—Organization

and Administration of Elemen-

Schools— (3) Bartky Th 7-10 Rm.

2.

Kappa Gamma Christmas Party The Alpha Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa

Delta 7-10

Modern Elementary Schools 244 The Curricula — — M 7-10 Rm. Women's Physical Edu461 — Individual Study Knapp M cation — Wednesday Porter W 7-10 Education — 100 — History Rm. General School Administration 322 — Seminar 7-10 Rm. (3)

and should not contain

to insure publication.

Gamma

its annual Christmas dinner Miss Ruth Anderson, 3075 Nineteenth Avenue, on Thursday, December 7,

the

at

will

hold

home

of

at 7:00 p.m.

243

Th

— Secondary

7-10

Rm.

School Curriculum



(3)

Gillette

53.

Saturday 222 Secondary School Administration (3) Odell S 9-12 Rm. 6. 225 School Plant Planning— (3) MacConnell S

— —

9-12

Rm.



2.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Federal

Aptitude Testing Program

Government Vacancies

The expansion

of

defense

agencies of

the

Federal Government, due to the present emergency preparedness program, has already created shortages in certain fields in the labor ft is forseen that the need for skilled

markets,

workers, professional people, and various other trained persons will become critical as the pro-

gram

gains

momentum. In

anticipation of fu-

ture needs and cognizant of the present requirements of the service, the United States Civil

Service Commission invites the cooperation of all citizens in our effort to recruit well-qualified

persons for the Federal Service.

At present, vacancies exist in the following Draftsmen (various options), Chem-

College for Women anbiennial "Aptitude Testing Program" will be held at the Lone Mountain campus on Saturday, December 2. Testees are asked to enter by the tower entrance.

The San Francisco

nounces that

its

A

battery of tests (personality, music, art, speed and accuracy, mechanical reasoning, language usage, and others) will be administered throughout the day, at a nominal cost. Applicants should be on hand to register at 8:15 o'clock. Afternoon tests will begin at clerical

one o'clock. The college dining-room open for the testees from 11:30 to 12:30.

will

be

Young women between the ages of 16 to 25 are eligible to take the tests. Each one is free to make a selection or to take all of the tests.

categories: ists,

Engineers,

IBM

Operators, Engineering

Aids, Typists and Stenographers. For complete information concerning employment opportunities,

interested persons should be referred to

Regional Director, Twelfth U. S. Civil Service Region, Room 128, Appraisers Building, 630

Sansome

Street,

San Francisco

11, California.

Council to Hold Annual Xmas Party The Annual Christmas Party of the Council of San Francisco School Women will be held at the Sir Francis Drake Hotel on Wednesday. December 13. Tea ($2.50) will be served at 4:00 p.m.

Yearbook Receives Honor Award

A

First Class excellent rating

week

was given

this

to the 1950 Telescope, student

yearbook at Galileo High School, in the 30th annual National Scholastic Press Association contest.

Some

902 yearbooks were entered and only 11 were rated better than Galileo's. Patricia Querry, now at the University of Idaho, was editor; Bill Dito, business manager; and faculty adviser.

New Course at CCSF A course in atomic will

Roger H. Wood,

warfare and radiology

soon be offered as part of the

fire

college

San Francisco acrecent statement by Michael Lo

training at City College of

New

Books

in

Teachers' Library

cording to a

Cooper, Dan H. Schools for Young Adolescents. Chicago, Superintendents' study club, 1949. Four significant reports were the result of the study group of Chicago's metropolitan superintendents who thoroughly investigated the

programs

in various schools

from

Presti, fire college coordinator.

The course

will

be modeled after the one

now

being given at Treasure Island.

the fifth to the tenth grades. Best, Clarence J. Music Rooms and Equipment. Chicago, Music educators national conference, 1949. Based on the theory that only by working with the community leaders in the building program, and utilizing all resources, the author has prepared this practical manual, with floor plans and illustrations, for educators everywhere.

Brown, Muriel W. Partners in Education. WashingD. C, Association for childhood education international, 1950. "A guide to the study of home-school

Meeting Planned

Fall

The San Francisco School

Field Adminishave their Fall semester meeting at dinner on Wednesday, December 6, 6 p.m., at trators will

City College. Call Pacific Heights School,

ton,

relations."

"Hamrin, Shirley A. and Paulson, Blanche. Counseling Adolescents. Chicago, Science research associates, 1950. The first book in the Professional guidance series, this presents techniques for counseling from both the directive and non-directive approaches. Council of State Governments. The Mental Health Programs of the Forty-eight States. Chicago, Council of state governments, 1950. An important study dealing with an ever-growing problem.

Hall, D. M. The Dynamics of Group Discussion. Danville, Illinois, Interstate printers, 1950. An associate professor at the University of Illinois has prepared a helpful bulletin for discussion leaders with the whys, whats and hows of group discussion.

1-0414, Miss Ethel Duncing,

now

WEst

for reserva-

tions.

Testimonial Dinner for Mike Voyne

Any men

interested in attending the

Voyne Testimonial Dinner Gold ber

Room

1,

of the

to

Mike

be held in the

Fairmount Hotel on Decem-

at 6:00 p.m., are requested to contact

William E. Feiling at Lowell High School as soon as possible. Enclose a check for ($5.00) for reservation.

five dollars



PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXII

DECEMBER

©i

No. 14

Annual Christmas Concert

Payroll Savings

By CCSF Students

Plan Outlined Randolph

More than

100 students of the music departSan Francisco will help get the Christmas holiday season off on a festive note by inviting the public to their 16th annual Christmas Concert, Thursday evening, December 7, at 8:15 p.m., in the College auditorium, Ocean and Phelan Avenues.

ment

of City College of

This year's concert program, directed by Miss Flossita Badger, opera workshop instructor, will the singing and enactment of "The Night Before Christmas," as arranged by Fred Waring, in addition to traditional carols and familiar Christmas songs. Soloists include Andrew Stathis, Cynthia Burke, Ruth Paxson, and Eileen Scott.

feature

There

is

no admission charge to the concert.

Christmas Vacation Period

The Christmas vacation is from December 18 to January 2, inclusive. The mid-term recess was shortened one day day's holiday. al

traveling

to allow for an additiontime after the New Year

President of the

1950

Matson

Navigation Company, and chairman of the Payroll Savings Committee, Northern California District, has sent a statement to the Superintendent urging members of the school department to enroll in the Payroll Savings Plan.

The Treasury Department has been urging view of the crisis which the nation faces combatting the menace of communism, a stepped-up program for the sale of U. S. Savings Bonds should be carried on during the next two months. An increase in payroll savings now will have an important effect in reducing inflationary pressures, and help to create a balance of our national economy. This will be of tremendous importance to the national interest and will also be helpful to the individuals who will set aside part of their savings in sound securities at good interest rates. that, in

in

If any schools or teachers are interested in availing themselves of the opportunities thus afforded, they may secure the form for authorization for withholding from the Payroll Department, 93 Grove Street (Mrs. Sophie Haake

UNderhill 3-4680). Interschool Coordination Program December 5, 9 a.m. -12 noon. Visiting Day.

Americanization Teachers' Meeting

The regular meeting of the Day Adult Americanization Teachers will be held in the Marina Adult School, Fillmore and Chestnut Streets, on Tuesday, December 5, at 3:45 p.m.

Elem. Asst. Principals to Meet

The Elementary

Sevier,

4,

Assistant Principals' Asso-

ciation will meet Monday, December 1 p.m., in the Activity Room of the

1,

at 4:00

Sanchez

School.

Christmas Seal Sale Seal Sale of the San Francisco Tuberculosis Association is now in progress. This is the Association's only public

The 44th annual Christmas

appeal for funds and its only source of revenue to carry on its year-around program of discovery and prevention of tuberculosis.

All students planning to go to senior high schools out of district will visit the selected high schools for program checking and orienta-

Counselors should accompany groups tion. wherever possible and should take the Interschool Assignment and Preprogram Cards with them to the high schools. Children do not handle these cards. Where there are but two or three students to visit a high school and no counselor plans to accompany them, the Interschool Assignment and Preprogram Cards should be sent by mail previous to this visiting day. Conferences between the counselors can then take place as needs arise. This plan offers opportunities for junior high school counselors to visit senior high schools in various parts of the city. Before taking advantage of the opportunity, it is suggested that the counselors refer to "Suggestions Related to Interschool Coordination", Page 3, Section IID.

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Gift to

The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of Schools 93 Grove St., San Francisco 2, California is

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, December 4 visit the following schools: Mission, Abraham Lincoln, Marina C, Pacific Heights, Starr King Vac. 40., Monroe, Jefferson NS., Sanchez Vac. 40. Meeting of the San Francisco 3:00 p.m. Secondary Assistant Principals' Association.

Physicians will

Commerce OT.,



Youth Guidance Center, 375 Woodside Avenue. Tuesday, December 5 Physicians will Presidio,

Galileo,

Laguna Honda

visit

district supervisor in the public schools of

ington, D.

Balboa, Horace Mann G., Hunters Point No. 1, Dud-

HC,



Regular meeting. Day Adult 3:45 p.m. Marina Adult Teachers. Americanization School.

Wednesday, December 6 Physicians will visit the following schools:

Commerce OTR., James Denman, Abraham Lincoln, Girls High, Roosevelt G., Sarah B. Cooper NS., Lincoln, E. R. Taylor, Raphael Weill, Fremont, Marshall, Hawthorne. Meeting of the San Francisco 4:00 p.m. Chapter, International Council for Exceptional Children. Aha Vista School. Fall semester dinner-meeting. 6:00 p.m. San Francisco School Field Administrators. City College.





Hancock HC, Emerson, John Muir, Frank McCoppin, Farragut, Edison. 7:00 p.m. Annual Christmas Dinner. Alpha Theta of Delta Kappa Gamma. 3075 - 19th Avenue. Friday, December 8



Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco G., Lowell, Galileo, Commodore Stockton, Franklin, Bret Harte, Golden Gate, Sheridan, Hillcrest, Lafayette, Roosevelt.

— Meeting

of the

1

Room,

Sanchez School.



4:00 p.m. Annual Christmas Tea. San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association. Chinese Room, 465 Post Street.

ACEI.

died in 1949. ACEI recently received and placed in its Memorial Endowment Fund the Association's share, $5,325.79. The interest from this Julia Hahn Special Fund will be used to further the Association's work for children. Miss Hahn's wish is being fulfilled: that the tangible results of her work during her lifetime will continue to contribute to the improvement of the educational opportunities of both teachers and children."

"Mrs.

Hahn

Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: torial

1

—C 106.1 Working Foreman Janitor—City —C 106 Janitor—City College.

College.

These vacancies will be held open for a period of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily filled, they may still be applied for under the seniority rule. Request for transfer should be made, in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, supervisor of school janitors, 93 Grove Street, and through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66 A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only.

Secondary school teachers may secure maFrench and Spanish for use in their classes and also appropriate posters by calling the Information Center for the United Nations, EXbrook 2-5500, Miss Lillian Phillips, director. terials in

Wednesday, December 13



in 1942,

U. N. Materials Available

Elementary As-

sistant Principals' Association. Activity

Wash-

an active worker in the

provided that her estate be left in trust to her mother, Mrs. Laura Hahn, during her lifetime and, following Mrs. Hahn's death, divided equally between Teachers College, Columbia

1

tola G.,

as

ACEI. Miss Hahn, before her passing

Thursday, December 7 Physicians will visit the following schools: Aptos, Polytechnic, George Washington, Por-

Monday, December

C; and

University, and the

the following schools:

ley Stone, Cabrillo, Roosevelt.

4:00 p.m.

ACEI

Miss Lucille Schmidt, president of the San Francisco Branch of the Association for Childhood Education, suggests that the following article which appeared in the November issue of the ACE Branch Exchange may be of interest to many San Francisco teachers: "Many readers will remember Julia Lethald Hahn as the president of the National Council of Primary Education; as the author of textbooks for primary children; as a lecturer; as a

4:00 p.m. Annual Christmas Party. Council of San Francisco School Women. Sir Francis Drake Hotel.

Monday, December 18 8:15 p.m.



Annual meeting. The Public

Education Society. Auditorium, Roosevelt Junior

High

School.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN School Broadcast Conference

Public Education Society

Dates Announced The 1950 School Broadcast

Annual Meeting Dec. 18

Conference, a national meeting on the use of radio and television in education, will be held for the 14th consecutive year at the Sherman Hotel in Chicago on December 12, 13 and 14. This Conference has long been regarded as one of the outstanding meetings each year where educators

Dr. J. E. Wallace Sterling, president of Stanford University, will give the principal address of the Annual Meeting of the Public Education Society to be held Monday evening, December 18, at 8:15 p.m., at Roosevelt Junior High School. There will be no admission charged to Society members and guests.

mutual

The title of Dr. Sterling's address, "CrossCurrents in Education", is indeed provocative.

to discuss their

and broadcasters gather

problems and, through demonstrations, to try to improve upon methods and techniques for utilizing radio

and

television as teaching instru-

ments. In the period of the Conference's existence, the use of radio in the schools has beestablished procedure; members have in the development of radio for school use; in the establishment of

come an

seen and taken part

more than 100 AM and FM school-owned stations, and in the introduction and rapid acceptance of the disc and tape recordings as teaching tools. Now, at the 14th meeting, time is to be given to consideration of the part television will play in education both for adults and for inschool youth.

The opening

session of the

consider the problem,

Conference will

"The Influence

of

Mass

Communication." A distinguished speaker will explore the problem as it applies in general, after which panel members will

Media

of

consider specific areas of influence, either needed or existing. At an afternoon session, conferees will be exposed to many different radio program formats, and teacher-pupil demonstrations of how they

can be used effectively to motivate new interests in various subject areas.

"Listening, title

A

Communication Skill," is the where participants will

years a member of the Executive Committee of the SBC and at present connected with the Wright Branch of Chicago City Col-

many

lege.

Five major facets of educational broadcasting will be demonstrated during the three-day network of Wissession: the State-wide of the consin, as operated by Station University under the direction of H. ,B. Mcstation and how it. Carty; the low-power in a large public radio need; community fulfills a school system; the Indiana University School of

FM

WHA

FM

many commercial staand a commercial stain-school program, WLS-Schooltime series.

the Sky,

which

suggested to the President Louis H. Heilbron that early requests for two tickets be honored to the extent that tickets are available. Of course, single tickets will also be sent to staff members who need only one ticket.

In view of the great size of the meeting, the Society will not hold a general dinner prior to the annual meeting as has been customary in the past. Dinner will be planned, however, prior to a forum to be held in the Spring. It is the Superintendent's belief that this ad-

by Dr. Sterling, a renowned educator, will be of interest to all staff members. He earnestly dress

urges, therefore, that all staff members who have the time available make every effort to

hear this address. Applications for tickets should be sent immediately to Hugo Arnstein, acting secretary, 2111 Franklin Street, San Francisco 9.

I.C.E.C. to

Members

Meet December 6 of the certificated staff are invited

meeting of the San Francisco Chapter of the International Council for Exceptional Children to be held at Alta Vista School on to attend a

Wednesday, December

6, at

4:00 p.m.

A

report of the State meeting held at Bakersfield on November 18, at which time a State Chapter of I.C.E.C, was organized, will be given.

The Special Education Staff of San Francisco State College will serve refreshments.

services

tions within the State;

tion

The Superintendent has

Society's

of another session

consider a neglected area of communications under the chairmanship of David Heffernan, for

To the extent that it is possible to do so, the Society will make available two tickets to each teacher who wishes to use them and requests these tickets. The Society will do its very best to honor all requests but cannot promise to do so in the case of late requests for tickets.

five different approaches to educationbroadcasting service will be presented by the director of each, who will explain his entire operation, its philosophy and its purpose, and

These

al

demonstrate how his programs are serving listeners. In each instance, it is planned for a

live-program demonstration to be broadcast over Station WBEZ, owned and operated by the Chicago Public Schools.

and transcriptions will two angles their usefulness in the classroom, and the required technical equipment and the necessary skill for making them.

Tape

recordings, discs

be discussed from at

least



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Great Books Sponsors Lectures At Marina Junior High

the Library Professional Teachers'

Recent Accessions

in

Kinder, James S. Audio- Visual Materials and Techniques. New York, American Book Company, 1950. A functional and practical volume on the best modern theory and practice in the use of the newer and more varied instructional materials.

Clifford E. The Counseling Interview. York, Prentice Hall, 1950. Graduate students at Michigan State, Harvard, Denver and the University of Southern California have contributed toward this helpful volume on one of the basic techniques of

Erickson,

New

counseling.

Benjamin, Harold. The Cultivation of Idiosyncrasy. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1949. A stimulating lecture on the cultivation of individual talents.

Moffatt, Maurice P. Social Studies Instruction. New Prentice-Hall, 1950. Organization, teaching, and supervision of the social studies in secondary

York,

schools.

Bales, Robert F. Interaction Process Analysis. Cambridge, Mass., Addison-Wesley Press, 1950. Problems of first-hand skills and ethics in human relations as they appear in small groups.

Dorner, Alexander. The Way Beyond 'Art'. New York, Wittenborn, 1949. This book raises, in the field of art, the great and vital question of our time: how can we achieve a better-working unity among men.

Audio-Visual Education Association of California. Setting Up Your Audio- Visual Education Program. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1950. Organizing the visual aid program, equipment and facilities, Inservice education are among the topics included in

handbook. Kinney, Lucien. Better Learning Through Current Materials. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1950. The results of three years experimentation by the California Council on Improvement of Instruction has resulted in this very useful publication on classthis well-illustrated

room

case histories of the use of current materials for enrichment, for resource material and to develop leadership.

Wallin, John E. Personality Maladjustments and Mental Hygiene. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1949. An extensive revision of a well-known text, which presents a systematic discussion of the outstanding types of personality maladjustments, with detailed, practical suggestions for preventing and overcoming mental conflicts and for developing normal personalities.

Evans, Ruth. Supervision of Physical Education. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1950. Effective programs in physical education in the supervision field, suggested techniques of teaching, guidance program building, etc.

brought out S.R.O. signs generally reserved for entertainers, returns to the city this week under the auspices of the San Francisco Great Books Committee. Dr. Adler will give two lectures at Marina Junior High School Auditorium. The first, "Men, Beasts, God," on Monday evening, December 4, will consider the consequences of man's conflicting concepts of his own nature on politics

Garrison, Karl C. The Psychology of Exceptional Children. New York, Ronald Press, 1950. A revised edition of one of the standard texts on the exceptional child, both gifted and handicapped as well as those emotionally upset. Froehlich, Clifford P. Guidance Services In Smaller Schools. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1950. Examples of effective guidance practices from all parts of the U. S.

The Federal Government and EduYork, McGraw-Hill, 1950. An intensive

Allen, Hollis P.

New

study, the result of the

Hoover Commission, on

all

federal activities in education, with the opinions of several hundred individuals and organizations who

were consulted

in connection with the study.

and morality.

In the second lecture, "Unity or Chaos," on Wednesday evening, December 6, Dr. Adler will take the stand that world government is both necessary and possible. Both lectures will begin at 8:00 p.m. The author of "How to Read a Book" and "How to Think about War and Peace" has been plugging for the past two decades for the rediscovery of the great ideas preserved in the writings of the western world. Lecture proceeds will be used to make the reading selections available to members of Great Books groups in this area and to train group leaders in discussion techniques. Tickets for $1.00, tax included, may be secured from The Great Books Foundation in the San Francisco Public Library, or at the door.

CCSF Choir

in

Concerts

A

Cappella Choir from City College of San Francisco in their first off-campus appearance this year presented a program of Christmas music, last Thursday at the Emporium. Cynthia Burke and Ruth Paxson were featured.

The program was

the first in a series of three the second and third of which will be given December 5 for the Portal

Yuletide

concerts,

Hurst Women's Guild and December 7 when the choir will be seen and heard on their traditional Christmas concert at the College. S. F.

C. D. Arts & Crafts In Our Schools. Toronto, Ryerson, 1949. The Ontario Department of Education tested out the ideas in this practical bulletin in over 3000 schools in the province. Gaitskell,

cation.

Mortimer J. Adler, the author-educator whose philosophical lectures here last winter

Classroom Teachers' Meeting

The December meeting

for School Representatives of the S. F. Classroom Teachers' Association will be held on Monday, December 11, at 4:00 p.m., in the Chinese Room at 465 Post Street. A program of holiday music will be given by the Teachers' Choral Group of Lawton School and Teachers from Le Conte and

Daniel Webster Schools. All

members

are invited to attend.

Secondary Asst. Principals to Meet The next meeting of the San Francisco Secondary Assistant Principals' Association will be held at the Youth Guidance Center, 375 Woodside Avenue on Monday, December 4, at 3:00 p.m. All members are urged to be present.


PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN VOL. XXII

DECEMBER

No. 15

interest to those

December 15, 1947: "Soon we shall be

day period for Jewish people

have its fullest possible effect upon the minds and hearts of men, and 'Peace on Earth to Men of Good Will' were to become an actuality, how different the world scene now and in the future would be. An appreciation of the significance of this day and action based upon it would do much to promote the brotherhood of man of which there is so cance of

much

this

day were allowed

to

discussion.

"Knowledge and understanding beget tolerance and respect for another's point of view. The Christian, his love of the event it commemorates, the beauty of its music, poetry, and significance of this season to the

drama

can

be

shared

with

our

1950

who are Christians. At this season Jewish children also present gifts to

The Superintendent has been requested by a group of citizens to reprint in the Weekly Bulletin the following article which appeared in "the Superintendent's Corner," celebrating the most sacred holiday for the Christian world. Were it not for this holiday, it would indeed be a dull and truly bleak month for Christians. It is a time when children and adults look forward to the exchanging of gifts to bring happiness to one another. If the real signifi-

11,

each other.

"The

religious

significance of

this

is its

eight

commem-

oration of the fact that, in the year 165 B.C., the Temple in Jerusalem was reclaimed from Syrian Armies oppressing the Jews. For eight days a cup of oilwas burned in the

Temple

to

although

it

commemorate its redemption, appeared that the small amount

of oil found in the Temple was but one day.

sufficient for

"There are forces in the world today which would divide us into groups and magnify our differences. The respect for one another's viewpoint which comes from knowledge and understanding will do much to counteract these forces of

evil.

"May

that same light which shone nearly 2000 years ago and brought hope to a world torn by dissension again bring by its shining to

members

and

of the staff, pupils in the schools

and happiness sacred Christmas Season."

their families, hope, faith,

during

this

Sincerely,

Jewish

friends.

"About this same season of the year Jewhomes observe the Chanukah feast days or Feast of Dedication which should be of

ish

U. C. Extension Offers Course

Superintendent of Schools

Council of School

"Recent Advances in the Field of Physics." This U. C. Extension course will include lectures and demonstrations covering the advances

Mary at

Women to Meet

McCarthy

will be the guest speaker the Christmas Meeting of the Council of

C.

in the various fields of physics during the past ten years. Each field will be covered by a

School Women to be held Wednesday, December 13, at 4:00 p.m., in the French Room of the Sir Francis Drake Hotel. All teachers are

specialist.

invited to attend.

made

The

open to all science teachers. Classes will meet on Tuesday evenings, beginning January 16, from 7 to 9, on the University course

is

Campus at Berkeley. This course sponsored by the California Science Teachers'

call:

Tea

Margaret Dunn,

feahter,

WA

$2.50.

OR

For reservations Ruth Penne-

3-0357;

1-3986; Elsie Schoh,

WA

1-8550.

of California is

Association.

Teachers

who wish to enroll in the course M. Van Waynen, 184 Duncan

should contact

Way, Oakland Approved

Elem. Asst. Principals to

The Elementary Assistant Principals' Association will meet Monday, December 11, at 4:00

11.

for publication by: supt. of instruction, SFUSD.

Watt A. Long,

Meet

p.m., in assoc.

School.

the Activity

Room

of

the

Sanchez

1

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN The San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin issued weekly during the school year from the Office of the Superintendent of S< hools

is

93 Grove

St.,

San Francisco

2,

California

Delivery Dates for

December Time

Rolls

December Time Sheets should be

delivered Payroll Department, fourth floor, 93 Grove Street, on the following dates: the

to

Teachers

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Monday, December

1

Physicians will visit the following schools: Roosevelt, Cleveland, Mission, Balboa, Jean Parker, Le Conte, Bryant, Fremont, Guadalupe, Glen Park, Andrew Jackson.

4:00 p.m.

— Meeting of the Elementary As-

sistant Principals' Association. Activity

Room,

Sanchez School.



Annual Christmas Tea. San 4:00 p.m. Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association. Chinese Room, 465 Post Street.

Physicians will visit the following schools: Marina B., Lowell, Horace Mann G., Yerba Buena NS., Sunshine, Ridgepoint No. 2, Dudley Stone, Cabrillo, Irving M. Scott, Edison NS., Roosevelt, Sanchez SSC.

the

Dec. 16-30, 1950

Adult schools Other schools

Dec. 26, 1:00 p.m. ...Dec. 26, 8:00 a.m.

Members of the administrative or supervisory who are contemplating retirement or res-

staff

ignation at the end of the first semester are requested to inform the Superintendent of this fact as soon as possible.

Such information will be treated as confidenupon the request of any staff member. Pro-

Wednesday, December 13 visit

Clerks and Janitors:

Retirement/Resignation Data

Tuesday, December 12

Physicians will

Senior high, junior high and Dec. 15, 8:00 a.m. 11 days (Principals and assistant principals.. 20 days (Symbol "A" Dec. 18 thru 22, 26 thru 29 (Symbol"H"Dec. 25 Dec. 15, 1:00 p.m. Adult schools

elementary schools Teachers

tial

following schools:

Commerce, Polytechnic, Emerson, Raphael Weill HC, Bay View, Alta Vista, Lafayette, Lawton, Miraloma. Annual Christmas Party. Coun4:00 p.m. cil of San Francisco School Women. Sir Francis Drake Hotel. Presidio B.,

viding the Superintendent with such information will enable the central office to plan more effectively for replacements and prevent undue interruption of the work of such position.



Thursday, December 14 Physicians will visit the following schools: Francisco, Horace Mann B., George Washington, Presidio G., Washington Irving, Potrero NS., Page-Gough NS., John Muir, Longfellow,

City College of San Francisco engineering students transferring to the University of California do well, as 27 instructors report placing of every student completing the courses satisfactorily.

Instruction at City College is given in architectural drafting, map drafting, structural steel detailing, air conditioning, operating engineer-

Paul Revere, Alvarado. Friday,

Engineering Students Placed

December 15

Physicians will visit the following schools: James Denman, Everett B., Balboa, Mission, Redding, Candlestick, Ulloa, Roosevelt.

ing, refrigeration, building, contracting, survey-

ing; radio, television, electronic,

and

engineering; electrical machinery, and ical technology.

electrical

mechan-

Monday, December 18



8:15 p.m. Annual Meeting. The Public Education Society. Auditorium, Roosevelt Jr.

High School.

City College

News

Five thousand students enrolled at City Colbegan a Christmas vacation on Friday, December 8, to return to classes on Tuesday, January 2, 1951, according to an announcement made yesterday by Dr. Louis G. Conlan, lege

Christmas Vacation Period

The Christmas vacation is from December 2, inclusive. The mid-term recess

18 to January

was shortened one day al

day's

holiday.

to allow for

traveling time

after

the

an addition-

New Year

president.

Applications for enrollment in the Spring term which begins on February 2, 1951, are now being received by the Registrar's office on the West campus adjacent to Balboa Park.

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN C.T.A. Group Insurance Plan

The Guardsmen year their Raising Drive. this

are conducting again Christmas Tree Fund girls

were

summer camps with

their

Last summer, 1,452 boys and able to attend

expenses paid by the funds raised through the Guardsmen Campership Fund Campaign. Those of us who are teachers appreciate more than others what a differ-

summer camping experience can to children who might otherwise have to spend much of their vacation on ence

make

the city streets.

The work of the Guardsmen is an invaluable service to our community. The Superintendent is happy to recommend wholehearted support of this campaign. All proceeds from the sale of Christmas trees at the

Guardsmen

lot,

California and

Spruce Streets, will go toward summer camperships and youth guidance work. Since our boys and

girls

work

are the direct

Guardsany assistance we can give this worthwhile campaign through the purchase of Christmas trees is most deserved.

beneficiaries of the

of the

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association plans a reserving of their group insurance project. This has been in operation very successfully for nearly 21 years with more than

$500,000 having been paid to the members in The last open period under the group project was in 1947 and the Central Committee has requested the company to again reservice the project. Meetings will be held in each school building at which time a full explanation of the project will be given and all questions answered. Building meetings will be held outside the school hours and will be approximately 15-20 minutes. If it is possible to give this amount of time during a regular faculty meeting in the larger schools, it will be greatly appreciated by the Classroom Teachers' Association. The Superintendent is requesting principals to cooperate with the San Francisco Classroom Teachers' Association in making this open period as successful as possible. The Reservicing Committee would like to begin speaking at these meetings immediately following the Christmas holidays. benefits.

men,

Misdirected Service Calls

The

attention of principals is called to the many schools are calling the Diof Supplies regarding the following

fact that too vision

services:

Superintendent of Schools

trol,

Garbage,

and Elevator

Window

Cleaning, Pest Con-

Service.

Please call Division of Buildings and Grounds when you require information pertaining to these services. direct

Christmas Story Hour

A

special Christmas story

Wednesday, December

Main

Children's

13, at

hour

will

be held

4:00 p.m., in the

Room, San Francisco

Public

"Bulletin" Deadline

Library, Civic Center.

Mrs. Hermine story-teller.

The

Van

See reverse side of General Requisition under "Special Services."

Gelder

will

be the guest

Girl Scout Glee Club, under

the direction of Mrs. Alvin Arlom, will sing carols.

All members of the certificated staff are invited to furnish contributions during the school year to the San Francisco Public Schools Bulletin which they think would be of interest to other members of the teaching professions.

invited.

Copy intended for publication in the Bulletin should be mailed or delivered in sufficient time to reach the Superintendent's office by 12 o'clock noon of the Tuesday preceding the

Art Exhibit at 750 Eddy Street

Monday

All boys

There

is

and

girls

and parents are cordially

currently an exhibit of recently ac-

quired instructional materials in the Art Work-

shop at 750 Eddy Street. This display will be

open daily from 3:00 ary

2.

The

to 4:30 p.m., until

Febru-

exhibit consists of reproductions,

of publication.

This "deadline" is necessary to insure delivery of the bulletins to the schools on the following Monday mornings. Administrators, teachers and organization secretaries are requested to make a special note of this "deadline." Articles must be signed and should be typewritten, doublespaced, and should not contain

contemporary textiles, wallpapers and other materials to be circulated for

more than 200 words

classroom use.

announcing courses should be cleared through Watt A. Long, associate superintend-

art books, art films,

Elementary and secondary teachers, counand administrators are cordially invited.

selors

to insure publication.

Articles

ent of instruction, prior to submission to the Superintendent's office.

'

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BULLETIN Existing Janitorial Vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the following janivacancies exist in the San Francisco School System: 1 C 102.1 Janitress Sherman School. 1 C 106 Janitor Roosevelt Junior High School.

torial

Uncle Sam Says

— — — — — C 106 Janitor—Visitacion Valley Elementary School. —C 106 Janitor—San Miguel Elementary School. —C 106 Janitor— Phoebe A. Hearst Home School. — C 106 Janitor—Noriega Home School. Elementary School. —C 106 Janitor— —C 106 Janitor— Crespi Home School. 1

1

UNCLE

1

SAM

1

SAYS'.

Hillcrest

1

1

These vacancies

EVERY AMERICAN'S OPPORTUNITY

BUY U.S.

filled,

SAVINGS BONDS

will

be held open for a period

of fifteen days except in case of emergency. Even though these positions may be temporarily

they

may

seniority rule.

-

made,

still be applied for under the Request for transfer should be

in writing, to Stanley R. Leavell, super-

visor of school janitors, 93

Grove

Street,

and

through the Civil Service Building Maintenance Union, Local 66A, 916 Ortega Street. These vacancies are for transfer of permanent employees only. Here's an old saying: "There's nothing like being without money to make one appreciate having it." And now is your opportunity to make certain that you'll always have plenty of it by putting some into U. S. Savings Bonds every payday. The safest, surest way of providing

roll

is by saving the reguautomatic way through the PaySavings Plan where you work.

Or,

if

League to Present Xmas Program

The Golden Gate Story League, sponsored by the Park-Recreation Department of San Francisco, cordially invites children and their parents to its 7th annual Christmas program. Christmas stories, puppets, fun and gaiety are promised. Storytellers in costume of different nations will be: Polly McGuire, Josephine Gardner, Amy Deeter, Evelyn Median, Alice Hutchison and others. The date December 18, time: 7:30 p.m., San Francisco Museum of Art, Civic Center, McAllister and Van Ness Ayes.

future security lar,

self-employed, enroll for the

Bond-a-Month Plan at your bank. No fuss, no bother with either plan. Your bonds will be delivered to you. And in 10 years your money will come back to you with interest, $4 for every $3 you invest. U.S. Treasury

Department

Open

to the public.

Five Concerts for Children S. F.

Classroom Teachers' Meeting

The December meeting

for School RepreClassroom Teachers' Association will be held on Monday, December 11, at 4:00 p.m., in the Chinese Room at 465 Post Street. A program of holiday music will be given by the Teachers' Choral Group of Lawton School and Teachers from Le Conte and Daniel Webster Schools. sentatives of the S. F.

All

members

in progress. This

Seal Sale of the is

now

the Association's only public appeal for funds and its only source of revenue to carry on its year-around program of disis

covery and prevention of tuberculosis.

Kurt Herbert Adler, widely known conductor, will

be in charge of the concerts.

The

pro-

grams are designed ot stimulate among children a desire to hear the best in orchestral music.

Alexander Fried, music

critic of

The Exam-

iner, will deliver

Christmas Seal Sale

The 44th annual Christmas

concerts in the Opera House beginning Saturday, December 16, at 10:30 a.m.

explanatory remarks designed to make the compositions played more intelligible and enjoyable to the youthful audience.

are invited to attend.

San Francisco Tuberculosis Association

The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra will perform its annual series of five young people's

Program for the opening concert includes the Overture to Beethoven's "Fidelio," Dance of the Tumblers from "The Snow Maiden" by Rimsky-Korsakoff, and Debussy's "Festivals." Tickets, at "movie prices," are available at the Opera-Symphony Box Office, Sherman,

Clay

&

Co.

<=S/2^ ^^ici^toclcO'

JANUARY

No. 16

VOL. XXIi

American History Award Winners Listed Below

is

a complete

list

of winners in the

Bay areawide 1950 Hearst Newspapers American History Awards: First, Eric Elsesser, 2835 Steiner Street, George Washington High School, $600; second, Angelo Cosmides, 1640 O'Farrell Street, Lowell High School, $300; third, Joanie Gock, 3927 Lawton Street, Abraham Lincoln High School, $200; fourth, Ann Elizabeth Hall, 221 El Cerrito Avenue, Piedmont, Piedmont

High School, $75; Forty-first

fifth,

Stanford

M. Lyman,

431

Avenue, George Washington High School,

$50.

Sixth to fifteenth, $15 each: Bernard Haas, 1606 Twenty-seventh Avenue, Lowell High School; Isao Fujimoto, P. O. Box 116, Madrone, Live Oak Union High School, Morgan Hill; Mary Abbott, 654 Ninth Avenue, Star of the Sea Academy: Carlos W. Nolte, 2206 Twenty-fifth Street, St. Peter's Boys' High School; Theodora Steele, 582 Twenty-seventh Avenue, George Washington; Paul Fong, 1555 Jackson Street, Lowell High School; Patrick H. McLin, 13553 Bancroft Avenue, San Leandro, San Leandro High School; Victor Fruman, 3744 Geary Boulevard, George Washington; Deborah Sampson, 25 Scenic Way, Lowell; Ronald W. Brosemer, 967 Hillcroft Circle, Oakland, St.

Ignatius

High School.

3,

Tea- Reception! to Honor Commissioner Geo. W. Johns Members of the certificated staff are

1951

plan-

ning a tea and reception in honor of George W. Johns, retiring commissioner of the Board of Education, on Monday, January 22, at 4:00 p.m., in the

Gold

Room

of the

Fairmont Hotel.

The

following teacher and administrator organizations are sponsoring the event: Association for Childhood Education, San Francisco Classroom Teachers, San Francisco Federation of Teachers, San Francisco Teachers' Association, City College Faculty Association, Council of San Francisco Schoolwomen, Elementary School Assistant Principals' Association, Elementary School Principals' Association, Secondary Assistant Principals' Association, and Secondary Principals' Association.

Memo to

Principals

Some elementary

school principals have called to the attention of the Superintendent" the fact that there is being mailed to them, without

Sixteenth to forty-first. $5 each: Thomas Trilling, 161_Tara Street, Balboa High School; Mafalda Maughelli, 1659 Grant Avenue, Galileo High School; Andrew Leong, 810 Clay Street, High School of Commerce; Marshall Leve. 140 Magellan Avenue, Abraham Lincoln; Neil Malloch, 1360 Montgomery Street, George Washington; George Simcox, 556 Central Avenue, Polytechnic High School; Dennis J. Doolin, 3635 Broderick, Galileo; Rudolf J. Stohler, 1584 Milvia St., Berkeley, Berkeley High School; Nona Lee Prendergast, 1912 St. Jarlath St., Oakland, St. Elizabeth High School; LaForest E. Phillips, 2245 Octavia Street, St. Ignatius High School; Carolyn Gail van Every, 686 Glenlock Way, Redwood City, Sequoia Union High School; William J. Kempenich, 1633

any request on their part, a propaganda sheet from the American Russian Institute, 101 Post

Arroyo Avenue, San Carlos, Sequoia Union High School; Anne von der Lieth, 1124 Mandana Boulevard, Oakland, Piedmont High School; Jean Smith, 1656 Funston Avenue, Mission High School; Patricia Kelly, 516 Princeton Road, San Mateo, Mercy High School; Evelyn Jeanne Paula, 164 Lake Avenue, Piedmont, St. Elizabeth High School; Roland Persson, 1305 Aberdeen Drive, San Mateo. San Mateo High School; Ronald Foreman, 200 Van Ness Avenue, High School of Commerce; Virginia Waxman, 2010 Lyon Street, Lowell; Frances Melanephy, 3814 Army Street. St. Paul's High School; James Hall, 434 Ser-

a copy of the letter for

rano Drive, Abraham Lincoln; Zita Levine, 1711 Forty-second Avenue, George Washington; Wilbur Lee, 650 Jackson Street, High School of Commerce; William R. Edyar, 453 Fairmount Avenue, Oakland, St. Mary's College High; David T. Little John, 1016 Walnut Street, San Carlos, Serra High School; Leonard Calegan, 1008 Cortez Avenue, Burlingame, Serra

High School.

Street,

entitled,

"U.S.S.R.

FACT SHEET,

a

monthly newsletter." P