Sports Illustrated 1963-06-03

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BOB HOPE OF THE CLEVELAND INDIANS

The handsome

HOBO

-good-looking casuals that stay that

way

Hobo— as carefree as a shoe can be! Soft brushed pigskin uppers specially treated to shed water, dirt and and keep the Hobo handsome. Cool, and only 12 ounces light, too, with soft crepe soles to cushion each At your Pedwin store— now. Meet the stains, step.

HOBOby HODO HOBO

Gol< Sheet 12.99.

Juniort for boys 6.99. Other Pedwin stylet 9.99 to 12.99. Higher Denver West and Conodo.

All

,

pedwin.

999

young ideas

PEON DIVISION.

BROWN SHOE COMPANY.

ST. LOUIS. MISSOURI. Also

Brown Shot Company

el

in 5r>oes

Canada. IW.,

Parlli,

Ontario.

Why VW

does the Volkswagen have 4 forward speeds?

The hos 4 forward speeds because 3 wouldn't be enough and S would be one too many. The 4 forward speeds let you get the most out of the engine without straining it. And without swollowing up o lot of gas. 1st gear gets you off to a running start. And 4th gear is actuolly overdrive,- it lets the engine relax (and live longer)

when you're on the highwoy. Just to moke it eosy, oil 4 gears ore synchromesh. You con shift up, down and But

maybe more

then onylhing

else,

boredom. owner said, "You feel you

shifting helps relieve the

VW

As one have something Shifting

to

do

notionol sport. lots of

4-$peed

On

sidewoys without crunching.

with driving again."

gears may even turn into a new

people are paying foncy prices

stick shifts, just to

the

VW, one

est tronsmissions

is

get

in

on

for

tne fun.

of the world's smooth-

standard equipment.

So even

if

you don't

love with the ideo at

fall

first,

in

ot

least you're not poying extra

for the privilege.

Why

the Emperor of Austria sent an ambassador to Milwaukee

Franz Josef, Emperor of Austria (1867-1916),

knew a good

glass of beer

when he

tasted

it.

is now under new management, But the Schlitz standards of quality that im-

Austria

And when he

pressed Franz Josef are

Schlitz beer

Always



To paraphrase the Emperor, Schlitz gives you "real gusto— in a great light beerl"

High praise indeed. When it came to making beer, the Austrians were no amateurs.

Schlitz— the beer that made Milwaukee famous simply because it tastes so good.

tasted a glass of our good back in 1903, he promptly dispatched a royal envoy to study our methods "for the betterment of Austrian brewing."

still

in

effect today.

will be.

.

.

.

Stoats Illustrated published weekly by Time Inc., S40 N. Michi, gan Ave., Chicago 11. III., except one issue at year end. Sccond-claM postage paid at Chicago, III. and

Contents JUNE

3.

Volume 18. Number 22

1963

at additional mailing ofRces. AU' ihorized ns second-class mail by ihe Post Office Depariment. Ottawa, Canada and tor paymeni of postage in cash. U.S. and Canadian subscriplions S6.7S a year. This issue published in national and

photofitaph by hiark Kauffman

18

The

separate editions. Additional

Spitter

Back

Is

pages ot separate editions numbered or allowed for as follows:

That controversial and outlawed pitch raise the heat

is

back again to

— and humidity— of the pennant races

El'ES;

eastern,

Wl-

western.

W4; special, SPI-SP4. AcknowMgmenis on page 78

22 Getting Fit to Fight Again Arnold Palmer, resting at home, discusses his recent slump and says he is ready to come back strong

26

A In

Spirit that

Wrecked a Computer

an age of planned

New

races.

miler, Peter Snell, struck out

on

Zealand's magnificent

his

own — and won

30 The Moral Force of Sport Athletics, under fire at

home,

is still

among our finest

ex-

ports, writes Sargent Shriver, Peace Corps director

32

Good Looks on

the Ladies’

Tour

Fresh young faces and vigorous promotion are giving en's professional golj a

38 Slipperiest Fish

wom-

new image

in the

Sea

Eels are not easy to love. But they do provide fun for the fisherman and food for the gourmet

48 Shipshape New

designs

in the

and

Next week

Beach House

discoveries

make

the

summer

cottage a

THE

NEW

Grand

color-filled delight

‘500,

-

rcplcic wilh

Hrix drivers

and

rear-

engined racers, should be the

64 Bob Hope: Behind

his

A

fastest ever.

Nut about Sports

gags and downing on the subject

is

Kenneth Kudeen on

reports from Indianapolis

a deep,

America’s premier auto event.

lifelong devotion to sports

WARREN GILES, the cherubic National League president, is a of integrity, honesty and



man

controversy.

As spokesman for own-

his

10 bosses, the club

ers,

he

fields his position well.

The departments 10 Scorecard

COLLEGE CREW is

56 Baseball

Week

77

Baseball’s

50 Rowing

78

For the Record

54 Golf

79

I9th

48

Design for Sport

O

Hole

196S BY TIME INC. Atx RIGHTS RBSERvEU. BETBODUCTIOK' WITHOUT

brilliantly

illuminated in eight pages of paintings by Harvey Schmidt

and the

first-person story

race by a Harvard

who can

PBRMIiUllON IS

of a

sophomore

write as well as row.

STRKTtV I'ROHIBITEO

3

Sports

Illustrated

Edi(or-in-clii«l:

Cbairman,

E)l4^ruIit(

Cbairman

Henry K. Luce

Comniillrv:

of Ibe Buaril:

Preiidrni:

Editorial Direct or:

Director: Richard

Cangcl

Kune. Hamilton

Maule. Jack

B.

Olven. Coles Phiniry. Ered R- Smith. Jeremiah Tax, Roy Terrell, Whitney Tower. Alfred Wright

Associate Editors: Waller Bingham. Joseph Carroll. Lee Linngon, Huston Horn. NS illiam Leggett, Gilbert

Rogin, Kenneth Rudetn,

Le-s

Uepartmcnl: H.irvey Grul, Martin Nathan hiitiiorsy, William Bernviein. Brendan F‘, Mulvey. Cailicfinc Smolich. Thomas Vanderschmidi Art

Editorial Asvistuiils: Jean

Senior Editors: fcrra Bowen. Robert H. Boyle. Arthur L. Brawicy. Robert Cantwell, Ray Cave. Robert Creamer, Andrew Crichton. Roger b. Hewlett, Gerald

Holland. Martin

E. Larsen

Heiskell

Hedley Donovan

Manaitinc Editor; Andre Liguerre AssiMiiiic Manacine Edilurk: Richard W. JohnMon. John Tibby

An

Ray

Andrew

James A. Linen

Woodcock

Lock hart, Theodore Sicphncy

Special Correspondents: CHIEF. Lari Burton; assistA-sf, Eleanore Milovovic; Allunia, J'lm Mintcr; Aiislm Jimmy Banks; Bahimure. VNalicr NNard;

Bulon Rouge. Dan Hardesty: Bellingham (H'o.i*.). Dolly Connelly; Boston. Leo Monahan: BuUnh. Dick Johnston: Carton City (AVr.), Guy Shipler Jr.; Charleston (S.C.). NNarrcn

Koon; Charlotte (A’-C.). Ronald Green; C'/iur/or/pfi>i//< (Pa.I. Chris Cramer; Chicago. William Furlong; Cincinnati. Jim Schottclkotte: Cleveland. Charicv Heaton; Columbus Ohio), Kaye Kessler: Dallas, Fort H'orlh. Wes Wise: Denier. Bob Bowie: Detroit. Pete Waldmeir: Greensboro (.A'.C.). Smith Barrier; Harrisburg tPa.), John P. Cowan: Houston, Jack Gallagher: Jacksonville. Bill I

Tom C. Brody, Gwilym S. Brown. Barbara Heilman, Alice Higgins, Mervm Hyman. Jenkins, Virginia Kraft, Rex Lardner, John Losevey, John Underwood. Jo Ahern Zill Staff NNfilers:

Dan

Photographs; mcTiAE editor, John M. Siebbinv; J. Bloodgood: assist ants. Bctiy Dick, iiiruTY. George

Dorothy .Merr; comribi'Tino PtioTiKiRAPHf RX. Phil Bulh. Jerrv Cooke. James Drake. W'aller louvv Jr., -Mark Kauffman. Ncil Leifer, Richard Meek. Marvin Newman. Herb Schariman, Brian Seed, Art Shay, Triolo

L.

Tony

Wriler-Reporlers: chief. Honor Eitrpalftck; Duncan Barnes, Julc Campbell, Frank Deford. Peggy Downey, F'lond, Pamela Knight, Morton Sharnik, Merman Weiskopf. Arthur M. Zich Jr.

Oav

Krporiert: Mary Snow, Eugenia Frangos, Mary Ann Gould, Mary Jane Hodges, Felicia Lee. .Susan McGrath. Rose Mary Mechem, Judy Murphv. Harold Peterson. Nancy Pierce, Patricia Rvan. Paul R. Stewart

Contrihuline Editors: Charles Goreo (Corifj). Carleton Mitchell tYachUnn). John O'Reilly iNalurt), NVilliam F'. Talbert iTrnnii)

Theodore O'Leary; Key M'rst Day: Las Vegas (Are.), George King;

Kasieir: Aoniuj City. tF'fo.l,

H.

b,

Lexington (Ag.J, Kent Hollingsworth: Lox Ange/p.r. Jack Tobin; l.ouisville. Larry Boeck: Miami. Edwin Pope; Minneapolis. C. R. Cordon: Sashville, George Barker; Oklahoma City, Bob Dellinger: Omaha, Robert Phipps; Philadelphia, Gene Moore; Phoenix lAriz.t, Frank Gianelli; Pittsburgh, Eddie Beachler; Portland (Ore.). John White; Proridente. John Hunlon: Salt Lake Cllv. Hays Gorev; Son Antonio, John Janev;5un Diego, AI Coup pee; jrort francisio. Art

Rosenbaum:

Sealtle.

Emmett Watson: South Bend

ilnd.), Joe Doyle; .Sr. Louts, Bob Morrison: Sr. Petersburg iFla.), Gordon Marsion; Syracuse (A'.P.). NVilliam Clark; Tallahassee tFla.'i. Bill McCrollia; fF'oro tTexoi). Dave Campbell: Washington. D.C.. M.iriie Zad; Winston-Salem (A'.C.), Mai Mallelie Canada: Calgary. Bob Shiels; Montreal. Arthur Siegel; Ottawa. Ciordon Dewar; Toronto, Rex MacLeod; Vancouver, Eric Whitehead

Foreign Bureaus: CHIEF, Richard M. Clurman; DEPl'John Boyle

TY,

Production:

Gene Ulrich iMunagrr). William Gal-

lagher. Daniel A. Rago: copy disk, Beatrice tiolllieb iChirf). Belly DcMcesicr, Geraldine Simmons. Helen

Taylor

Publisher; Sidney L. James Associate Publisher: Garry Vatk

Advertising Sales Director; Stephen E. Kelly

General Manager:

WITH THE PURCHASE OF A

pennsifivania

GOLF BAG A

full set

tNo's

club head covers

I thru 4) of

made

(jeemium quality

of glove-soft Mello-Vin*

Golf

$2.77 with the purchase of any Pennsylvania Bag retailing for $14 or more. Covers are

full

gusset type. Waterproof. Available

just

complementary equipment

bag. Check

to

is

noiv

R. Ammarell

Jr.

Comptroller and Assistant Secretary, John F. Harvey: Assistant Comptroller and Assistant Secretary, Charles L. Gleason Jr.; Assistant Treasurer. W’, G. Davis; Assistant Treasurer. Lvan S. Ingels; Assistant Treasurer. Richard B. McKeough.

in colors for

this

Sports

Special Buy from Pennsylvania wherever better golf

Raymond

EDITORIAL A AOVERTisiNO CORRESPONDENCE SpORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, RockeCenter, Nesv York 20, New ^ofk. Time Inc. also publishes Timi. Lifi. I ortisf. Architeltvral Forum, House & Home and. in conjunclion with IIS subsidiaries, the International editions of Timf and Life. Chairman of the Board. Andrew Hciskell: Chairman. Executive Commiiiee, Roy E. Larsen: Chairman. Finance Committee. Charles L. Stillman: President. James A. Linen; Executive Vice President and Treasurer. D. W. Brumbaugh; Vice President and Secretary, Bernard Barnes; Vice President and Assistant to the President, Arnold W. Carlson; Vice Presidents, Bernhard .M. Auer. Edgar R. Baker. Clay Buckhoul, R. M. Buckley. Jerome S. Hardy, C. D. Jackson. Arthur R. Murphy Jr.. Ralph D. Paine Jr.. P. 1. Prentice. Weston C. Pullen Jr.; feller

Illustrated

SUBSCRirT;©;. SERVICE

sold.

Championship Quality For Fifty Years PENNSYLVANIA ATHLETIC PRODUCTS/ AKRON.

SPORTS ILLLS0. 1

insure write

prompt

CHANCE OF ADDRESS

sets-

about your

aiiach label here MAIL TO: SPORTS illustrated North Michigan Ave Chicago II. Ill Charles A- Adams. GenT .Mgr,

540

.

TO SUBSCRIBE your

mail this form

subscription. subscription.

renew-

SUBSCRIPTION RATES

my

present

U.S..

Canada

and U.S. Possessions, yr. S6.75 other subscriptions. yr. $8.00. I

I

wuh new

payment, check one

All

If you're mos-ing. please let us know five weeks before changing your address. Place magazine address label here, your new address below. If you have a iiucstion about your subscription, place your magazine address label here and clip this form to your letter.

print

/ '

0^

NO(j} AtWdOOi' CAN SO 3i£> MlL£5 SetiJEeN MAJOR LUBRCAtCNS

And 6,000 miles BETtOcEN OIL 0HAN6E5 AND MINOR LUBES...

I

J

now available in Falcon sedans, hardtops, convertibles and There's more lo il than that. Charlie Brown. You also gel wagons the same V-8 power that did so well in the those service-saving leatures with any new car or wagon Monte Carlo Rallye! And with this new V-8 power you get you purchase from Ford.* America's only fully synchronized 3-speed manual transThey go 36,000 miles or two years between major chassis mission as standard equipment. Visit your 6,000 miles between oil lubrications America’s longest, Ford Dealer's soon fora Falcon test-drive. changes and minor lubes. Even the brakes liveliest line of wagons Tell him Charlie Brown sent you. adiust themselves! But back to those fun*tuepl SIJImn Biiv .in


.

.

.

FORD I



I



ride the big

waves with jantzen These are new Hawaiian Surfriders developed and tested

bers of the Jantzen international Sports Club: Rick Grigg, Pat Curren. and John Severson. in

longshoremen's

the big

overalls,

set. Six styles, all

that's almost canvas)

The waist

is

snug, and there

with button-down

have a button

Jantzen Surfriders developed

in

fly.

Hawaii.

is

plenty of

wax pockets on the back

room

And be

in

The

fabric

is

tough

by the big surf

twill like

mem-

the kind used

the seat for straddling the board while you're v/aiting for

One has football pants lacing front, two (of supertough twill Many colors, all sizes, priced from $5.95 to $7.95. Look for the

hip.

three have rust proof zippers.

sure to see the Jantzen movie "Surf." filmed at Sunset beach, Rincon, and Makaha.

uantzen^K^ '

VMTSClttS

Sky map of Megalopolis Plus Megalopolis, of course, is

its

rapid transit line.

is

the 400-mile-long supercity between Boston and Washington. Allegheny

We

serve

West

Virginia, plus Cleveland, Detroit, Buffalo.

serve people (a million Allegheny's system constellation

.

.

.

but

in

’62) by getting

Megalopolis, too ...

We

serve

map covers the busiest, most populous we really fly Convairs and Martins.

of Pennsylvania,

all

cities large,

them there and back

medium and

in

small.

much of West Above all. we

a convenient, comfortable hurry.

part of the U.S.A.

It

may

look like a

UUGH£NYAIRUmS El

Every Jaguar

XK-E comes

only one

way— fully equipped* {and ready

The unique fcalurcs of the Jaguar

XK-E

arc on each car— at a realistic price. You don't have to "huild-it-yoursell” from a costly list of optional extras,

modifications and frills. Much of what you get in an XK-E is immediately apparent. The long, sleek, aerodynamic look of the car tells at a glance of its phenomenal speed (150 m.p.h.) and roadability.

You always feel completely in command of an XK-E, no matter what the

'Monocoque'* body (more strength with less weight); independent suspension all around: four-wheel disc brakes. I he interior is functional luxury. Genuine leather covers the bucket scats. The dash panel is completely instrumented. A rear door on the Coupe opens wide for access to the large luggage area.

Roadster price: S5.325 P.O.E. (Coupe

*AI1

this at

to go!)

one price:

26.^ Hi’, twin overhe-iU-cani ) -lult-llow three S. U. carburetors— dual cxpipcs-lop speed 150 m.p.h. Monoconuc conslruc-

cniiine llinished in hiiihly polislicU alloy

cneinc

oil

lilicr

hauMi, chrome

pliiicd

pliis-0 to UHJ in 15. N secs. lion-knocfc-oir wire wheels

-

lorsion bar front suspension -ami-sway bar-independent suspension all .iround-2 shocks Irom. -t shocks rear-limited-slip dilTerenlial -d-whcel disc brakes powcr-a:$islcd. quick-clianpe pads, dual ssstems, fixil and handl

brake self-adjustlnti. fluid level and handbrake warnini: liiiht - li>draulically operated clutch— spe)

S20() more). Competitive domestic cars start a little

lower

in price,

but catch up Also, in-

when comparably equipped.

high speed RS-5 iircs-):ciiuine leather upholstery— healer and delrosicf roll-up windows — racing type steering wheel, adjustable for hciiihl and reach-rack and pinion sieerinji, 1 turns from lock to lock-submeriicd fuel pump, luci Miterwindshield washers three 2-specd windshield wipers— complete instrumental ion- electric clockback-up linht mohair top. with bi«>t on Ro.idsler rear-deck trunk openinn on Roadster-rear door lo lugpape area on Coupe. cial

'

speed, road or driving conditions. It's a thoroughly enjoyable confidence that no lesser car can give you. A few of the reasons for this arc: twin overhead-cam, race-proven engine;

1-2

quire about Jaguar’s moncy-savingOverDelivery Plan if you're going to

seas

Europe. Inspect and drive the XK-E at your Jaguar dealer’s.. .or write JAGUAR

CAR.S INC., 32

East

.‘>7ih

Sl„ N. Y. 22.

MARKETING MEETING Marketing Dirictor:

"}Io\\ can

Prisioi nt: ”

No

»V

caii’i.

we be sure?" But ut owe -

company today can ignore the exciting changes

taking place in the American marketplace.

Witness the phenomenal attendance. Consider

its

rise in

elTect

high school and college

on occupation ... on

in-

come

... on buying habits. Education changes people’s

curious

.

.

.

more

critical

.

.

.

tastes.

more

They become more

discerning.

They read more. They are reading magazines more. (Circulations are at

it

to

ounelves

to invesligote

every approach."

an all-time high.) This spiraling reader interest — combined with the unique magazine advantages of flexibility, selectivity, believability — has brought new cfiiciency to an already

dynamic medium. Have you examined magazines, recently?

You

won’t be

advertising

Can you

first

to discover that they arc tlie

medium of

growth

the 60’s.

afford to be last?

MAGAZINES MAKE THINGS HAPPEN I E3

Chevron Dealers installed more than 250,000 auto seat belts for smart drivers in the past year.

Were you one

of

them? They paid only

$5.95 per belt, including installation, for this lifesaving security.

You can

Same

price.

still

Same

Do scat bolts Ix'lonjr in your car? Tho National Safety Council and yotir Chevron [)oaIer believe that llu-y belong in rrnj by 106 1, seat belts foi- new cars will be ntundotory in several states. i

car. In fact,

Tlu“ belts your Chevron Dealer is offering ai e made b.\- Davi.s Airo aft of rugged, 100''; nylon. Tliey have strong, two-piece metal buckle.sthat can be oi)ened instantly. are lightweight,

The

comfortable

belts

be one of the protection.

smart ones.

fully adjustable. Most important, they exceed the tough GSA reipiirements by the S. govoi'nment. More than 2r><),()(H)])eople now rifle with belts installed by Clievron Dt-alers. If you don’t have yours yet, stop at the sign of the Chevron this week. While you’re tliere. a.sk your Chevron Dealer to fill yoiu’ tank with Chevron Suin eme — the great supei--

and set

premium

for "top-form” performance!

C-L .1/ thr

sujn of

CAitronsi* OIL .r.

E4

fit

CAS'Ou

f ('JJ

division,

EVUOX

rtox uaiHC TO

trr

LiaoiNtA.

take heffrr rare of ijour cat

Crow about your rooster You can when that rooster

new

Voit slalom

s-
tail

of

spray comes from the

You can even cackle a

bit at

pounding out

people's expense. Voit skis give you a ride that's more daring,

more responsive. That's because

Voit's

ski

Wish-

bone Super Skeg* gives a controlled response

heel

adds

to

easy

for

So either. Voit's

J.

VOIT PUSetR

-.S« jeRSCv/CMie*6C'

high-speed rides.

of

and

to see.





.-/a

you

in Voit

will

ColorGuard*

They keep you warm

flop, they'll

in

and cut

buoy you up. They’re

something to be seen

in.

will look better

you. In fact, you’ll be proud as a peacock,

rooster-tailing

:

shorts.

If

a Voit ride. soon. Your skiing

ta-^e

and so

Cushion-Ride*

your comfort by taking the slam and the

W.

jackets

of the water.

sharper, surer turns.

Speed won't throw you

tail

And. you’re always comfortable

other

on Voit

skis.

WtilO'AR. or AMCBICAV MAOMtsc * rouvCRV tOMPAnv

Sure you can fly! In two hours with a Cessna you’ll be taking off,

making turns and enjoying every minute of

it.

And to

to

prove

it

you, we’re giving

away

the first

two lessons. Read how you can win!

!

Here’s what two hours of flight instruction in a RfreiilhjaSl.Louis hH!tincf:sman took filing 150 at a Cessna leasous iti a nfu‘ dealer's.

This

wa.s

more

like the

golf pro at the club than a teacher. ‘Uelax.” he told me. "You won't be perfect but you will be surprised at how good you really are!” Just listening to

him perked up my confidence and the whole business sound like fun!

MY

made

PLANE

TRAINING at the Ces-sna dealer’s was a new 150. lt’.s a favorite for training because its high wing gives it more stability and ideal visibility for ground reference. And the side-by-.side s(*ating makes it easy for the student to understand the instructor, which gives him more confidence.

FIRST

HOUR OF INSTRUCTION

started with a pre-flight inspection of the plane. All pilots make this check, and it u.sually takes only a few minutes. It took us about twenty-five becau.se he also exlained exactly why the plane flies and K ow it is controlled. /

TOOK THE PILOT'S SEAT

and ad-

justed it to a comfortable position. The cabin of a Cessna 1 50 is comfortable, with attractive appointments similar to my instructor sat on my right and ear. explained the instruments. Then I started the engine, checked the instruments for proper working order, and we were ready

My

to taxi.

TAXIING THE

/>Z.>5/V£ is easy.

You steer

with your feet on the rutlder pedals which are connected to the nose wheel. At the top of the pedals are toe brakes. At first I overcontrolled the plane, but he showed me the proper way. “.Always be gentle with the controls,” he said. "Treat the plane like a lady and she'll be good to you.” Just before we reached the runway I stopped short of the run-up line. Then we ran through our take-off check list.

OO YOU KNOW WHY THE ENGINE RUN UP JUST BEFORE TAKING IS

OFF? It’s not just to warm it up, as I u«'d to think. The pilot is checking the magnetos which furnish electricity for the ignition system. Airplanes have a dual ignition system; that is, two magnetos, two spark plugs for each cylinder, etc. It is designed so that the engine will run on either one or both.

WE WERE READY FOR TAKE-OFF we

finished our check list and made a full turn on the ground to check the sky for aircraft. (We weren't using radio.) I taxied onto the runway, pushed in the throttle for full power, and held the controls while my instructor took off

as soon as

could

feel

new Cessna 150 are

FLEW

AHEAD

/ STRAIGHT for a while, and he .showed mo how to trim the plane so it would fly it.self. On the elevator, there is a movable surface called the trim tab. You control it wiih a ILlUe wheel in the cabin. When you change the speed of an airplane, pressures on the Control wheel change and you can adjust tor it with the trim tab, You can even pull or push the control wheel, then turn it loose, and the plane will automatically straighten itself out! This is why it's easier to steer a plane than a car.

NEXT

/

MADE SOME

TURNS. U’s

easy to turn a plane. You can do it simply by turning the control wheel. But you can make a neater turn by coordinating the rudder pedals with the control wheel. For example, to make a 90^ left turn I turned the control wheel to the left and simultaneou.sly pressed on the left rudder pedal until I was in a normal bank. Then I neutralized the controls except for holding a little back pressure on the control wheel to keep the nose from dipping, and the plane remained in the turn. When I wanted to straighten out, r "roffed out” simply by turning the control wheel to the right and pressing the right rudder pedal. It’s easy; it's fun, too.

know

it.

We

WAS OVER

before

flew back to the airfield, feet,

and entered the

flight pattern. .\fy instructor landed the piano, explaining each step as he did it. Then we went to lunch and discussed

what we had done.

THE SECOND HOUR

/

TOOK OFF!

And it was easy. I pushed in the throttle to full power, guided the plane down the runway with the rudder pedals, eased back on the control wheel, and when sufficient speed was reached the airplane actually flew itself off the runway. Just like that, we were ofT and flying. /

CLIMBED TO 2.000 FEET

after

leaving the flight pattern and leveled off. Then I made some right and left 90"' turns, 360’ turns, and 720° turns. I was surprised at how little prompting my instructor had to give me. Next he taught me how to make climbing turns (in which you use more power ) and de.scending turns (in which you use less). Before I knew it, the hour was over.

FLEW BACK TO THE AIRFIELD TO LAND. This time I did everything but /

the actual landing

itself.

As he

directed, entered the

I descended to 800 feet and flight pattern. About two-thirds down the "downwind leg" (flying with the wind, parallel to the runway), I ran through the brief landing check li.st and cased back on the power. From then on in a glide, maintaining 80 m.p.h. Just past the end of the runway we made a 90° left turn into our "ba.se leg” and then turned left again to line up with the runway for our "final approach.” I btld

we Were

you down

runway

the same distance ahead as you woulil look if you were driving your car at a comparable speed). When the time come.s to level oil, you feci it. There are three basic steps to landing, but they blend into one smooth movement of the control wheel. The first is the normal glide; then at a proper distance from the ground you ease back on the control wheel to flatten the glide and then continue to case back more to lift the nose of the plane. The knack is to hold the plane just off the ground as long as you can. It will sidlle to the ground and all you have to do is steer with the pedals and apply the brakes if necessary. I had no idea it was so easy

AS

/

WALKED TO THE HANGAR.

I

felt like a new man ami I wa.s! Like anyone who has learned something new, .

I

felt

,

.

bigger for the experience. In only

I actually learned why an airplane flies, how it flies and I had even handled one myself. 1 couldn’t help thinking about how eu.sy it had been to make thi.s change in my life, once I had made up my mind to do it. As I looked ahead a /icc/e to the ways this flying busine.ss would change things for me, I was glad 1 hud made the decision.

two hours



WIN/ TWO FREE FLIGHT INSTRUCTION .

THE FIRST HOUR I

descended to 800

like:

the controls a.s he landed, and he explained each step. One thing to remember as you approach is to keep your eyes the (about ahea
I’ll confess, I had a few misgivings about ability to learn to fly. Then I rememhen-d how it was when my dad took driving lessons from the first automobile dealer in my home town. He was concerned, as I recall, about being too old to learn. But he did it because he knew he had to keep up with change. And learning to fly is my way of keeping up.

my

MY INSTRUCTOR

I

flight pattern,

teas his experience:

ON THE WAY TO THE AIRPORT,

MY

what he did. He left the climbed to 2,000 feet, and then turned the controls over to me.

so

.

.

HOURS OF in a

Cessna

Model 150 or 172 at your nearest Cessna You've just read how a St. Louis dealer.

businessman reacted to his first two hours He, like thousands of others, found that learning to fly was easy — and enjoyable. Now it’s your turn. We’d like for you to try it yourself. For 250 winners, the fir.st two hours are on us! of flying.

TO ENTER THE CONTEST simply print your name and address on a postcard and send it to Cessna "Learn to Fly” Contest,

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111.

All en-

must be postmarked by July 15, by a drawing administered by the Reuben H. Donnelley Corp. and notified by mail. tries

1963. Winners will be chosen

Contestants must be 21 years of age employees and families, Cessna dealers and adverti.sing agency or over. Ce.tsna

personnel are not eligible. Offer is void where prohibited, taxed, or otherwise restrictea. Kvery entry will receive a complimentary booklet, "Pre-Flight Facts.”

NOW

IT'S

YOUR MOVE. Prove

yourself that

flying

is

easy

— and

Enter today. It may be your toward a lifetime of flying.

first

to

fun.

step

and it will embarrass him to read this now, for he docs not consider what he

SCORECARD CLEANUP MAN

loose with

The man chosen by Pete tional

Na-

Rozclle.

Football League commissioner,

to guard the league against recurrence of

the recent betting scandals

by many law-enforcement

is

considered

be

officials to

some

children’s ponies.

The

horse soon conics around, In the course of a long intimacy with

some considerable observawomen. Blake has acquired firm

horses and tion of

hypotheses about both breeds.

He

is

con-

the most informed cop on underworld

vinced,

in the nation. Captain Jim Hamilton of the Los Angeles Intelligence Division has won the commendations of the McClellan committee, the Kefauver

women, “talk a lot among themselves." The horses also, he says, understand what humans say and that is one reason women trainers do so poorly.

operations

The

scores of others.

in

to

applaud twice

this

letics,

Mantle

last

night against the Athhit

two home runs and

runs as the Yankees won 7-4, The next night he hit another home run. It struck the facade up near the roof

drove

in five

it would have traveled if Yankee Stadium had not way and Mantle himself it was the hardest ball he ever There was a lot of noise about the big home run, so much that almost forgotten was the fact that it came in the

estimated that

some 620 feet

gotten in the said that

about

exchange of information hood/uni activities.

They had

On Tuesday

tist

de-

in police

partments throughout the country, units that now cooperate with each other in the

When

happens, even Yankee-haiers have to applaud.

week.

of the stands in right field, only a few feet too low to become the first fair ball ever hit out of Yankee Stadium. A .scien-

Intelligence Divi-

Los Angeles became

the model for similar units

explosive figure in the sport.

for instance, that horses, like

committee, the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. Attorney General and sion he created

docs as unusual. Whether a completely sound Mantle might have been the greatest baseball player who ever lived is academic. He has never been a healthy ballplayer and he neier will be; at 31, with 12 seasons behind him, he probably is well ahead of the game. There are days, however, when Mantle plays as only Mantle can, and then he becomes the most exciting,

hit.

In addition to his qualifications as a

policeman, Hamilton has an avid interand a haired for those who would corrupt it. He is, in fact, largely

11th inning and that

it

won

the ball

game. And this, after all, is what Mickey Mantle does best for the Yankees.

est in sport

responsible for the federal convictions

COMMAND PERFORMANCE

of Frankie Carbo and Blinky Palermo, mobsters who ruled boxing with impunity for

Amid

more than a score of years. When men had gathered enough

it

mere

Hamilton's league lineup fixers

is

presence

the

in

certain to give pause to

who might contemplate approach-

ing football players.

As Hamilton’s

boss,

Police Chief William H. Parker, puts

“If the

NFL

image, and

do any

I

is

interested in

assume

it

is,

its

it,

public

how can you

always makes the mistake, when she has a troublesome horse,” he

selves about Blake?

who seems

to

have

HOMAGE TO MANTLE The medical history of Mickey Mantle would provide a year of scripts for Ben Casey if Mantle v/ould only talk. Instead, with a stoic acceptance of pain

He

also, for a bit of fun,

“horse psyBlake treats about six chronic

— restoring

and throwers

to gentle usefulness.

biters, kickers

One

of his techniques, which never include



that

would make a Comanche blush, he

goes about his business of playing baseball, day after day. often playing not so

em-

much

barrass a difficult horse by turning him

pride.

the infliction of physical pain,

is

to

None

Japan

in

Britain

a larger busiof the top-liners earn less

in

is

it

than £3,000 (3,(X)0 nicker, that is) a year. Up and down the sceptered isle, grunt-

and groaning, they pack the people and television shows attract insatiaAt the ringside of top tournaments lovely ladies blow diamonding

in,

ble millions.

likes to refer to himself as a

patients a year

wrestling

the biggest thing since the black bot-

tom. Only ness.

chiatrist.”

educationist.”

To know

professional

Prince Philip, the royal consort.

is

among them-

Blake of Yar-

combe, Devon, England, who carries cards that introduce him as an “equine

as 10

he was there you have to realize

about and that she’s

the horses say

been eavesdropping.

Norman

much

that

What do

according to Blake,

is

as

or S28) for the

why

she’s talking

afraid of him.”

“They say, 'The old man is a bit " tough, but he never hurts his horses,’

better?"

bespectacled and gray-haired re-

farmer

that night, there

what

FROM THE HORSE'S MOUTH tall,

is,

Royal Albert Hall was The Dook himself.

privilege of being in

explained recently, "of chatting about his bad habits in front of him. He knows

A

tired

profe.ssional wrestling fans,

nicker (pounds, that

“A woman

over to federal authorities.

soaring mountains of red plush

and 5,000

some of whom had paid

Hamilton's

evidence on the pair they quietly turned

with muscles as with spirit and He has been doing this for years

studded kisses to their favorites, while their escorts

make

believe they are

Beau

Brummells. Last week's royal accolade was the summit of a postwar boom, the first time a member of the royal family had shown an interest in wrestling since Henry VIII tried a headlock or two on some of his more athletic, and submissive, subjects. continued

10

Will this

be

just

(or are

another

you

While we're out here building Pontiacs,

we were

there. Ah, well,

from the Trophy V-8 that is



it's

even

all

summer

we know what

dealer's.

you'll

your ownl'J

be doing with yours: Having a wonderful lime. Wish

alone you can enjoy Pontiac's satiny sort of

about as eager

as a small

You might be

ride.

And you can

get your kicks

boy on opening day of baseball season. And who could ignore

Wide-Track roadworthiness? Nobody who's ever

your Pontiac

of Pontiac-watching?

set to get a Catalina of

tried

it,

that's for sure.

surprised at the price

he'll

let

The place

you

in

on.

to start this

sweet summer

W1DE«TRACK PONTIAC

^ Walchts »hown (Ifom

letl);

Kimberly 85-6. $85, Glamour 68, $100; Kimberly

/W/Z_7“0/V

$115; Vogue FF. $175; Aurora 86, $225, Alt prices plus lax, Al Hamillon Jewelers

in Ifie U. $.

and Cartada.

SCORECARD

continued

Elegantly gowned girls sold programs. Mrs. Bessie Braddock. M.l*., attended, and sodid Sir Learie Constantine, former West Indies cricketer, now high comfor Trinidad and Tobago. Philip turned up live minutes and somebody yelled, “Whcrc’veycr He was there, actually, because the profits were promised for the Duke's Award Scheme for Youth, and he would attend an aspidistra-growing competi-

missioner Prince

late

been?"

tion in Rochdale, Lancashire,

if

the price

was right for one of his pet projects. So w restling earned its elevation to the English Establishment,

only for a night.

if

The Duke shook hands with each of hairy-chested behemoths,

the

among them

Mick McManus ("The Man They to Hate"). When the Duke moved McManus a voice from near the audi-

villain

Love to

torium dome, obviously long familiar with Mick’s dubious tactics, warned: "Don’t shake hands with him, Dook!" In the night’s last bout Johnny Kwango and Jackie Pallo expended themselves trying to throweach other into the Duke's lap but did not succeed.

and

the

Duke's

Award Scheme wound up some

10,000

Jt

was a

jolly evening,

nicker ahead.

PREDICAMENT PREVIEW College football's new substitution rule

March ll) has been a puzzle to it was proclaimed, and still Prank Broyles, Arkansas coach, now come up with a nightmare situation

(SI.

coaches since is.

has

that, he feels,

may

well confront him.

"Suppose,” he says, “your team is on down, with five

the 18-yard line, fourth

yards and six inches to go for a

first

down. You send in your field-goal kicker and a man to hold the ball, replacing your fullback and your quarterback and using up the two substitutions you arc allowed on fourth down. On the try the defensive team jumps offside and gets a five-yard penalty.

"Now

it's

fourth

down on

inches to go for a But you have your field-goal

line, six

Are alcohol and a nice fragrance you can expect in an after-shave

all

Not

in ^ardley's. Be^-idej^ its famoii.s

first

1

3-yard

down.

man and

a

from feeling taut or chapped.

A

liigh-powered

hacteria citeck that helps prevent infections and

actually hcljis heal shaving nicks

men on fourth down and you already have sent in your two. What do you do and how do you explain it to the alumni if it doesn't work?”

ing

Put to puzzle

Abb

drew

Curtis, supervisor of

offi-

Southwest Conference, the answer:

this

CMlinned

13

get a

moisture ingreilient designed to keep your fare

holder in the lineup and your fullback and quarterback arc on the bench. The rules say you can change only two ball

cials for the

fragrance

and a measure of refreshing alcohol, you the

irritations

from shaving. A healing agent

Aiifl a lubricant that

ral oils is

rpialilies to still

that

and scrapes.

replaces .some of the natu-

you shave away every day.

Vt’lial'

.surpris-

-

add so many beneficial their After Shaving I.otion am!

that ^arrlley can

come up smelling

.

like V.-VKDI.F.V.

.

.

SCORECARD “Fnrorccmcnt depends on \shcilier ihc was snapped. tC it was, it counts as a

ball

down and two more men can If

the ball

be sent

in.

bad not been snapped before it is still the same down man and ball holder do anything else. tJic coach

the infraction,

and

if

his field-goal

aren't able to is

in

trouble.”

C old comfort, Broyles.

HELLO. MARV, BYE-BYE, BO t\cr since Marvelous Marv Thronchcrry. hero of the New y ork Mets. was exiled to BuH'alo. there have been those

w ho have held that. Iikedeneral Dtuiglas MacArthur. he would return. It has been a simple faith and.

seems,

it

is

deathless.

wif; when a Mot fan. who also had been away, came back to town on the occasion of New 'Fork's ticker-tape parade welcome to Astronaut Ciordon

To

Cooper, he felt sure he knew what had happened. Breathless, the fan patched together a sign to hang from his

Avenue

office

window.

Fifili

read:

It

WFirO.VIF HO.Mf, MARV'

While on the subject of departed baseball heroes,

that

we note

that

Bo

Belinsky,

bon vivanl. has also been shipped

to the minors.

for bright

But Bo

will

not be lacking

and good limes.

lights

Ilis

destination: Hawaii.

The

Schilling is local currency in Austria.

So

SHIP A-FREUO More than 12'',' of the people in the country who own boats never use them, for one reason or another. Of those w ho an impressive number feel guilty about it. These are some of the facts, or fictions, pul forward by the Outboard

do.

is this.

Industry Associations

in

frank 47-pagc ciTori to

organizations

why

a surprisingly

tell

Us

member

people buy bouts.

W'omen. according

an OI.A survey, present the greatest threat to boat sales. Their proper habitat

to

is

the kitchen, the

OI.-\ seems to think, and their sense of adventure is less likely to concern itself with the sea than with a new seasoning.

For

this reason.

OIA

deplores boating

ads that picture an American male surrounded by bevies of bikinied beauties. .At the same time, warns the OI A. the

Austria, Australia, or Afghanistan:

— or

off— the beaten

track,

whether you’re on

BANK OF AMERICA

TRAVELERS CHEQUES

are as good as cash. Better, in fact. Loss-proof and theft-proof, they’re money only you can spend. Only your signature

makes them

valid.

spend them as you

Buy them before you

go— anywhere

go—

notion of 'Tamily boating" should be discouraged, in print anyway. Why?

Because the word responsibility,

‘family” connotes

while the word

boat-

ing” should conjure up visions of ‘pleasure

and relaxation, and the two con-

cepts arc incompatible.”

boat

IS

The

pleasure

always an indulgence. Hence, ,

around the world. 14

it

oniinurJ

LUTE ELDRIDGE, LOCKHEED F-104 TEST PILOT A SPECIAL BREED OF MAN

# MG

drivers are a special breed among sports car enthusiasts. Their tradition of loyalty goes back to 1925, when the models of these pace-setting

earliest

4-bangers first rolled off a production line— all seven of them' • In 1955, they watched the TF turn into the streamlined MGA and zoom ahead in both populittle

lessons of almost a decade have joined to create a spectacular

new car— the

MGB. New styling— based on an all-steel, unit-construction body. New power— from a larger engine. New safety— from bigger brakes. New feel to the wheel— because turns-to-lock have been raised from 2.6

It became the a production figure

And new comfort— wind-up windows, quick-stowing top, a smartly redesigned cockpit. With all these, the MGB

more than 100,000, and it accumulated enough awards to crowd a badge bar • Today the style and engineering

retains all the basic good manners of its predecessors— exceptional cornering, no lurch or fade when braked, and a top

larity first

of

and competitions.

sports car to

hit

to 2.9.

PRODUCT OP THE BRITISH MOTOR CORPORATION,

LTD.,

MAKERS

Of

speed of 100-plus without laboring.

# You

can see why this distinctive breed of car appeals particularly to a special breed of man. Perhaps you’re already a member of the MGB owners club. If you aren't, give yourself the

thrill

one of these powerful, responsive new cars. You might just as well begin with

of driving

the best. roit

ovE*seAs oeiiveav info*. ,

•lOee'KlO.N

MG. AUSTIN HEA LEV, SPRITE. MORRIS

j.

AND AUSTIN CARS

DOtJt

SCORECARD

<,

may become

a

when

serious problem

’for example, a man buy.s a boat dethe Opposition of his wife. He

EV£V\(^rvC

spite

guilty because he

fcel.s

.she feel.s guiiiy

bought the boat,

because she objected.”

and the boat itself becomes ”an instrument of complexes fraught with subtle

tHEKTDS

EOSHsg

undertones.”

On

the other hand, provided he can

square

with the missus, the boatowncr

it

boon

to his ego,

‘‘closely affiliated to prestige

and status.”

finds his possession a

Advertisers, however, should take care to

NATtHOuf

suggest

a.

At

sea-going suburbanite wouldn't want

jmt5

«

of C^PAoLAM

NyLfffV.

Sure you go slow with your precious cargo, but listen — 84% of all auto accidents occur at speeds under 40 m.p.h. The Rx? Seat belts of Caprolan* nylon. Made to meet or exceed all S.A.E. requirements, they’re the iowest-cost safety insurance going. Attractive, too: colorcoordinated to auto upholstery. Available at Mobil Dealers, riBEB M»««ETIH«0£PT 8«l lil*BISO» and most automotive outlets. .

*VE .K,r l»

The only thing ordinary about a Carter’s T-shirt Is the number of sleeves. Everyth/ng else In

Is remarlcabie.

only offhandedly, for the

this

For example, a Carter’s T-shirt won't shrink 1%

length— as shown by Government Standard Test 7550 (CCC-T-191b).

All because of Carter's Pak-nlt*fabric which makes every other kind of cottonknit underwear obsolete. What's more, this T-shirt refuses to bind at the arms or sag at the neck. It stays soft. It stays looking like new. So why settle for obsolescence? There's a T-shirt your size with a label that says "Carter's".

his pals to think he's stuck-up.

END OF AN AFFAIR The much-mooted Ford-Fcrrari alliance is off. f-'or a time a deal was “quite warm." according to one insider, but talks between the powerful American automaker and the talian builder of racing and Cirand Touring cars have ended. Said Henry Ford II; “We Just couldn't I

get along.”

and dandy, to our way of thinking. The Ferrari model with which Americans arc most familiar- -the allThat

is

line

conquering red sports racing car -already has a Ford in il.s future. Jl wil) be competing against the Ford-engined Shelby A.C. Cobra. Given a year's development, the Cobra might crack what has become a rather tiresome Ferrari monopoly of the major prizes at Schring

and Le Mans. Cobra-Ford battles with a captive Ferrari would lack bite. Ford’s loss of the works is the racing fan’s gain.

Italian

THEY SAID •

IT

Joey Jay. Cincinnati pitcher, after win-

ning his

first

game

of the .season and

two

after nine straight losses over

“My

sons:

wife says

it

was

like

sea-

waiting

for a baby.”

George Sauer, director of player personnel of the New York Jets, on working with the new management: “Every time 1 call Weeb Kwbank, he asks me if need some more money. That's one thing never heard from Harry W'isnier." •

I

I



A

Seattle high school ba.seball coach,

Tony Dickinson, bemoaning a losing streak; “Things are terrible, The washer

broke down,

the

television

won’t

work, my wife and kids are sick, and my team can’t win ball games. If became a pumpkin farmer, they’d discontinue end Halloween.” I

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Sports Illustrated JUNE

3,

1963

THE SPITTER Not since'1920, when

it

was outlawed, has the notorious

spitbali

IS

BACK

been thrown so often,

has brought added heat-and humidity— to an already controversial season

its

increased use

by WILLIAM

LEGGETT

O

way

n your

to the refrigerator be-

tween innings, baseball fans, stop

moment and

for a

consider the plight

of your favorite hitter. First they make him a bigger target by increasing the size of the strike zone. Then, just hen it seems that he has something good going s’,

for

him

in a

new.

enforcement ot what do they do but rigid

an old balk rule, reword the balk rule? And now. in the midst of the driest major league spring in years, the chances arc that he is going to drown. That damp and horrid thing, the spitball.

From Los Angeles to New York, from Minneapolis to Houston, everywhere the poor baiter looks, there are spitballs. Lift your umbrella for a moment and study the pitchers shown here. or don't they?

If

evidence

itary

may

then this

they

Do

they

do— and the unsan-

accumulating fust-

is

well account for the ex-

traordinary pitching that has dominated the 1963 season. In less than seven

weeks

of play there have been two no-hitters, four near no-hitters lost in the eighth or ninth inning. 77 shutouts and no less than 68 ball games

which one team got three hits or less. If these pitchers do not throw the spittcr then they seem to in

be missing a good bet.

first

because they

it anyway, second because everyone else seems to be throwing it and. finally, because both Ford Frick, the commissioner of baseball, and

are being accused of

Joe Cronin, president of the American

League, absolutely adore the thing.

do

umpires seem

the

to

Nor

mind. This leaves

only National League President Warren Giles

and assorted managers opposed.

Giles, in his ceaseless attempt to keep

game immaculate, conan improper subject. The man-

the image of the siders spit

agers would just like to get the whole thing straightened out. legal, they ask.

pitch, just as

it

or

is

Is it

the spittcr

now

an outlaw

still

has been since 1920?

The answer would seem

to be that the

is being legalized through usage not through the rule book, and testi-

spitball if

mony

indicates that

pitchers

in

some of

the

best

are throwing the Detroit Tigers and the Baltibaseball

The more Orioles contend that Whitcy Ford New York Yankees probably best left-hander in the American thing.



of the the

League— has

refined the spitball to such

a point that his

Form

box score with an

asterisk along-

Daily Kucin^

designates "“mud marks” to Thor-

Duke Snider, for 14 and now the old, gray

full

years a

Viet of

Don

Dodger

New

maintains that the National fine right-hander.

York,

League's

Drssdale of the

Los Angeles Dodgers, has "ihe best one" in the

National League. Al Lope/, man-

ager of the Chicago White Sox. says he saw Dean Chance of the Los Angeles

Angels throw a

spittcr this year ‘“that

would have made Burleigh Grimes— the

flying again.

is

the

in

side. in the fashion that the

oughbreds.

name should

be carried

pitcher of all

greatest spitball

time

proud."

Gene Maueh.

the contemplative

ager of the Philadelphia

man-

Phillies, asserts

that "there arc 100 pitchers in the tional

League, and

them throw the

Why,

I’ve

I'd

Na-

say that 25 of

spittcr to

some

even got a couple

degree.

who throw

myself." Orlando Pena of the Kansits

it

City Athletics, that team's best pitcher,

supposedly loads his pitches. Does Pena throw a spittcr? “No sir." says Hank Bauer,

and

who managed Pena

this

more.

last season year serves as a coach for Balti-

"What Pena throws

is

a

When

Eddie Lopat. Pena's current manager, was asked if his pitchers were throwing the spittcr, he answered simply, "Not any move than anyone else." Pedro Ramos ot the Cleveland Indians, Earl (No-Hit) Wilson of the Boston Red Sox. Jim Burning of the Detroit Tigers. Ron Kline of the Washington Senators and Jim Brosnan of the Chicago White Sox are names that keep bobbing up in spitball conversations in American league dugouts and dressing rooms. In the National League. Ron Perranoski. the relief specialist of the l.os Angeles Dodgers, allegedly throws it. as does the National League's player repfork ball."

resentative.

Bob Friend of the

I’ittsburgh

Pirates. Last year Dick Farrell of the Houston Colt .45s admitted that he threw a spittcr to Stan Musial of the Louis Cardinals. Farrell had told

St.

Musial. "I can't even gel you out with

an

Musial. who has seen in his day, smiled and thought that looked a little

illegal pitch."

a few spitballs replied,

"'I

wet coming

in

there."

Recently Jack Buck, a

St.

Louis anlOnlinutil

e

1963 Tin

Orlando Paha of the A's sometimaa throws

what Hank Bauer

calls

"a Cuban fork ball."

Cuban Don

Drysdale. according to

Duke

Snider, has

the best spitball In the entire National League.

THE SPlTTEft

reluctant to back

continued

them up.

In the con-

won’t go one way or another on the rumors that Purkey throws a spitball.” said Buck, “but er

go out

The

to the

one day

I

saw

the catch-

mound wearing

a bib.”

accelerated use of the spitball this

may be traced to any one of several causes. The players insist that loo many year

young umpires are more concerned with getting their own image across on television than in calling a good game. “There are more hot dogs among the umpires

now

than there are

among

the

Most of them under ma-

players.” one player contends.

these

young umpires—

10 of

the age of 40 have been hired by the jor leagues in the last

two years- were

born

was banned and,

after the spitball

according to one manager, “they don’t

even

know what

a spitball is.”

To make

matters worse, they arc not even at-

tempting to make sure that a pitcher wipes the saliva from his fingers when

“Bob gave me some sticky stuff for my hand," said Belinsky. “Thai’s supposed to be

turned.

can you gel?”

Some

some excellent pitchers, including Preacher Roe (SI, July 4, 1955) of the Brooklyn Dodgers and Joe Page of the New York Yankees have admitted that they employed it. They admitted it,

The

spitball.

however,

is

not the only

pilch that has the hitters upset. feel that pitchers

than their glove to the it

will

lief

Some

arc taking other things

mound and

that

not be loo long before some re-

pitcher

marches

in

20

the

first

place

is-

— was

that stuff

and keep your

.shut," said Turley.

"How dumb

Not too long

been

illegal

of course, only after retiring.

A

from the bullpen

in his right hand and a bowl of borscht in his left. The “vaseline ball” is an offspring of the spilier. and there arc suspicions and charges that the vaseline ball has become a mighty popular item.

with a jacket

after pitching his first this

year

— he

was

fore attending to his public

in

"Give me

mouth

for 4,1 years, but

discovered that Warren Giles— who

sued the order

illegal," a re-

porter told Belinsky.

In theory the spitball has

slippery stuff

the one-second balk rule, umpires soon

is

said Bo. "It

’em. And once having discovered how effective a good spitball can be, the pitchers weren’t about to stop, even when the balk confusion was straightened out and the umpire’s attention re-

sent to the minors this week— Bo Belinsky of (he Los Angeles Angels returned to the dressing room at Chavez Ravine. Be-

League the explanaeven simpler. Ordered to enforce

In the National

Turley.

“Hey. thanks for that stuff, Bob." worked good.” "What stuff?” Belinsky was asked.

umpire worrying excessively about a

and only victory of

he begins to pitch. tion

Bob

lube to his fellow pitcher.

balk was in no position to concentrate elsewhere. So the pitchers began to load

fusion pitchers quickly realized that an

nounccr. spoke at a dinner attended by Bob Purkey of the Cincinnati Reds. ‘*I

and

his press

Belinsky paused and then handed a small

pitcher uses the spittcr in a tight

on base and good hitter at the plate with two strikes The pitch is thrown with an overhand or three-quarter motion, and it rides into the batter at knee level with spot, normally v\ith runners

a

against him.

very

little

spin.

As

it

nears the batter

it

explodes, diving into the dirt and leaving the batter sw inging at something that isn’t there.

Bob Rodgers,

(he

handsome young

catcher for the Los Angeles Angels, admits that the spitball

tremely hard.

“As

is

hard to hit. Exspeed of the

far as the

— warned Ford, but the Yankees went on

er the spitball should he allowed into baseball. Cal

If

win 10-3. “Ford." .says Myatt. “gets the ball and spits on his hand. Sometimes he uses sweat. Then he reaches down toward the

on

resin bag. Just as

spiticr is concerned." says Rodgers, ’‘it's between the fast ball and the change. Hill a hitler knows a bad one when lie it. and he calls it the old meatball. you get one that doesn't have cnougli it you can jerk it right out of the building. Today, though, there are quite a lot of pitches that are lumped in with the spitball and arc really something else.

secs

A

pitcher will take vaseline or

some other

greasy stuff and put a glob of his trousers.

Or

le.

inside

it

Right behind his bell buck-

he will put a thin coat of

the underside of the

it

He

of his cap,

bill

on

can also put it on the outside of his uniform. right behind his knee. People have grown used to seeing pitchers fidget on

mound. They yank

at their trousers,

tug on their caps, reach

down and scratch

the

behind the knee. They can get a load that

way."

on the

resin

ball.

The

bag

in

tion will trickle right

and

res-

bare hand and that he can't

put the ball on the ground. What Ford was doing was putting his hand down with the ball in it, making believe he was putting resin on his hand, and while doing that was rubbing the wcl spot on the ground to get dirt on the ball."

Snider believes that the use of the ter

spit-

has increased “maybe as much as what it used to be

three, four times over

willing to give the pitcher seven outs for

wcara

the perspira-

down

rule

up the

pitcher has to pick

ways

several

in

days.''says Battcy. “a pitcher will long-siccve sweat shirt,

The

dirt helps his sinker.

in his

“On warm

pitcher can get

.says that a

moisture for a spittcr

is

began playing regularly in 1949, This game of baseball is tough enough. If you get three hits in 10 times up you can make a lot of money. A hitter is

American League's All-

other than from his mouth.

ball.

going to rub Then he rubs the wet he

if

spot on the ground and gels dirt on the

.says that a

when

Earl Bailey, the

Star catcher,

to

his

arm and

I

three hits. But

what those guys want

is

for us to gel eight outs in every 10 times.

The

rules say

remain on his wrist. He's got a load right His forehead sweats and he reaches

used on the

up

no foreign matter may be

bail. Spit

is

foreign matter.

“The umpires," continues Snider, “can

there.

Watch a pitcher wet his lingers some day. He wets them by licking them

be pretty tough when they want to be. know. Last year found a but with real good wood. There were lots of hits in that bat. and didn't want to lose it by

or rubbing his hand across his forehead.

spliiiing or

When

silver nails into

for that."

The

I

difTicully of detecting a spitball is

evident.

he wets his fingers he can also spit

quickly on the heel of his hand. Even

if

he wipes off his fingers on the blouse of his

uniform, he

still

has the material on

the heel of his hand.

The

big question,

is: Does he really rub those linon that uniform, or does he just pass them closely in front of it? When Al Lopex made his accusation against Dean Chance he startled a lot of people by asserting that use of the spilball had increased .10'’, in the last five years. Then he accused ihe umpires of laxity. "There arc enough umpires on the field to have one of them keep his eyes on the ball at all times." Lopez said. “If they are going to permit a pitcher to wcl his fingers, and they don't make sure he wipes them off before making the pitch, then they should outlaw wetting the fin-

1

I

ting.

I

against

out.

utilizing illegal

mound and

If

in

a

game

the nails I

they can en-

can't they enforce the

some guys can move

around and

How Look

hit for

a bat

average, and that's

not too bad.

“When you spitter

back

say. 'O.K., fine,

in.'

thing else, too?

aren't

One

you

sjiying

the

let

some-

of the great things

about baseball is that there is supposed to be something the same about the game, about the way it is played. always thought you could not go to a game for a couple of years and then come back to one and say to yourself, ’Well, in a changing world something remains the same.' Let basketball have its always changing rules, let football go from three platoons to none, but let us keep one I

of

form

thing fine that

The

is

fine."

spitball hassle

has now- reached

must leave the game, and a 10-day suspension follows. The

last

pitcher for using a spittcr

now

man

to call a

was Cal Hub-

ihe supervisor of umpires in

American League. During a game in St. Louis in 1944. Hubbard threw Nelson Potter of the St. Louis Browns out for throwing a spitball against the New York Yankees. Today Hubbard says, “1 tossed the

out for violating the

He had

his

Down

If

they say no

emphatically enough, then the umpires will

be forced to enforce the existing Warren Giles discovered

rules and. as

bard,

few!

watches the ball go out. figures how far it went and then sits down. Let's not forget that

this spring, a rule rigidly

Potter

Ford was

of the bat.

why

The penalty for using the spitball is Once an umpire charges a pitch-

rules.

that

rid

hit .300.

now? Darn

severe.

the time.

Rice went to the

split-

hit .300

er with throwing a spilier the pitcher

Ti-

pitches.

from

I

man

ing against seeing a

many men

You have these guys hitting home run after home run, and everyone stands up in the ball park, at all this long-ball stuff.

shortly to say yes or no.

the

John Rice

drove three

I

it

enough, was the only member to vote yes, "I'm for anything that will help the pitcher." he says now. If the spittcr does come to a vote again shortly, one opponent will be Fresco Thompson, vice-president of the Dodgers and a member of the rules committee. “When you admit the spitter back into baseball," he says, "you are opening up some mighty big doors. In will come the emery ball and cverythingeisc. The pitchers. the pitchers- everyone is all of a sudden for the pitchers. There are a lot of them who can't even control the pitches that they have now. have noth-

a point where the major leagues ought

A reversal

Ford was throwing spitters and using bag illegally. George Myatt, the

Umpire

so

spiiier?”

the Detroit Tigers argued that Whilcy

ger third-base coach, twice told

it

keep

Houston the catcher saw

had to get

Not too long before Lopez spoke

to

shining and beefed to the umpire, and

force that,

gers."

it

wouldn't be seen. But one day

however, gers

resin

breaking

painted the nails over so they

back Hubbard, strangely

hands

in his

inside of

me

pitching

mouth all knew he

I

was throwing the spittcr." When the major league rules committee met two years ago to vole on wheth-

enforced can

turn into a monstrous thing.

If

they say

on the other hand, who knows what skulduggery may follow? “If baseball is worried about the yes,

games today," says Fresco Thompson, “just let them legalize the spitball. Guys will be length of time

taking so

it

much

and fake a load

takes to play

time to load the ball

—that

people

will

never

gel out of the ball park."

But

let

no one be shocked

if

baseball

allows the current nonsen.se to continue. After

all,

there

“Does he or too.

is

intrigue in wondering:

doesn't he?"

And money, *NO

21

natural that they should call Palmer the greatest golfer in the world. / never did.

A newspaperman me

point-blank

me and asked Palmer wasn't the

called if

greatest golfer ever to play in the Masters. I

told him, ‘Heavens, no!'

and asked

if

he'd ever heard of such fellows as Ben

PALMER GETS

FIT

Hogan. Sam Snead. Byron Nelson and even Jack Nicklaus. I feel certain he'll snap out of this slump and come back to win again, but don't believe Palmer will ever beat Nicklaus with any con1

TO FIGHT AGAIN

sistency.”

Even

mer. the Latrobe pro Golf's

most renowned player explains the slump that has had

everyone talking, and shows the wondrous effects of two weeks

by

off

the

game, had some

who

tart

got to decide whether he wants to play golf or

ERNEST HAVEMANN

(Dcac) Paltaught him words. “He's

his father, Milfrcd

make

television films with

Bob

Hope [.ree pagt' 64]," said Dcac. Thus a visitor to Latrobe late last week might have expected to be faced with an aging and short-tempered king with deep lines of worry etched on his forehead and a tremor haunting his fingers. But what he would have heard was a war whoop, and what he would have found ill.

T

iic

most interesting sports situation

in

the country could be found last week,

not

in

any big-league baseball stadium,

not at any famous tennis court or racetrack. but in

oir the side of a country road

on the out-

town named Latrobe. Pa. There sat Arnold Palmer, King of the Golfers, in temporary exile while his felskirts of a little

low pros pursued S50.000 in prize monMemphis Open. Palmer had packed his clubs and gone home after a much-publicized slump. He had just lost four tournaments in a row in which he wasdefendingchampion. In the Masters, where spectators blinked in astonishment one day as Jay Hebert matched him yard for yard off the tees, he lost by five strokes. In San Antonio his irons plagued him. In the Las Vegas Tournament of Champions, where pudgy Billy Casper was fading drives as far as Palmer ey at the

was

hitting

years old and strong as an ox. King.Arnic

his

best,

he

lost

by

five

Fort Worth’s Co-

tven the most faithful follower in Army was bound to wonder if had had it. he up to in that neat white

33.

is

Arnie’s

were theorizing, that he was a man whose

was a surprise. The war whoop came from the 17th green of the Latrobe Country Club, where the king was playing a S5 Nassau with three old cronies. It was there he could be found, hopping in that familiar Palmer ecstasy, after sinking a 20-foot putt uphill over two

intensity required that he be alone at

undulating terraces for a birdie.

the king

What was

a white ranch house hidden

house

in

Was

Latrobe?

Had

to abdicate?

his tec shots, the fine off his putts?

Could

it

gone out of

edge of accuracy

be, as

some people

now

realized he was no longer alone there— in other words, that Nicklaus had beaten him and he was going to stay beaten? Was the famous Palmer spirit— that superbly con-

the top

and

he getting ready

the snap

that he

fident will to

up

television

win that has been lighting tubes and creating new broken at

golf fans by the thousands



last?

Behind him. as he went off to Latrobe, rumors swirled. He was said to be have required surgery during the

the

sick, to

Fort Worth tournament.

shot a 299, the fourth

It was gossiped had lost his incentive, that he had been living too high, that he was

worst competitive score of his profes-

depressed, that he was sick of golf. His

strokes.

Finally, in

lonial, his troubles

culmination. sional career,

He

and

reached a spectacular

finished

20 strokes

that he

fellow pros

all

had

their theories.

And,

behind the winner.

in a

The man who won two of these tournaments was Jack Nicklaus, only 23

named Bobby Jones

pre-

dicted flatly that the Palmer Era

was

over, At ease and atone on his father's course at Latrobe,

game by

Palmer resumes work on

his

sinking a whole cupful of putts.

Ptioiog'ophs by Kichord

statement given wide circulation,

that ex-king

and

in fact

questioned whether

it

had ever existed.

sliding,

the

downhill 40-fooler that

missed by a hair. His card showed a

good

70,

and

his

mood showed

a lot

more. Later that day. in his basement playroom, Palmer talked for a long time about his problems and his future. Once he stopped to jostle his 7-ycar-old daughter Peggy on his knee and read her a story about a Mr. and Mrs. Vinegar who lived in two glass houses. The couple from next door dropped in for a predinner drink. Another neighbor stopped by with a driver that needed fixing. A house guest, Artie Anderson, an old friend who owns a Los Angeles driving range, suggested a match over the felt putting green at one end of the playroom. Daughter Amy. 4, came in to be kissed good night. The telephone rang, but not with the urgent business deals

“Sportswriiers arc given to extrava-

gances,” said Jones, “and

On

18th he hit an even better putt, a slippery,

it

was only

that in the past pursued

Palmer where-

ever he went; just friends

who wanted

to

23

PALMER

IS FIT

except the famous sebaceous cyst that

make him feel at home, to remind him there was a local election and he would want to vote. .After nearly two weeks of voluntary exile among the home folks, the king was totally relaxed and looking great. He had figured out the answers to the questions that had bothered him. He was fit and full of fight again, ^'ou can look out the back windows chai, to

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

was the subject of so much speculation at Fort Worth. Newspapers have reported that the cyst is in his “lower back.” Actually it is in his groin, and during the Fort Worth tournament it became irritated and swollen to the point where it

lance nriter in the coiinirv.

and a

ii
racehorse owner and all-round sporlsinan

as

well,

has been assisting

with a series

and

techniques will

of

articles

the lessons

appear exclusively

in

Arnold Pnhner on his golfing

of his life that Sports It i.usweeks he

iRAii’i) this siaiinier. I'hc lotig

spent with Palmer place

him

a unique

in

position to observe Palmer's attitude to report

on what

is

happening

and

at Latrohe.

of the house in Latrobc and see the lush green fairways of the neat little nine-hole

course where Dcac Palmer taught Arnie to play the

game of

of the house

is

golf.

The playroom

lined with photographs,

paintings and enlarged magazine covers

of Arnold

Palmer. Adjoining

it

is

a

w'orkshop. where hundreds of putters, drivers and irons rest in the racks and where Palmer can put his hands quickly on every possible piece of equipment designed to file, grind, bend, paint or change the grip of a golf club. Palmer flew a private plane not his



own Aero Commander

but a

new

Riley

Rocket he has been thinking of buying the house in Latrobc on Mon-

—back to day, May

13. right after the disaster at

Fort Worth. For

five straight

stayed out of the workshop.

days he

He

fell

no

yearnings toward the fairways that beck-

oned to him through the windows. *‘l wasdisgusted wjih golf and with myself,” he explains. “I played bitc/aC Fort ^Vorth. I didn't have the determination, or even the patience.”

During those flew a great deal.

first

five

days Palmer

He enjoys

the avocation that relaxes

flying.

It

is

him most. He

was supposed to go to a board meeting of the Arnold Palmer Company in Chattanooga. but he decided to pass it up: too

tired.

He went to his doctor, who is also a good friend and golfing companion, and had some tests at the local hospital. The doctor found nothing wrong with him 24

“1

knew

that

if

I'd

feel

like

going back and playing.”

1

home

stayed

for a

week

But he resisted any lemptalion to rejoin the tour at this

time

I

Memphis: “I’d decided that was going to slay home until

caused him pain with every step, It has since subsided to normal, and he will probably have it removed.

really felt like a human being again.” Instead of going for the S50.0()0. Palmer merely practiced a little that first Satur-

The closest he got to a golf course was going to the new second nine that his father is adding to the Latrobc Country Club. He went over occasionally to run

some game

the Ernest Hiiyenuum. the hcsi-known free-

By Friday he was thinking about serious golf again, just as he had cx|>ectcd:

bulldozer

I

day. then played the Latrobc course with

his

and knock down some

trees. He also posed for a newspaper photograph that seemed to show him painting boards along his driveway, but this wasa phony. As his wife Winnie says, “ll was the first time he had a paintbrush in his hands since we were married.” He spent one evening making a speech at a meeting of the Greater Pittsburgh Greenskeepers Association and another evening carving two layers of felt (courtesy of the Palmer putting course company) into the seven-hole putting surface that now covens ihe end of his playroom. He began to file and grind on a new putter (“I've welded the old one so much that it's lost its resiliency, and 1 think maybe I'll have to change").

friends

on Sunday. He enjoyed the and began enjoying

quite a bit



subsequent rounds a

lot.

Certainly, he conceded

a.s

he talked

about these events in the basement playroom, he had been in a slump. He himself figured it began long before anybody else noticed it— right after last year's British Open, the last time he fell really good aboutiris game. Since then, even in tournaments he won. he had never once been completely happy with his play.

No,

it

wasn't a matter of distance off

the tec. “I'm hitting the ball as far as

ever did.

“In

fact.

when 1

I

hit

it

I

properly,” he said.

don't think there's been any-

thing badly

— with

wrong

at

all- mechanically

my game. got into the habit of closing my stance a little too much, and let my hands move too far to the right on the club. But now that I'm home I

1

these things don't bother me. They're

WHAT THE OTHER PROS ARE SAYING

not hard to correct.”

Nor was

it a case, he insisted. ofNickhaving the Indian sign on him.

laus

When

‘Absolutely not.

Snead was beating me

started.

I

now

turned the tables. Right that

happened

I

it's

bis fellow professionals

they thought he couUI

I

just

It is Palmer's pulling used to putting so phenomenally that a little bad puttingeomes as a mental jar to him. It seems to have

that

ments that Nicklaus happened to win [the U.S. Open, the Masters and the Tournament of Champions]. He's still got a long way to go, He's a wonderful player,

but he's got a

it's

Mark McCormack

his

lawyer-

future.

lot

1

BOLT:

will be able

think he has lost a

I

his confidence.

of

His putting has been affected most. But he has lost some of his

He

distance, loo.

doesn't

seem

to be

catching the ball solid any more. Will he

win again?

You



plete rest.

TONY LEMA:

I don't think he is in a He played some wonderful golf Las Vegas. When Palmer’s timing is is no one who can hit the ball as well as he can, but that is something no golfer can hold more than a short time. A tot of people have said that he is tired, and I guess he has begun

slump. at

perfect there

to believe

it

himself.

DOUG SANDERS; He doesn't seem to be able to concentrate as well as he did in the past. I think he is involved in so

many

outside interests that they are tak-

mind away from the game- And everyone has to relax. Each year you are a year older, and you have to rcla.x a bit ing his

JACK NICKLAUS; Wc

BYRON NELSON: Nobody

can stay

both have our

outside interests, but neither of us really has to let them bother us. There is nothing wrong with Arnold's golf. Pretty

soon he

bet he will.

hitched up and going all the lime- The body and mind won't stand it. When you arc playing tournament golf you can feci that tension point coming, but you can't help it. The golf bug has been on

(the Masters, U.S.

Open, British Open and PGA). That’s my ambition, and it still is, more than ever. Money never was my play golf as incentive in this game. well as I can because like to win, and always been

Palmer's buck no matter where he goes. So the tension keeps building up, and the confidence drains away. The only answer is what Arnold is doing com-

more.

BOB ROSRURG:

want to win the

I

couldn't say.

to beat Nicklaus.

‘I've still got the desire to win," he said. ”1 want to beat every golfer there is,

some year

I

know when anybody

don't

TOMMY

worry about his game. Palmer said it might be logical, but is totally untrue.

and

two years is There arc more players able

to be off as badly as people are

Will he beat Nicklaus?

(SI,

Palmer has risen in country boy to highest-paid athlete in history, the first ever to earn half a million dollars a year. It might be logical to suspect that he now feels too rich to

prc.sent

game

thinking. It is Just that he is in a mental slump and can’t concentrate. MIKE SOUCHAK: I'd have to believe that Arnie's whole game has sulfered some. His pulling is not as good as it used to be. Other things, too. But everybody who ever played has gone through what he's going through. He'll snap out of it.

Nov. 12), a few years from

Big Four

100','.

up



and the cleverness of

psychologically. Then, too,

him

the competition in the past

a

on the pedestal than to get there. There arc a lot of good young golfers coming up Tony Lema, Bobby Nichols. And how about Raymond Floyd? He hasn't done much yet. but he's only 20. He could be tremendous.” Thanks to his own skill and personality.

is

to Slick with him. But he has too solid

harder to

stay

agent,

He

is off.

affected

of playing

lot

come hack

DOUG FORD:

to lose three big tourna-

ahead of him. And usually

In usTRAiruojA«/.v(»«ff>/ what changes they saw in his game ami whether strong. Here are their comments:

While Pahucr \\asre\tingUi^i nw/t. Sports

Sam

the time, but

all

be back and playing well.

will

He may win

a tournament right

the other hand, he

may come

off.

On

close a lot

and not win. That happens. He won seven tournaments all last year, didn't he? he has won only three so far this year? Gee, th.it's a terrible slump, isn't it?

And

I

1

the

money has come more

or less by

accident.”

Palmer's

What “Sure,

own

theory of the slump

is

about outside distractions? had too much to do,” Palmer

I

of work to

said. “It takes a lot

And

simply that he played too steadily and. like a horse that is raced loo much, tailed

businesses.

olf his

peak form. '‘This is my first real he pointed out. "’^ou tournament and play you try to make them all. soon you're just another player. Also I'm not as young as was, and you age faster if j'ou keep hitting the trail every week. I was dead tired at Fort Worth, and felt physically lousy. That cyst was bothering me. I could have kept going, but hope to be playing golf for a long while and I figured this was the time to take

myself get involved

invited

I

pressures myself.

I

hate to say no. in

too

at once.

the day to practice. But

well;

the

I

I

1

a

good

really

again.

rest,

then sec

if

I

couldn't get

charged up and playing my best The funny part is that some of

the writers

who

of meanings into

are reading

my

all

kinds

vacation are the

same fellows who were urging me take one.”

to

hill

turning tions,

move

I

didn't have

many

enough time

rest in three years,”

can’t play every if

set up some of the

now

I

let

things left in

we're over

with the companies. I've been

down

the offers for exhibi-

all

and a half-million-dollar deal to and things I'll have a lot more time for

to California as a pro,

like that.

that

golf

is

a great believer in the theory

“90'‘o from the thinks concentration,

played

is

shoulders up.”

He

more than any last analysis, is

is

the

this, in

the

physical factor,

secrei of playing well.

And

where he

felt

me

a mistake that got

—and

I'd

trouble,

in



mean that lay awake at night like that. I'm too good a and 1 was so tired anyway that dropped right off. And now I'm not at all. As soon as you get a little rest it's amazing how you perk up. All I

don't

I

or anything sleeper



I

worried

I

now

need

again,

is

to start concentrating

and then practice

timing a

little

sharper.

until

It's

get

I

my

going to take

a lot of practice after this layoff, but

the golf course in the future.”

Palmer

began to have mental lapses

make

or miss a pull I needed. Naturally, I began to worry which made it worse. No,

something

had been really wrong with his game. "There were too many other things creeping into my mind,” he said. “Instead of thinking only about the shot, I

now

I'm

in the

mood

for

it.

I'll

be ready

to play by the time of the Thunderbird,

two weeks from now.

1

have

er the last few days than

I

felt

strong-

have

in

the

past five years.”

And, as if to emphasize his point, he poked his good friend Artie Ander-

rose,

son

in the belly,

squared off into a spar-

ring stance and said, "I could take on end you and a herd of elephants.”

25

To beat Peter

Snell.

Coach Mihaly

Igloi

up against a miler who liked to race

devised a four-man racing machine. But he was

men— not stopwatches

HOW A MAN OF an age

ti

I

displace

human fort

in

which

man,

when

seems grimly probable that the computer will comforting to have a Gordon Cooper prove that

it

it is

intelligence

was provided

Snell,

is

irreplaceable in outer space. Similar

last

weekend by

powerful

a

he ran the third fastest mile ever.

New The

com-

if lesser

Zealander, Peter finest miler

of

all

was only five-tenths of a second behind his own world record. He was also a living example of an old truth: there is nothing lime, Snell

quite so impressive as self-determination.

Modesto, Calif., some 90 miles southeast of San Francisco. and he produced his superlative cfTort against a mile running machine the Los Angeles Track Club. Coached by Mihaly Igloi. the LATC operates on the theory that if the correct buttons are pushed and the correct lap limes calculated, a win and a world record will emerge almost automatically. The LATC has been right more often than not but, until Snell's thundering triumph, the old-fa.shioncd method of combining pride, guts and strength with an instinct for making the proper move at the proper time had been almost forgotten Snell ran at



—except by people

like Snell.

There were four significant milers

in

the race: Snell, the world

cham-

pion; Jim Beatty, the small, indefatigable American middle-distance

runner

who most

people thought was ready to take Snell; his Los An-

Club teammate. Jim Grcllc; and Cary Weisiger, an outsider of sorts who, almost unnoticed by his compatriots, had been running some very good times recently. Grclte is a sensitive, nervous runner who suffers from migraine headaches one kept him out of the Coliseum Relays a fortnight ago, where he might have beaten Snell. Weisiger, now a marine, receives his coaching by mail from Al Buchler, his undergraduate coach at Duke, whose system is a synthesis of the methods favored by Igloi and Arthur Lydiard, who handles and sometimes influences— Snell. In addition, there were George Jessup of Los Angeles State College, a 4:10 miler who was asked by meet promoters to run the first half mile in 1:56; and Bob Seaman of the LATC. whose role was to pile on geles Track





a fast third quarter directly after Jessup's half.

Beatty was not particularly anxious to run against Snell on SaturHe came to the race tired from a vigorous 5,000-mctcr run the week before against Murray Halberg. which he won, Never before had Igloi asked one of his runners to return within a week from so hard a day.

race to appear against a competitor of Snell's class.

unmercifully

By way of

in

He drove

Beatty

practice.

contrast, Snell trained rather casually, although he

not been impressive

in his

maiden appearance of the year

when he won an uninspired over 4 minutes

at

in

had

the U.S.,

race against Dyrol Burleson in a fraction

Los Angeles.

“He

has been nigglingat his training," conllnueti

Coming

off last turn, heavily

Weisiger (center) as

26

tiring

muscled Snell powers away from

teammates GreUe and Beatty

U.S. Marine

(lett) fight

by

SPIRIT

for third.

TEX MAULE

WRECKED

IGLOI’S

COMPUTER

IlJwtfrgtton

by

f!ol>o«l

Hoidvilla

27

MAN OF

SPIRIT

coHlimieJ

Los Angeles mile. “The best thing that could happen to him is for some chap to do in his mile record. That might niakc him work. He has been running on the interest of the conditioning he built up when he really wanted to said Lydiard before the

run.

I

don't

know how long

the interest

will last.*’

Lydiard

is

not truly Snell’s coach, in

the sense that Igloi

is

the coach of the

members of the Los Angeles Track Club. “1 do not tel) him what to do,” Lydiard siud in Modesto last Friday. “If he asks me,

1

help him. But he doesn’t ask often.

He is not as fit as he has been. But if an American is to beat him tomorrow night, he must run at least a 3:56. I feel that no American runner can beat him. His great quality is that he insists that he

hands o£ Hanes

will

not be beaten.”

Although Snell

is

grateful to Lydiard

for supervising his

marathon training

over the

hills and through the sands of Zealand, he does not feel that Lydiard knows quite as much as he does about the half mite and the mile. He be-

New

lieves that he has been able to combine what Lydiard has given him on distance running with what he himself knows about middle-distance running. It is not a preplanned to-thc-fraction-of-a-sccond system that Snell admires. It is, rather, a system which depends upon

SncII himself.

“I

am

not a time-trial runner,” he

says. “I am more of a racer. I run against the man, not the watch. If I am to run a very good mife in the U.S., someone will

have to

pull

me along.”

Thus the big mile race, which had been some two years, developed as a contest of temperaments and planning. eagerly awaited for

had written Cary was capable of 3:56. But, he had

Weisiger’s coach that he

cautioned, Weisiger must his forte as a miter

was

remember that

his strength.

He

should impose a strong pace because he could not hope to sprint at the end with

and Snell. Beatty, Grelle and the rest of the Los Angeles Track Club contingent wanted a hard tempo, too. The only runner in the race who was hoping for a rather miters like Beatty

at leading stores Diplomatic way to

demand

the finest:

say "Hanes Statesman, please. " T-shirts, briefs and

American And for such luxurious quality, surprisingly moderate prices. This Hanes Statesman T-shirt of 100% pima cotton costs just $1.50. favorite likely has Hanes Statesman Your shop most now. If not, won 't you please let us know ?

leisurely pace for the first three quarters

shorts, impeccably tailored of choice

was

cottons,

they must run a quick half,” Snell said.

r<>l1in( C«..

Winibn-Stltmi.N.C.



Sw«d«n



AinItMK



Snell himself. “If they

want to win,

“J hope they don't. I’d like to run about 3 minutes for the three-quarters. it is not under that.”

The rabbit— Jessup

28

—led the

I

hope

first

lap.

but he did not perform well. Hxpcctcd to

do 56 or 57 seconds, he ran 58. The lield was right behind. Seaman was closest, and Beatty, running third, finished the quarter in 58.8. Snell, who was sixth heading into the .second quarter mile, had pre.scrved his personal timetable by running the quarter in 59.3. Jessup led through part of the second but again in too slow a time to erode

lap.

Snell's finishing speed. Beatty

patient with

him on

this

grew im-

second lap and

took the lead himself, trying to force the

He

pace.

1:59.1,

good

passed the half-mile mark in

with VVeisiger second. This was

who had an

time, but to those

ling of svhat

Was

come

to

it

was

ink-

plainly

disturbing.

Before the race Weisiger had said he that

felt

he kicked, he would have to

if

start early

and carry on long. Trying

to

force Snell, he took the lead through the entire

third

lap.

finishing

quarters in 2:59.4. This

time

ble

but.

the

was a

unfortunately,

three-

respecta-

not

the

kind of time designed to deprive Snell of his finish thrust. Right place, right time

Going

into

the last

lap.

Snell

was

fourth in 3:00.2. exactly where he wanted to

be.

Now

Weisiger

slrctcliiiig his

lifted

pace,

the

lead over the other run-

ners around the penultimate turn. Snell responded by moving up ptist Beatty and dropping in just behind (irolle. who was trying to match Weisiger's kick. (“I came up on his shoulder and tried to go by couldn't." Greile said later. "I and knew then Cary was too strong.") I

Going down

backstreich of the

the

Weisiger continued

running

strongly. Snell, coolly patient,

was run-

last

lap,

ning well within himself while Beatty,

plodding desperately behind Snell, be-

gan to labor visibly. About halfway down the backstretch. Snell looked back at Beatty. Then, as he hit the last turn, he began an almost incredible acceleration, fie flew by Weisi-

the big shoe

ger and finally seemed to be finishing a different race than the one the Americans were running. Snell, suddenly, was a sprinter, among distance men. His time was 3:54.9. Weisiger. holding on for

.second,

and

ran

CrcJIe.

Beatty,

3:57.3. in

fourth,

in

felt

had to sprint around the

bend." Snell said, “because the homestretch

on

Take Keds

‘Mainsail.’

Made

for action

on the decks,

with a special non-skid sole, but equally at I

this track

want room

to run.

Beatty, because he

is I

was

very short and

chap

I

land. Cleanest lines

want! Plus

built-in

and smoothest

comforts and

a

fit

LOOK FOR THE BLUE LABEL'

home on

you could

rugged construc-

I

looked back at the

is

KEDS

third,

both recorded

3:58 Rat. "1

U.S.

tion.

Ask

for 'Mainsail,' as

shown, or slipon

style.

was

cuniinueJ on page

W

United States Rubber Rsckirairr c»ni«r.

29

N(w York 20.

t

The director of the Peace Corps and brother-in-law of President Kennedy, stirred

by a Sports

Illustrated article defining the true threat to

sport, cites the achievements

of a notable group of athletes and coaches

THE MORAL FORCE OF SPORT by

Tuo

weeks ago, disturbed by a new wave of football scandals, Sports Illustrated reflected on the moral crisis in American sport. If there is a crisis, it belongs strictly in the publicity-drenched

world of commercialized

athletics.

This

was spectacularly demonstrated to me last week when Dr. William Unsoeld, a mountain climber from Corvallis, Ore., and Dr. Thomas F. Hornbein became the

men

first

Unsoeld He,

pal.

ever to traverse Mt. Everest. is

many

become a highly effective U.S. export and a good one by any standards. confirmed dozens of

times in the past year,

The men and wom-

en we have sent overseas have shown, in the best tradition of American sport,

wc can

that ter,

help build personal charac-

national pride and international un-

derstanding. teers

I

am

proud of these volun-

not only for the work they are

doing, but because

I

believe that they

represent and e.xemplify American athletics

far better than a handful of de-

who have

been led astray by fame and wealth. In the motion picture. The Hustler, a young player challenges a recognized king of the poolroom Minnesota Fats. It is apparent that the young man is the better player, and at first he wins consistently. But as the long hours wear away and one day fades into the next, fatigue and alcohol slow his game, and linquents

their zeal for



30

well stand as the

motto

for sport through

the ages. In giving the highest honors of



this

emulation, the gambler's comment could

the city to the Olympic victors, the Greckswere not merely honoring strength or swiftness. They were paying homage to the dedication, the toil and determined training, the joy in competition which symbolized their highest ideals of man's

ous activities is again proving the profound moral force of sports. Athletics, wc have found in the Peace Corps, has

have seen



Ne-

in



of character and courage far outnumbering the few nationally known athletes who have involved themselves in dubi-

I

Fats, imperturbable and and beats the challengA cynical gambler explains to the bitter and uncomprehending youth “sure you got talent, a lot of people have talent. what it takes is character." While some people might doubt that any pool hustler, even Minnesota Fats, possesses moral attributes worthy of er.

other Americans

a Peace Corps leader

like so

SARGENT SHRIVER

Minnesota

steady, overtakes

When we

forget this,

and are

when wc

exalt

indifferent to character,

A

regional loyalties

those

who

share a true

But these few do not represent American sports or those who play them. I know they do not. For in the Peace Corps have seen hundreds of our athletes break through into an entirely new dimension of athletic and human achievement. They are revealing, on an unprecedented scale, the value of sports as a tool in building that world of independent. friendly nations that is the major goal of America's foreign policy. From Venezuela and the Ivory Coast I

Iran and Thailand, volunteers are

teaching the universal language of sports. arc

“By teaching down tribal and

and help

to

build a

is

essential

our future." In Ghana, Michael Shea, a Peace Corps coach, was carried off the to

the

all

love for sports.

Some

to shoot.)

president of an African country

sports you will break

few can be so disheartening. They cast a

shadow over

Olympic

athletes.

Others come

is

writes the Peace Corps:

field

is

All

of excellent court players who have never

had a chance

nothing more than a parlor game, an especially clever card trick. That is why the unethical actions of a then sport

to

field.s.

removed from the commercialism and profiteering of which Sports Illustrated speaks. They serve virtually without pay. often under difficult and primitive living conditions. They often lack equipment and facilities. (One of our basketball coaches in Tunisia saw high winds blow down his baskets. Undismayed, he proceeded to teach dribbling and passing. As a result he has a team far

sense of national pride which

character.

talent

from high school and college

share a dedication and idealism that

on the shoulders of

his victorious

team, one of the few white men carried triumphantly by Negroes anywhere in

world recently. At the African Games in Dakar, competing teams from three countries were coached by U.S. Peace Corps volunteers. Next Friendship

year seven countries will have Peace

Corps coaches. In Indonesia. Peace Corps volunteers (SI. Dec. 10) soon will

who

be training the athletes

will

compete in the huge stadium built at enormous expense by the Soviet Union. In

Venezuela, Will Prior, formerly a

catcher with the San Francisco Giants’ chain,

helped

has

camp out of foundations crates

for

the

build

a

recreation

wilderness,

for

tents,

tables.

In

from teeming Caracas

pouring

collecting

this

old

camp boys

get their first taste

of organized recreation.

“You

pick up

a ball," says Prior, "and. bam! 10 kids around you. They've never had a chance to do anything like this. We arc training young leaders.” In Thailand an American Peace Corps athlete fought a draw, in a benefit match, against a Thai boxer. He was the first Westerner ever to escape defeat in a sport which allows kicking, kneeing and elbowing in addition to the more con-

technique of punching. The

ventional

Bangkok newspapers reported .American pioneer

"The

that

won

Thai boxing

in

the hearts of the crowd by his realistic war dance [an elaborate prclight ritual designed to conjure up the support of the spirits] and his neat way of handling his in

And

opponents."

much

young .American

for his country as all the

highly paid stars

And lar

same

the

ways,

a few minutes,

in

a distant arena, that

did as

who

ever played.

story, in less siicctacu-

being repeated daily through-

is

out the world.

When

Joe Mullins went

Iran as a track coach, the

to Isfahan.

school to which he was assigned had

won

Today it holds five and the city championship. Joe has been given an award as the best coach of Isfahan, and the Peace Corps has received a request that never

a trophy.

individual trophies

he be

made

town.

And on

land of

St.

track coach for the eniirc the

league.

new

St.

He

West Indies

little

first

island basketball

the top scorer

is

on the brand-

Lucia all-island team.

These are plishment.

They help

stories of individual

And to

they

ed States arc

accom-

multiply

daily.

demonstrate the Inner

nificance of sports which in

we

in the

sig-

Unit-

danger of forgetting. In

the international arena, as well as individuals, sport

"We

is-

Na-

Lucia, volunteer Carlos

ranjo formed the

is

among

the great democrat.

cannot compete with you

in steel

mills or in airplanes,” the leader of

an

eonlmucd on page 62

DIRECTOR sMRrvER. who Corps volunteers

for

an

often invites Pc.icc

athletic

weekend

at his

Roekville. Md. estate, leads pel monkey Tom Tom, which he acquired on trip to Sierra Leone.

31



GOOD LOOKS AND GOOD GOLF ON THE LADIES’ TOUR BY GWILYM

ariially

obscured by the prosperous

clamor that emanates from the men's professional golf tour

is

the significant

fact that the ladies of pro golf are enjoying a newfound success of their ow n.

The two similar as

golfing caravans arc about as

Bermuda

onions, but

is

it

shorts

and Bermuda

precisely this contrast





The future, with its promof still more tournaments, more prize money and more fresh faces, is even brighter, especially since women’s golf is

could take the chance of turning pro,” says Betsy Rawls, a South Carolinian

growing

Texas and has been playing golf professionally since 1951. ’’But now the young-

the pro circuit. ise

The

at a faster rate than men’s.

LPGA

tour has always had con-

siderable potential as a sporting showcase. Its fields arc small, so

its

tourna-

and an ability to exploit it that has suddenly swelled the popularity of the

ments are more compact than the sometimes unwieldy men’s events that must

game played

schedule dawn-to-dusk action.

Up

until

Professional

the

way

the ladies play

it.

two years ago The Ladies Golf Association— which

has no connection with the men's

— was down on

its

PGA

collective knees beg-

ging someone, anyone, to put on

its

tour-

naments someplace, anyplace. Today

LPGA,

like the

who down her

wallflower

her spectacles, shakes

the

discards hair

and

petitive thrills.

Mickey Wright, the finest women’s golf,

ith

women

tempo than the men's,

do not leapfrog around

so

The

the country

many golfing airline stewardesses. total prize money for 1963 will in

1961— and a lot of attractive, talented young women, like the five pictured on the following pages, are moving out on

money we

er players see the prize

are

winning out here. They sec the 10 leading money winners driving around in new Oldsmobiles, and they figure their chances of making a living arc pretty good. As a result, we are now getting quality players in depth.”

One

of the best examples of this

the

are forced to rely heavily on

game

well. Since their

spectators to see exactly players are trying to

much slower

it

is

easier for

what

it

is

do with a given

the

shot.

But perhaps the most important reaall for the current popularity of

petitive

pro tour late in 1959 at the age of 18. But last year she won two LPGA tournaments.

made $14,324

old

money

girl.

"Shirley keeps the ball

in

play about

text fonlinueJ im

son of

game is that new look: the charming look of young girls

in prize

and picked up another $6,000 from various endorsements and teaching jobs which isn’t a bad income for a 22-ycar-

page 1?

the ladies’ version of the

SANDRA HAYNIE

the tour literally has a

pleasant,

"A

few years ago only an outstanding amateur like Mickey Wright at play.

This tiny Texan, little girls,

about her

but there golf.

one of the tour’s nothing at all demure

at 19. is is

She won $7,050

lust year.

Phoiogtophi by Jomet D'C

32

is

com-

youngster from Caldwell, Idaho. She had won only a few regional titles as an amateur w hen she came out on the

w

basics to play the

be about 5280,000— up from 5186,000

Kappa key and

Shirley Englehorn, a slight, hotly

racy

swings generally have a

like

Phi Beta

tremendous distance and accua swing as uncomplicated as a breath of air. Lacking the physical strength of their male counterparts, all gets her

played this year, as compared to 24

girls

who earned a

a degree in physics at the University of

player in the history of

becomes .something to see, can greet its growing list of suitors with new confi-

1961, and they arc scheduled in an orderly geographic progression so that the

The wom-

en arc also able to offer their galleries instructional opportunities as well as com-

dence. At least 31 tournaments will be in

BROWN

S.

LESBIA LOBO Dark and piquant, this youthful Texan Oafi) doesn't enter every tournament, but galleries find

her as welcome as a dash of spice.

SHIRLEY ENOLEHORN Ectehing and dimpled. 22-ycar-old Shirley {riyhDcan flash one of the most competitive games on the tour as well as a winning smile.

JUDY KIMBALL Blonde and bouncy and an all-round athlete, Judy [bfhw). only 24. has already won a big event, the Ladies' PCJA Championship,

V

JUDY TORLUEMKO ir freckles

were

birdies,

nobody would be

who

at 18

on the Ladies'

tour.

able to defeat this St. Louis miss, is

the youngest player

GOOD-LOOKING GOLF conllmied

asanyone out here.” says Mickey Wright, "but the most impressive thing about her is her competitive temperament. She just never gives up. The gallery can sense this and likes it. It shows as well

in

everything she docs." Shirley

ing to the tour, spirit that

in fact, the

once kept her

bring-

is

same kind of March

alive. In

of I960, immediately after playing

in

tournament in Augusta. Ga.. she went horseback riding and galloped into an overhanging tree limb. The shocking blow to her head and the subsequent fall caused a brain concussion and five broken vertebrae. She was unconscious for two weeks. “When came the Titlcholdcrs

I

to." she recalls, "1 didn’t think alive.

when

I

was

There had been snow on the ground I

fell.

Now

I

could see

it

was warm

and sunny outside. Besides. I was surrounded by nuns." So successful has Shirley been that she and her contemporaries are now in the majority on the tour, and the older, established stars are finding it harder and harder to beat them. Long-hitting Kathy Whitworth. 23, won two tournaments last year and was second only to Mickey Wright in money earnings, with S20.052. Little Sandra Haynic was 5 feet 1 and weighed only 95 pounds when she joined the lour in 1960. She has since grown three inches, gained 20 pounds, won two tournaments and displayed the most natural swing in women's golf. Mary Mills, a 23-ycar-old

who

handles every club

skill, was voted Rookie of Year in 1962 and won more than Judy Kimball, 24, w on the Ladies

with equal the

$9,000.

PGA championship.

Twenty-four-

Ann Creed (SI. Sept. 3, 1962), an amateur sensation in 1962. turned professional late in the year and was able to finish third in the first tournament she entered. The good looks of girls like Lcsbia year-old Clifford

doubles as one of the Midwest's best basketball

college

at Baltusrol in

Wirtz felt

U.S.

to the brawling of basketball.

— as

some

his present duties

Women’s Open New Jersey. Though ac-

during the 196!

customed

any normal man would about trying to conand financial destinies girls. So he de-

hesitation

trol the athletic

of three dozen career

cided to apply to his golfing activities the rules of behavior he

"I

had long used

on the basketball court.

to survive

try to treat

every

I

X

has worked well.

policy

his

money

What woman would want kind of

horsepower

gift

The other was his success with the

"But

LPGA I

and

its

like a

corpse than a corps every

year goes to a man, the

tournament

A

5-fool-5

LPGA’s new

Leonard VV’irtz. tornado of activity who director.

into the air. then realized that

flip

she had not

felt $50 worth of rage. She attempted a diving catch, but could not come up with the club in lime. So long, $50. Jo Ann Prentice, however, produced one of the memorable athletic moments

when she hurled

is one. The LPGA has only 30 regulars on its tour. The men have more than 100. Thus the LPGA’s prize money average of S9.(X)0 per event goes a long way. "You get a lot for your money with the Ladies PGA," says Stan Sousa of Carvel Franchise Systems, which will direct the Carvel Ladies’ Open on Long

size, for instance,

two

golf club that

some

and a woman scorned. He look

all

risks he cared to in that direction

the

when

he sweetly, kindly, quietly and firmly

ordered the girls to improve their personal appearance on and off the golf course.

slim

The chubby ones were asked

down

a

little

or, if they

to

could not,

from wearing shorts, l-'requcnt permanent waves were suggested, and playing outfits were to be kept neat and to refrain

well-pressed.

to be

The

players took his

good

manly

the change

for morale, as well

LPGA's public image. Wirtz also extended his authority into

decorum. He felt temperamental outbursts looked bad enough coming from a Tommy Bolt, and were absolutely boorish when displayed by a lady. So he imposed a S50 fine for clubthrowing. A club is considered thrown if it leaves a competitor’s hand and hits the ground. The women are considerably less blase about money than the men. and this fine has provoked a number of the field of

as a benefit for

charities.

motion for the sponsor,

fury

hell,

month

New York

"You

get a

is good prois easy on the and can make

four-day tournament that

who

about

into

bad shot. Sensing in a flash of thrift that immediate action had to be taken, she managed a catch worthy of Willie Mays. Thus W'irtz has done much to improve the tour he is selling, and potential tournament sponsors are finding good reasons for buying his package, Its small

presumably knows

all

a club

near-orbit at Beaumont. Texas after a

Wirtz, a husband and father of five

as for the

more

ated

Island late this

put through anything really important without consulting the players,’’ admits

ness of teen-agers like Judy Torlucmkc and the competitive balance created by matching the energies of youth against the skill and c.xperiencc of its betterknown names has done a lot to improve the LPGA's status. So has good pro-

ing

mouth? com-

wouldn't be so stupid as to

proved

was look-

the

getting

tournaments.

suggestions to heart, and

that

to look this

in in

winners.

plete authority over everything involved

Lobo, a Te.xas country-club professiondaughter who is seen increasingly

group

So

have two of Wirtz's more tangible One was persuading to loan showroom-fresh

Oldsmobilc

often on the tour, the buoyant puckish-

this vitality into a

I

arrangements.

Starfires to the leading

amusing incidents. Last year at the Cosmopolitan Open in Rockton. 111., Mickey Wright hit what she thought would be a superb nine-iron, only to sec the ball take a big hop and bounce over the green. She gave her club an exasper-

of 1962

way

the

girl

would a basketball player during the heal of a game," Wirtz says. "In other words, everyone, from Mickey Wright to the least important kid on the tour, gets strict and equal treatment."

al’s

motion. .Much of the credit for bringing

during the

olficials

assumed

winter. Wirtz

hosts

money

nice

it

for charity as well."

"We can't compete with the men and don't want to," says Lennie Wirtz. "We arc trying to promote women's golf on a completely different basis. like to put our tournaments into the small metropolitan communities that will want to get behind the event year after year and make the promotion a kind of family we

I

affair.

We

terms.

If

have to think in long-range our philosophy was ‘make a now and to heck with next

quick buck

year’ we'd be dead. I'd like a 35-iourna-

ment schedule and

I'll

be happy with an

average purse of S 0,000 per event." This is not being overly optimistic. To bring it about, Wirtz will travel l(X),1

0(X) miles

and make calls in at least 42 knock on doors any-

stales this year. “I’ll

where." he

s;iys

of his increasingly suc-

cessful attempts to line

sponsors.

Mis

ladies,

up tournament meanwhile, are

playing golf at a competitive level and

dreamed possible just two LPGA is becoming a end at last.

for stakes not

years ago.

glamour

The

girl

37

Slipperiest; Fish in the The

eel

languishes on the

muddy bottom

of

man's regard, but he

Sea is

really a

personable fellow once you get to know and understand him an invitation to the angler and a delight to the palate

38

by Virginia Bennett Moore



Only three of the five serpentine fish shown above are true eels. At the bottom arc the eommon eels, with the conger eel Just above them. At right is the sharp-toothed, cavcdwelling moray. All three are edible. The electric eel. actually a relative of the carp and top left. The Jawicss. sucking fish at top right is the lamprey, a vampire which lives on llie blood of other fish, soineiimes wiping out whole populations. catfish, is at

hverybody knows about grading similes as

—have

Our

eels.

—as slippery

made most

as, as

de-

slimy

of us knowledge-

able eel haters. But eels do have their fanciers,

these

even their devotees, although

do not seem

The

fanciers

cious to cal.

loom very

to

the population, This

is

know

The devotees know

besides being tasty, an eel

fisherman a very good first

battle

is

large in

a pity.

that eels are deli-

in

light

w'ill

that,

give

any

— twice. The

the water, the second

in

And if you go out for conger, marine branch of the eel family that European and Asiatic seas you

[he boat. a



lives in

can even charter a special boat to fish for them off County Galway. Ireland

you arc apt to

find yourself with a lively

boatful of sea monster.

One

venture-

the Bristol Channel, it

and

finally

boated

with the aid of an oar and his strug-

gling partner.

The

beast bit a

chunk out

of the oar and sent the fishing partner spinning into the bilges. Then it knocked O’Brien overboard.

Compare

that with

the polite protests of your channel bass

name

of

or your wahoo. weaklish, or porbeagle

O'Brien, hooked a seven-foot conger

in

shark. Yet neither the freshwater

some

fi-shcrman not long ago,

eel,

nor

coniintieil

39

Sfipperiest; Fish

all directions.

coMiuued

known

Well

to us in this

country and to Europeans

is

the Sar-

even the mighty conger, is listed in any records of the International Game Fish

2.000-mile-wide Atlantic float of sea-

Association.

weed calmly

Why, then, is the eel neglected? There is more than a single reason for it, F'or one thing, it is shy. The common fresh-

the Azores

water

of the eastern U.S.,

eel

like its

brothers and sisters everywhere,

mud

the

lies in

of either fresh or tidal waters,

sensibly minding

own

its

quiet during the day,

from dusk

business.

It is

feeding mostly

dawn. Even the toothy marine cousin, charac-

to

gasso Sea, actually not a sea at

of cel

by some as the criminal element society— usually will bile people

only as the result of unprovoked,

if

A

further reason for distrust is

carrion.

a

is

that

bottom feeder and an eater of eat anything— even milk

(It will

from a baby bottle, as Pennsylvania state hatcherymen have (rained some of normally finds

their cels to do.

But

plenty of carrion

on the bottom.) Some

people think they do not it

this is

it

a nasty habit, though

much remark upon

or hold

it

against the flounder, oyster, clam or

blue crab.

The is

eel

a true fish, not a reptile.

is

not a primitive

adapted to the

fish, cither,

life

it

It

but highly

leads. Its paired fins

(except for the pectorals) arc long since

and the dorsal, anal and caudal fins have grown into a long swim-fringe reaching from the last third of its back lost,

to

its

belly, activated

ray bones.

As for

by some 500

little

the slime, marine biol-

a coating that helps the eel move from ocean to fresh or fresh to ocean water without any known prepaogists think

it

and

eels.

The

third

is

also in the Pacific, off

northeastern Australia.

In addition to

minor and Indian Ocean beds fora hat-

these three major beds, there arc Pacific ful

of species of tropical

The liny-headed nothing so

much

as willow leaves

made

of glass, set with two mother-of-pearl eyes.

They swim and they

is

The

drift

wide

1

1

five to

20 years

company of her dilatory mate-to-be as she travels out to the depths. Eels are driven to the seas by the same instinct that brought them inshore, and this time

they find and follow the deep current

running below and against the Gulf Stream.

Not

all

go. Just as

many males tidelands,

some

larvae appar-

and

never get farther than the

some females never

leave the

freshwaters where they have reached ma-

Most, however, rejourney of their lives,

turity as yellow eels.

turn for the

last

turning as they go into silver cels marked

by nearly black and somewhat bronzed backs and flunks and silvery-white bellies, and finally developing those strange,

!

shores after a year of effort. The 9-vertebrae, but smaller,

larva turns right at signal

some

to three or four feet, until time for her to return to the Sargas-

so Sea. presumably picking up the

whirlpool of

103- to

cel larva

well, that the elver finds again.

Flere she lives for

it is

10-vertebrae American swims northwest to reach U.S.

like leaves loose in a giant air.

pond or

and grows

ently never choose to leave the sea

eels.

eel larvae look like

with the oc.an currents that carry them

sometimes unwitting, attack. the eel

but a

and shared as a cradle by both the American and the European ccl. Off the coast of Japan in west Pacific waters there is another ocean nursery for

moray— another terized

all

lying between the U.S.

and makes

1

10- to eel

overlarge eyes that one assocratc.s with

iralTic

nocturnal creatures. The mother-cel-to-

European

some invisible way eastward

its

to the

waters of Europe, a journey taking three

be. having reached her

weedy ocean ren-

dezvous, drops, sometimes as

much

as

years and thousands of miles. At long

1,600

myriad little three-inch glassine packages wash up into the tidewaters of

depths until she finds the temperature layer she likes. FCer appetite, voracious

last,

both continents. By

coming

now many

elvers, or tiny adults,

arc be-

and

re-

semble the adults in miniature. Here in the tidewaters some of the males lurk behind, often for good, and take up a lazy life around the salt basins and flats. But the more industrious young females swim upstream as close to the headwaters of their particular river or creek as they can get. it

was her mother's

Some

say

river or stream, or

feet,

to

the

black,

astonishing

She lays perhaps 5 to 10 million eggs. She takes no more food, becomes emaciated, swims listlessly about to no purpose and dies. The male, who never reached a size more than half of hers, drops his sperm and closer to shore, disappears.

follows suit. It took Johannes Schmidt, a patient Dane, 15 years to find out this much

about the ccl in the 20th century, though the fish has long been a staple of Euro-

ration.

Eels arc ubiquitous in the eastern half

of the United States and abound in the waters of Europe, Japan and Australia. in streams of Connecticut, backwaters of Maryland and Virginia,

They are

creeks and wells of Kentucky, ponds of Indiana, rivers of Mississippi

meadows of Ohio ows; because fall

on

their

if

and dewy mead-

(that's right,

they hit a

dam or a

water-

way up or downstream, they

and walk).

get out

Despite this prevalence, the ccl has for centuries been cloaked in mystery as

black as ignorance itself. Aristotle pondered where eels might come from, but the secret was not out until a few decades ago. Even now, puzzles remain. The cel

— the

freshwater

oceanic

basirjs in

cel— has which

it

three great

spawns and

out of which the young swim to land in

40

eel is round in ihc eastern hair or the U.S., and in ihc waters or Europe. Japan and Australia. It spawns and then dies in three enormous oceanic basins shown above. The bestknown spawning ground, the Sargasso Sea, lying in the western Atlantic, is shared by Ihc American and European eel. The other two major ureas lie in (he Pacific olT Japanese and Australian coasts.

Thc common

pean

A German

diets.

naturalist \sho

described eel larvae thought he had

first

found a new

fish,

though somebody

lat-

a tank

metamorNot only that

becoming elvers,

the larvae shrink

er proved they were eels by

phosing one but. in

in

noticeably, to everyone's further con-

These

fusion.

Schmidt had- pre-

facts

He

cious few.

also knew that as far hack

as 16S4 an Italian

named Redi had sugspawn in the

gested that freshwater eels sea.

Schmidt got his information about by sleuthing down ever

the Sargasso

smaller and smaller eel larvae, until he

knew he had come

to their source.

He

learned about world eel populations by

banding thousands of

them

all

Some

and tracking

eels

over the oceans. things he never could explain.

Although the normal Atlantic eel larvae have an average of 107 or 15 vertebrae and most larvae reach a length of two to 1

three inches before metamorphosis, on hi.s

1920expedilion the reliable Schmidt

reported catching an ccl larva

in

the At-

had 450 vertebrae Even allow ing for would this

lantic off .Africa that

and was

six feet long!

the usual shrinkage, whatever

creature have turned into? Other stories

of such sea nionstcrs have sprung up here and there, but ihcir meaning, too.

remains the

The

eel's secret.

has continued to figure larg-

col

er than car.

life

size in folklore. In

cial ladder.

it

at the

Those

cording to the

come back many parts of

the elite

is still

bottom of the so-

in the

tale,

lowest class, ac-

are reborn as eels.

The next become boa In

Madagas-

the local belief in transmigration

of souls puts

constrictors, while

as crocodiles.

the world eel meat

believed to be poisonous. In the

darkling corners of these, our

own

Unit-

ed States, some superstitious folk even swear that the ordinary, unassuming cel has a taste for

This

is

human

(Tesh.

absolutely unfair and untrue.

apparently true that the moray. ponamed Muretemi hcleiui. prized today as a Mediterranean food fish and It is

etically

positively cherished as a delicacy in fun-

loving ancient

Komc. had

the favor re-

turned now and then when a slave or two

would be thrown into the pools where the morays were kept. Not that the ordinary eel does not have

its

accomplishments.

It

can

lie tor-

pid at the bottom of a damp mudhole for days, and when the rain comes to fill it. li

sw im off as if nothing had happened, can nearly starve and recover. Then

there

is its

habit of leaving the water

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Slipperiest Fish crawling about on land for a mile or so at a lime in dampish places. Further, the eel can survive injury or infection that

er creature.

for this

would kill almost any othThe probable explanation take you right back to

may

witchcraft after tains a

all:

the eel's blood con-

serum poisonous to nearly c\ery-

thing but cels. This is the tiniest of inconvenience to people, who will do no

more than possibly get some of the stulT in a cut on their hands— which the serum will

promptly but not seriously inflame.

But it is no joke to a small laboratory animal, for an injection of cel serum into

its

veins will

kill

it.

The scrum

contains a nerxe poison that shuts olT the heartbeat reHex; cells

it

also destroys

body

and red blood corpuscles and

acts

as an anticoagulant. Scientists think, in effect,

than

that

the eel has to

any of

be tougher

enemies just to live with its own blood. The scrum has no ciTect at all, however, when the meat is

its

eaten.

One of the largest adult eels ever caught brought an old man triumph and tragedy. Only i\ few year*, ago. on w Dalmatian island where everyone

still

makes

his living by fishing in the Adriatic, a

patriarch wa.s forcibly retired by his sons

He consoled

at 70.

a conger that was

himself by going after known to live in the

When the conger repeatedgrabbed the old man's bait, bent his

reefs nearby. ly

hook and snapped his line, he had the blacksmith make him a special hook that he tied to a thin steel wire. So that the cel wouldn't sneak off with the new rig, he tied the other end around his ankle and sal and waited. Several days later in shallow water his sons found the pair, man and lish, both still leashed together, both dead. The old man's conger was 10 feet

long and weighed 300 pounds.

^^t

a

woman who

Australian farm has

lives

on a lonely

made

pets of the

freshwater cels that live in the nearby

Maxfli mile ball ball

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And no more

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It

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Since they are not dainty eaters, eels

accurately

arc not hard to catch with hook and

surely

line.

stays

knou n 'round the world

"A

greedy lish," wrote l/aak Walit has been recorded that, if

ton. In fact,

put in a tank together, cels nibble each

Super

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Dunlop

she says, has conic to feed regularly for

a single drive. In other words, no

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prove

Anatoki River. She feeds them blancmange, a slithery junket, and they readily take it from her fingers or. with teeth clicking noisily, from a spoon. One,

cvniimieil

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Slipperiest Fish

.

or the lamprey, and only a few fisher-

cel

..r.rjr>./r
men go after true eels with hook and

English

down

tcather*

To

fish, totally

unrelated to the cel. One of the measures employed against these bioodsuckers has

catch after them. These are taken and

been to bring

sold in the local markcls, quick-frozen

to the last survivor.

be

was not recorded whether they

fair,

it

were

fed

anything else during

this period.

As if the eel's reputation were not and the electric ‘'ecr' are also thought to he its kin. though neither is an eel at all. The lamprey. which reverses the eel's cycle hy spawning in freshwater, where its vampire young have all hut w iped out certain .shady enough, the laiiipre>

populations, including lake trout,

fish

a primitive, jawicss sucking

is

the Atlantic eel to feed

in

on lamprey larvae burrowed

in

the

mud

of freshwaters.

The

American

waiting to deliver up

rivers,

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SPIRITS.

BARBECUED EEL

EEL SOUP WITH tVIARIGOLDS

ith

butter over a campfire to be de-

Or more elaborate recipes two below can be followed.

licious.

large cel, unskinned

J

Vi

cup olive

2 teaspoons salt

>4

cup lemon juice

1

teaspoon

1

oil

like

1

2

teaspoon pepper

2 cups fresh peas

enimbled bay leaves

I

2 cups nvilk 2 tablespoons finely chopj'»cd parsley

reneh mustard. Dijon type

6 tablespoons butler Petals from H marigolds

54 teaspoon dry mustard

about 3 inches thick. Place in a shallow dish and pour over it a mixture of oil. lemon juice, sidt, pepper and

Cut the

cel into slices

herbs. Let

it

marinate for

I

hour, turning

the slices occasionally. Thread the slices on

skewers or

a spit. Broil in a

er or on a charcoal

grill

preheated broil-

about 4 inches from

the heat, basting frequently with the mari-

nade.

Before you say martini,

Cook

lender

when

for it

about H) minutes, or is

tested with a fork.

until

The

Fasten head and

tail

of eel together with

cord. Tic in a piece of cheesecloth and cover

with cold water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and tender. liquid

peas.

simmer 25

Remove

cel

to 30 minutes,

and

set aside.

until

To

the

add salt, pepper, cabbage, leek and Cover and cook over a moderate heat Make a smooth paste

for 15 to 20 minutes.

of flour and a little water. Add to the vegetable mixture and cook for about 5 min-

cooking lime de|>ends on the thickness of

utes, stirring constantly, until slightly thick-

the eel.

ened. Gradually add the milk, parsley, but-

say Lamplighter

To make the mustard s;iucc. combine the two kinds of mustard with the mayonnaise.

ter,

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Serves

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1

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chopped green cabbage

leek, lincly cliopivcd

1

teaspoon dried rosemary

MUSTARO SAUCE

I

large ccl, skinned

2 cups finely

salt

V4 teaspoon pepper

imported gin that makes your martinis glow. Next time, “light

the lamp.”

eels is

than cleaning most

simply cut the skin around the body just below the head and peel the skin down

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is

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Mostly they arc taken by gigging. An is a trident with a handle perhaps Some anglers gig at night by fastening a how light to the boat, watching the muddy bottom ahead. Long Islanders take a leaf from the Lskimo's book. When you tly low over the Island's ponds and marshes in winter, the ice looks like Sw iss cheese as busy eel fishermen are seen everywhere driving their forked spears through one round-cut hole or another to the mud beneath. They

other

IFS BRITISH DRY! 44

6.

marigold petals and the cooked

into thin slices.

Meal

do not allow

ccl,

cut

to the boiling pointy

to boil. Serves 6 to 8

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foes. Salt water,

humidity combine to cause metals to corrode, fabrics to fade, rot or mildew,

painted surfaces to weather and chip. Suppliers to yachtsmen have pioneered the development and perfection of materials

withstand

that

now

the elements

— and

Shipshape

make

a house by the sea as easy to care

Neither sun nor sand nor even mildew can mar the beauty or diminish the durability of

new decorating materials designed

tarianism. these

new decorative

chitecture.

They were not always

thus.

The

first

synthetic fabrics

made

sea's erosivencss

were deliberately drab

to withstand the

— the nylon tarpaulins used by the Navy

such bright colors as the bolt of solid

It

Homespun

e.xcellcnt

drapery fabric at

it not only is mildewsunproof and fireproof but re-

A new

Sheer fabrics of resists

water even

The

Dacron also Da-

lOO'.'f

make good beach-house

draperies.

protecting, yet

two striped rolls beneath (the blue by Knoll; the yellow, Cohama) and

the is

motive and boating industries. Looking for sturdy upholstery for car seats

and

boat cushions, they worked with

Du

developing a fabric that not only

its

much exposure

bright colors after

and

to

Recently leading

textile

designers have discovered in the

man-

sunlight

made their

dirt.

fibers special

functional

properties beyond

merits

— they

come

in

bright, fadeproof colors and arc as amenable to dye as they are resistant to dirt. There arc many examples in the photograph at left. A pillow is covered in a new Antron-nylon upholstery fabric designed by Dorothy Licbes for Stroheim and Romann in "'vibrating" colors of red, yellow and magenta. The acid-green roll of fabric is from the same hand. Another designer. Jack Lenor Larsen,

has

recently

horsehair

introduced

made of

a

synthetic

in

the

made of

all

of Acrilan

of canvas,

type

acrylic liber, offers the highest degree

aw ning and durable, it is

of colorfastness ever available in material. Watertight

made hammocks, windswimming pool covers and caba-

It is

represented by the bold blue-

(Glen Raven) the bottom of the photograph.

at

Of

all

the

fabric

new boons

to the

summer

such wide

housekeeper, no material

is

in

use as vinyl-coated fabric.

1 1

covers walls,

furniture, floors

— and

even, as

Gernreich's yellow swimsuit ture, pretty girls.

in

width of

real horsehair),

off,

wood

such materiveneers and

from Herbert

(all

Bright). Vinyl-lamin-

ated materials also work handsomely on

and counter tops. most new beach houses there is as much window as there is wall. At night, unless the view is that of a harbor or In

town, these glass walls become big black

As an

double

as

(both by Denst

&

side the pillow in the

Bloomcraft).

The elements are not to plague a beach

usually

useful here, too, since they will not sup-

materials

that

forms on natural fibersand provides

fodder for carpet beetles, silverfish and moths. And nylon .screening, which

comes

in extra-wide rolls, discourages both mosquitos and corrosion with com-

mendable

Miles).

Perhaps the biggest reason for the new* popularity of

in

the only things

house— there

arc insects as well. Synthetic textiles are port the growth of keratin, the substance

The yellow-and-whitc

upholstery

Horace

new

Rudi

printed vinyl on the platform below the girl and the square of splashy red, yellow and magenta flowers are wall coverings that

antidote. Architect

Gifford

the pic-

in

washable, colorfast and,

width (about three times the

true

bandanna handkerchief (from a 5 & lOe store), some specially dyed pebbles in round disks, and a square of caning

a

recommends one of the many fishnet materials of nylon or blends of acetate and cotton, such as that alongphotograph (from

nas.

and-gray-siriped

isavailable in

52-inch

showing

pebbles. In the photograph, vinyl seals

holes.

breaks,

and

in a

vinyl-

makes them suitmeans of

into tents, awnings,

cool, prickle-

conxis

at the

Schaffer.

easy to cut and sew and can be

is

It

&

walls

A new

window shades is that nearly all of them now come with an invisible vinyl coating. It makes them

nylon.

proof, water-resistant,

fabric

Dacron.

the auto-

crystal-clear vinyl even

als as caning,

Cohama)

photograph,

Howard

able as floor coverings or as a

most humid climate.

in the center of the

the red-and-pink-striped

was long-wearing but also maintained

Mexican animal print photograph adorns a

process of laminating fabrics in

fading and docs not absorb in the

tropical-print fabric (by

foreground (Seneca) are

was launched by

yellow’

rear of the

brightened up. for c.xcitcment in synthet-

The

no ironing.

Orion, vinyl and fiber glass— have been

in

by the sea

flameproof and flame-resistant. Highly patterned shades dccoratively eliminate the need for any other w indow treatment.

coated shade by

draped

The search

sheer.

resistant,

cron

— Acrilan. Dacron.

is

makes an

bolt behind the yellow

Fiberglas

the beach, for

quires

ance but not with their dreary appearance. Since then, nylon and all the house-

hold-word synthetics

The blue

yellow.

horsehair

in World War II. After the war. Sunday sailors picked them up in surplus stores and were delighted with their perform-

Pont

life

utili-

fabrics

and materials, most of them man-made, in a vivid array of colors and patterns to go with today's beach-house ar-

come

textiles

for

cabin cruiser. What's more,

for as a

along with the sterling quality of

ic

beach house

in the

the lessons learned by mariners are

being applied with wondrous effect to

many

cases.

A

efliciency.

beach

house decorated and de-

fended with these new materials is a mother’s delight, where even an army of children attacking the peanut butter jar

is

no menace.

end

EASY-CARE SUMMER FABRICS ARE ATTRACTIVE AND VERSATILE ENOUGH TO COVER GIRLS. WINDOWS. FURNITURE OR FLOORS

49

rowing/ Tom

The laughing Lion has After nearly

two decades

of

S

pring

is

usually a time of uncertainty

as college crews

move out over

the

nation's lakes and rivers. But for years and years rowing fans could count on one vernal phenomenon that was as sure as robins, crocuses and the equinox itself. This was the fact that on any given race day. a boatload of young men wearing the light blue of Columbia University would splash across the finish line dead last. During 17 years of utter futility. the Columbia crew managed to come in first in only II of 73 major races. "We do not expect too much trouble from the Columbki boat." na.s the ki^tdest thing a rival coach could say about the Lions before a race.

While 10 other crews rowed for

servers

is

a

on the shore snickered audibly,

named Carl

saw nothing funny in "Columbia was making a

Ullrich

the race." said Ullrich,

the fias-

A

year

distress of

later, to the

most of

humor has finish first

surprise

and

his friends, Ullrich

took on the job of making a serious play out of this comedy of errors as coach

Columbia. Tor three years, under Ullrich's coachColumbia crews followed form by winning not a single major race. No one, therefore. »;j.s quite prepared for the storm that has swept down off the Harlem River this spring. The Lions arc still at

ing,

What has happened?

can't very well bia

is

Columbia, and

him

over, Ithaca

in the

finally drifted so far

50

in sight

behind the in or-

of the pack. Most ob-

MIT and Rollins College had a good look at the faces of

He

that's

brings

something they

If Ullrich had followed his original indination be never would have hcco/)ie the Columbia coach. "Don't take it," his friends besceched him when Colum-

young men

moonlight. The Columbia

noeing rowers

der to stay

Onondaga

winning.

brains and a sound technical knowledge to

Penn.

regatta four years

it's

theirs in quite a while."

all

IRA

Coach

go around saying Colum-

why

haven't had around that boathouse of

have

the

the dedication of spooners ca-

shell pulled

a winner because of himself, but

that's exactly

ton.

in

in

"It's a question."

says Ullrich's old boss, Cornell

had to swerve wide and pass them

Lake with

time

Stork Sanford, "of Carl Ullrich. Ullrich

others that the referees* motor launch

very lives

ago. Columbia paddled up

far

first

happily ahead.

from being the best college crew in the land. They took a bad beating in the eastern sprints two weeks ago. and they arc still a long way short of the class displayed by Cornell and the visiting Germans from Ratzeburg. But so far this season, coxswains from Navy, Prince-

their



Columbia's rowers for the their memories as the Lion

farce of

who was then made me

Cornell's freshman coach. "It sick."

fun

Brody

to roar

of

when you

coach with no sense

much more

hut a lean, rugged cx-marinc co.

begun

finally

comedy and chaos,

persuaded Columbia's oarsmen that rowing

C.

bia offered

graveyard."

the job, "It's a coaches*

"Not one person advised me was inclined As freshman coach

to go." says Ullrich, ‘'and to agree with them." at Cornell, sition

he had. after

I

all,

a secure po-

from which each spring he could

launch a

flotilla

of tall, broad-shouldered

into the Cornell shells.

was a good

More-

place to raise

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ay the irons

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IN

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BRUNSWICK SPORTS CINCINNATI

32,

OHIO

1962 U. S.

ROWING five

conlinued

aetivc eliildren. "Besides." UKrich

adds. "I remembered that launch passing the

Columbia boat."

Bui. having turned bia job, Ullrich

Hows

ments on

down

began

ihe

Colum-

to resent compli-

his wise decision.

"The more

people told him whal a wise fellow he w'js.".->ay.s Sanford. ’The moodierhc be-

came." "I was

Hhis for endurance?

just gutless." is the way Ullrich puts it. So he told Columbia he would take the job after all. A few weeks later. 12 smiling and plump young men. anticipating pleasant hours on the water, stood in the Co-

lumbia boathouse waiting to greet their

new coach. "Good grief," members thinking. "1 knew

Ullrich re-

things were had but wasn't quite prepared for this." Taking a firm grip on himself, he told his rowers things were going to be different. "1 am not used to losing and am not about to acquire the habit here," he said. The 2 aspiring oarsmen winked at each other knowingly. Crew had always been a pleasant and casual way to win a varsity letter and they were quite prepared for what they thought was the iraditiorval coaching spiel. It was a surprised group of flabby young men. then, who soon after found the side door of their boathou.se blocked by a device they were told was an isomctric-cxcrcise bar. "What's more, you I

I

1

The famous marathon runner, Clarence H. De Mar, of Melrose, Mass., ran in the 25-mile Boston Marathon 29 times— at the last he was 61 years old.

will use it," Ullrich told his varsity

And

hows this?

now...

didates.

can-

The crewmen not only used

the

bar and spent long earnest hours in the rowing tank, they startled fellow' .students by running pell-mell around the outdoor track in the dead of winter. "That wasn't the ordinary procedure," said one Columbia professor in a mon-

ument of campus understatement. Despite this un-Columbia approach to rowing, the crew that made up Ullrich's varsity shell

school.

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AP

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Weight

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a muffler, you’ll find

AP. Look

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endurance, for example, when greater weight

heavier than the average of

looking for endurance

AP

and corrosion resistance on

AP

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if

you’re

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it

lasting muffler— AP.

were

"They were

calls grimly.

tered five

still

of the old

losers," Ullrich re-

That spring Columbia enlost them all and fin-

race.>i,

ished 12th in a field of 12 at the IRA regatta. "There was no change in the Co-

lumbia rowing picture," observed a forstroke. He was only partially right. smiling, genial, hail-fellow coach of

mer The

other years was no longer waiting at the

dock after each race to

offer

comfort

and consolation. The crew was greeted instead by a tight-lipped driver who treated each loss as a personal affront. "The atmosphere was not one of levity,” one crewman. The following spring

recalls

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52

the

new coach

informed

all

prospective rowing candi-

dates that they were expected to “eat wisely, study hard

Anyone who

else."

— and

row, Nothing

that such a Spar-

felt

tan regimen was too

much

to endure

had

better not report.

Columbia

lost

more

five

races,

there was a distinct difTerence

but per-

in

formance. “1 was not displeased with

our improvement." Ullrich admits, “but I was dismayed by alumni well-wishers who would swarm down over the dock after races to congratulate us on what they called 'a good show.' The alumni were trying to make us the toast of the town because we finished in second place.” Ullrich said. “I wanted nothdidn’t want ing to do with second and the crew to have anything to do with it

Why sleep like a soggy pretzel on hot summer nights?

1

either.”

IRA last year Columbia rowed two and a half miles, and finninth. “I was extremely grati-

Jn the

well for

ished



“to see that the boys were not happy with the race.” fied.” said their coach,

Sunken Navy Fortified with these encouraging signs

of genuine dissatisfaction, Ullrich

last

Columbia oarsmen know

that

fall let

the

they were going to win a race and were going to pay a price for it. What he meant was that his vigorous training methods were going to be even more

"He won’t

vigorous. to

fill

a boat,” insisted

have enough

some of

the

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pus experts. But at registration lime the dock nearly swamped under the weight of 30 husky young men reporting for the first fall

practice.

I



Columbia’s first big race was against once invincible Navy. “Wc were not." said Ullrich, “just thinking about giv-

good race. Wc were thinking about beating them.” The race proved a chilling experience for Navy's oars-

DON’T PUT INFECTION

men. The Lions tore across the choppy Severn River with the programmed pre-

BACK

ing them a

cision of

an IBM computer and crossed Mid-

IN

the finish line a length ahead of the

shipmen. Two weeks

after demolishing were even prodding the world champions from Ratzeburg with their newly sharpened prow. At the finish of the Childs Cup regatta, they were only a flash behind the winning Ratzeburgers, and Columbia fans were ecstatic over the triumph. But neither Coach Ullrich nor the new breed of Columbia rowers shared the joy. “We don't like

MIT,

THE

later,

BOTTLE!

the Lions

being beaten,” said the Lion coach, “not end even by the world champions.”

53

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.

golf/ Henry Longhurst

only

If

it

had ended Friday

The

British

U.S.

comeback on Saturday kept an

were dancing

at the

been the Holy

^

founding of

this

Rechargeable

cept light

personal

in

lighting.

elec-

new con-

The

flash-

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that those

the eight

1

Some of

interesting.

sulted

the

the excitement re-

from

lirst

a change in the format: for time the matches were played at

18 holes instead fine,

the past.

of 36. a length that gave

sudden-death quality lacking Some of the excitement was

caused by the weather, which gol terribly British. And lots of it was caused by the British golfers on Friday afternoon, w hen they got brilliantly able just as the weath-

‘'Vic-

promised land"

sight of the

more

eaulitius

London

Times.

Friday night at the Turnherry Hotel a raucous babble of liquor and chat-

was ter,

Black

lies

bloomed and champagne

members of

flowed as

the British team

their wives twisted to Ihe

combo

music of a

the ballroom. The only notable absentees were the Americans,

small

not one of

in

whom was

present.

Changing times

am

1

a

conlirmed toucher of wood

premature. These forebodings were

all

On Saturday mornwind died down and the tempera-

too swiftly juslitied. ing the

ture went up. Aided by

on the part of the

some

loose play

British, the U.S.

won

four of the foursome matche.s. In the afternoon singles it soon became apall

parent that the rot had set

in on the Britteam to stay, Only Shade, who was two under par after nine and beat CJray once again, played exceptional golf, The Americans were steady, Amateur Cham-

ish

pion I.abron Harris putted excellently,

On F'riday morning the British lost two foursome matches in which partners alternate hitting one ball, a form of golf rarely played in America.

and slim Charlie Coc. the most experienced U.S. Walker-Cupper, was not to

But that afternoon they ignored ihc high wind, which docs not seem to upset

Walker Cup had they displayed anything like their form of the clay before, and certainly would have if they had handled TuTwberry sslvb the vigor ihcy had shown in practice matches a month

er got horribly bad.

American

players,

•which docs, arid

go ahead

6-3.

and

intense

cold,

won six singles nvaKhes The

elegant, aging hero

four straight birdies in one stretch as he ignored the gale and defeated Dick Sikes

be beaten.

The

British

might have won back the

earlier. But the general pattern took shape early. By the time the last match had passed the 6lh hole the scoreboards the Americans up in six matches,

Yet the best British amateur was Ronnie Shade. He was live under par when he ended his match with

showed

American Downing Gray on the 15th

score was 12-8 for the U.S.

hole.

were

The

MallorY

twist

and noncounier of unhatched chickens and to me the rejoicing was ominously

who

watched foursome matches and 6 singles matches in the two days of play at Turnherry felt the golf itself could have been any more

of the U.S. 7 and COMET

it.

the popular

to enliven the competition

to

stores everywhere. Mallory

Battery Co., North Tarrytown. N.Y.

“A

in

and

last

of British golf, Dublin's Joe Carr, scored

At better

tory" shrieked headlines press.

new

the most of

week they actually had it. only to have the Americans ruthlessly snatch it away once again. The disappointment, from the British point of view, was more massive than ever, and 1 suspect a lot of Americans were secretly hoping the British would win loo, just

in

tronics ... a

made

staled the

them a

From space age

L.S.-British competi-

the country

ha\c won the cup only once. In some of the matches it ha.s never appeared in their sight. In others, they have gotten only a glimpse of it. But in Turnberrv on the Ayrshire const

Not

Flashlight operates 10 years on the same battery

Since the

victory, but a

old story from getting a

tion in 1922 the British

of west Scotland

New Mallory

Cirail of golf.

Cup

prospect of a Walker

To ihe British the Walker Cup has long

was

54

British

a feat they

5.

players'

may

surprising lead

never repeat, and

down in one and all square in the other. Not much changed after that. The linal left

The

British

only with the fervent wish that

this year, at least, the

on

matches had ended

that glorious F'riday evening.

eno

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BASEBALi^/?o6e/'i‘ Creamer

D

.itiny

Litvshilcr

was

a

league ballplayer for

decade. Philadelphians

good major more than a

may

recall that

he was the Phillie s'.ho fielded 1.000, the major league outfielder ever to go through an entire season, without niak* first

With mirrors,

ing an error.

Sporiswritcrs

remember

him fora more

special reason

— after Lii-

whiler completed 10 years

in

the majors

he gave a bottle of whisky to the sportswriters in each of the cities in which he

fiat

gloves and

sawed- up bats

played as a ihank-you for the stories they had written about him. If the errorless season wasn't enough to make him

unique

among

ballplayers, the

whisky

decade and more later, l.itwhiler remains unique. college graduate who taught school in the off season during .•\

A Thomas Edison complex has led to fun, profit

and coaching success

for Florida State's

Danny

Litwhiler

major league career, he was named head Ixiseball coach at Horida State his

University

in

Tallahassee

in

1955.

In

seven of his nine seasons.

has

made

NCA.A

the

lorida Stale

I

playoffs

district

and twice has gone on to the college world series at Omaha. But success can be routine.

What has brought

Litwhiler

Coach to attention arc his novel methods of teaching baseball. Danny is a gadget man. an improver, an inventor. He is always fiddling with something to see if be can’t make it work better, or wondering if he did this that way what would happen, and would the

it

be good,

Litwhiler had lived a hun-

if

dred years ago he would have invented the

telephone,

telegraph

the

and

the

Murphy bed. lie has developed or adapted training aids and coaching techniques that include the

miniature

glove, the

fiat

bongo board and

ball, the

the

eve patch, not to mention bat-throwing

and isometric pitching and bat-swinging He has dev ised a machine that smooths out and waters down an infield in less lime than it takes a ground crew to do it (the Kansas City Athletics liked exercises.

this

much

gadget so

they traded

that

him an expensive major league tarpaulin for

it).

made product balls

and

He

put a ram-soaked infield

and can

playing con-

in

He has

dition in less than an hour.

writ-

book on baseball Utasi'huU to Drilh and Skills

ten a text

Coach's

inlield

Tallahasscc-

sells a

that dries out wet base-

footballs in seconds



(iiiitic

Prentice-Hall) and has prepared a glossary of baseball terms in four languages

Dutch.

(Lnglish.

and Spanish)

Italian

for State Department use. He has run baseball clinics for the State Department in Huropc and the Caribbean and this will spend six weeks in Central America on another such tour. He has

summer a

pretty wife,

and many league

live

handsome

children

boys’

baseball

friends.

(.A

Tallahassee

in

whiler League,

much

is

called the

to his wife’.s

l.it-

amuse-

ment. “The Babe Buth League and the Litwhiler League." she says. "Doesn’t it

sound

'.vonderlul'.’"

Danny

Litwhiler

like

walking

just grins.)

Visiting

through

a

Litwhiler

museum

is

with

curator. L.v-

its

erything has a story, and everything be-

comes more fascinatingas Here

When

is

isexplained.

it

Danny's live-man batting cage.

he arrived at Klorida State there

was no batting cage at men's club ran a benefit to build one.

The

all,

but a local

to raise

money

result vvas a standard

UNBREAKABLE MIRROR

rcflccis

Danny

Litwhiler (r/ij/i/) and star I lorida .Slate Pitcher A1 Bcccacio, whose legs appear in foreground.

56

enclosed cage, long enough for a pitch-

mound at one end and a home plate at the other. But it bothered Danny’s Pennsylvania Dutch soul because it seemed such a waste, all that space and only two players in it at a time. He dier’s

vided the cage into five

home

plates

put in

five sections,

Be a Champ

and turned the batters

so that they were hitting along the short axis of the cage instead of the long one.

He

put

mounds

pitcher's

five

with

outside

WMe Siktg- Speec/o

the cage at the proper distance from the

home

plates

and cut holes about the

size

of a strike zone in the side of the cage. five pitchers can throw through

Now

the holes to five batters simultaneously.

The

balls the batters hit are

in the cage,

contained

except those they hit straight

little Olympians of tomorrow will win more hearts than races in their new orange White Stag-Speedo Racing Suits, the suit worn by 14 of 16 Swimming Champions in 1963. Now the favorite swim suit

These brilliant

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Here

is

Danny’s mirror, a

thing to see on a baseball

remembered

that

field.

startling

Litwhiler

Ted Williams used to bedroom

mirror to detect flaws

in his

girls,

and

now for Mother a swim suit of the same material yet Bra-Constructed

and beautifully

sw ing u bat in front of a hotel ers cannot

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drives

stripe combinations.

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back to the pitcher.

Litwhilcr's batters gel their kicks

styled- Also

swing. Pitch-

Available in

do the same thing because

men’s

they cannot get a true idea of their pitch-

motion without actually throwing a ball. And you can't throw a ball at a mirror. Litwhiler remembered the TV commercial about the invisible shield that slopped baseballs and golf balls, and ho remembered the glass window in the astronauts' space capsule which obviously had to withstand great pressure. He asked

sizes.

ing

Pittsburgh Plate Glass

if

they could

j

make

what he had in mind. Hmmm.said PPG, and shortly Litwhiler had a piece of clear, hard glass

and

six feet high, three feet

wide

three quarters of an inch thick.

A

mirror manufacturer coated the glass to turn

it

into a mirror,

and Danny added

a fclt-and-plywood backing, framed

it

and mounted it on a heavy iron stand. Then he threw a baseball at it. The ball bounced off as though it had hit concrete.

Baseballs have been bouncing off the

mirror for two seasons

now and

it

spar-

kles on, untroubled,

unscratched, unmarred. Litwhiler uses the mirror to

show

his pitchers

how

a curve or a fast ball,

they can telegraph

how

they can

off balance as they deliver a pitch,

fall

how

they can develop a rhythmic sameness to continued

57

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BASEBALL their pitching motion. He turns them sideways and has them practice pick-off

moves

The

ihe bases.

to

pitchers see

ihcnTselves as the batter or base runner sees them, and they begin to understand what they are doing and why. Here is Danny's bunting bat, a regular

bat that

is

sliced in half lengthwise, ex-

cept for the handle, for use in bunting practice.

An

ellipse cut

out of the bot-

tom between the handle and what remains of the hilling surface reminds the batter lo keep his hands away from the business end of the bat when he bunts.

vhevkeii ttndertrvar to a fath4*r o€'er iO*/ Siloutti ifou

Would you

— would he —

young

in heart. Paisley.

The half-waiermelon hitting surface makes the batter lift ihe bat and bunt

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right field.” life hit

is

it.

‘Easy,”

hard-to-gct-along

it

when he

says. "I never in

my

a ball like that to right, not even

Now

the Appling Tech-

league experience, his humor, his stories, his sense

of public relations, Litwhilcr

would be an

ideal

manager

for a

major

He was asked what he would if he were offered such a job. "Oh, wouldn't want to leave here," be .said.

league leam.

do 1

your antagonism. Learn more about this problem of mental illness. Send for this free friendship, not

"I like this college atmosphere.

It’s

a

good way to live." Hesmiled. "Of course, I

could ask the president of the univer-

of absence, to get my doctorate in baseball. Then I could come sity for a leave

booklet. Write to:

MENTAL HEALTH York

Danny

With his intelligence, his years of working with young players, his extraordinary knowledge of baseball, his major habitually

Often these people

New

he did

nique for Opposite Field Hitting is a part of the Litwhilcr coaching method.

ill. Your understanding can help them. They need your

BETTER

how

field,

the majors.”

in

are emotionally

Box 2500,

the opposite

Appling said. "You stand against a fence and swing." Appling stood no more than a foot or so from the side of a batting cage, facing it, and swung his bat hard. His hands had to slay close to his chest as he swung so that the bat would not hit ihc cage. When he tried it away from the cage his hands stayed close to his chest and his wrists did not break in the swing of the bat until they were in front

batting practice with his players. "I hit

can help someone mentally ill We all know someone who irritable,

always

always asking,

is

went down to camps and asked Luke Ap-

the ball on a line over the scoreboard in

iDIv, of SAultoft)

quarrelsome,

the training

of his body. Litwhilcr tried

YOUR UNDERSTANDING

with.

Litwhilcr

learning. This spring he

pling, a recognized genius al hitting to

got back to Florida State and ihcn look

.

CapYfigM 1963. CollJ« libo'
down at the ball, which is the proper way to do it. (If you bunt wiih the top half of a regular bat you pop up. If you bunt with the front surface the bunt rebounds too quickly to the infield and invites a double play.)

1,

back here after

N. Y.

Published as a public service in cooperation with The Advertising Courrcll.

58

1

got fired."

snd

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MAN OF

He didn’t insure

SPIRIT

cominueil from page 29

his car through an independent agent

was a bit surprised by was always the man saw had him covered and I had won the race. It was a

worried about.

I

VVeisiger. but Beatty

to beat.

I

1

knew then

I

big race for me. There had been so

much

it. And have quite of national pride, you know. U set up a bit when they pla>cd the New

attention focused on

1

a bit

me

Zealand

national

anthem

before

the

race.'" •'If I’etcr

wants to train.” Lydiard had

said just before the race. "I believe he

and

juries often

can do a 3:48. really mean it." Very likely Peter can. But the pleasant thing about Peter is that he trains or not

tliesc days.

Because he

as he very well pleases.

1

He boujjht what he thoiisht was enough insurance. But lie liacl nobody to tell him how mueli was enough. And he was .sued for many thousand dollars more than his coverage.

Can this happen to you? Nobody can prevent your being sued, but

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At Modesto there were, besides the wonderful mile, three world records. Had they been set on any other occasion than when Snell and Beatty reached a reckoning, they might have been the whole story. As it was. two of them were

business. it.

stories in frustration ing.

the idol of the crowd? His

^

prowess reached its zenith spotted a ruby-throated sspsucker

athletic

aromatic

been 25

Personality? Something like strained hmreol

stays

i

10,

his

first

but fouled.

attempt he

On

his sec-

ond jump he cleared 27 feet 4 inches for a new world record, but it is a world record

lit

The deck stacked favor

On

feet 5.

leaped 26 feet

BOND STREET

in 52.

inept ofliciat-

first record was set in the broad by a University of Washington

sophomore named Phil Shinnick. Before he came to Modesto his best jump had

Rich, moist,

Certainly not his looks.

when he

and

The

jump

What makes Mr. Marmaduke

runs against

deal to be said for the vsay Peter Snell

Only an independent agent can display

He

the man. the national anthem arouses him and he is proud. There is a good

is

in

your

when you

which will never be allowed. Why not? Because two officials, whose only duty is to watch a w ind gauge to make sure the wind is blowing at less lhan the limit set for national and world records, were not paying attention to their job. **i only watch when a jumper think can break the record is jumping," e.\plaincd one official. I

follow Charles

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University

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16

cleared the height hon-

But the crossbar was

il-

legal for a simple reason it was too long, according to the International Amateur :

Athletic

Federation's standards, a fact

any track

Oregon

official

should have known.

Stale's two-milc-rclay record

— 7:18.9 — probably

will be recognized, though that .seems almost too much to for. Maybe Snell was lucky he did Had he broken his record, end it might not hase counted.

hope

not run faster.

60

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Nor is it any accident that have placed enormous emon Olympic teams, or that Cuba AmerGames. They realize, as do we, that

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On

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our physical edu-

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Organized recreation

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63

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-

Zone

Stale

will

Hope: All Kinds of a Nut

About Sports by JACK OLSEN

To the part owner

of the

Cleveland

Indians athletes are heroes. Behind his rapid-fire

gags and clowning

is

a deep, lifelong devotion to sports

Arnold Palmer breaks up at a Bob Hope joke during rehearsal for their recent television appearance. Hope

once had

11

athletes as his guests on a single

show.

continued

65

Bob Hope

rwi/mrW

Y. remember

Ike," says

Bob Hope

one of his mosi famous quips. "He was the pro at the While House.” He refers to [>ean .Martin as "the pro from in

Smirnoff's.”

Hope

himself, but

if

nov cViarac\ciiic

^iocs

he did

might be as "the

it

pro from everywhere." In an entertain-

Hope

ment world given

to hyperbole

(jee cover) stands

supremely alone as

and

the wildest-eyed, most unreformed

unreconstructed sports nut

He

of show business. nut

who

fly

round of golf been a

is

the kind of sports

New

interrupt a visit to

will

Orleans to

in the history

to Cincinnati to play a

some

w'ith

cronies.

fighter, a sprinter, a

He

has

pool hustler,

a four-handicap golfer, a professional

mascot and

football team's

a holder of

substantial shares of stock in enterprises

Rams and

such as the Los Angeles Cleveland Indians. big fight, even

He seldom

the

misses a

he has to rush over to

if

Hollywood

the Pantages Theater in

to

on theater TV. He has played something between \ ,000 and \ .500 golf

see

it

courses, in such varied places as Bra?!! in company with antmonkeys and. sometimes. Presi-

and Greenland, eaters.

in on his North Hollywood,

dents. Occasionally he drops

wife and children

where he

own

his

in

most often

is

to

be found on

190-yard one-hole golf course,

or at the pool table working out double

banks with a

kiss, or

borhood sharpies the

whipping the neigh-

at table tennis.

way he has managed

money

for

Along

more

to raise

near-bankrupt golf courses,

Olympic committees, war relief, meddown-and-out old ical charities and friends than any other fact that

he

will

six celebrities, a

break a leg rather than

discuss.

A Hope

course

a sure guarantee of a

is

appearance on a golf

for whatever charity

the

is

full

house

involved,

and

crowds wd\ ignore the f ikes of Arnoid Jimmy Demaret and Sam Snead

Palmer,

merely to overhear Hope say;

Fora widely traveled multimillionaire. Hope maintainsanastonishing reverence

once served as honorary kicker

game

a 49crs-Bears

open

to

San Francisco.

in

for athletes, 'i’ve always liked to rub el-

"I got off a beaut." he recalls. "Eleven

bows with

yards on the



sports figures,” he once said.

‘They've always been heroes to me." Ac-

them on his TV shows The high point ol came when

cordingly. he puts

at the slightest excuse.

his comcdy-f«///-sports iife

he rubbed

1

bows on a Wilt

famous pairs of sports elSurrounded by

1

single show.

Pancho Gonzalez,

Chamberlain,

Bears and

1

Then saw all those jumped into Frankie Alfly.

1

bert's atTYts."

He

has been

in

and out of the Cleve-

bought

a big slice of the

Vceck bought

in,

team when

team— "for

share

Roger Maris, Barry MacKay, Arnold Palmer, Floyd Patterson and Norm Van Brocklin. Hope was as

reasons; I'm from Cleveland, you

close to speechless as he will ever be. But

the Indians will

Jayne Mansfield wasn't. She asked the

"How many

Stilt,

weave

last

W'ilt

baskets did you

"You

don't weave baskets

game. You throw them.”

"how many games

dumb

did you

throw?" occasion

Hope found

exchanging network banter with

Fred Haney. I.ou Burdette, Duke Snider and Willie Mays. "Fred,” he said to Haney, '‘you haven’t always been in baseball, have

finds himself a

the board of directors.

this year, thus

end

were

He

know" member of

predicts that

in the first division

proving that he abounds

"Sure, they're off to a bad

in fidelity.

in first

gonna

"But

year they

last

place by July

reverse that."

He

first

and then

has his

own

formula for ending the Yankees' dynasty.

On another hirnscif

—and now

sentimental

they took a nose dive. This year they're

"Well," said the professionally blonde,

of the

start." he admits.

year?”

Said Wilt: in a

Bill

when Vceck

sold out

Recently he bought a small

sold out.

Dick Groat, Rafer Johnson. Joe Bcllino, Jerry Lucas,

He

land Indians’ ownership twice.

"All they have to do

Mantle, Maris and

duce

tbeii pitchers

explains.

"Then

is

bench

Howard and introto Bo Belinsky,” he

the Indians

would have

a chance.”

you?"

"What do you mean?” asked Haney.

Hope's

"Well, weren’iyou with the Pittsburgh

career in golf, has taken place mostly in the grandstands, although he and

Pirates for a couple of years?"

(That was a while back. Hope has updated the joke as follows: "1 like the Mets. But

1

like baseball,

Hope asked Mays how

too.”)

he liked San

"The first time the fog lifts you know,” said Willie. saw a "The last time

Francisco, I'll

let

Said Hope:

game up

there

1

it

was

called

on account

of clear.”

look in

Gary Cooper played in an annual charity baseball game in Los Angeles for years. Hope would arrive in u Brink's truck, walk out on a red carpet and make a grand entrance while a valet sprayed him. brushed

him

Duke: "You great shape, Duke. How's the to the

knee?"

and administered to his tonsils. take phone calls on the and undergo

olT

Hope would field, dictate

sages,

Then he turned

career in baseball, unlike his

and

messages

mas-

collect in the

neighborhood

of 520,000 for the Hollywood Youth Welfare Fund, His fascination with baseball started in

Cleveland when he and

"\ can't kick.”

bis

"You

dians' games. "every once in a while even

belong with the Rams.”

boyhood

pais used

to attend In-

When

own adventures with the Los Angeles Rams have been extensive. Once

eyed gatekeeper would catch them.

Palmer pants and Arnold Palmer shirts, but I play golf like Betsy Palmer."

he shared ownership of 10^. of the team,

and

unloading the stock when his group sold

traditional

One

out to another. "I like the Rams," he

a ball park without a knothole was con-

my wallet

sidered bush) and stare enraptured at

"I

wear Arnold Palmer shoes, Arnold

i'll need three caddies, please. to carry the

bag and two to carry me.”

’Let's see now.

It's

to the hole. Caddie,

the pin. please?”

66

Hope's

about 150 yards

would you remove

said. will

"They taught me a

lesson

never forget. They'll do better next

year. They're going to put a handle

the

ball."

Ouilandishly attired,

on

Hope

paying our way in.”

an eagle-

Hope

buddies would repair to the

his

knothole

(in

the old days,

the backsides of Tris Speaker

and Napo-

leon Lajoie.

When Hopw

seldom,

something along the

it

is

brags, which

is

lines of,

guess ( was the Grey Kagle’s biggest fan. I got to know him pretty well, you know." or. know Joe DiMaggio, He comes from San Francisco. That's a city bounded on three sides by DiMaggios." He is even proud of the lime he was mis-

taken for Trainer

Gus Mauch by a

paltry

31 million people. Mauch. then with the Yanks, now with the Mets. was appearing on To Tell the Truth at the same lime that Hope was doing the opening monologue on his own TV show. The

Tell the Truth

accompanying the

vid-

tually saying. in

"Richard Nixon

Whittier. Calif.,

and

"The next

lives here

the

TV audience merely sttw his lips movhim say three times. "My

ing and heard

name

Gus Mauch."

is

‘This

It

was confusing,

the baseball nut.

Although he hasn't played much baseHope was once an inveterate bettor

ball.

on the game, usually on the wrong In fact, tles

side.

one of the longest nonstop hus-

on record began with a baseball bet

between Hope and his friendly archenemy, Jackie ("1 am the Greatest") Gleason. Here

is

a slightly

censored ver-

Hope

sion of the affair as rendered by

on a recent all-night transcontinental flight

while everybody else on the plane

was trying "It

all

know

1

I'm out on

me and

calls

"He says, can we

in

"He

he says, ‘Say, where

at,

to the lee

and we decide on

‘‘1

sit

say. ‘Where's that

around

that baloney?’

1

grandmother nine

"He says,

'I

guy

say.

'I

green and knocked a putt 2 to

1,'

and he

says,

light.

at the

and

I

1

end of the

1

5

this voice say,

so says.

.

for .’ .

ness

Is Jes'

I

1

lost

Basilio, I

get

it.’

and

1

isn’t

it

me.

"So Carmen

gels the decision

and now

hole he look a

On

7.

the

two woods on the

hit

in

fora

dirty fat so-and-so!

I

love

a

‘‘.After that

Then

said

my

birdie.

You

"Then he table i

and

Thill/!

him that

’I

he's singing Happi-

Culled Joe.

he never

made

a par.

finds out I’ve got a pool

and so we go back to

take

my house and

at that, too. But after all this,

would you from

it!"

fly

here just to embarrass

me.' He's dancing around hollering,

up

Judge So-andfroze

somebody's getting robbed here and

first

way out

it!

‘Judge So-and-so

Basilio,

And

the

love

rounds

say to myself, ‘Well.

hear

says 9-5-1

the

‘You

said,

I'm up in the

balcony and Robinson murders

and

I

all

I

Pantages to see the

"On

second hole he

I

don’t give

shots.’

can’t play like your grand-

picker.' is

that used to

Shor’s and hand out

at Tool.s

mother.’

"1 say. 'Basilic

want nine

‘1

says,

shots handicap.’

Brown Duhhhby. Sourball, and tonight Sugar Ray fights the onion picker, and you got the onion

‘You got the odds.’ So bet him an amount of money and rush over to the

I

me

brings

to play golf.

‘‘We get

all

‘Where arc you? You must be

He

first tee?’

money wrapped in a handkerchief little piece of wood in it, and then

the

public somewhere.' says, 'I'm at the

am

’Never mind that, what time

gel to the

w ith a

we go

he says,

John Benny, W'hcrc you

i.s

"I say,

out

though not altogether unpleasant for

Hope

thing

and he

me up and

at?'

"I say. ’What d'ya mean, where

an amount and he

Sourball?’

he’s so sure he's

going to be President that they're build-

you

at? I'm right here waiting for the money.’

I

1

guitar player here to entertain us.’

the Coast

looking for Gleason. The next day

J’lTi

he calls 1

eo from the Hope show. Hope was ac-

ing the log cabin he was born in." But

’Hc).

saying,

Fatso, double the bet, huh?’

signals got mixed, with the audio from

To

way behind and I’m

I'm

"So at the end of the fourth game owed him a distillery. And then I'm his pigeon. So he keeps trying to gel me to come up to his place so he can hustle me some more. I'd get phone calls from him whenever wa.s in New York. He tried everything to get me up there. One remember he called and said, time ‘You’ve got to come up. I've got a nude

believe

World

me doing a guest know why."

it?

I’m

Series. If

still

behind

you ever see

shot on his show, you'll

to sleep.

started at

Toots Shor's," Hope

began, the nostalgia glaring his eyeballs.

"For years Gleason used to come up to me and he’d say (you know how he talks), ‘Oh, if ever get you out on the golf course, man, you're mine!’ I

"I'd say. ‘Listen,

money

if

you ever

get a

little

together, check me. Daddy.'

"This went on for about 10 years, and then came that 1954 World Scries with

Cleveland and the Giants

Giants

won

— the

one the

We

started

four straight?

belting on the

first

game

— we’re betting

for drinks, you know. W hat else arc you gonna bet Gleason? And pretty soon

Sometime pool

game

hustler

Hope shoots

with daughter Nora and son Kelly.

67

Bob Hope The

rules of fair reporting require that

both parties to a dispute be given a

chance to speak. Herewith Gleason on

game:

the subject of the pool “It

known throughout the Hope playing broom handle with a but-

well

is

world that

1

pool using a

could beat

tered tip while suffering a severe

asthma

attack and a third-degree migraine headache.

If

him

Mr. Hope dares to deny

one big

pile,

and

of

all

historian's lot

his

money

his

will play

I

handed while doing the

The

ask

this,

hock everything, including

to

underwear, and put

him

in

left-

twist.”

is

a difficult one.

Each deponent budgeih not from

his

and Hope even insists that his game has caused him to become known a.s “Burbank Fats.” It is documented that Hope the child shot a hot story,

pool

around the Alhambra poolroom

stick

I05th and Euclid

at

Cleveland, and his

in

brother Ivor once remarked that

Bob

toddled into the house one day with S85.

which cause

mother insisted he return bewas “tainted.” Hope, ever the

his it

modest one. maintains

same

that Ivor exag-

gerated the story by a multiple of about

Once during World War

So we'd

time.

up American

call

Beach— and we’d

the picnic at Euclid

man

and we'd

in charge,

tell

him we’re the Clc\elami Plain Dealer and what time are the footraces going about

say, ‘Oh,

2:30,'

and we'd

huh? Weil, that’s a shame. wanted to send a photographer out you and the race, but

say, ‘Oh, 2:30,

Wc

to lake a picture of

we couldn't make

make

it

ways

say,

Wc’rc you could

that early.

it

covering another event, but 3:45 we’d be there.’

if

And

he'd

al-

‘Oh. that's O.K., we'll cat

“So then we’d go out and make our

Luna Park

to

by singing and danc-

fare

ing on the streetcar.

We'd go up

and we'd

starter, see,

say on your mark, get say,

‘I

go?'

say on your mark, get

So now wc know pic

set.

to the

‘Do you

say.

the race with one, two. three or

off

start

do you

And

he'd

set,

go.'

and we’d be wasn’t the Olym-

this, see,

on ‘set.’ mean, it Games, you know. They wouldn't I

So we'd and Charlie

restart the race just for that.

have

yards on the

five

field

Paddock didn’t have a chance, you

"The

announced and stalked

table slopes,” he

on the

out.

race.

streetcar

and go win the other

Cleveland of Hope's youth, circa

started

winning a few, so wc had

bump him

bump him at bump him at the

to

abounded in pool hustlers, but Hope and his friend Whiley Jennings

start

were certainly the only footrace hustlers

yard mark, and Henry was out of the

1918,

in the city,

perhaps

in

any

city.

Cleve-

land used to have big Sunday picnics, and the main event was always the 100yard dash. First prize was usually a S15

purchase order, and place SIO.

money was

Hope and Jennings were not seldom been exceeded

the annals of criminology, Says

“Get

es-

were hungry, and

pecially fast, but they their guile has

the picture now.

Maybe

in

Hope:

thcrc'd be

a

little.

and Whitcy'd

I’d

in

still

be around Cleveland

the footraces

if

it

weren't for

ingness to get a laugh even at his

expense. “I

am

the only fighter

ed to

finish

one-two

in

both races,

sec,

but they’d be scheduled to go olT at the

68

own

who was

ever carried both ways,” he has said. “In

viewed about his pugilistic career:

city,

A

He

described

has

loser but a lighter.

or out of the ring.”

didn’t hurl

not entirely untrue.

is

dozen odd

anybody

Hope had

around the YMCA, bringing harm to no one. One day Whitcy Jennings came to Hope and announced that he had entered the Ohio half a

fights

amateurs under the name of Packy

state

Hope

West. Not to be outdone,

up

signed

for the lightweight division as Packy

East. In his

he met a timid box-

first tight

who kept turning to his corner for advice. Hope hit him while his head was turned and won the fight. Then he drew a bye and found himself

the semifinals

in

Ohio lightweight champion.

against the

Happy Walsh. “He was

Happy

called

because he Just smiled buck when he was

Hope

slugged.”

said

“Nothing

later.

bothered

this

fellow— fists, knives, guns,

nothing.

He

looked as

muscles

he even had

if

in his hair.”

In the presence

of a posse of howling

Alhambra poolroom. Hope trembled his way into the ring to do battle. Walsh engaged in the classical act of feeling his opponent out in the first round. Hope took this for weakness. from

fans

the

He began showing

his

ofT his fancy foot-

boyant

right,

“and

fell

Hope went

over. "I got so

I

remem-

Hope went down

bounced once and

much

resin in

hair,” he said, "1 can

still

of Humoresque

with a comb.”

The

fight

in

it

my

play two verses

decided Hope’s

life.

Up

to

then he had been torn between a career

and a career asa brilliant “Walsh knocked me right

as a star athlete entertainer. into

dancing school,” Hope

says.

“1

never missed a beat.” His only encounter with

Hope: No. Three times knocked out

and

side

his

that’s all

ber.” Others recall that

in a

losses?

to

smiled. Full of confidence,

inter-

I

the cheery warrior

gloves

out for the second round, threw a flam-

was a ihree-and-three fighter. hiierviewer: Three wins and three Hope:

whereupon

button,

dropped

in a sitting position,

Hope might

and out of the ring.” Once he was

maybe a 40minulc ride on the streetcar. So wc wantend of the

50-

money.” running

Luna Park and an-

the other

the

an amateur fighter named Happy Walsh. There arc many bizarre stories about Hope’s boxing career, some of them disseminated by Hope in his fiendish will-

other picnic at Euclid Beach, which was

a Greek picnic at

Garagiola.

50-50 fighter.

in

work. and even popped Happy on the

"The only trouble we ever had was from a guy named Henry Thomas. He

The

Joe

as "a fighter.

A

er

first.’

know? Wc had our shoes olT, our toenails grown long to dig in. We could move. Wc could move! Then we’d hop

ing on the 10th.

Hope

This

“He’d

Hope

II

Philadelphia Naval Hospital, picked up a cue and ran nine balls before scratch-

three limes failed to show. The noted baseball-and-lasngna his-

torian,

off?

walked into the recreation room of the

40.

and

and Wire, sec— they'd be running

Steel

ask for the

fisticuffs

since the Walsh fight

came

when he was

refereeing a boxing match movie with Mickey Rooney. The

mighty mite unleashed a punch from the fourth

row and decked Hope, thus

enabling him to keep his personal losing

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SOLE DISTRIBUTORS

Bob Hope

cominued

Hope will drop everything He is still annoyed at missing Cassius Clay's debated win over Doug Jones. He flew from Nassau just to see

“Yes,” Mope would

Streak intact.

to see a fight.

the fight in

New

York, but the weather

was bad and the plane landed instead in Montreal. Hope ran all over town looking for a theater showing the fight. Alas,

He hopes

there was none.

forthcoming

the

at

fight.

He

to do better

Liston-Patterson

thinks that Patterson deserves

a rematch even though his showing

in

Except for the night he

“You

won on “the

I

want

me?"

it

You have

with you.

was

He

hit

the

morning

such a

bad memory.”

landings. He hit You could have made a

fortune selling Band-Aids.”

played with Arnold Palmer

would begin

the

a string of

Crosby horse

Hope had once

explained to

Columnist Dorothy Kilgallen: “Holly-

comedian so many sub-

gives a

looked

slice. It

Normandy

like the

eight people.

The game would start and Hope would shout: “Get that dog out of there before Crosby puts a saddle on him.” Then he jokes. (As

after for the

left-handed and the crowd

couldn't get u.sed to his

don't want to bet unless

I

calls: “It

Babe.

don't trust

“Well,

wood

Chicago was “ridiculous.”

"but

say,

to see the money.”

you've got

movies,

jects to talk about. There's the

As

Hope

recently as last February,

He matched

nix pro-am.

nine, with a triple

Palmer-Hope came “1 stole a

Hope

in the

Phoe-

Palmer's 35 on

nine and took a 40 on the back

first

bogey on one in first.

hole.

Said Hope:

silverware.” In England,

little

bet Palmer

£5 on

a

iS-fool putt

it.

Palmer gave

onion picker," the former Packy East has

the weather, Crosby's clothes, Crosby’s

fared about as well in his fight betting as

horses, Crosby's golf, Crosby's racetrack,

Hope

Crosby's hair and Crosby.”)

the putt. “It takes a real pro,” he an-

he fared

actual boxing. For

in his

some

reason, he kept expecting Joe Louis to lose (except

On

when Louis

finally

did lose).

Louis-Conn

the night of the

fight,

show from New Orleans, and he announced to the audience that he had a bet on Conn. After the second round he reported that Conn "is ftehting it jusl iike ue pianned it.

Hope was doing

He'll tire Louis

Joe.

If

Conn

his

and then

wins,

1

curtains for

it's

may

retire

from

radio. If he loses. I'm back in vaudeville.

But we're winning, we're winning.” After

Hope announced:

the eighth round 'Well,

money

isn’t

everything.”

Hope would

on one of

say: “I put S2

Bing's horses and the horse balanced the

$2 on his nose

all

way around.”

the

“One of (inst

his horses

dying.

is

one he ever saw

finish.

late ’30s

golf

and Bing

both the of

more

till

bury her.”

“Did you hear about

All this badinage the fact that

and Crosby showed up, the

fine

“He

in his car,”

even drives a car

Crosby lived,”

is

the most generous guy whoever

Hope told

the press. "He'll spend

two or three hundred bucks on

a dinner

party and think nothing of clip

him

you

get plenty of

it. But if you on a round of golf moaning and you wait

for a S5 bet

awhile for the

five

bucks.”

trains

go

and every

i

essarily in

say.

(“If

he of

Dean

could play Dizzy a couple of

I

game.s every winter for stakes,

Hope

has even

made

J

could re-

a few dollars

day from the famed golfer and President, Dwight David Eisenhower.

One day Hope found

the strike

morning Bing goes out and lines up the horses. ‘See,’ he tells them as the train ” 'that's what mean.’

goes by,

Hope mobs fol-

Hope would

list

himself part-

nered with

Mortimer

with a slice." The “feud” waxed. “That

Still,

includes Senator

Hope butchered the course for an 84, and he and Ike lost S4 each. The next day Hope drew General Hoyt Vandenberg for a partner against Ike and an-

the coffers

two. “Here comes Crosby

that

be paid by the hour.”

Caplin could count. Wherever

lowed them, eager to catch a quip or

list

Crosby’s jockeys put on? They want to

humor and

of

be

should

tire”).

charities than even

field

It’ll I

in his

wait

I'll

right past Crosby’s stables,

—the

Crosby, a twin lode that has enriched

and Hope dropped

I

Saturday to

but

“Those new streamlined

Those were the years when Hope discovered

bet

Frank Lausche of Ohio (“1 keep him in an aviary and pull him out once in a

she runs before Bing decides to

feel sorry, if

same

has not yet added Palmer to his

while to clip his wings”) and Di77y

sition.”

the

the

nounced, pocketing the money. pigeons, a

“Bing has the only horses I’ve ever seen that could start from a kneeling po-

sec

and watched Palmer miss

obscured

effectively

Hope and Crosby,

that

amateur

order, were

golfers.

three holes in one

not nec-

becoming

Hope now

round; had he not been such a natural clown, had he approached the

game with

the funereal attitude of others, he might

have become a serious threat teur championships.

As

it

in

first

“You didn't way yesterday.” Hope never tires of kidding the for-

ama-

mer

President about his love for golf.

“You’re never lonely when playing golf with Ike,” he said. "Three or four Secret Service to

make

men

ride along in

If

rough and

it

lime on the Sacra-

your golf bag

sure you don't swing your clubs

too wildly.

pro-am

almost always for charities.

Playing for the

Hope shot a 75 and Ike was a S4 loser again. Pulling out the money, the President said to Hope, other golfer.

play this

was, he con-

tented himself with appearing in contests,

two Senators.

without a flicker of a smile:

lists

and many a sub-par

Ike against

you knock a

ball into the

stops near a tree, the tree

becomes a Secret Service man and walks away.” Hope said Ike once bawled out

mento Golf Club with Babe Ruth,

his

Crosby and the governor of California, Hope shot a 36. one over par, a remark-

caddie said, “This

caddie for looking at his watch. The isn’t

a watch. Mr.

compass.” And when

Crosby would show up for a match and say, “How about the financial arrangements? Would 10, 10 and 10 (SIO

ablc round in view of the fact that

Ike shanked a ball onto the adjacent

Crosby had hired hot-dog vendors to

way, the caddie observed:

SIO for the second and

shout at the top of their lungs every

freed that one. Mr. Lincoln.” Last year

for the first nine,

$10 for the match]

suit

you?”

time

Hope approached

a ball.

Hope

re-

President. This

Hope

is

a

“You

fair-

sure

cracked: “President Kennedy

is

tonllnued

71

Bob Hope

continued

flying to California. His wife

and

Italy

Bobby

India.

Remember

is

wood,

flying to

is

flyingto Japan.

For

a

warm

and present.

how

the story of

ble

1952 Amateur. Answered Hope: CtRT.AlNLY HOft CAN WORK

play in the

I

"A junior?” Mrs. Eisenhower said. "How come you've never been to the

BING

With President Kennedy, Hope is a more distant, osving to the fact Kennedys seem to play everystill

slips in

an

occasional barb. At a football banquet

he bowed to the President and said.

there

football

Hyanni.sport. roughing the pass-

in

a federal rap.”

is

Up

not a sissy sport.

is

Hope swears

once asked an athlete

if

that he

he played touch

and the athlete answered. "No,

I’m not interested

in politics."

CAN

1

ACiAIN

IN BRITISH A.MAIEL’R.

HE CAN GET

11

That night. The Star,

sister

paper of

News Chronicle, let loose a blast: "However much cinema fans may re-

the

trifle

football

THREAT

COMING TOO

IS

ENOUGH ADRINALIN.

house before?”

thing but golf. But he

ca-

dismay

joice, golfers will feel only

at the

Bing Crosby and Bob Hope playing in our Amateur. Bing came Andrews in 1950 and was welcomed. Bob came to Porthcawl last year

was

into a sour situation, and England. He showed up for Amateur at Porthcawl. Wales,

in

the British

game

long

playing all

in

"My

.

.

Hope never looked

Last year

.

first

like a

Asked who

JVeM‘

ican wrote that

chance to

The

Hope had an

get into the

Hope

this

teed off

excellent

second round;

he had to do was draw a bye

Against

late Bill

York Joiintal-Amcr-

in

background of

the

yards dead ahead.

all

first.

frivolity,

and smacked the

ball

50

To the 500 spectators,

24 stewards and assorted policemen, he said, line,

"My you

usual drive. Always on the

see." Christopher C. Fox. a

calm pipesmoker. eliminated Hope 2 best by

commenting: "I didn’t play my any means, but it was great fun."

Not

of the high priests of British golf

and

I.

all

sighs

in

seven different ways, the crusading Star sat

back and reaped the whirlwind.

had

just

First

Jimmy Demaret, who

to sound olT was

with

finished winning the SIO.OOO

Hope

Demaret

as

said he

was stunned by the

honestly believe that

if

,

.

Bob Hope or

Bing Crosby could have the time to practice a little

more they could

lick

90%

of

the British amateurs."

Hopeand Crosby, havingcnrichcd

an-

a MVi-hour telethon and raised more than a quarter of a million dol-

went on

breaking out

cially in

all

It

It

is

the most

happened

wonto us.

assures us of being able to send our

pic

OlymGames. The Olympic Committee

will

be eternally grateful." Later that

year

Hope was

strongest group of athletes to the

PGA

elected

chairman of the

Advisory Committee, and the

as-

sociation struck special medals for the

three

men

they reckoned had done the

most for golf: Bobby Jones, Bing Crosby and Bob Hope. Hope carries the medal with him and will show

it

at the

drop of

an eyebrow.

over the map, espe-

England. Few

Said Avery Brundage, president of

lars.

the committee: "This derful thing that ever

Hope

Grantland Rice added: "Peevishness is

Amateur.

at Pine-

partner.

.

Hope was making a

travesty of the game.

his

report. "I can't think of two guys who have done more for golf than Crosby and Hope. They have given everything to it and taken nothing from it. I

would ever care

72

A

good lime wa.s had by all. and the News Chronicle and Star turned their cannons on weightier matters. other charity, returned to the United

many

leaving behind

having said the same thing

agreed; there was muflled criticism that

David Niven, shooting a picture

played

Stales to discover that the U.S. Olympic Committee was in financial trouble and would not be able to send a complete team to Helsinki. The pair promptly

Now

"England keeps talking of her golfers in comparing Crosby and Hope," Dcmarci .said. "What golfers? Never heard of them."

the other great golfers.”

New

up. The

"Hope

where the crowds were biggest.”

He departed

Bing Crosby pro-am golf tournament

Coruni of the

I

shots beautifully and consistently

nightmare of gagging and tomfoolery.

was

else

Peers

York Tnnt'j commented:

right

match was a

Amateur, Hopesaid. "Oh,

stinks."

the

my

putting's bad. but

I

Singer Donald

his long career in sports

Hope run

has that

announcing,

a challenge.

Bing would play any two British

"and hey can have Lloyd's of London on their side." The match was played for charity later that year at the Temple Golf Club in Maidenhead. England, and the atmosphere was even more jolly than it had been at the Amateur. The British crowds mobbed Hope and Crosby, surrounded the greens before the tec shots and in general made such a howling mess of the match that it had to be called after nine holes, with Comedian Ted Ray and

his

of relief.”

^^nly once in

the British

Amateur, and instead issued

to St.

serious contender. His

has given

entertainers for any bet they wanted,

probability of

and wa.s endured. Let u.s be spared the two of them together on one golf course.

Bob alone

Britisher ever gave to his

own institutions.” Hope stayed away from

He and



OUT MY SCHLOULE SO BE A BIG

that the

in

harumph and Hope intended to

charily lines than any golfers

in British history.

more than any

from the London News Chronicle.

which wanted to know ahem.' whether .Mr.

Tony explained

er

when Hope got a

the next year,

till

like to

he took his son

hower at the White House. Mamie said, “Are you a freshman at Georgetown?" that he was a junior.

human and

the British thousands in days of need,

of England,

search of publicity.” That ended the light

friendship with the

former President. Hope's friends

Tony, then a .student at Georgetown University, to meet Mr. and Mrs. Eisen-

"Touch

game and

a great love of the

and not as a professional entertainer

the ragging, past

all

Hope enjoys

know him

to state that he entered the

competition as a private sportsman with

President was? Out on the

golf course?”

tell

sallied into the fray; "I

enough

well

when you

the good old days

knew where the

first-class golfers

to play in the British

so happens Bing Crosby and

Bob Hope have done more

for golf along

has been ordered to slow

since he suffered an

clot) in his left eye in 1958. it

w as feared he would

eye,

down

embolism (blood For a while

lose the sight of the

and Earl Wilson wrote

in his col-

umn: "Bob Hope never made anybody

she be as great a player as Will

Althea Gibson?

It’s a loll”'

New

road from paddle tennis on the streets of

^drk to

tlie

cluimpionship

at

Wimbledon,

fitness of

than

liul

Althea (iibson went all the way. Twice she won that most coveted of tennis titles, twice she was U. S. Singles

Champion. For her winning ways,.she wa.s named Woman .Athlete in 19j7 ami 10.58.

very few even participate events,

much

less

become

in

a chami)ion. In fact,

organized sporting Hut e\ erv young

has

11

I'nr/i

rfproductioti oj fhis drauiiig, send

your

fiavte

and address

H-ord.1 . .\llhca

C.r.O. Box

Gibson,

I.SJS. .Y.

I.

iind the }'.

j)rej)are
row a print

i The Equitable

Life

Home

^

is

no greater than the d’he level of

of this film for

“Abuth Physical Fitne.ss If you would like to borshowing to community

groups, contact your nearest Ktiuitable oflice or write to F
to: Kiiiiitaldc, 1'.

been more important Kennedy has stated: “The

jjeojjle,

—.A Report to (he Nation. '*

stars.

person — if only a .spectator— can be as physically fit as the star athlete. Never before has })hysical fitness, particularly the

For an allractire 7^i x

our young

today. President

physical fitne.ss of every .Ameri<-an citiz(*n must be our constant concern.*' To support the President's program, Kcpdtable

Outstanding

Xot every youngster can be

it is

strength of our democracy

collective well-being of our i)eop]o

^

Assurance Society of the United States

Office.

1385 Avenue of the AmunCHS,

New York

1B, N, '<',®1963

Bob Hope

conllniifd

sad until now." But specialists saved his eye and warned him to slacken his pace.

Hope came out quipping on

his

tele-

happy to say this is Boh Hope coming to you live from Hollywood," he began

monologue. “I'm

his

back again, courtesy of

New York

the

my

sponsor and

Medical Center’s Parts

Department." Hope said the doctors

my blood to the point

"have thinned out where I'm

A

normal athlete now."

just a

few days

he went out on the

later

course and knocked off a 34 for nine

He

holes.

has been going ever since, de-

warnings from the doc-

spite repeated

A

tors.

few weeks ago, taping

his last

show of the current season with Arnold Palmer as a guest, Hope bounced around

COURSE WITH ROYAL

NBC-TV

Burbank as if word "embolism" were not in (he

the the

SPECIAL LIP...

.studios in

When

c\'erybody else

le.s.sons.

five. Hope was practicing his Warming up the audience, he was in nonstop chatter. He teed up

a ball and

"You

hit

softly into a curtain.

it

my

on

notice I'm holding back

swing," he said. "I'd hale to shank a drive

and

thin out the crew.

you the

give

full

the hands a

holding

my

I

shall

front, eh, Arnic?

in

I'm usually

pocketbook.

"All right, melt.

Now’

swing. Fore! Foi e! Have

little

Thai’s pretty interesting.

go. I’m starling to

let’s

Get dressed, Arnie. You ready? Al-

ways hanging around

ACCELERATOR Thread

huh? Golf

my

is

know. The other

Bahamas

month.

me

for lessons,

you

regular business, stuff

is

just

a

I

Devonshire.”

"He

"I played with Phil Harris the other

day and he had a stepped up to the

terrible accident. tee,

his

He

hands

to quit

on

the second nine; his golf bag sprang a leak.

He

Seagram. the

first

putt

has the only five-iron in the

in.

I

le

in the

had a

terrific

74

end.

Made by

hangover.

On

hole he bent over to knock this Just as he

was lining up the putt

a dog ran between

United States Rubber Rockefeller Center, NewYork 20,N.Y. WOSLO'S LARGEST MAKER or 60(.F SAILS

blew on

and they disappeared. He had

world with a cork

©

trap.

his legs.

He never

trouble.

is

was a docI was hurt

"And

The

script

bus driver to break Hope's

next lime, leave the driving to us!"

Peter Leeds, the actor playing the bus driver, breaks the stick with too

enthusiasm and

hits

Hope

in

cries

out

Hope

in

much

the groin.

pain, shouts, "We’ll

do the retakes tomorrow," and hobbles to his dressing room. Ten minutes later he returns and stiys, "For a minute there thought was in the Peppermint Lounge." During the retake, the new I

I

golf club

fails

to break.

The audience

and Hope cries, "That couldn’t happen the first lime, huh? coulda been 10 years younger."

dissolves into laughter,

I

A son

too old

ran up, saw

there

golf club over his knee and proclaim:

the

loo. I'm really sick.

He

he could play through.”’

if

calls for a

and

want to get into a

said. ‘Luckily there

On camera,

game

it.

He

tor behind me.

I’m out there every day, playing 5C a

LOOK FOR THE L/P

stepped into a hole at the Ber-

muda Dunes Club and hurt his leg. He ‘it won’t bother me with my act. I'm

sideline.

for fellows that are

he said, ‘Man. "

had a bigger belly button.'

I

used to working from a kneeling posi-

for girls

still

his

over the

said,

Golf's a

love

all

to

libs.

in the

almost broke

He looked up and

wish

hundred.

I

It

"One time he told me. ‘My great Dane came from a litter of five. He was third, and paid S3, 20 to show.' " "He said he and Bing dug so many divots in England that Sussex is now in

greater go! to Accelerator Thread, the Royal Special L/P takes a new faster leap off

Hope ad

an ambcrjack

arm. The rod was bouncing place.

"

commingled

favorite

into

last

dog bother you?’

that a real dog?' his friends

their

"He hooked

for faster getaway, Thanks

your clubhead. Delivers greater go for unexcelled distance. Gives a crisper click and sweeter “feel." Play the L/P— and start to burn up the course at your club. Sold only at golf professional shops.

’Was

tion,'

and over again

for free

new

said.

Oir camera

and asked

against the drapes over

a study

with

‘Didn’t that

.said,

I

He

of Champions, found himself backed

was taking

...first golf ball

in.

exchange

new Webster. A harassed Palmer, on his way to Las Vegas for the Tournament

swing.

JSot/a£-Specaie

even looked up. He just rapped the putt

‘Tm

vision show.

later he

little

is

singing Thanks for

Memory, and another television seais over. Then he goes off to New York and

for 30 theater appearances

ner speeches

in

five din-

many play. So much Hope has one pace, and He has no regrets. He

seven days, and as

rounds of golf as he can for the doctors. that is

all

is

full-throitlc.

like the

to do.

Teasdale poem: "If we had it

it

would be done the same

again."

Except maybe he’d little

more

golf.

try to

squeeze

in

a

Not baseball, however. more time with the

"I'd like to have

Cleveland club." he says, should

I

louse them up?”

“but why

END

YESTERDAY

B A N I S H I) A A I) R U F F

Fast Lass with a Sulky

/\

An 11>year>old

named Alma Sheppard

girl

set a harness horse record

26 years ago that has never been equaled

O

n a September day in 1937, an IIyear-old

girl

slipped

dersized sulky at the track

“Red Clay Oval”

Ky. She wore a had been cut down and pinned. She

Lexington,

in

driver's jacket that

and

an un-

into

basted,

stitched

by

pression not unlike that of some of the cherubs one secs on a Della Robbia

plaque."

He added

tucked her blonde curls under a hat that several sizes too large and moved her

to such

horse onto the starting stretch. Her ob-

one's credulity."

was

jective

was

to break the teen-age har-

ness-horse driving record of 2:05

3 /4.

By the time the clay dust of Lexington's "Red Mile" had cleared, Alma Sheppard had driven Dean Hanover to a mile in ;58‘/i. No one man. woman or teen-ager had ever driven a 3-ycar-



It

that the

lady's

little

bounds of probability it trespassed upon

an extent that

still

seems implausible.

native Pennsylvania today,

In

Alma's

many

poli-

that a girl of should have to wait 10 years before even enterone of the Keystone ticians think

1

1

ing the grounds of

set records for a lady driver

and

— records that

still

ered by the Pennsylvania Senate.



old sulky horse that

for

feat "strained the

new harness tracks. A bill to bar persons under 21 from the tracks passed the State House of Representatives recently and is now being consid-

1

Alma

RUSTY COWAN

John Hervey in The Harness Horse, "with a sweet, childish profile, a roseleaf complexion, golden hair and her ex-

an amateur driver

fast.

On

the

way

Alma had always been around

haven't been broken.

For a few weeks little Miss Alma rivaled Shirley Temple as America's Sweetheart. Trotting papers and magazines told the story over

and over, proeuphemism

gressing from superlative to to rhapsody.

"She was

State's plush

fair

of face," said

IVI

She was born the same year (1926) that her father, Lawrence B. Sheppard, now chairman of the Pennsylvania State Harness Racing Commission, established the world-famous Hanover Shoe Farms in southern Pennsylvania. eomimted

t5

More than nine relief

tube of Breck Banish. medication 22T4 penetrates to condition in this

Used

and

regularly,

fortify the scalp.

When

the scaling surface layer

washed away, the new is

horses.

CIN

out of ten find dandruff

smooth,

wili

is

layer

healthyRegular use

elastic,

not flake.

gives continuing control of dandruff. (Plastic tube won't

break

in

shower or suitcase.)

2 ot.,

7St 4

oz..

SJ.25

JOHN H BRECK INC SPRINGFIELD MASS

®1963

1

.

A. L. Kirkpatrick of the Atlanta

Quarterback Club

sponds

to

re-

raconteur Joe

Garaiciola on the winter banquet circuit (SI, Jan. 14, ’63) 2.

A man who needs no introduction grimaces and bears it during poignant moment of New York Mets’ opening season (SI, Aug. 13, ’62) 3.

Austrian

Gerhard

Olympic prospect Nenning embraces

teammate Kditli Zimmerman after her victory in slalom at Innsbruck (Sl.'l'eb. 25, ’63)

n6

\

rw

music

l.au^lutfr jo\'

a

is

in

ilic

nsoiUI ot

rhc essence ot the sound

Thousand lorms the

— the

happv reminiscence of hiiinor, in

ss

Si*ori.s ot

sjxirr.

gleeful joy ot

ritinj^

and

\

1

i.i.l'S

In

ir

^ooil tintes

and

I

it

tliese joys lor

week. In so doinii the\ have earned

1

t.s

is

I

i.i

i

s

,()()(). 1H)1)

a serious

i

each year have increaseil their investment i.i.i'STRA'i'Ki) until

they have

advertising pa^es ol

amon^

made

it

ot

laiij^luer

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Takes

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W irh

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families every

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I

sound

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tra

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companions.

^^ooil

illustration. Si’or

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ri;i),

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ictoi>', tlte \m\'

in

7th

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the lumdretls

magazines pid^lished .America today.

in

Sports Illustrated E7

IN

MAINE’S

LOVELIEST LAKE

A Fast Lass

AND MOUNTAIN

COUNTRY

‘Horses

-om-viM.i

iiiul all t>

pcs of animals were

her dolls." Sheppard reealied recenlK.

"She had

cocker spaniel named Noo-

a

hen she

dles

v'as a little girl

dress liim up

HOTEL. on Moosehead Lake KINCO MAtNK O. Hlllen Manager

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r

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in

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Avewui, aosTON, m«i«.

go." says Sheppard. -•Mma had Just one practice session

Dean Hanover before

with

On

at Lexington.

the lime trial

the day of the

trial

everything seemed to go wrong. A spe-

and hat ordered for

cial driver s Jacket

•Alma failed to arrive. Henry Thomas,

Hanover

the

f

arms' trainer, ttmk one

of Sheppard's jackets and cut it down, lie pinned one of Sheppard's hats on

Alma and

then helped her onto her sulky

built

cially

— her

stve-

were too

legs

short for a regular-si/ed one. she scored

-As

al skill.

quarter a

horse, veteran train-

llie

was u driver of unusuDean through the lirsi

ers noted that she

She sent seconds as Thomas kept

in 291/2

Thoroughbred "prompter"

— hooked — Just

The runner couldn't keep up as -\lma and Dean hit the half in 5 x 1/2 seconds. Many in the big and knowing crowd murmured that Dean would surely he

Two of

hurned out before he finished the mile. But he went the next quarter in 30 seconds and everyone sensed that something special was happening. As they

the best trainers in the business

do

a thing with her. But .Alma

friends with

Nimble

just

like a

with a dog."

On Jukv 27. 1937 less than two months before she set her world's record — Alma climbed into a sulky behind Nimble for her first drive m public, The mare trotted a mile in 2:09 3 4. .Alma became the youngest driver ever to pul a horse on the select list of trotters that had bellcrcd 2:10 for the mile, She didn't stop for a bow at the end of the mile but continued to the stables,

where she went to work rubbing Nimble down. When cameramen found her

do anyweek later

there, she said simply: "I didn't

thing.

The horse

did

it."

A

she duive Nimble ihiough a mile in 2:09i/i, .-Vbout this lime Sheppard set

about rectifying one of liis infrequent errors of judgment about horses. Two years earlier he had sent Dean Hanover to the Old Cilory Sales in New York and saw him bought by H. Stacy Smith of

down a chance to buy him back for S6,()(K) because "no horse was worth that." In 1937 he bought him back for 520.000.

Dean Hanover was >

through his

"There has never been another him and there never will be

like

mare named Nimble Hanover, "Nimble was a real outlaw." says Sheppard. "She had been abused somewhere along the line and haled men.

pard turned

CO-EO. IN BACK BAY, BOSTON BOS1

2:()0>X4.

to a sulky but permitted to run

Short Hills. N.J.. for S4I0. Later Shep-

JUNIOR i&Chamberlayne COLLEGE

— midway

3-year-old season he trotted a mile in

one

another one. no mailer how long you

another rich horseman's daughter had not been for a fractious 4-ycar-old it



51-B

once used

wonderful

wortli

there

.-Mina. A horse would try for her —try hard." When -Mma was 4 she started driving liarness horses, sitting on the lap of Tom Berr), the famous old driver. .A year later she had her own sulky and hitched an old gray mare named Almo to it. Still. Alma might have remained just

man would

Hall, Atlontic City, N.J.

Hgyiiiiiiij

this

into his

was going

about

made

CINNAMON

^

,Mma would go

his legs like he

and lake him out to gra/c. He seemed to know that she was something special and he wouldn't hurl her.

couldn't

a Vajca&n

Rrt,

yow^f Neve/L Fotget

to bo the fastest

The old stallion, Dillon ,\\\vt>rthy. had

been retired on our farni when .-Mina \sas 7. He was about 25 years old and

to the races

private golf, tennis, swimming pool, boating, lake and stream fishing. Accessible by car, train or plane. June-September.

or

\\oiild

him

stall,

"the fa<( true frontier on the Eastern Seaboard," a luxury hotel on its own 1200-acre resort estate, provides everything you’re looking lor. The greatest hunting and fishing, Here,

in a

and

doll elolhos. put

in

the last colt sired

by Dillon .Axworthv and he had proved

E8

behind her.

down

swept

the long homestretch, the

horse responded perfectly to .-Mma's urgings although she never used the whip.

The crowd roared when posted as

1

:5S'/2.

was

the lime

breaking the old record

for 3-year-okl trotters

by three-quarters

of a second.

The roar was

Many

however.

al.

partly

one of disapprov-

people

the stands

in

had clocked the lime as low as l:5X. .A petition was later circulated by the famous horseman and tobaccoman. W. N. Reynolds, to have the record lowered to mark. But .Alma's time went into book as :58'/2 ‘*nd there it remains

that

the



1

today.

Alma shrugged just

the whole thing olT.

as she had done before, with

"I

do anything. The hoise did it." other drivers-Henry Thomas, M. Parshall and Sheppard himself — drove Dean Hanover to world records of one type or another both before and after Alma's ride. And not one was able to belter didn't

But

Tom

five

Berry. Karl Recor. Dr. H.

Alma's 1:58‘/2- -Alma, any more records and ing while

still in

herself,

retired

her teens.

never set

from

driv-

end

Why Wembley’s E-Z On

tie

makes

it

neat and easy not to knot..

the difference. Just slip the clip over your collar... tuck raring to go. Cool

Guide' that

.

it’s

In

pre-tied, that’s

why. And no one

glance just what color suit the

indeed? You’ll find Wembley

ties at

most

tie

goes best with.

fine stores, priced

will

ever

know

the side tabs... and presto, you’re ready and

and impeccable. Every E-Z On has the famous Wembley Color

tells at a

knot?

Why

knot,

from $2.60 to $7.50,

vW ^ - II LuembiGu fo*

i,»

wrr» /A*

coio» autoe*

Take

off in all directions.

(But take along Gulf's Tourgide kit... and your Gulf Credit Card.)

uswhereyou'rcgoingand when. GulfTourgide tell you how best to get there... how to avoid detours and delays .where to stay along the way. Your Tourgide kit will include road maps— picked and marked expressly for your trip. (The quickest route? The scenic ^ route? You tell us— Gulf knows them all.) You'll gel motel guide books, too- and a log book for recording your trip expenses. Don’t forget your Gulf Credit Card, either. It's a must Service will

.

.

I

Most everything you need foryour cur can be charged at your Gulf dealer's, You can travel with less cash throughout the G. S. A. and Canada— by using your Gulf Card for gasoline, motor oil and so many other items all along the way. Ask your Gulf dealer for a free Tourgide request card — and a Gulf Credit Card application, too. Just fill them out and dropihem in the mail. Gulf will takecare

for a well-planned trip.

Tell

III I

I

I

I

JH

of everything. You just pack.

GULF CARE MAKES YOUR CAR RUN BETTER





BASEBALLS WEEK THE PLAYER It has not quite reached that point yet. but if Cal McLish continues pitching as well as he has recently, Philadelphia ManagerGene Mauch may inquire: "Do you feel weak enough to pitch today?" After two losses this year. McLish recalled that he used to have a good sinker when he did not feel so strong. McLish experimented by warming up two days before he was

to start a

game and

was

est assets

his

the results showed that one of his strong-

weakness.

"Now

that

I

don't feel so strong

1

Rich Rollins hit .550. Camilo Pascual had a Manager Sam Meic had few comabout the performance of any of his athletes. But not until Captain Harinjury for most of the season. Killebrcw returned May ll.lt took him a few games to recover his timing, but as soon as it came, the Twins went. In two-hitter and Minnesota plaints

many of them had lived up to advance billing Killebrcw came back. Out with a knee

mon

when Killebrcw

place

last

Twins followed

don't try to throw the ball past the

my control is better," Mc-

hitterand

THE PLAYER

connected for a homer, the sweep

finally

their leader to

games and shoot up

nine out of 10

was never better than last week when he walked only one man as he shut out the Giants on five hits and beat the Reds 5-1 with a four-hitter. In his past four games

to

he has allowed an average of 4.2

Do not look for Killebrcw at Charlottetown Mall tomorrow, however. Mclc was so ecstatic about his star’s performance that even though Kil-

Lish says.

It

As

a re-

37-ycar-old McLish.

who

walks and

hits, I.S

sult. the

1.0 runs.

slam," sent

has worn seven major league uniforms since signing with the Dodgers in 1944, finally

evened

hit

seemed to signal San Francisco's annual slump. No Giant was more glum than Felipe Alou. “When you hit as bad as am you gotta do something. Jump over the fence, maybe.” Instead, he slammed a home run over the fence his third hit in 40 ABs and beat the Phillies 6-5. Other homers, by Jose Pagan (until then 0 for 20) and Tom Haller (a grand slam), helped win two more games- Still, the Giants could not pull away from the surging Dodgers, winners of eight in a row going into last weekend's three-game scries in San Francisco. But Sandy Koufax, who pitched a no-hitter against the Giants the last time he faced them, did not get by the first inning of the opening game. Orlando Cepeda (.381 for the week) hit a three-run double and Alou a I



two-run homer in that first inning. A seventh-inning home run by Ed Bailey, his fourth of the week, enabled the Giants to win the second game. Bailey, a .232 hitter last year .333 batter so far this season, attributed

success to sleepless winter nights. "I'd

why

1

hit

much

lie in

and

a

of his current

bed thinking about

some and

didn’t hit others."

SAH ERAHCISCO CINCINNATI LOS ANGELES PITTSBURGH ST LOUIS

CHICAGO

HOUSTON PHILADELPHIA

MILWAUKEE NEW YORK

OPP, L S

BATTING

PITCHING ERA

WALKS STRIKEOUTS

12

"they

recalled,

to Charlotte the next day.”

he thought he would surely first time this year.

.300 for the

THE TEAM

The people of Baltimore,

registered 4 to

I

Demo-

turned out their Democratic mayor three weeks ago. Regismaybe 400 to as Oriole fans, they turned out hardly at all week for the hottest team in baseball; the average attendance was only 8,400 for a first-place team in the midst of winning eight straight games and 13 of 14. Instead, the fans left the pennantcrat,

tered

1

last

race excitement to the Orioles themselves,

who responded

in

such

way that a couple of guys who arc not exactly playful kids Coach Hank Bauer and Pilcher Stu Miller chased each other in glee around the locker room with a shaving cream bomb. The populace also missed out on good pitching (2.10 ERA), power hitting (12 HRs) and excellent fielding (only three errors, none by infieldcrs or outfielders). Manager Billy Hitchcock— until recently no more popular than the ousted Democrat turned strictly GOP: Genius Oriole Pilot. For instance, he actually a





dared to ask Jim Gentile to sacrifice for the first time in his IIyear career. "I didn't even know the sign." Gentile said. But the bunt worked. If leading the league won’t stir the fans from their crab cakes,

BA

SI

262

HR

ERA

HITS

maybe the excitement of Jim Gentile bunting

OPP

WALKS

W

4

1

4 4

64

.221 .242 .237 .307 .2S6

MINNESOTA NEW YORK CHICAGO KANSAS CITY CLEVELAND

SI

246

4 4 6

45 32 25

.228 .168 .128

DETROIT LOS ANGELES

36 47 47 67

2 2 2

BEST Covinglon. Phil 358 Aaion, Mil 14

IHt AB)

Aaron. Mil 35 0-Dell. SF 7-0 Ellsworth. Chi 1.09 Huxholl, 8 (I per game)

Cm

LA 65 game)

Drysdale, (7 per

L

HITS

HR

ERA

will.

OPP

OPP.

HITS

WALKS

BALTIMORE

4 4 4 3 2 2 2 0

(1 per

RBIs

HITS

t

THE SEASON* HOME RUN HITTERS

Killebrcw

AMENICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

THE WEEK

Killebrcw had

home runs, one a "The first time 1 hit a

five

Icbrcw was up to only .225, Mele

CAL MeLISH

Successive shutout losses to the Mets and Phillies

pitchers, trying to analyze

me

said

his life-

time major league record at 82-82.

THE TEAM

place.

.sixth

RBIs and

grand-slam.

BOSTON WASHINGTON

6 5 4

3 2 2 2 2

0

WORST

BEST

Jones. Mil .163

BATTING

SchoReld. PillO (160 AB) Landrum. Chi 0 Jay. Cm 1-7 Gibson. SIL 6.38 Gibson, SIL 33 (6 per game) Burdette, Mil 14 (2 pet game)

ERA

HOME RUN HITTERS

Causey. KC .369

Wagner. LA 13 per 11)5 AB) Wagner. LA 37 Barber Ball 8 3 Pappas. Balt 1.59

(I

RBIs

PITCHING

WALKS STRIKEOUTS

Roberts, Balt 3 (54 per game) Barber. Balt 64 (6)4 per game)

WORST Me|ias. Bos .150

fox, Chi 0

(152 AB)

Wash 6 Belinsky. LA 1-7

Collier.

Belinsky. LA 6.43

McDowell. Clev 33 (6)4 per game) Rudolph. Wash 17 (3 per

game)

'Dirouph SelvrOoy,

May 25

77



FOR THE RECORD A roundup

sports information

of

ol the

week

JhKRY

a siraighl player deal NC M, whose pinch-hilling prowess helped ihe Cincinnati Reds lo a >961 pennant and coined Ihc phrase "Lynch in the Pinch." was traded «o the Piilsborgh Pirates for Oullicldcr BOB SKINNLR. Thc Washington Senators and New York Mets were also swapping. Soft-spoken CilL HODGtS. 39, a ma)ur leaguer for 18 years (Dodgers and Mcis). left New York and the National League to manage the Washington Senators, as unpredielable Jl.MMY PlfcRSALL tourneyed up from Washington lo become a Met- Meanwhile Ihe Washington infield was Braced by a freshman Senator just up from the mi-

BASEBAlt. -In

nors.

JOHN KENNEDY. BO BELINSKY, left-handed

Name:

Party-lpving

pitcher

with a 1-7 w’on-losl record, having proved an angel hi only for falling, was sent to Hawaii of the Pacilic Coast League by the Los Angeles Angels and will not return until his form does.

lASKETBALL



TliC

world championships bounced

10 a close in Rio dc Janeiro with Defending Champion BRAZIL clinching the sescn-icam roond-rohin lournc) with a tserfect 6-0 record. A surprising Yugoslavia team hnished second with S-I while Russia Mnished third with two losses (Bra/il and Yugoslavia). The O.S. dribbled into fourth place, losing lo all three top finishers.

CHARLEY

Afier three years as coach of the Royals. WOL) decided lo leave both Cmcinnali and the Eastern Division and vigncd a two-year contract as coach of the Detroit Pistons. He replaces Dick McGuire. who resigned April 15 after one of the Pistons' worst seasons yet (won 34. lost 46t. Wolf had complied a 125-130 record and taken Ihc Royals

NBA

to Ihe

playotls twice, hut

felt

insecure at the

Hensel line Royals’ new owner, didn't msiic me college draft meeting this spring. gathto the ered I didn't fit into the new owner's plans." Owner licnscl's comment; "Absolutely pericci for every-

NBA

I

body concerned."

HARD

NOSE won the horse appropriately named $5,000 feature lo pay shrewd bettors $3.40.

YAN

1

Defending W’orld Driving ChamHILL of England successfully opened ihc 1963 season by driving his BRM lo

MOTOR SPORTS

GRAHAM

pion

only .Scots could love— hail, sleei, wind and ram— the British W alker Cup team threatened to upset a royal and ancient tradition by taking

GOLF -In weather

m

lurna 6-lo-3-point lead over Ihe favored U.S. betty, Scotland, but twm day under clear skies the American amateurs returned lo lorm and won the Walker Cup for the I8ih iimc in 19 aiiempis dating back to 19’; (»eepo*r 541.

Thc 5231. (XX) Hamcss Tracks America spring pace senes came to a close with

HARNESS RACiNO

an upsel victory at Chicago's .Sportsman's

Park.

HANOVER

guided LEHIGH onc-lenglh triumph over Adora's Dream, who had gone vndefealed in the five preliminary races ihroughoui the country.

Dancer

HOCKEY ing. the

to

a

-After nvuch hemming, hawing and hedgChicago Black Hawks finally fired Coach

RUDY

PILOLS. With '.he club since 1958, when ihe Hawks ended up fifth and out of the cellar lor four vears. Pilous improsed on the Ihc first lime record vvith four third-place finishes and a Stanley Cup victory in 1961. Ihvn last season, with their first league chami>ionvhip seemingly clinched, the Hawks went into a spin, yielded first place lo Toronto and the Stanley Cup semifinals lo Dciroil. Their dreary finish was ion much for Co-Owncf James D. Norris, and Rjcunicur Rudy was out. A likely successor; BILLY RhAY. who coached the Hawks' Buffalo Bisons lo an American HiKkey League champiimship til i past season.

m

HORSE RACING i

IRM POLICY

Grand

victory in Ihc 100-lap

With Manuel Veara in the irons, (S5-70I scampered lo a 4i/i-lcngth

lamaruna in the $55,200 ai Agueduci. I'avoriie Cicada finished a tired third, sesen lengths back of Ihc

iriumpli over pace-setlini

The unruIBcd snow alop Everest, highest mountain in Ihc world, was becoming as trampled as a city sidewalk. Last Janies Whniakcr became the first American to scale the peak. Last week four more Americans

month

their fooli’nnts with his at the lop.

LIAM UNSObLD

WIL-

IHOMAS HORNBblN

and

DOCJ
at lo score his

Inglewood. Fasecond straight two Hying

trying voriie in thc race, couldn't catch Ihc fronl-rvinners and finished third.

In their first day as legiliinale Vermont merchants. Ihc pari-mutuel machines at CiRfXN

MOUNTAIN

78

HAUCH-

8.

of famed Driver Billy

wife

Harness

.Ml.

reached the peak by climbing the hiiherto never alicmpicd W'esi Ridge. Father in Ihc day BARRY BISHOP and LUIHLR JbKS l climbed to Ihc via the South Col, the route taken by Whittaker. It was the first time four men had reached thc thc same day. "W-c feel very good about it." said Espedilion Leader Norman Dyhrcnl'urth, despite the fact that two climbers. Bishop and Unsoeld, were so frosibitten they had to be plucked off

er lo win 2.000 races.

by helicopter.

feci

AD

summit

OELMAN McNABB,

summit on

AOwiNG

a senior

(La.

CORNbLL

ihcir usual

Stale College on a irack scholarship ncxl fall.

DORIS RILEY, who

ROY

SON

m

earns u living exercising horses, w as one of nine lady jockeys to enter Ihc 12ih Powder PulT Preakness at Pimlico. She engineered Freight Train over ihe five furlongs in a crediiahic

I

MANLEL

ERSON

-NtE

.SCHUURMAN

and England's

25. furiously paddled hisdugout canoe over a rugged four-mile course on Bayou Baralaria former l.ouisiana hideaway of Pirate Jean L.iline and slid past IS contenders to slash



m



cleared 16 feel

7 inches in the pole vauli and would have regained Ihe world record but it appeared that the crossbar was loo long. And in an even more ludicrous situation. hilherio unknown PHIL SMINNICK. also of Washington, leaped 27 leci 4 inches in the broad jump, bettering Igor Ter-Ovanesyan's record by hi inch, bul since no one had bothered lo check Ihc wind gauge to see if there was un aiding bree/e ihe record was disallowed. In thc mile New Zealand’s PE 1 LR SNf 1,1 brce/cd lo a 3:54.9 victory, with Cary W'cisigcr second in 3:57.3. while Jim Beany and Jim Cirelle finished third and fourth respectively. in 3 58.

away

a

phia Phillies when he hit 24 homers -a record lhal 1919. stood until Babe Ruih hil 29

m

18,

-

19-Wa:i. I.

20-vV

-Did Oo'--:

.I.jrfl -

Ol

New

40-mif.

housewife

stale's "bighunter of the year." She achieved ihc honor by bagging a near-world - re cord

game

moose

live miles from her Alaska home.

0m

BROWN,

BILL a

senior ul

Prep

m

[g.

Creighton

Omaha, won

Ihe slate high school tennis lillc an iinpreefourth time.

edented

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 31

Nabc.sna

Ihc 49th

(Gav-

vv) C'RAVArM, 83. former ma)or league baseball player, in Laguna Beach. Calif, Oavvy led the National 1 caguc in home runs si* limes and reached hiv peak in 1915 as an outfielder with the Philadel-

I

consce-

and mother of four, was awarded the first Khneburger Trophy as

m

JUDGE CLIFFORD

fifih

world pirogue

MRS. LOREHE ELLIS.

ADOLPH PLUMMER,

m

his

ulivc

championship.

"I w anted lo do vomcihing for the last race of my college career. It's a nice way of saying thanks anvl so long," said University of New Mexico senior aficr breaking the world 440-yard record at the Weslern Athletic Conference Irack meet in Tempe. Plummer covered ihc distance 44.9 seconds and for Ihc first lime over 12 meetings beat Arizona Slate Universiiy's Ulis Willinmv. who also goi in under ihe record (45.7) with a 45.6 clocking.

MILEPOSTS -DIED:

for

MALCOLM LsBLANC,

One olficiat world record, plus ihird lasiesi mile in history highlighted the California Relays (see page 26) in .Modesto. Calif. With no complications. the ORECiON .STATE iwo-milc-rclay team brought Ihe Heavers llieir first world mark by pacing 7:18.9. Uniscrsity of Washington the distance

BRIAN STERNBERG

the

lo

l:(H)'-,

ihe fourth time.

two more that might have been, and ihc

sophomore

heeome

winning joekeyetle

ANN HAV-

the Aussie team of .siargarct

Smith and Robyn Fbbern.

TRACK A fielO

Delman.

u star footballer as well, will enter McNccse

form, thc Aus-

iralians let a lew uulsiJcrs into Ihe finals of the French Championships in Paris but slill managed to E.VILRclinch four of the five lillcs. Aussie siiueaked into the men's finals and held his game together long enough lodcicul Pierre Darmon, the first t renchman lo get that far 7 years. 3-6, 6- 1, 6-4. 6-4. Meanwhile. I ESLbY lURNbR. behind uniil the I llh game ol the second sel and down 2 5 in the deciding set. came back and beat Ann Haydon Jones of l.ngland 2-6. 6-3. 7-5. lo give ihe Australians the women's lillc. In doubles play EMlearned with .SANTaNa of .Spam 10 take the men's crown, while Aussie ace •MARG ARE. I SMI I H I whose defeat in the quarterfinals of Ihe singles was the major upset of the tourney 1 teamed with counlrynian ELEfCHER to win the mixed doubles. In the final that got away -the women's doubles- South Africa's Rh-

DON JONE..S downed

5 feet 7 inches

in u Slate meet.



a heat.

in

Labe Charles

1

mark by

four-year winning slrcak in the Crawibrd Madeira Cup with a iwo-Icngth triumph. This spring the Big Red has taken the wake ol only one rival- The Kat/eburg Rowing Club of Germany and before sullenng Ihe loss Ihe college eight defeaied the world

champions

TENNIS -Playing below

111

High School,

I

hurled the javelin 2.31 >4 inches to break thc national scholastic

-In Its final test before the IRA championships, last year's winner continued to dominate college crew by snapping Pennsylvania's

Top Highi Handicap

triumph

DOROTHY

Huughion. won a race of her own wiih Thoroughbred Fasi Dale at Aducdiici. Nine hours later her husband brougbl more honors lo Ihc family bv becoming the first U.S. sulkydnv

MOUNTAIN CLIMBING

mingled

THE CROWD TON,

Monaco. Thc

Pris de

musiached Brilon wav followed across ihe finish line by BRM teammate Richie Omihcr of Granada Hills. Calil.. while New Zealand's Bruce McLaren, driving a Cooper, roared in ihird.

"

Stanley ($6.80)

IN

KEN

After iw-o long, long months, the ninth world chesv champion wav finally crowned in Moscow when Russian Challenger TIGRAN PETROSdefeated world champion and fellow countryman Mikhail Botsinnik 2*^ points lo9V4, Called by the "Tiger" by his wife and "Iron Petrosyan .Soviet pubitc. the young (33) challenger simply tired out his older (51) opponent in ihe 24-gamc senes.

CHESS

ol

FACES

Georg.

lo-S H.iolo Ti.bunw Be-iMie.>i b»

Making good use of a powerful serve, he has blasted his way (o victory in 5 matches this 1

spring ping a

without set.

drop-

IQJTole

THE READERS TAKE OVER THE CRISIS

who

Congratulations to John Underwood, for penetrating analysis of T/ie

his excellent,

True

arc going to be punished by the de-

cision forbidding

Sirs:

Crhh IMay

ican sports scene.

Such

articles as this are

necessary to arouse the public to the realiration that sports must be anchored to the

of every individual participant,

integrity

not become merely another facet of big business.

Ronalo K. BissiNciroN Canton. Ohio Sirs:

appreciate your well-written article on the possibilities of ruining sports if the I

that he are not ever on the alert. Baseball survived because the magnates were smart enough to pick Judge Landis to

powers

its

activities.

when

But

the

mag-

nates thought Old Mountain was getting too severe, they asked him to tone down. The judge replied that he would tear up his

and step out before he would be compromised. Result; the magS50.000 contract

Football Commissioner Pete Rozelle is in a similar predicament— the penalties he dealt Horniing and Karras apCurrently,

pear very severe compared with the extent of the infractions, but were Rozelle to overlook this who knows what further liberties

My

opinion

is

that Rozelle

acted correctly.

WAt J ackson

rrR (TucBOAr)



Sirs:

Your loudest battle cry is "example to our youth." but how many children today realty do worship their sports hcrcKs? The adult fan, what of his worship? Mr. Underwood believes him to be a passionate, idealistic lover, whose lender sensibilities must be protected at all costs. I wonder if Mr. Underwood has ever sal in the middle ot the standard group of sports snipers? We are

little

people,

we members of

KeeixtLurn. gas or other

symptoms of acid

indigestion

PHILUPS:

I

tablet's

the great



little that most of us cannot enjoy the success of anybody bigger We draw up u list of rigid super-

god public, so really

than we.

human

specifications for the playing per-

formances of our athletes, and when they fail by u tiny margin to meet those specifiwe abuse them mercilessly. Wc also up similarly unrealistic moral specifications. When a man fails to meet those wc pretend to be shocked and hurt, we may even believe we are. but I believe that secretly or subconsciously many of us arc delighted, our own wretchedly imperfect egos never felt so good. K. C. MacLeod Boston

cations

Isn't there

enough

talk

spreads, shaving points and

I

from Upset Stomacli

wish him E.

Say

it

with Sports Illustrated

Sirs:

supposedly good Americans would

censure Mr. Rozelle for trying to protect and .save the great game of football. I

wouldn't know'.

For On-the-Spot Relief

Asdi rson

Heights, N.Y.

Sirs:

Why

Jim. the question

set

nates took the hint.

would be taken.

to play.

Jamfs Van Bu.skirk

is: Is it wrong to bet on games when you have agreed to observe a rule against doing so? ED.



in

the hope that "the American pastimes" do

supervise

him

N.Y.

Tully,

Amer-

20) confronting the

all

good

things.

M. NtSHirr. D.D.

Beaver. Pa.

about point

all

the rest of

it

without your idolizing a guy like Horniing?

My

hat

is

off to Pete Rozelle.

He

is

Cincinnati

.

.

SUV

to

Cotif/rntuInHotis

.

Thunks for of

the

Furor

.

.

.

Birth(ioud hirh .

.

... a eolorful gift

fil’ORT.s Ii.i.i'STHATKt) will rist* to

the oc-

For SI arrives fresh and bright promi.ses news, every week of the year adventure and line n*ading for the whole

THE LOCKER ROOM

.

Sirs;

am 15 years old, and Paul Honiung is no way has his brightness been dulled by the gambling incident. Gambling to me and other kids is not a crime that a person should be punished for. Kids make small bets on games (like a quarter), and when we grow up we'll probably still

One factor unmentioned in your piece is apparent week after week within the very covers of Sports iLLusTRArto itself. There the playing of games for pay and 'or pleas-

bet.

pride, of

The question is; Is it wrong to bet on games? As far as I'm concerned. Paul Hornung played his best in every game and gave the fans their money's worth. Is this wrong? Of course not! The fans arc the ones

sultant

I

ffu.V

{n.simi.

Sirs:

a hero to me. In

you wmit

the

one who should have made the cover. Thomas Jfnkins

ure rite.

as

fninily.

is

I

treated as

some

The Greeks had recall

it.

a

sort of

word

solemn holy

for

it

not pick

it

.

ne.xt

time you’re

shopping for a giftf .lust send us the nnnio and address of your friend (yours, too, plen.se)

.

.

.

tell

us

how

to sign the gift

you later: for tme; you order two or more gifts.

eard. We’ll bill $.')

eneh

iiiil>n\.

if

Sports

the defect of overwhelming

"wanton arrogance" and

Why

.

Dept.

Illustrated

3406/540 North Michigan Avenue/Chicago

t1, III.

the re-

"disregard of moral laws or re-

SURE-FOOTED COMFORT

straints."

As one who has played

football,

semipro cooleit on

baseball and performed that highest form ol

decii.

court

masochistic exercise, cross-country running,

campus^

m Jr

SPERRY \J TOP-SIOERll

conlimitJ

79

i

I)

Rubber A«e

.

Nsugaluck,

Ct.

19TH HOLE

iimliwieil

1^

not con\e>cd to

the genuine and

me

memorable

in

sour

articles

sweci-aiid-soiir

to players and the ill temper, ciiviousness and destructiveness of most participants

during moments of play. A Nathanael West could base well climactic scene of his nosel. The Lucuii, at any

little

Dm

league game.

men

enmeshed

in

writing about

SI

I

I

I

who

American sports

loved

and athletes, and where someone might ask for an explanation. You haven't left me any room to deny the charge that "Americans arc only interested in the dollar!"

Los Angeles

of the in

Ring l.ardner because he was a sen-

playing the sports of boys.

in

111

Vene/iielans

Mrs. Ravmomj Acivioo set the

And

fit/geraid discusses the progressise deterioration of

longer

of Si'ORTS

Sirs;

Sport cannot be any

the essay collection. The Crack'up. V. Scott

sitive adult

pvKkctbook. Tm glad Venc/uela, where my copies RA n) were so welcomed by

in the all-important

am no there

stenches of sport: the basic hostility of the locker room, the basic hostility of crowds

grown

"However

deeply Ring might cut into

it." wrote Scott, “his cake had exactly the diameter of Trank Chance’s diamond." A. WVSLI-V BARrilllVlt-SjR.

less

corrupt than the

it is a part. Our merchanmade money the national money is power, and its cordomof the American way of life,

society of which

dising society has

god. Therefore

rupting mnueiice will continue to be a inant feature

sports included.

Allxamh k Taylor New York

City

Washington Sirs;

Your

Sirs:

In my opinion, you haw begged the cruquestion concerning college sports, namely, what should be the criteria for college entrance. If we admit that college exists for education and that purpose alone, and

cial

that this

is

the sole function for

its

existence,

then any criteria for admission that doesn’t relate to the scholastic ability of the appli-

cant

is

irrelevant.

If.

on the other hand, we

assert that college funelions to (rain prospecIt's

that simple.

tive players for the

Evinrudu's push-button electric shift as easy as driving

makes driving a boat your

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done with a finger touch. You push a button, feed the gas and steer. How does it work? Simple. The control box up front has a throttle lever and three buttons neutral, forward, reverse. The buttons are connected by sealed wire to an electric clutch which drives the pro{K*llcr. ('an you depend on it'.' Completely? There’s nothing to get out of order except the push-button It's all

just

switches. cycles.

And we

test

them

years of

.“iO

operation.

After that you buttons.

may have

to

buy new

.

To prove warranty.

it,

wo

.

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MEVmUDE FIRST

product

we really mean to be honest in this mess, and a mess it is. then we must give an honest answer. The athlete or violinist or what have you who has scholastic ability If

warranting

a scholarship

one, as a scholar.

The

talented individual ability

should be given

athlete or otherwise

who

d
have such

IN

OUTBOARDS

its

“.squares" of anyone wlio

there

is

is.

Watertown, Conn.

absolutely

in

TV

AM he means is that you should no worse, he is really saying, than any other. The popular politician insists absolutely and categorically that he is not a believe try

it.

it. It is

candidate for the highest oflicc

—and is

everybody takes

it

academic

in

the land

for granted that he

lying through his teeth, and they love

for

him

it.

those idea of an

sets that his

every way the best

but he doesn’t really want you to

"campaign oratory." You Sirs:

institution in-

vesting in subsidized, spectator sports

The manufac-

face value.

turer swears on a stack of

Wendell Willkicwas almost laughed out of politics when he excused something he liad said with the alibi that it was only

docs not belong in college. Shi KvtAN R. St avin

is

about as sensible as the Cireen Bay Packers hiring personnel for pure research in the humanities. The moral issue in sports (and

things,

campaign

is

Just don’t say

everyone

yet

talk

no more

knows

that

reliable than a

double-your-moncy-back-ir-nol-absolulelysalistied guarantee.

Who of us today is abso-

lutely .satisfied?

other phases of living) seems to revolve about our unlimited capacity for self-de-

In this age of hipster morality, perhaps the one cardinal, unforgivable sin is the sin of believing. What arc you? Some kind of

ception.

a square?

No wonder

finding

way around.

Trank Welofr

its

sport has a hard time

Monroe. La.

Pi

Sirs;

Sirs;

John Underwood warns "the men at the top" that their conduct must be changed so their profits calls for

80

HR Sasofrs

Hempstead, N.Y.

THE PEOPLE

Just see your Kvinrude dealer. I^ook him up in the Yellow Pages. Ask for catalog, or write h'vinrude Motors, 4018 N. 27th St., Milwaukee 16. Wis.

make

lakes truth at

and these olherabililies beconiecrueial. The attempt to establish a middle ground finds us in a morass of hypocrisy.

The

Other luxury feature.^ are just as reliable. !..ike an automatic choke. lake a thermostat control t«> keep your engine at peak operating efficiency provide better lubrication and prolong engine life.

designed to

or to pros idc violinists for the concert stage, then scholastic ability becomes irrelevant

A)r 1,000,000

That’s equivalent to

National TtHvtbali League

on the easy morality of sport could be projected, it seems to me, onto an even hirgcr screen. Sport today is only a rcneclion of all endeavor in this age of the "little lie." which almost makes a must of easy virtue. Hitler. Stalin and their propagandists were blamed for s;ipping public morals w ith the Big Lie. w hich is an easily recognizable device if anyone cares to examine it. Tar more dangerous, in my view, is the little lie of Madison Avenue, which is fine css;iy

may continue,

As

a

wise

man once

it

will hit

them

"There are no

degrees of honesty."

CuARLts H. Dickson

or conversely, he

higher standards or

said.

Park Forest,

111.

Jr.

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