Sports Illustrated 1967-07-10

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“Using JohnnieWalker Red in sours?

Ted, you’re a real

sport’.’

A ^

V'

Johnnie Walker Red, so Ml lUO M $coriuo

lltNiHO SCOICH tVMiSir

W d PDOOf

lUPORIiO dr

Scotch.

Just won’t quit! No other

A Dial shower has staying power.

soap but Dial with AT-7 really clobbers the bacteria that cause odor.

No other soap

keeps you feeling so fresh. Just Dial.

Why is one so well-groomed while the other seems to need a shave? You’d think we’d make one great Championship tennis ball and let it go at that. But not

It plays the same, “feels” the same on any court surface: always full of pep.

Wilson. We make two. good reason.

the extra-duty

And with

The well-groomed looking tennis ball is the one the pros rave about for its special brand of control and liveliness.

The other Championship it

ball,

ball,

looks like

needs a shave. But

it

delivers

equally controlled, consistent

and

liveliness

will

outlast

anything else on a concrete,

PLAY TO WIN WITH

iDie^ mkao (A

Ccodt C« *1

.

t C«

>*c >

asphalt or hard surface court. it has a special

That's because

dacron-nylon wool felt cover that actually roughs up and

renews

itself.

Pick up your choice of either And you may never have another love. version today.

Spouts IuLUStratti) i« published weekly, eicepi one issue ai year

JULY

10,

(Ui Ave

Chicago,

,

III

N. Michi> 606ll;prin<

capalofFicc Rnekclcller Cenler.

New

York, N.V. 10020; Janses A. Linen. D. W. Hrumbaugh,

Volume 27. No. 2

i967

MO

end. by Tinie Inc.,

Contents

President;

Treasurer: Ifcrnaed Barnes, Seeeelary. Second-class postage paid 41 Chicago. III. and at addilional ntfices. mailing Aulliorieed as

mail by (he Post Onke Deparinscnl, Ollawa. Canada and for paymenl of postage in cash. Conlinenlal U.S. subscripiinns SS a year; Alaska. Canada, Hawaii. Pueno Rko, Virgin Islands SIO a year, mililary personnel anywhere in (he world S6 a year; all others SI4 a year-

'e,.und-clasii

14

Yoweec Chicago! // HOI the norlil luriiccl up'
m

18

The Once and Future King? Liston wuils to challenge the winner, eight

H7n/f fighters enter

22

A

a louriuinieni for

Rewarding Race

Hydros the

Ali's title

Detroit

in

flying high of late

were relatively tame in on the Detroit River

U or/tTs Championship Race

24 “But Papa,

1

Played Like a Clod"

France's Catherine iMcosie, upsetting the odds and the is the first amateur to win the U.S. y^'omens Open

pros,

26 Life

in the

Old Girl Yet

The aging C\>lumbui went west for a face-lifting and now returns for another try at the America's

Cup

Next week trs BETTER TO SCRAMBLE than

30 Stadiums of the ‘60s A

built

far major league

39 Scourge of the Seven Seas IVith dedication

FranTarkenion.

York's unorthodox pro

guartcrback, as he begins the story ofhis career with an anal-

color portfolio

of football's new mobility.

ysis

all the

lose, sisys

New

new stadiums have been

Eight

baseball since I960.

L/EE IS A

and determination, women are out

to

land

RARTr

56 Life with the Jax Pack

manages

The swinging story of Jack Hanson, an ex-minor-leaguer it big designing women's sport clothes

is

the-scenc

don on Its

played every year at report

52

65 Baseballs

Week

66

For the Record

ei

19lh

O

1967

INC.

AU

Hole

RIGHTS RESERVeo. REPRODUCTtON WITHOlrt

from

the tournament

Lon-

and

winners by Prank Oeford.

The departments Rowing

fast-

fastest

the world.

Wimbledon. An on-

historic

48 Boxing

all

THE WORtO'S BEST amateur tennis

46 Golf

be the

to

steeplechaser in

who has made

1 Scorecard

Gaston

living

still

44

for

Roclanls of Relgiunt. a

30ycar-old who drives madly, hates to go to bed and

men's big-game fishing records

KERklUSION

IS

StRICTI-V

LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

Sports Illustrated Founder; Henry R. Luce I$98-I967 Edilor-in-clii*I:

CbBimuo

Hedley Donovan

of tbe Board:

Andrew

Kciakell

James A. Linen

President:

Senior Stafl Editor

:

Thomas

Oriffilh

Cbainnan, Ezecutiee Commiliee: Roy E. Larsen .Manaains Editor: Andre Lacuerre Executive Editor: Richard W. Johnslon Asaistaot Manaainc Editon: John Tibby,

Hewlett docs

The production of this kind of boat-

not always stride through the office gait, but still he does have

ing package has kept Hewlett so busy

with a rolling

he has not had

a wind-etched face

and a kind of splenrumpled, salty look about him, and there are times when he seems to be leaning into an indiscernible wind. With good reason. Hewlett was a sailorman long before he w as our boating editor, and he has always been passionate about the sport. It makes a happy journalistic combination- He works out this enthusiasm in two ways: as skipper and crew of his own 20-foot cruising sloop. Beta Cygni, in which he pokes around Long Island's south shore, and as commodore, as it were,

Cygnl

this

did.

known

fact that a

Senior Editor Roger

S.

1.

No.

1

.

in

which

Prince Philip sailing and

rowing, boating has been one of our. well, mainstays.

but

iiionih,

a well-

is

it

boating man.

tem-

if

and even

in editing

other people's

boating stories.

"To me, a boat is something that matches your soul's yearnings." says Hew lett, dry-docked in his office. ‘The '

of boating

joy

promises, and tainty.

It

it

compounded of

is

excites with

uncer-

speaks to man's longings as

and

well as to his vanity,

to his pride

as well as his humility."

And

since

mood ema-

And

in this is,sue the

Hewlett-directed crew reflects

more of

We move

num

tower in the center of Manhattan. Hewlett is the first to admit that there is

a lot of escapism in boating. Says

Hewlett:

"The

de.sire

or— more accurately,

to

Gwilym S. Brown, Joseph Carroll, Frank Deford, Dan Jenkins, Virginia Kraft, Mark Kram, William Leg^it. Jack Mann. Bob Ollucn. Edwin Shrike. Lee E. Thompson. John Underwood, M. R Werner, Les Woodcock

Staff Writers: Fete Axtbcim, Duncan Barnes, Tom C. Brody. Jule Campbell, Alice Higgini, Mervin Hyman. Joe Jares, Barbara La Fonlame. Mark Mulvoy, Harold Peierson, Cary Ronberg, Patricia Ryan, Liz

Photography: PICTURE rditcm, John M. Stebbins; DEPUTY. George J. Bloodgood: assist ants, Betty Dick. Dorothy Merz; coktributino PMOroaRAPHEms Lee Ballerman. Jerry Cooke, Gerry Cranham, James Drake. Walter loois Jr.. Neil Leifer. Richard Meek, Marvin E. Newman, Herb Scharfman, Brian Seed, Art Shay. Tony Triolo Wriler-Repoitc
own

perhaps

a boat,

— to take

Reporters:

Ann Johnson.

Production: Gene W. Ulrich (Manager). William Gallagher. Wayne Prather: copy desk, Beatrice Gottlieb ichle/), Betty DeMccsier. Roberta Frost.

Barbara Gordon.

Iris

think, as a mistress, is prompted. by a need, naive in many ways, to make

droplane races on the Detroit River

a solid and tangible

to a

(Asslii
(page 22) to the remodeled 12-mclcr

dream. You will lavish foolLsh attention on her and make harsh and exacting demands, and in return she will share with you some moments that arc

Thomas Vink-Lainas

from

Columbia and her owner. Thomas Patrick Dougan (page 26), a.s they prepare for the America's Cup observation trials next week ofT Newport, and, to the Pan-American Games' rowing trials at New York's Orchard Beach (page 44). finally,

one

good and some that are less good and some that are downright awful. "But just often enough, when the sky is blue beyond belief and the water sparkles with the summer sun. when the wind is soft, yet strong and steady and blowing from just the right quarter, and when the shadow' of a stay lies acros.s a clean white sail you and your boat will share a

moment

near per-

fection."

And

so saying, having lashed

down

his stories for this is.suc. Editor-sailor-

man Hew lett has headed off on a vacation. He is, as you read this, almost certainly

Herman, Helen Taylor

I

commitment

looking salty

— and.

we hope,

squinting into the perfect sun and leaning into just the right

w ind.

Elisabeth Krauticr, Julia

Lamb, Felicia Lee. Ruih M. Lieder, Rose Maty Mechem. Judy Murphy. Paula Phelps. Sarah Pileggi, Michael Quinn, Ionise Rogers, Lynn Simross, Christiana Walford Special Cootribulon: Charles Goren (Cards), Carklon Miiehell
the world championship unlimited hy-

the scope of the sport.

Terrell

Senior Editors: Walter Bingham, Robert H. Boyle, Arthur L. Brawicy, Robert Cantwell, Ray Cave, Robert Creamer, Andrew Crichton, Roger S. Hewlett, Martin Kane, Hamillon B. Maule, Jack Olsen. Coles Phinizy, Gilbert Rogin. Kenneth Rudecn.rrcdR. Smith, Jeremiah Tax, Whitney Tower, Alfred Wright

Nancy Williamson

heady

all this

Roy

Art Director: Richard Cancel

Associate Editors:

talking about boating, in writing about it.

nates from a stone and glass and alumi-

in this

we depicted

time for Beta

porarily stranded ashore, delights in

of the boating activities that appear

magazine. Ever since Volume

much

Administralire Aaislaoi:

Maureen Harris

Department; Harvey Grul, Martin Nathan William Bernstein, Brendan F. Mulvey. Ctiherine Smolkh, Thomas VsnderschmidI,

Art

Editorial Aasislants: Jean Lockhart, Theodore Stephney

Special CorresiKindents: CHIEF, Earl Burton; assist-

ant. Ekanorc Milosovic; Albu^uirqur. Arch Napier; Anciiorag* {Alaska), John Ratierman; Allania. Jim Minier: Austin (Ttxas), Jimmy Banks; Balilmort, Walter Ward: Baton Rouft. Dan Hardesty; Bttllngham (Wash.), Dolly Conrtellv; Boitr (Idaho). Ray Ginn; Boiton. Leo Monahan: Buffalo, Dick Johnston; Carson City (Nev.), Ouy Shipler Jr.; Charleston (S.C.).

Warren Koon: Charlotle (S.C.), Ronald

Green; Charloitesvitle ( Fa.), Chris Cramer; Chicago, William Furlong: Cineinnali. Jim Schottelkotte; C/ere.'nmi. Charles Heaton. Columbus (Ohlo\. Kaye Kessler: Dallas. Fort Worth. Wes Wise; Denver, Bob ^wle; Der Moines, Bob Asbilk; Deiroll. Pete Waldmcir; Greensboro (N.C.). Smith Barrier; Harris^ burg (Pa.), John Travers: Honolulu. Ted Kurrus; Houston, Jack Gallagher: Indianapolis, Dick Oeony; Jaeksonrille. Bill Kaslelz; Kansas City, Theodore O'Leary; Las Vegas (Nes ). Tom Diskin; Lexington (Ky,), Larry Van Hoose: Lillie Roek (Ark.), Orville Henry; Lot dnfeies. Jack Tobin: Lon irvi/ie. La rryBoeck; Memphis. Charles G>lk>.pie; hflamI.Edwin Pope; MlnneapoUs. Dick Cordon: Hashrllle. Max York; New Haren (Conn.), Bill Culftrie; New Orleans. Peter Finnev; Oklahoma CUv. Harold Soles: Omaha. Hollis Limprechi; Philadelphia. Cordon Forbes; Phoenix

Eddie Bcachkr;

Frank

Oiaiwlli: Filisbursh. Prorldence, John (Ore.). John White; Hanlon: Salt Ixiki City, George Ferguson: San Antonio, J^hn Janes: San Diet'', Al Couppee; San Franelsco. Art Rosenbaum: Seattle. Emmett Watson; South Bend (Ind.), Joe Doyk: St. Louis, Bob Morrison; Si. Petersburg (Flo.). Gordon Marsion; Syracuse (N.y.), Bud Vander Veer: Tallahassee (Fla.). IFaeo (Texosl, Dave Campbell; Bill McGrotha; Washington. D.C.. MartK Zad; Winston-Salem (N.C.), Bob Hampton Canada: Montreal. Arthur Skgcl; Ottawa. Dillon O’Leary: Toronto, Rex MacLeod; Voncouetr, Eric

(Arts.).

Po'lland

Whiiehead Foreign Bureau: CHIEF, Richard TT.

M. Clurman; dEPU-

John Boyle

PuUisber; Garry Valk

HEWLETT

IN

HIS

SALTY DREAM WORLD

Advertising Sales Director: Hirry Sleinbreder, Circiilition Director:

Generni MnnsigeT'.

J.

Robert B. Cowin Rkhard Muttro

Jr.

LOCH

NESS. c/omimiteJ hv UrijMfitJrt Castle. Strategically sitmtteci, this castle for centuries controlleii tfie u Kole uf>per fwrt of the Great Glen. Less famous than the Loch Ness monster, hut more reliable are the nearby distilleries that /mniuce Hi^thlanti malt tt hisicies for too I’i/vrs Scotch.

CAN A SCOTCH MAKE HISTORY^ Talk to somebody

who

has

100 Pipers, at\d you’ll hear the

tried

souod

of history being made with three .simple words: “It tastes good." Until now, taste was not necessarily the thing people liked most about Scotch. Perhaps it was tlie lightness of Scotch, its smartness ns a drink or

the fact it sat so comfortably with them. Now, with 100 Pipers, taste Isccomes the ti>p reason for prelerring Scotch. 100 Pipers is a Scotch that can be enjoyed from the first taste by the occasional drinker as well as the connoisseur. Bottled in Scotland by master

100 I.S*

SCOTLASP AT t»

100 Pipers

of their craft, uniquely easy to like.

re.spectful is

If you enjoy a sense of the past and the savt>r of now, try a bottle of

100 Pij^ers Scotch by Seagram. VC'c think you’ll find it tastes the way you always hoped Scotch would taste.

PIPERS

SCOTCH EVkRY DROP BOTTLkn

blenders

PRCX3F StlKCrJ

BY SL.\C.R.A.M irvj

h>

Pi.tillOi

Comptny. S.Y C.

BlenJ
Wliiklf

POLAROID®

That’s a lot of money. That’s a lot of camera.

This camera will set you back something under $160. Not exactly peanuts.

How does Polaroid come off charging that kind of

money

when you can buy a Color Pack Camera for under $50 and get beautiful color prints in 60 .seconds? And when all the models are light, compact, fast-loading?

And when have an

all the

models

electric eye that reads

the light of the flash

when you

shoot color pictures indoors.

sets the exposure automatically. (You never have to

and

worry about special distance settings.)

Here’s

how

they

Polaroid went

come all

off.

out on

this one. It has a superb singlewindow Zeiss Ikon range- and

viewfinder that automatically corrects for parallax

and

field

size.

And a transistorized shutter that lets

you shoot black-and-

white pictures indoors without and even make perfect

flash,

time exposures up to 10 seconds automatically. This camera can make full use of the Polaroid Portrait Kit, Close-up Kit, cloud filter and many other accessories. It has a sharp triplet lens. 4 exposure ranges and a deluxe all-metal body with brushed chrome finish. There's even a flashgun included. It is unquestionably the finest automatic camera Polaroid has ever produced.

A lot of money? It all

depends.

in more than 100 in the l!(90s and only also worked as a trapeze Barnum, his specialty being somersault. About 70 years ago. feeling his age, he gave up the trapeze to become the chief assistant to

Lewis says he fought

amateur bouts

He

one.

lost

star for P. T.

SCORECARD

blindfolded

a

Harry Houdini. years. Lewis

is

whom

he served for

.'0

a longtime vice-president

of the American Sviciety of Magicians,

SLOWDOWNS

resinclive in their

and anguish were predictable last week at Indianapolis when the United Slates Auto Club rules committee sharply curbed the power of tur-

The

cries of jo>

bine racers.

Andy

Granatelli.

classed the field in

whose lurbiKar outthis year's 500 and

came within 10 miles of winning llie lucc. said, “They base reduced the power of the turbine so much that it could not qualify for the 500,

What

it.

let

alone compete

they have done

effectively

is

in

ban

Granatelli got support from another

longtime Indy competitor. J.C. Agaja-

‘Tm

nian. "It's

not

very disappointed," he said.

fair to

stop progress. This

is

the

just as

ous. At least they re-researched the question

and made a forthright

diligently

what may have seemed a similai action but was actually u hasty and regrettable one. an advisory group to the International Automobile FedMeanwhile,

in

recommended

eration (FI-A) tion of the to

liters

in

the prototype

class at Lc Mans and other manufacturcr-world-championship endurance runs. If approved this would force Ford to replace its winning seven-liter engine

jected by the

ruling were pis-

1

with a drastically different type or quit

and

u possibility

in

an automobile accident,

bruised ribs, four skull frac-

1

tilers)

five spinal bruises.

1

ong

since

recovered, he likes to demonstrate his

hanquel-si/cd coffee

pot and pouring 25 cups without a quiver of the hand. And the run around

Golden Gate Park? Thai’s not just

fitness,

everyday exercise.

SHOCKING

A

British psvchologist. Dr.

John C. Bar-

ker. reports considerable success using

trcaimcnls

clectrie-shock

on compul-

sive gamblers. His success at curing un-

husbands by aversion therapy

faithful

persuaded the psychologist

to

try

the

definitely

same technique on other problem pa-

out of the

tients. He began by hospitalizing a oncarmcd-bandit fanatic along with a one-

would

it

put Chaparral (seven

and

own best advertisewhen he was 98.

the reduc-

piston-displacement maxi-

threx*

out ban as this decision implies.”

USAC's

he was hurt suffering

his

years ago.

fitness by lifting a

ously linked to ’safety.” should be

Pleased with

Two

tures

I

I

ment.

revised.

and we've got to live with it. As a car owner, all wanted was some way of equalizing the turbine so it would wanted be competitive for all of us. something reasonable, not an out-andage.

jet

and he must be

If the ruling is proved wrong by next year's performance it should he

ruling.

mum

the turbine by the political way."

new formula,

the previous formula proved too gener-

Lc Mans business. The proposal, dubire-

FLA when

consideration

in

it comes up for September in Milan.

ton-racing enthusiasts like Mario An-

"rm

dretti.

for it." he said.

"I

don't

think the turbine was an interesting car.

Furthermore, the accessory companies

HIGH LIVENS Olympic Committee rules prohibit an athlete from training at high International

it, and they are the backbone of racing." Caught in this crossfire. USAC at least had the courage to make a decision. By

altitude for

more than

prior to the

Mexico City Olympics, un-

reducing the size of the turbine air-intake

mind, Sweden has come to a high-level decision. It is sending six members of its

aren't interested in

and

area

thus

horsepower,

it

is

decreasing

potential

attempting to put tur-

bine and piston cars on equal terms. Bethis

fore

searched car

year's

USAC

Indy race

turbines and

was

it

nobody

fast

qualifying

but not fastest.

fully realized

its

166-

qualifying speed in racing condi-

tions.

while

the

piston

cars- having

qualified with near-empty tanks

zy nitromethane additives eral

What



and

all lost

With

that

to college next fall

University of New Mexico. The hope is that the Swedish students, who major in such subjects as physics and math, will find the proper atmosphere at the

will

(alt. 4,94.1 feet)

for their

work.

may

armed

bandit. Ihc

around San Gale Park. That was honored at a dinner given

nine-volt

gambler that the quit.

its

allowed to

lime he pulled the lever he received a

June 25 Larry Lewis was 100 years is his custom, he went out

Francisco's Golden

well be too

man was

play the machine constantly, but every

SLEIGHT OF NANO

On

old and. as

for his daily run, 6.7 miles

four-wheel drive, corner better, too. officials

Olympic track team

jaz-

could accelerate quicker and. with

USAC

days a year

sev-

mph, as they always do. The turbine

The

.^0

of course, the athlete just happens

in

then was that the

turbine could run right back to

mph

re-

Granatelli's

let

in as a potential equal. In

trials

less.

to have mile-high residence.

night he

by some of the

city’s

many of whom he

foremost citizens,

serves daily as a wait-

er at the St. Francis Hotel.

jolt.

After

four

finally realized,

days

the

with a shock,

odds were against him, and he not gambled in 18 months.

He has

Curing horseplayers

more of

is

proving to be

a problem, because the doctor

has found

it

dillicult

to

realistically

present a betting situation in a hospital. co/illfiufd

!

SCORECARD

Meet the most useful power tool

eonlinurd

He hasobtained cITcctive results, though, by running films of the patient placing wagers in betting shops and then administering a shcx:k as the gambler lays

down

money. The

his

dixrtor also plays

— music to

recordings in the background

ever invented

by—

bet

that consist of tapes of the pa-

tient's wife telling of the consequences of her husband's habit. One man treated

manner was

in this

he

ly that

now

horse race

is

affected so profound-

has to leave the

shown on

room

turned

himself

if

a

But

television.

another admitted having a relapse.

He

and received three

in

booster shtKks.

treatment seems extreme,

ir the

Other

drills are

single speed. This

one is any speed you want it to be. An accelerator instead of an “on-off”

switch gives you speeds from 0 to 2000 r.p.m. to drill any material. Other drills operate in only one direction. This one goes forward and reverse. Lets you drive screws, nuts, bolts and remove ’em, too. Powers a workshop of accessories. We call it Drive-R-Driil. You’ll call it the most useful power tool yg" and Vz that was ever invented. Comes in sizes. Prices start under $32 at better hardware, lumber and department stores everywhere. Skil Corp., Chicago 60630.

Barker says, dote for

in

your hands with

SMI

more

times

I>r.

the only successful anti-

in

“We

debt than their annual

salaries.”

OPERATOR

No one is more enthusiastic about ihc remarkable success of the Chicago Cubs 14) than Ernie Banks, the Cubs’

aging All-Star, first

division

years

who

team

has never been on a

outstanding

in his 14

the National League.

in

Now

every time his

game Banks rushes call the star

Cubs win a home

to the telephone to

of whatever team

playing

is

against the Cubs’ closest rival for the

league lead that night. Last Thursday, with the

a half games out of

Cubs two and place.

first

home from Wrigicy

hurried

Put power

it is

his c.xircmely sick patients.

never see them." he says, “until they are six

allowed a friend to Willie

Mays

Louis.

It

at

went

listen in

Banks and

Field

on

a call to

the Chase Hotel in St. this

way:

Banks. Hello. Willie? That you? \fays {sleepily: he had evidently been

Who is this? Who is this? It's

nappiny):

Banks:

Ernie Banks.

w ant to conyou on an outstanding perlast night. [.\/f/y5 hud ^nnie 4 home rims, and the Chinls hud beaten the Cards.] You're a wonderful player and a line person. You know that don’t you? ,\/in'.T:‘Was that you who called me last Listen. Willie. First of all.

I

gratulate

formance

for 4. im ludinn two

night?

Banks: Of course

it

was

inc.

I

wanted

1

thought

to

congratulate you.

Mays: got a message, but was somebody kidding. I

Banks: Kidding! I'm not kidding.

We beat

it

Willie.

the Pirates again this afternoon.

Did you know that? Mays: 1 know, Of course

I

know

that.

conilnutj

8

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Be HawTilous

state Mutual can now give you a healthy rate reduction on disability income insurance. Remember ue.^ VN'e're the peoftle who pioneered reduced rates on new lile in^'Uld^lLe for people wlio hadn't smoked a cigarette in And now we re offering the sar^^edeal on Disability

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Income health insurance because in our opinion, non-cigarette smokers are better insurance risks. If you haven't smoked a .

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For details about either

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and cigars are permissible), the little Disability Income now costs one of our Non-Smoker plans .

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MINDING OUR

SCORECARD

OWN BUSINESS WEEK BACKSTAGE AT BUSINESS

fonitmird

Don’t you think on?

know

I

what’s going

Banks: Wonderful. Then you know the are going all the way. Nothing’s going to stop (his team. There's going

Cubs

to he a city series right here in C’hicago,

and we’re going

sweep the While Sox

to

la note

in his voice):

of incrcJiJiry tell

me

ihuil

Banks: I’m calling you to

tell

you

Are you

calling

me

to

out there tonight and give

it

to

go

your

all

against (he Cardinals. You’re a superstar!

want

1

you play

to see

like

a super-

star.

Mays: Who’s pitching for them? Banks lp4)sirively, as though this was an aJvaniage):

Bob

You always

hit

O’fVison!

You

him.

hit

When you come up Gibson it's murder.

him.

to the plate against I

sorry for him tonight.

feel

.Mays {giggling): All right.

1

got to get

Banks: Good. That’s positive thinking. And when you get there, remember,

Don’t worry there’s only one thing reduced about Business Week. The that’s shrinking in our magazine is Black-and-White. In the last decade, advertisers have been using more and more color. In 1956, only 14C'< of our pages were tinted. In 1966, a whopping 35% were in glorious, glam-

you’re Willie Mays.

orous, living, breathing color.

Banks:

BW

It just proves that the

coming color conscious the business world.

world

is

be-

— including

Not only have

ad-

upped the color content of Business Week, so have our editors. We’re getting as yummy-looking as some food magazines, as zippy as some news magazines, as sparkling as some art magazines. But no matter how much delicious color we run, our main purpose will still be to supply Amerivertisers

with food for thought; our viewpoint on the news will still be strictly business: and the onlyart we’ll serve will be the art of management. Business Week will never be just another pretty face. Not us. No, sir. Absolutely not. By the way, do you think our masthead would look better in a shocking pink? ca’s executives

You

advertise in

BUSINESS

WEEK when you want to

An

.

No.

...

24!

.

IGiggIcs.)

Banks: Willie, you’re going to see that ball come out of Gibson’s hand. And it’s going to float up there to the plate and wait for you to hit it. You hear me?

Mays

.

.

.

.

I

.

I

1

hang up.

It’s •

ca-

How

got to

is

Mays:

Commonwealth

meet, read: in-

ure FUTURE OF THE MEET AT STAKE. F5SFNTJAL KEINO COMES TO LOS ANGELES

WHETHER lO PARIICtPATE IN MFET OR NOT. tmiRE PROMOtUm BUILT ROLNO KEINO VERSUS RYUN 1.500 METERS. Finally, on the pleading of officials of the

KAA, Keino agreed to appear in Los am not happy about it.” he

Angeles. ”1 said. “I

do not

feel

up

cept the invitation.

I

meeting Jim But am a

to yet.

sportsman, and because of

I

this

I

will ac-

better after

feel

winning that mile Saturday.” It would seem that he is just unfit enough to wor-

THEY SAID •

I

games of the Cardinals. (Gig-

gle.)

IT

Casey Stengel, on his days as an out”1 was such a dangerous hitter

fielder:

(Giggle, giggle, click.)

a half

of the Kenya Athletic

which arc to be held in Nairobi the day the U.S.A.-Commonwealih meet opens in Los Angeles. Keino. a police sergeant, said he had only been in training two and a half weeks before his mite at Nyeri, and that he had raced "just to build up stamina and to improve on my fitness. The result was as big a surprise to me as anyone else." He adamantly refused to compete abroad. By then cables from the sponsors of the foreign meets were arriving in government offices in Nairobi. One from Glenn Davis, promoter of this week’s ships.

our year!

That night the Giants scored II runs in the first inning, knocking Gibson out of the box. Mays got two hits and two RBIs. The Cubs closed to within one

and

officials

Keino they were told he would be running in the As-sociation got in touch with

ry the competition.

got to go,

Banks: You mean you got to go win. The Cubs arc going to be one and a half games out when you go to bed tonight. This

When

Kyun and Ron Clarke

{laughing): Yeah.

whammo! And then reer home run five hundred. many is that going to make it? Mays (giggling): don’t know.

even got intentional walks

in balling

practice.” •

Manuel Santana, after being upset in first round at Wimbledon: “For the

the

past year everyone tried extra hard to

was the Wimblebeat me just because don champion. Now it will be difTcrent. will be one of the hunters instead of the hunted man." I

1

FIT

A

TO

Klkl.

short, cryptic message

came out of



Y.

A.

Tittle,

discussing

the

49crs’

Africa a fortnight ago saying that Kenya’s famed runner. Kipchoge Keino,

surplus of quarterbacks:

would not appear

to his age. then confuse the opposition

as scheduled in track

meets in Finland and the U.S. because If that seemed myshe was “too unfit.” terious, a

few days

later the unfitness re-

port became even harder to believe

Keino was clocked at

inform

management A McGraw-Hill Magazine

.

.

immortal'.

Mays:

feet,

at sea level.

U.S. A.

dressed to go to the ball park.

/SiOP



5,900

is

Kenya track authorities estimate Keino would have run the same mile in 3:49

Kenya Intraprovincial Police Champion-

four straight.

Mays

Since the altitude there

10

when

in 3:55 for the mile

a provincial police meet at Nyeri.

plan.

I’ll

start

John Brodie

“I’ve got a in deference

with Cicorge Mira in the second quarter, give the to cheer in

Go-go Generation something about by using Steve Spurrier and then in the

the third quarter

fourth quarter

clean up the

I’ll

mc.ss.’*

come

in

myself to

end

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97S9

Parnelli

Jones knows the score.

Firestone's record of wins

major world-wide racing

in

for

1967*

Others 24

Firestone 73

Firestone's winning record (U.S.) 6

-Firestone

45— Others 20— Others 22— Others 42— Others 18— Others 17— Others

Firestone

17— Others

4

500

Firestone

Darlington Motor

Speedway Firestone

Indianapolis

Daytona



Pikes Peak

Trentnn

.

Firestone

Firestone

.

Speedway

Firestone

Milwaukee 200

7 6 9 5

4

Phoenix National

Championship

,

.

Firestone

4— Others

3

Firestone

10— Others

5

Speedway Firestone

8— Others 4— Others

7

Firestone

Firestone

2— Others

0

Riverside

Atlanta Motor Speedway. Charlotte Motor

Yankee 300



1

Peach Blossom 500.

Rockingham

.

That’s

why he

insisted

on

Firestone tires for his turbine car in

In

57

veal’s

the 1967 Indianapolis 500.

racing research.

of

Firestone has won more races— more places— than any other make of tire Nobodv knows this better than Parnelli Jones This year Parnelli brought a new kind of car to Indy A turbine

powered

racer.

even sound

whooshed

So

quiet,

it

didn't

racing car instead of roared like

a

It

The car. with its four-wheel -drive and turbine engine, developed so

much power

it

threatened to tear

ordinary tires into shreds

But

mph

Parnelli knew the score So he turned to Firestone Firestone had the tires the experience What

race at 164,926 But It's not what

happened is history The turbine stole the show

strong, It

led

all of the way and set 18 new track records Tt^en with just three laps to go. a S6 ball bearing failed and with it the chance for a

almost

remarkable first-y.ear win The Firestone tires performed flawlessly,

without

a

single tire

change, and carried Parnelli to tf^e fastest lap speed ever in the "500”

racing

It's

figures

It

we

get out of Safe,

what you get

long lasting

tires

like

the

Super Sports Wide Oval It's a passenger-car tire built wide like our racing tires To grip better Corner easier. Run cooler. Stop quicker than your present tire. And It has rugged Nylon cord for maximum strength and safety There's only one original Wide Oval tire— and Firestone builds it See your Firestone Dealer or Store

THE GREATEST TIRE NAME

IN

RACING

Sports Illustrated JULY 1*67 10,

YOWEEE CHICAGO! The Cubs won, slipped past the Cardinals and at that

— the Second City a

Ed Stanky had

14

had

murmur was heard:

a glint in his

a

monopoly on

first

the first Cubs- White

place. O.K..

moment — 3:72 maybe

it

p.m. C.O.T.. July

couldn't

Sox World Series since 1909

last,

7,

1967

but in Chicago

by JOE JARES

aya and Lao Ourochar lookad Uka a canary-swallowing eat as thair taams roda high and Ians chaarad acsiaticaily

A

t

Billy

The Cottage on the North Side, on the South Side, at the

It seemed a.s though Divine Providence was repaying the nation's Second City

Goat Tavern and even in the bouand beer joints of Old Town, the

for a winter so cruel that people

at Butt's

tiques

people of Chicago— that toddlin’ town

were talking about baseball

And f

at

ield.

last

3:22 p.m.

they were

Sunday

scrfimu/i;,'

in

week.

Wriglev

first

about

it.

for

able by that ugly intracity railroad called

Chicago and then snakes its way that way and this. Should the Cubs and White Sox toddle their way to pennants, it would be the lirst all-Chicago World Sc-

together with muscle and bone instead of

White Sox already American League by 41/2 games.

putty. Since the

led the

the El. which loops around

ries since 1906. less

1

when

the

Hitless Wonders of hicldcr Jones, four games to two. Until the West Coast two of its teams. New Ork was stole

'i

about crosstown

relatively blase

dreaming out loud of an Elev ated Senes some of the games on the South Side, some on the North Side and all reach-

Cubs had beaten moved aheadofSt. Louis

The win was the Cubs' l.tth in 14 games, and it proved that this year they were put silly

to

Some exuberant Chicagoans were

place in the National League.

year's last-place

Cincinnati and into

last

last

had

put on chains just to walk.

downtown

Cubs

of I’eer-

rank Chance were upset by the

classics,

but for Chicago it would be a greater coup than playing host to the tX-mcKTaiic. Republican and D..-\.R. conventions all at

once.

Mayor Richard Daley could

present the participants with special rne-

nientos of the city,

maybe autographed

photos of Al Capone.

The

historical rarity

of having bollt

home town teams in pennant races Cubs have not even finished in the prising thing to

(the first

was the most sureontmued happen

division since 1946)

TOWEEE CHICAGO!

coniinufd

Chicago since a Brink's truck with in cash stood stuck in a snowdrift for two days and nobody bothered to rob it. People were fascinated by the possibility of a confrontation between Leo Durochcr of the Cubs and Eddie Slanky of the Sox, those combative managers who are also known as The Lip and The Brat. The Brat, Stanky, had no superstitious qualms about mentioning an Elevated Series. "It would be wonderful," he said. "It would be great for the city. It's good for a city just to have two clubs in contention. Some people like a monopoly, but I don't. And I guess I think it would be in

time

S300.000

home

nice. too. because of

my

fondness for

in five years.

plate

that said.

particularly

and he's something to see if you can see him. His name is Chuck him Twiggy. Lack of muscle doesn't bother Twiggy:

relief pitcher,

now you

"

the Scries arc being taken a lot riously at the

moment than

arc Leo's,

and he knows it. Earlier in the .season Stanky said, "If we're within a couple games of the lead at the All-Star break, we'll

take the pennant": and, after a

tonight are

why

the

he claims his sinker gets better as he gets tired. "The slower the ball gets to the

more time

But

Through Sunday, Hartcnslcin had apfive of the Cubs' last eight However, a young Canadian,

Ferguson Jenkins, obtained

trade

in a

year with Philadelphia, has been the

Cubs’ most

Sam

Lip. Jenkins in the

improved

game Sunday

in the league lead,

his record to

that put the

going the

1

1-5

Cubs

full

nine

Reds and allowing them Just three hits. Everything was going right. Adolfo

week the White Sox were on and it was Leo basking in the

cashmere sweaters and buckled shoes, hurrying from the park to keep a dinner engagement with Frank Sinatra, not once forgetting a statement made by Dodger General Manager Buzzie Bavasi when The Lip was second-guessing on TV: "The game has passed Leo by." Leo was feeling so good he was even contemplating a book to counter the attack against him in the newly published autobiography ofex-Umpire Jocko Conlan. Only it would not be ghosted by a mere sportswriter. Me was going to get a rc'ti/ writer, "a guy Frank knows." name of Truman Capote. Cub fans were feeling good. too. Little old ladies were coming out to ring bells, toot horns and curse the opposition, Police were speculating that maybe it was because of the Cubs and the Sox, and not the unusually cool weather, that there had been no racial strife thus far. Around W'rigicy Field they were selling lapel pins labeled cub power, and the club had to open the second deck for a weekday game for the first

division,

Chicago

is

Phillips,

the spectacular center fielder,

missed four games because of a back



so Leo put Al Spangler who had been a free agent until the Cubs took him on a while ago into the outinjury,



field in Phillips' place.

three runs in his

first

Spangler drove in

four games. Adolfo

returned, hit a game-winning

homer and

the lineup again the next day. Span-

left

gler

hopped back

in

and baited across

yet another run.

Along with

and the

ingly strong pitching, the

surpris-

Cubs have had

sustained hitting. Their team average

is

and they have scored more runs than any other team in the majors. Old Ernie Banks, seemingly washed up a season ago, is batting over third in the league,

.300, had his 15th home run the other day and was named to the All-Star team, Billy Williams. Glenn Beckert and Randy Hundley, the young catcher the Cubs wheedled away from the Giants, arc all hitting at or not far below .300.

and Ron Santo, the impressive third baseman who was in a deadly slump early in the season, is back up to .280 and hitting in the manner to which he is

accustomed.

One

has to wonder.

If

Cub

still

the

purveyors of the more valid dream. The

team average

hit (their

is

to .259 for the Cubs),

.239

and

they’ve scored 96 fewer runs than their

North Side

rivals.

They have not one and they have been

many

as 10 runs in only

two games. They have depended on the speed of Jackrabbits like Walt (No Neck) Williams. Al Weis. Jimmy Stewart (an ex-Cub), blocky Don Buford (once a good college halfback) and roommates Tommie Lee Agee and Tommy Lee McCraw. And they depend on

"We

their pitching.

have no really big

except for our pitching staff." says

stars,

Stanky,

The pitching has been

as good as the would it Hoyt Wilhelm, almost 44,

preseason analysts predicted be. Reliever

has allowed only three earned runs

in

and his earned run average might soon be visible only (0.75) through a microscope. Stanky's arsenal of arms includes Tommy John (Chicago is big on Tommys). and All-Stars Joe

36H

innings,

Horlcn (10-1) and Gary Peters (10-4). Peters also happens to be an excellent hitler, a er.

smart

ba.se runner, a

good hunt-

an archer, a fisherman, a scuba diver a joker. When rain held up the start

and

of a game recently he came out on the field in full scuba-diving regalia. When he er.

won

from his managdown. "But rentember "When you catch me

a suit of clothes

he turned

this,"

the luck

essentially a

town), but the White Sox are

Sox don't compared

Uncle

effective pitcher since

snatched Holtzman away from The

innings against the onetime first-place

last

the road,

has to

it

we made

glory at home, resplendent in light-blue

despite 20 straight years in the second

regular hitting .300,

last

and Holtzman, would they be? and the Cubs

this

are exciting,

able to score as

Sox are going to

big victory, "Plays like those

win."

all

far in front

Harlcnstcin, but they call

games.

making more se-

how

The Cubs



peared in

got ours today,

course, Eddie's chances of

that

they

despite the loss of their best

Ken Holtzman. to the Army. He had a 5-0 record when he departed last May. Of course, they did bring up a pitcher,

dip."

'We

says,

yours tonight.'

amazing about

Cubs was not merely moved into first, but that it

Cubs had

the too,

arc drawing the crowd.s (deep down, and

What was they had

had done

"He

16

kid sitting behind

the sincere

"Why, Leo calls me every day," he added, with a mock serious expression.

Of

A

dirty gray sweat shirt

plate." he says, "the

Leo.

get

wore a

"How can wc lose when we're

so sincere?"

it

he said.

breaking training

rules, don’t fire

Deduct the

A

suit."

few days

me.

later,

he

went through an entire practice session wearing a burlap bag over his uniform and telling everybody, "This is the suit got from Stanky." In the 17 days before the midseason hiatus, the White Sox had 18 games to I

play without a day off against Minne-

and Detroit. They startoff losing two of three to the Twins, then got involved in an exchange of football body blocks in Baltimore. To break up a possible double play. Tommy McCraw went five or six feet wide of home

sota, Baltimore

ed

Orioles Catcher

plate

to collide with

Andy

Etchebarren. Tlie umpire did not

call illegal interference

because

McCraw

was within lagging distance of home plate as he barreled in, and the outraged Ftchebarren, looking as though he was going to tear down Memorial Stadium

in his

eye." Stanky said

to see

it

with his bare hands, had to be restrained

sighted Mr.

by another well-known Baltimore noncombatant. Manager Hank Baucr.

ril remember

"We

that play.” said Bauer.

can go out of the baseline to get

them, too." The next night Frank Robin-

son of the Orioles didn’t have to go out of the baseline at all. Sliding in to break up a double play, he crashed into A1 Weis, the White Sox second baseman. Robinson suffered a brain concussion and was out the rest of the week because

to

Magoo on

we

there."

gel

Then he put Wayne

run homer

night,

came over matching

to

his

Stanky w ith an expression

name.

"You may have to .scratch Ken

Berry."

He cites a

fot)l.

typical

Ron

Han.sen ran

in from the outfield, and tagged the uncon-

scious

Robinson

make

a putoul at

Stanky.

talked in baseball."

seaMin that Stanky thrives on.

"New

breed"

is

Fddie Stanky’s ha/ily

defined favorite expression, and he applies

It,

usually with affection, to sports-

and his playthe most well-

writers, his wife, his six kids

he sees

it, is

1

the plate.

I

Berry finished

fifth

Clearly,

new

in

favor of

in

Tommie

the voting for

-Agee,

who

ished sixth- Stanky will not be

fin-

drawn

argument on the relative merits of his two star outfielders, and he is all for Tommie being on the team, but he into an

home some

day." said

was the kind of week and full

of

arguments is most dear. Cubbies were w inning,

breeds, tough baseball,

with umpires and. what Victories. If Leo’s tiK>. all

The

the better.

fact that the

Third Baseman

Cubbies were indeed

Ron Santo money

his

-not

he minded a great deal. .Santo owns

that

a thriving pizza parlor in

Chicago and

pizzas arc sold at Wriglcy

Hach time the Cubs win a Santo orders a load of pies

Field.

game. brought into ball

the clubhouse.

can League Manager Bauer pas.scd him by

it

for the puiout. "He’ll

winning, almost every day, was costing

"He'd play anywhere." Stanky says. wouldn't care if put him behind Next year, if our boys win the pennant and manage the All-Star team, Ken Berry is on it even if he hits .211."

"He

all-

heads-up

Robinson and Weis collided

But Berry raced

by nearly a

All-Star outfielders this year, but Ameri-

game

Berry has been his best

player.

that night. Shortstop

called for the ball

three-

in the eighth.

There was another worrisome health matter during the week. Before one

with the Orioles. Trainer Charley Saad

insists that

round

play: after

Over to see what he could do for Weis.

But on the

it

the game for Chicago 5 4. "You're really a new-breed lawyer, you?" Stanky told him afterward. "This is the first lime I’ve ever been out-

hred of the new breed.

if

like."

pitch,

next pitch he hit a two-run single that

missing

ers. Berrs. as

Causey in to play second the next and Causey won the game with a

is

first

aren’t

the season with a tttrn cartilage in his

left

"You had

Berry

the

won

of double vision, but W'eis was out for knee. Stanky called it a clean play and had no complaints, hut he felt had that Weis "can't be part of the World Series

later.

know what Ken

Stanky relented and sent him up to Berry looked like the near-

the plate.

as

Santo wants an Elevated Scries just much as anyone else in Chicago, and He must

he's rooting for the Sox. too.

known that something like this was going to happen. His pizzas are sold have

at

Comiskey Park.

too.

bno

he said. Stanky hurried into the clubhouse.

The young

outfielder's left eye

was inflamed and he had out of

it.

I

le

difficulty seeing

admitted he had been both-

ered by headaches for four or live days; it

could have been his asthma or some

sort

of allergy. Whalescr

it

was. he was

given drops, and did not suit up, which

meant

that the

W hue St>x were facing the

defending W'orld

Champions without

their best outfielder

and

their

hitler (at -2K0) and, speed or

Sox need every Halfway lhrt>ugh

the

leading

no speed,

hitter they've got.

the

game

Berry

quietly appeared in the dugout, dressed for duty in his

form.

He was

powder-blue road uninot tap-tapping with a

cane, so Stanky. thinking he could

u.sc

the outfielder as a defensive replacement,

played the role of an optometrist and

used the scoreboard as an eye chart. Berry passed the examination by correctly reciting the score

of the Mels’

game

and was sent in. When it came time for him to bat in the top of the ninth inning, with the Orioles ahead. 4 3. Stanky decided to u.se a pinch hitter, and he called Berry back from the hailing circle. "I'm all right. Skip." Berry argued. "You had to see that pleading look

17

THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING? Though lacking the glowering presence of Sonny Liston — who waits

home

interesting

have so

television

many owed

to the absence of one.

Muhammad

intransigent

matches so

will

determine the No.

t

to

When

tournament of

by TEX

title

the

was

S300.000. an unimaginable

sum without

stripped of his heavyweight champion-

the contribution of television.

ship. he transformed a baker’s dozen of potential victims into credible heavy-

Action's victory

weight contenders. In counting him.self

will

may have done even more

to re-

vive interest in boxing than he did

m the

out he

For the man

lively era

in the living

some of

three fights in his

club Joe Louis presided over during the

Ali. will

No

one honestly believed that a Joe Kra/ier or a Jerry Quarry could give Ali a light. The only question was how long they could remain standing. All towered over (he field, and boxing might have perished in the

shadow of

Now.

is

Sonny

gas, a

Liston,

be playing

r/je cover: rell.

3)

D

George Chuvelo, i) £rnie

Karl Mildenberger.

*)

ter-

Joe Franer.

to

ment ends.

Why

eliminations

is

he

missing from the

is

known

only to the pro-

moters. Joe f'ra/icr, the young lion of Strength of what Frnie Terrell calls green

power.

once wore as a former Olympic champion on his way up, is aligned with the

Green power, of course, is the power Inc,, headed by Mike Malitz, corralled most of the

Garden, where he

of money. Sports Action.

C'huvalo on July

top contenders for Ali’s crown by the

fight the

simple expedient of offering them more

valo,

is

only

a genuine challenger when the tourna-

heavyweight division was a portent of things to come. In this encounter a

lowliest

pres-

Las Ve-

220-pound black Hamlet wonderis to be amsidered as

skirmish in the battle for control of the

no one stands head and shoulders above

The

solitaire in

boxing who has a-ssumed the mantle Ali

on again.

Among all the pretenders to All's throne, the rest.

candidates

and two of those

life

ing whether he

his excellence.

suddenly, the fight

likely

among those who has lost

to replace Ali are not ent.

modern versionof the bum-of-the-month his distinguished career.

He

the people in the tournament,

because a few of the

of his tenure the heavy-

weight division had degenerated into a

dog days of

n>om. Sports

a pleasant thing.

is

be able to sec the whole tournament

without forsaking his cold beer and icebox lunch. He may quarrel a bit about

three years during which he held the heavyweight championship. At the end

of the

MAULE

The Garden would not match these guarantees, and no private promoter would, cither. They are part of a nut of some

Ali lost a de-

cision to the law of the land and

—a

challenge the winner

claimant to AH's vacated

much

capable of giving

the best an argument, and the opening

young contender knocked a veteran cold as a mackerel. The light did not take place in the ring. It was a paper battle fought with contracts, and Sports Action, Inc., the youngster with American

money to fight than Madison Square Garden would. Malitz' group could make this olTcr because ABC will carry

was

If

fight

George

he survives this

winner of the tournament. Chu-

who may left

very well whip Frazier,

out of the tournament because

he dropped to lOth to

will

19.

Frazier, loo. wilt be available to

test.

in

rank after losing

Oscar Bonavena, who

is

in the tour-

the matches in the elimination tourna-

nament. 2ora Folley, who fought one of the craftiest and most courageous

mon-

ment on the IViJf l\\)rld of Spans, the first two on Saturday afternoon, Aug. 5, from the Astrodome in Houston. The

corner, disposed of the vener-

purses for the four lighters in this dou-

Madison Square Garden

blchcader range from $2J.0(X) to S50.000.

Broadcasting C ey in

its

able.

crafty

ompany

television

with a knockout punch revealing the

and

to

all

fights against Ali.

is

absent because ho,

dropped out of sight in the spurious rankings of the World Boxing Assoloo.

ciation.

of them this represents riches.

As

it

Stands now, eight lighters will ronitnufd

Hunched over a card

table in Las Vegas. Liston sits out tha tournament despite the fact that

An

says Sonny could lick

all eight participants.

19

ONCE AND FUTURE KING?

conlinwd

be allowed to decide the championship

television. W'ith the

among

tional

them. The> are.

in

alphabetical

Oscar Bonavena, Jimm>

order: l.eotis

Ellis,

Martin. Karl Mildenbcrgcr. bloyd

title in

tune,

may

sports history.

I had Spencer Waiting hopefully in

This

C’huvalo and I ollcy. arc a trio of long shots- Eduardo Corictti of Argen-

made up

Manuel Ramos of Mexico and Buster Mathis, erstwhile protege of Cus D'Amato. The matches made so far are between Terrell and Spencer and Ellis and Marlin in the Astrodome, and between Mildenherger and Bonavena in Otfenbach. Cicrmany, Patterson, who fought a draw with Quarry in Los -Angeles not long ago, will probably fight him again on Oct. 21 or 2X. again in Los Angeles, I he scmiliiial

matches between the winners

Astrodome on Nov. and Dec. 2 and the championship at same location in late January or

arc planned for the 1

1

the

early IS

F

ebruary The Aug. 5 doublchcader .

scheduled to begin

noon the

in

first

in

Houston, which time in boxing’s

the late afterwill surely

modern

be

era that

on at tea time. The tournament represents the final takeover by TV of a major sports field. Football, basketball and baseball all dance to the merry ring of television a light gives

dollars, but this

despite

the

sportsmen, thing.

is

an all-TV show and, views of many

contrary it

is

not necessarily a had

Practically speaking,

more

tight

fans will be given an opportunity to watch the action of this tournament than would have if the fights had been promoted individually and sold to theater

Tournm'rteni fighters include, from

left:

Jimmy

interest

attract the biggest

the wings, in addition to Liston. ITa-

tina.

offered to sit down and work out a But wc could not dance to their and they could not dance to ours. was that simple." Brenner, the Garden matchmaker, pul the problem another way. "They wanted

deal.

Patterson. Jerry Ouarry. Terrell.

We

to

and Ernie 7ier.

wide exposure of na-

the survivors meet for the January or February that light

television,

likely

is

When

build.

is

TV

audience

in

the creation of an nrgani7ation

of the remnants of Main Bout. which handled the theater telcv ision of most of Ali’s lights. It includes Malitz, who has been in boxing all his life; Attorney Robert Arum; Former C leveland Brown Fullback Jim Brown; Fred Hofhein/, son of Judge Roy Hofhciiu of the Astrodome; plus the ABC bankroll. It represents, as Harry Markson and Teddy Brenner of Madison Square Ciarden Inc.,

discovered, an almost unbeatable

com-

It

us to hold Saturday afternoon fights

Meanwhile they have given contracts guaranteeing them up

ing the doors. lighters

Many of these fighters have never received 520.000 for a fight.

to 550,000 apiece.

make money on that deal even wc got 575.000 of the TV' revenue."

couldn't if

Despite the absence of a few legitimate

loumamenl

contenders, the

the world in which to present a boxing program, and he demonstrated in the Cleveland W illiams-Ali and the Terrell-

one. "There aren't any out bets

matches considerable

skill at

produc-

ing and showcasing lights.

The Astro-

A

visiting F.n-

dome

itself is

a big plus.

w riter. after w atching a soccer game in the Astrodome that was attended by some 20.000 fans. said. “You could put glish

on a shm-kicking contest in this remarkable place and draw 20.000 people."

And

ABC

with

as a partner,

money

is

no problem. "Without ABC. we could not go

We

Thai’s the worst kind of inflation.

bination. Hofhein/ has the best arena in

Ali

in

for the B-'u/i* World of Sports," he says. "With that kind of date wc wouldn’t draw enough to pay for open-

July

is

a

good in the

whole thing." says .Angelo Dundee, the trainer of Ali and of Jimmy Ellis, one of the participants. "The worst odds may be 2 to I. and most of the fights are even or maybe 7 to 5. and wouldn't want to lay it either way. It's a breath of fresh air. Boxing has finally reached the I

point that

all

and

the other professional

amateur sports

in the

country reached

a long lime ago. These guys are evenly

matched."

The

Houston cerDundee’s theory. They

Ellis-Martin bout in

tainly supports

through with the tournament." Malit?

have fought each other twice before,

says frankly. ABC''s participation,

when

fect,

in ef-

locked out the Ciarden, which might

have come not been for in a special

in for its

a

fight

tie-up with

or two had

it

RKOCieneral

sports network.

"We

want-

ed the Ciarden to join us," says Maliiz.

"Wc were willing to accommodate them. Ellis (In

they were

Martin

won

second.

win

It

the

amateur middlcweights;

the

first

decision. Ellis the

is not likely that either will tournament, although Ellis

must be considered a better bet than Martin. Terrell,

who was savaged

for

while trunks), as he prepares to knock out Johnny Persol: Leotls Martin, flooring

15

Amos

rounds by Ali and survived despite a

beat a left-hander.

badly damaged eye sustained early in the fight, is probably the best of the lot. At 2X, he is mature without having lost

handled

anything to age.

He

is

ring-wise

enough

know, because

1

live left-handers at

one

this

He

too.

in

is

Germany, and

that helps,

madman

fights like a

Spencer.

how much

experience. Spencer has not

him

after their fight."

home."

at

to handle the youngsters and young en
Ali left

I

one time or

another. But Mildcnbcrger can fight, and

Terrell should be a clear favorite over

ing

He

and the

has the best

best

left

jab in box-

combination of age and

shown

a

says Dundee.

great deal, other than a propensity for

Liston is Ali’s own choice, and Ali is in the best position to judge. *’Heean whip any of the eight in the tournament." Ali says. But there arc a few

conversation second only to

questions about Liston today. Since he lost the second light with Ali in l.ewiston.

Me. he has confined

ties to

his

activi-

fcntKking over four nonentities in

Sweden, and one of the four. FImer Rush, rose from the fliHir live tinK‘s after Liston had knocked him down. He stayed

down

after the sixth.

who used to "He was a great

"That’s not the Liston be." observes Dundee.

him.

Still,

lends to

middlewcights,

retaining

no spring chicken. if

on a par with the Liston of the lirsl championship fight in Miami Beach, he can take anyone hut Ah." In the early matches it seems likely that Mildcnbcrger. Terrell, tllis and will move up. Mildcnbcrger gave Ali the toughest tight of his career as champion. "He’s a lefty, and most lighters have trouble with lefties." Dundee said. "His hardest tight may be with Bonavena, because Bonavena crowds and left-hooks and that's the way to

Quarry

speed

his

and others head with-

he

may very well beat move in a straight

I

ra/ier. line.

Fra/ier is ranked high by the World Boxing Association No. 2 but not all

boxers and few managers agree with that rating.

"He

won't

fight

Spencer. "His advisers

anyone." said

make

the old ex-

while gaining power. But Kllis has two is trained by Dundee, one of the smartest men in boxing, and he has spent more time in the ring with

cuse lhal he's not ready. Scrap Iron

Muhammad

knock Kra/ier t>ut with a hard look." It is Harry Markson’s opinion that the tournament is <5vcr the winner be left with no one to fight. Ihis he winner can take his choice among Liston. Frazier, k huvalo. the Uuigh Mexican. Ramos. and Argentina's Corictti. Finally there IS the forgotten man. Zora olley.

advantages; he

in

Ali than any other lighter

He worked with

the world,

Ali

before

of the champion's bouts and per-

all

toss-up.

for good. He's

he's lost his punch, forget him. But

their

hands on

mentary left jab to go with the heavy body punches that carry his attack, but he is at his best with a lighter who comes straight to him. Movement from side to side as demonstrated by Ali and Terrell in lights with him seems to confuse

who

down If

their

few months he has developed a rudi-

last

If

Ali's.

t

formed creditably.

he’s

his indestructibility. Ali

out disturbing his equilibrium. In the

underdog in the opening there is a 2 to round of the tournament it is Spencer. Quite possibly the most interesting and exciting light will be between Hllis and Martin. Both have grown up from

he put you down once you might stagger up, hut if he got a clean shot and put you down again you stayed finisher. If

was

damaged

In his last three tights

has scored lirst-i'ound knockouts.

Lllis

The Quarry-Pallcrson rematch is a Quarry is a very tough young

fighter

who

has

moved

quickly since he

turned pro, not surprising fact that

He

put

view of the

he had over 100 amateur bouts. Patterson

draw they fought lasted

in

down in

Los

twice

in

the

.Angeles, then

through the best counterattack It seems likely

Patterson could mount. that

it

will

all he wanted and Scrap Iron can't walk from here to the door without falling down. You can

when will

appears to be sour grapes.

the time before

second mulch. Aside from Liston, several

who could

would seem

of the best tights against

"He's the only guy and he

cut the ring in half,

hurt Ali with belly Jabs.

good as anyone

You as

I

him

figure

lighters

on

have

a

to

chance. C'huvalo’s forte for a long time

as

ti*da>."

have to figure

ali

of them as good

Muhammad

anyone today.

Ali has

vindicated himself as a Muslim holy

their

sidelines

I

I

"He made one

Ali." I>undce says.

bo Quarry, not Patterson,

who improves during

the

Johnson gave him

man

by passing a miracle. By not taking lhal step forward, he

made

pions of also-rans.

potential

chamIHO

For unlimited hydro racing

powered by

remarkably uneventful event. Nobody got killed and the boats, most of them

ivas a

it

aircraft engines, flew so

Bill Steretf ( above)

low that

won with

A REWARDING RACE ihat is good in the small dtnnain of the tliundcrboai wasdcmonslral-

A

'I

cd

last

Sunda> on the Detroit Riser dur-

ing the second annual World's

Race

pionship

planes. hirst

was

and

killed, for a

another change.

unlimited

for

best

Bill

o!' all

.Sterett.

ship at

all

to

no one

who

un-

War

II

surplus air-

engines that base been dnsing the

big hsdrsss for years, .Slerctl's winner

powered by twin 427-cubic-inch Chrysler hemi-head engines, the same kind chut Richatd I'etiy uses in his sKKk car racer, and the same kind, with a fesv slight adjustments, that sou can pick up at your neighborhood ( hrysler dealer's. Jim Ranger in \fv (jypsy and Sterett m his Miss Chiysh’r Creu sson two preliminary heats each and ssent into the championship tied for first with SCO svas

points.

But just after the flying

escrything was decided.

My

ly

(iyp.iy

He

half a lap

had an unbeatable ad-

crossed the finish line near-

The

a

like

in

but

utTect

me

'I

fu-

knew

wrong way,

the

it

sent

1

wreath and a telegram to his widow

a

Although Sterett's fastest lap in thcheatswas 104.046 mph. some IK1.I67 slower than Lee Taylor had done

don't know and then forgot about it what It is. hut guess the whole thing about racing is a matter of proving something to yourself, l-ike when I was

two days

starting out in the construction business

sport.

mph

earlier at l.ake Ciuntersville (.iw

iipposiic). a

hii.\-

closed-course race

in

a

piston-driven boat and a straightaway

on

assault

are

two

time record in a turbine of cat.

a

entirely dilTorent breeds

Unlimited hydroplane racing

in its ten

previous outings has produced a casualty

list

that

reads like a Vietnam war

I

I

had

dirt,

this terrible fear

but

Three weeks ago during the Suncoast race

in

Tampa, with

start,

limited season

came

charged

down

one minute

the old. Hill

un-

Brow

the straight of the 2'/^-

of being buried

vsent dosvn

I

in

my

U

a half.

legs so

marks where I

had

I

got

limes one day. once for an

five

hour and

in

and shored up

sewers when nobody else would. buried

cut off the circulation

had you could see the din clots were.

And

to.

boat than

in

I

the

But

went hack down. would rather die in a folks' home. I've

after every cavc-in

report,

Cup

1

I

an old

42 years." June 19 last year, during the runCup on the Po-

lived a full

On

mile course in Miss Biuiwcisci' at 170

ning of the President's

where Ranger wanted to he. but when in and position himself for the first turn, his left sponson

mph. He was 100 yards ahead of the nearest boat when he began lifting out of the water. Riuhicim-r wobbled twice.

Dome and Don Wilson

22

bounced

he was a good friend of mine didn't," Sterett said.

I

would

across the starting line on the outside,

he attempted to cut

flight,

full

direction,

thought about going to Brow's

"I

neral

perfect afternoon, unfortunately,

has become exceedingly rare. When all goes well a hydro under a full head of steam is the most spectacular sight in

reversed

bottom of Tampa Bay. Brow died two hours latcr. to the

ahead of Ranger to conclude

a perfect afternoon of racing.

a white-

an airplane. Instead of the

conseniional NS'orkl craft

again, rolled over in the air and plunged

vantage.

Sunday had neser won anything, won the race in a boat that had no relation-

wounded

quail

bounced,

run. hut by the time Ranger rccosered control. Sterett

hydro-

til

DETROIT

IN

caught water, ripping olT a section of (j.ypsy's deck. The boat continued to

Cham-

change. There was also

haired. 42-sear-old Kentuckian

by KIM CHAPIN

his Chrysters

tomac River. Rex Manchester in Notre in Miss Binlweiser raced flat out toward the second

turn heal.

on the first lap of the championship They were noi more than live feet was no way cither boat made the turn. Sud-

a split second before his accident that he

out of the water

digging and 7agging and turning left. They weren’t in his cockpit. They don't know what the manifold pressure was or what the oil gauge showed or a whole lot of other things. Musson? He was one

was

in trouble

and he could have taken

apart. There

his fool off the throttle], but racing

could have properly

more than

denly

Danif

.\olri’

lifted

and slammed down on BuJ»i’iscr's hull. Both boats exploded in a ghoulish shower of spray and broken plywood. Both men were

killed.

Just three hours earlier. Wilson had

on

knelt

the

dwk

attempt to revive

in a pathetically futile

His hydroplane.

propeller.

Bar-

.Kfiss

nosed into the water and flipped

Juhl,

of the best chaulfeurs

end-over. That was the bleakest after-

the accidents?

phrase, but I'd call

reali/.e

it.

money

driver.

of

expect something for

hydroplane

unlimited

in

the

racing,

owners, boatbuilders and race oflicials, and nobody knows what hapdrivers,

Was the water bad? Water conTampa and on the Potomac as "good." Was it design

pened.

too.

listed

of Kawkawlin.

failure? Lcs .Slaudacher

Some guy

is

lot

of

Owners put a

lot

and they

things

Then

it.

among

there's a

the drivers,

always after another

love But driver error? and won't have somebody stand there and tell me it was driver

driver's

.seat.

1

this sport,

I

error."

ditions at

were

these

into

of competition

lot

a

It's

the pressure

but there’s an awful

on a

pressure

it

Most outsiders don't

of competition.

noon

in the history of unlimited racing. former American Power Boat AsstKiait "an act of God." There are four main groups involved

business has

Two weeks

after

Washington

last year.

in

son

in

"Thompson was always sort of a wild man." says Staudacher. "But he'd driven that way for years, and the other drivers all knew it. He would come into my shop or call just about every week, and I'd say, ‘Chuck, the guys tell me you're pushing it.' He would answer, •Naaw. Les. I've got everything under

Smirnoff

the triple disaster

Chuck Thomp-

racing Tahoe Miss.

"

control.'

Newton

Referee

can

"What caused trite

A

lion president called

this

is

and

ever had.

Ron Musson, who had

Mus-son had sheared his

also crashed.

getting in that tin can

does something

him

a week's su.s-

call

he cuts a guy olT or

if

like

down somebody

that.

But

ing. Hell, the

pew the

to the

is

bad

the

best in

And

so

the debate

of stoic fatalism

and with no

tions

The owners.

in

sight.

real soluolTicials,

and wakes

everybody in. But

rtwstcr

tails

else

forever getting caught

is

that

then the water closes over and

same

as

troit

alive,

races

on

ambulance within three minutes of the hour later.

plenty of lime for

prob-

"if

attitude

its

to kite. If

is



too high,

5“ too low.

it’s

into the water.

it

tends

it

tends to nose

The proper balance

is

crash, but died an

own

builders and drivers create their

beat. 3-A of Gold Cup on the Detroit River. Thompson trailed Slovak by a boat length and was on the inside heading for the first turn when Smirnoff went up on one sponson. lifted into the air and dived back into the water. Thompson was in an

feels the

with

goes on.

everyone concerned taking the attitude

the

He

the

business.”

driven by Mira Slovak, in

lem was largely one of aerodynamics. "When a hydroplane is planing." he said,

driv-

guys that got killed weren't game. They were all pros,

respected drivers,

boats that started in the Detroit race for nearly 20 years.

can't

1

for overdriving or

what somebody might think

Mich, built or designed eight of the 15

and has been constructing hydroplanes

"I

said in Detroit,

fine a driver, give

pcnsion or a month's suspension or a year’s suspension

was

the

all Is

and nothing is settled. After Brow's fatal accident, one driver said, "rvc made my peace with God." Well, everybody got out of Deit

before,

but

are

there

six

more

this season's calendar. Thai's

the

others

to

gel

end

religion.

theoretically built into the hull."

Lee Schoenith, the c/ar of unlimited racing it says so on the back of his



jacket— disagrees. "Kiting

is

a factor.”

come

he says, "but that really doesn't

about 150 or 160 mph." Newton, the race referee in

into play until

And

Bill

Detroit, says, "If a boat got into trouble

every time

it

started kiting, we'd have to

stop racing today.

committee

last

Wc

up a

set

safety

year and there's a

specifications a mile long.

If

list

of

anybody

thinks he's got a belter way. and can

prove

we'll let

it,

him

what

run. That's

we're after." I'hat leaves driver error,

body

is

mention

the four-time

probably still

but

thinking along that

better not

the

it

if

some-

best

they'd

Vtuncey. is

hydroplane driver

racing.

"Driver error?"

harly

last

the boat line,

to Bill

Gold Cup winner who

says.

"I

lat

killed at

Hustler.

It

is

really a surplus J-46

engine surrounded by 30

pings. so scary that

feet

Douglas

of boat trap-

when Taylor

first

tried

it

really hit

it:



left

on

his

Coast Guard

got an extension, refueled, and

one run

at 288.1216

mph.

a re-

turn at 282.3039. for an average of 285.2127

mph and

four years ago he panicked and bailed out.

will let

Since then, world water-speed record holder

er,

It's

He

permit.

easy

to

310 mph. Bui this lime Taylor hit a sample 299.181

stayed aboard and

with only 20 minutes

blame Brow for his crash [some knowledgeable people claim Brow knew

don’t buy that for live minutes.

mph) Donald Campbell had

276, 3.D

been

home of the most frightened fish in Alabama and Lee Taylor Jr. got aboard the jet

Vluncey

week ihe weather was terrible and was 214 of trouble. Then, on Take Guntcrsville

Friday, skies cleared over

it

the

new world mark. Taylor.

stand.

"The

Hustler,"

Richard Hallett, "is

33.

build-

a tired old boat."

23

‘BUT PAPA, dod was

Bui whai a

France's bouncy Catherine Lacoste,

waltzing off with their biggest prize, the

A

i

were nol enough to have France’s Le (Jrand C’hartic forever if

il

spitting

Cirande

our

in C

eye,

atherine to

now comes La

do

the

same

thing.

Without an

iota of reverence for the tra-

ditions she

was breaking or the talent lust week at Hot

she was humiliating

Springs. Va.. 22-ycar-old Catherine Lacostc. of such well-known golfing cen-

Pans and Biarritz, became the amateur ever to win the U.S. WomOpen, the first foreigner to win it and the youngest player to win it. While all the big names of the women's professional game stood around with sand in their shoes and egg on their ters as first

en's

sunglasses. Miss Lacoste

them

made

beating

For three

liHtk ludicrously simple.

days she played the short but exacting

upper course of the Cascades G<’lf Club with such consistency that on the last day she could even allow herself the still win with luxury of a blowup and

71-70-74-79 294 that was good enough to beat runners-up Beth Stone and Susie Maxwell by two strokes. While Miss Lacoste was performing in such a professional manner, the real a

professionals,

including

leading

the

money-wmnersofthc

Ladies' PCiA. were mere cash was at stake, Kathy Whitworth started olT on Thursday with an 81, as did Jo Ann Prentice. Sandra Maynie had an opening-day 70 that preserved the pros' honor and immediately followed it with a 79 on Friday. Who couldn't break 80 that day? Mickey Wright. Judy Torlucmke. Marlene Bauer Haggc and Betsy Rawls, to drop a few

playing not as

if

but their very

last dollar.

familiar names. final

As she came

into the

holes Friday, Miss Lacoste found

herself with an eight-stroke lead entire field.

By Saturday Carol

was about the top U.S. pro

still

on

the

Mann in the

running, so Carol shot an 82. "It de-

from us as champions to have an amateur beat us," Miss Mann said that night. "But what can we do?" In the face of the way Miss Lacoste was playing, they couldn't do much extracts

24

PLAYED LIKE A CLOD’

I

U

S.

who stunned

the

LPGA

stars by dying in from Paris

Women's Open, which no amateur had ever won

by

and

MARK MVJLVOY

ccpl rcali/c that they had hccn hit with

Wright

one of the biggest golf upsets since Ouimei unglued Vardon and Ray half u

en’s tournament-

century ago at Hrooklinc.

always the favorite at a

nounced

week’s marvelous misdeed

for last

construct-

is

were ready for action, these being

girls

the nine younger players

who have been them by There was the shampoo and

ed along the lines of Jack Nicklaus, with

outlitted in red jackets given to

is so popthat crowds sometimes watch top events like the F-reiich Open, Vliss Lacoste docs have a strong golf background. Her father, Rene Lacoste, twice a Wimbledon and U.S. lennischampion, is the founder of the company that keeps

a

nerves to match. Thc)ugh golf ular in her

numbering

home country

in the

lOs

the world's golfers in alligator

shirt.s

Chemise Lacoste. Her mother, the former Simone Thion dc la Chaume, won the British Women's Open about the time her father was victorious at Wimbledon

in 1927.

(Jolf de

C

Today

owns

the family

hantaco, near Biarrio. where

home

Catherine learned the game, and a near Paris on the

Saml-Nom-l

she says.

Unlike the pros,

who were

playing

Cincinnati the week before.

motor-oil company,

usual borrowing of hair

in

Miss La-

cosic had a chance to acclimate herself

and she took advantage of it. Fresh from a successful spring, in which she had won two ITcnch championships, including the Women's to conditions at Cascades,

unusual excitement of a pending

the

who

wedding, that of Judy Torluemke

announced she was quitting the lour a day before Miss Lacoste gave most of the other women pros the same idea. On Thursday. Sandra Haynie. who plays out of Colonial in Fort Worth but says she has never .vmi Ben Hogan, much less talked to

en's

Open by

him, began the I9fi7 WomCascades with pro-

treating

fessional coolness.

Two

time, she linished with a

under par for a handy one-un-

ents. as she did every evening, to report

France was conquering just as it had in Daddy’s day. and then

whiff the ball." she said, inhaling deep-

the

LPGA

lour to

have easy pm p(.>silions, faced a situation they were not familiar with at Cascades, where

C3UISCS

USCiA

\V»a\

arc \ong

Hxcculivc

Director

shortened the total yardage to placed the pins spots.

why

This

in

Joe 191,

fi,

Dey but

extremely demanding

may have been one

the pros were put

on

reason

the defensive

Cascades course. They kept hitting their usual low iron shots and watching them scoot past the pins and by the

line

over the greens, from where they were having

trouble

saving

pars.

Lacoste,

meanwhile, was Caking advantage of her very powerful upright swing to hit high

approach shots that held the slick greens. The events of the first day gave little hint of what was to come. Mickey

She was also dancing a w ild Charleston at

her hotel that night.

Miss Lacoste has a theory about the game, and on Sunday it was put to a severe

"With amateurs,

lest.

golf

psy-

is all

you have your game

Women’s Open. C onwho have be-

scqucnlly. the lady pros,

I

golfers in the world, that’s all."

al

"You

around the Virginia mountainside, France’s latest insult to America was playing her same smooth game again, and putting superbly to tinish with a 70 that was suddenly good for a five-stroke lead. "Her putting ama/es me." said .Susie Maxwell, ’’especially from four or live feet. She never misses." That night Catherine called her par-

ey Wright. shaken over her XO. was smok-

Standards for the

Saturday

their

dropped out after receiving news of her half brother's death. "Mickey is the one who could have made a charge." said Carol Mann, "hut she won't even be here tomorrow. Fveryone else is completely out of it. really don't think that girl knows what she is doing. She is beating the best profession-

thing disturb you.

But Friday, while the pros were strug-

own lough

come accustomed on

completing

rounds, and Mickey Wright was headed west, having

and you play

gling

USCA

its

tice tee after

causing no concern, was Lacoste,

she spent some lime giving a small

course to

had turned to Miss Lacoste had and had her five-stroke With that, most of the

later they

wc’rc-dead frowns. rallied with a 34

pros did not bother to go to the prac-

chology." she says.

Amateur, she arrived at Ca.scades eight days before the tournament was to begin. In her second practice round she shot u fi9 and beat the club pro. As is done with the Men's Open, the tailors a

But two hours

lead once again.

dcr-par 70 to be the leader. At 71, and

a-Bre-

tcche course that was the site of the 196.^ Canada Cup. "I was brought up in golf,"

wom-

had arrived and anwas giving up smokArnold Palmer. The STP

that she

ing. just like

The young lady responsible

that

Forest Hills

at

girl

a

horseback ride around thcCascadcs Inn. But

life

was

less

relaxed elsewhere. Mick-

ing furiously. "I’ve

done everything but

ly.

"I’m not going to

til

the •wintcT. h's

try to kick this

no use

fighting

it

the end.

Ill

that

it,

won

If

was playing her game

it

When Margie Masters, who was in second place,

it

away with

slip

bogeys, six

On ter.

par

18, a

she

3 that is

crisp

up sharply on the

rain-

soaked green.

A 14-foo\cT was )usi short,

There was considerable feeling, understandably. that Saturday would see a different Lacoste. The name of Marty FIcekman. the amateur who led the Men’s Open two weeks ago and eventually blew to an XO, kept coming up. There was also a technical reason for hope. It had been observed that as grooved as Miss Lacoste was with almost every other shot, she seemed to go to a different swing when hitting a driver, a wild Gary Player type of swoop and slap that would

into tears.

Lacoste went four over par

the front nine Saturday afternoon the

rushed to

them said.

I

again over wa-

came through with a very

iron that backed

and she tapped the

When M iss

Then she

long string of

the air before dropping.

un-

I-told-you-so smirks began to appear.

a

seven holes.

in

By the time she reached 17 she was only one stroke ahead, hut then she must have remembered to play her ow n game. She hit a wonderfully bold eight-iron over a pond and right at the pin. which was light to the water. The ball stopped six feet from the hole, and she rammed the birdie putt in so hard it bounced into

playing golf at the same time."

on

Miss La-

hole.

first

costc had a seven-stroke lead. let

any-

let

for her.

the Australian

douhic-bogied the

and

be hard to control under pressure.

can’t

everything will go well."

hall

and broke

in

Then she signed her card and phone her parents. "I told

played

"They

like a

clod

all

day." she

just told me, 'Bravo.'

Minutes later Rene's daughter, composed again, was being presented with the LISGA's big silver trophy. More or less

unnoticed in the victory celebration

was the S5.000 winner's check.

It,

along

with sccond-placc money, was unobtrusively

handed

to the top professionals,

Misses Maxwell and Stone, but then one

should not get excited about money

in

a

sport dominated by an amateur. "I don't believe

Lacoste,

it."

said

"but you did

Maxwell to end

it."

25



n the S2 years that he has been alive I and smiling Thomas Patrick Dougan of Newport Beach. Calif, has known good times and bad. at work and at play. On the golf course he has sometimes eagled and frequently bogeyed. At poker he has sometimes filled an inside straight and has often drawn junk. In World War II. because of four teeth lost on the

playing fields (where wars arc supposedly

won), he was rejected as

terial

Pat

and made

Dougan

a

officer

ma-

Navy cook.

that in early

1

petition

Irishmen

Thomas

has been bilked once or

—such a success

964 he could afford to take

the is

record

of

definitely

Cup com-

smart, not

genial

good.

Sir

Lipton. Belfast's lovable old

dispeaserof lea leaves and (iaelic charm, tried for

30 years to win the cup and

is a certain mellow similarity between the two men, Dougan is definitely not a latter-day Lipton. As devoted as

there

Sir

Thomas was

to the America's

fray

much deeper than

his wallet- In his

windblown American beau-

and Amerihonor of defending the cup against Dame Puttie. Although her

Columbia, for the past year. Pat Dougan has not only been paying through the nose, but he has also been up to his arm-

crew -sailing another ancient defender. Weatherly has already faced the other contenders in a set of preliminary trials

in

the Irish jinx Pat

Dougan

is

once again

pitting his Columhiii against three oth-

er expensive,

Intrepid. Constellation

ties.

Eaf{U', for the



June 26). Co/nnihui herself will meet for the first lime in the observation

pits— and ivccasionally over his head the actual campaign. Furthermore, although Dougan’s Co~

as reckless a step as any genial, brairvy

(SI.

Irishman ever took. In a tax-heavy age

them

the oldest contender, she

when very few men can even afford the thought Dougan up and bought the handsome but obsolete 1958 America's

Newport this week. like two of her rivals. Constellation and Intrepid, was created by

original

Cup

girl

speaking, is

off Olin

synthetic sails than the prc-World

the

cated brain, she

is

(right)

by

ever get

canvas. She

eral

effort

is

contender once again, thanks to

Dougan

12s could

hut railbirds

"Columbia," America's Cup heroine of 1958, a vivacious

the obvious favorite,

who want a good long shot might consider Dougan’s boat for sevreasons. For one thing, although

COLES PHINIZY

THERE’S LIFE IN THE OLD GIRL YET

now

is

no longer the The

she used to be.

Columbia came

Ste-

phens' drawing board in 1957. She was one of the first 12-meters of the postwar

yacht to emerge from Stephens' compli-

selection trials against newer,

and winning only three. As anyone with a grasp of yachting

15 races

26

statistically

old-fashioned

1964 America's

right into the

not only

smarter boats and took a licking, losing

Patrick

liimhiu.

era. designed to get

jumped

Cup

He

Columbia,

master designer. Olin Stephens. Because Intrepid is the latest 12-nieter

her.

but

trials off

on short notice he

defender Columbiu.

bought

Cup

quest, he never personally got into the

most lucid moments Sir Tommy barely knew the difference between a bowsprit and a boomkin. In contrast, as owner and skipfjcr of

never did. But with utter disregard for

can

twice in the business world, too. but he

has ended up a success

history knows, in America's

more power out of from

their

was good enough

War

I i

baggy to de-

fend the cup against the feeble English in

1958,

but

never was

good

enough, or sailed well enough, thcreafier, fact that a new Anwrica's Cup

The

course was adopted

1964. putting a

in

heavy premium on work to winds^ard. was sufficient to make the old Colutuhki obsolete.

Indeed, by returning tast for another try with a boat that he insists

on

calling

Columhia, Pat Dougan comes close to committing fraud. Counting ribs, skin, bulkheads, scantlings, spars, lu-

keel,

tings. rigging and whatnot, there is only of the original Columbia in Dougan's boat. To be completely honDougan should change her name from Columhia to Culi/iimhia. because most of the present boat, though based on redesign work by Stephens, w as constructed in San Diego. Because of all the alterations. Dougan's Ctilifumhia (or

about 30'

,

est.

Columhia.

if

you insist) is. in elTcct. the and second most promis-

.second newest

ing l2-mcter yacht in the

rom amidships

I

entirely new.

is

aft the

The

trials.

new Columhia

original wineglass

configuration of her after sections has

been replaced by a more V-shaped Corm.

Thc

kec! of

her

younger

Columhia

is

now

of

like that

CouMillaium.

sister.

the

successful defender of the cup in 1964.

To make

the

most of her measured wa-

terline length, in the after sections of the

Columhia's lines ha\e been drawn

hull

out

those of the

like

still

younger

J/i/rop-

the newest contender.

itJ.

Colitmhia's deck, never too junky,

now

is

as uncluttered, efficient and unin-

Krom dow nward

viting-looking as a hospital bed. the centerline her deck slopes

two or three degrees to her outboard rails, and she di>es not even have a toe

To

deckhands aboard. their work commendwindy day. C'o/h/;i6ih's

to help keep her

rail

survive

ably

on

and do

a bouncy,

deck slaves need the brawn of King

Kong

and the surefootedness of a chamois.

From

tank tests

new Coliauhia

is

it

us

is known that the much an improve-

ment over CoiisU-lliiiioii as CoustclUh lion was over the original Columhia. Since there is no comparable tank data available, no one knows how the revamped Columhia measures against liilirpiil.

the newest girl in the game. fV»-

liimhia

might prove to be no match at as good, or she

all

-or she might be just

might be

better. IX-signcr

cummufd

27



OLD OIRL

ronllnufd

‘My sympathies,

Stephens confesses;

generally speaking, arc with the newer

Anybody who docs

boat.

this

kind of

work

likes to see his

out.

But. pulling against this feeling.

newest ideas proved

marms along as paying passengers. As he

now

recalls,

smiling and blushing, he ar-

rived in Los Angeles safely, with his out-

look broadened but his morals tact.

I

still

have a fondness for the older boats, Co-

merely to

lumhia and Consifllaiio/i.

fornia, the land of instant miracles. Al-

It

is

impor-

tant to remember that the more you try improve 12-meter design, the more you run the risk of stubbing your toe and falling down badly,” In its erratic, fitful history the Amerito

Cup

ca's

has attracted a wild variety of

sportsmen, ranging from very cool cucumbers such as Harold Vanderbilt to firebrands like P.ngland's Harl of

Dun-

who had the emotional stability of a Roman candle. Considering his origins, Thomas Patrick Dougan is as unlikely an America's Cup devotee as you raven.

might

He was born

find.

Maryville, in the

fiat

in the

town of

northwest corner

of Missouri, about as far from sea water as

it

is

possible to get in the U.S.

gan graduated second

in his class

the local parochial high school

Doufrom

—a

dis-

becomes somewhat undiswhen you consider that there

tinction that

tinguished

were only eight seniors that year. He attended Northwest Missouri State College. right there in Maryville, for

two and

a half years, and then in December of

1934 he got

To

in his

finance the

car and headed west.

trip,

20-ycar-old

Dou-

gan took two creaky 30-year-old school-

visit briefly in

ago he took up with the old 12-meter girl, Coltimhia. and has been equally loyal to her.

Dougan's

in-

His original intention had been

southern Cali-

m the

job

first

at

in

Los Angeles was

bedding-and-mattress department

of Barker Brothers

Home Furnishings When a cou-

Seventh and Figueroa.

named

came

though the only miracles he witnessed week were wrought on New Year's Day by two other tourists from

ple

in his first

Brothers they did not get back out until

Alabama- Dixie Howell and Don Hut-

ding hut chairs, sofas, tables, lamps,

son. the

who squashed Stanford 29-13 in Rose Bowl Dougan fell in love

Bailey

Dougan had

for their

Barker

into

them not only bed-

sold

and everything

rugs, kitchen appliances

home. And even then they were

with the promised land and stayed.

not through with Dougan.

Lest anyone assume that Pat Dougan was some kind of a nut to become enraptured so quickly by Los Angeles, it is

quently asked their daughter, Cather-

long-

together ever since, except for the clos-

only

fair to point

out that

in that

hand and got

for her

ine,

Dougan have

Catherine

World War

He

subse-

and

Pat

it.

lived happily

gone day the word smog had not been

ing year of

coined, the scent of orange blossoms

shipped off to the recaptured island of

hung over

and it was possible to Los Angeles to Long Beach

the land

drive from

without losing a fender. "Back then the

was soft,” Dougan recalls, "and so clear you could see ants crawling on the air

sides of the mountains.”

Dougan has

ixxasionally fallen in

love in improbable times. Friends

ways

improbable

at

who know him

out again. This quirk

-

still

happily married to his

filtrating his

why

real,

he

own

grub, kept

Navy mess, and

is

church-

rccognizcd wife, even though three years

chow

lines.

Dougan went

After the war

into the

foam-rubber business. The route of

ways to



in

Bradstreet, sufficient

he ft..'

his

and sometimes sideis enough Mr. Dun and Mr. To understand Dougan. it is

various companies

befuddle both only to

know

that in the proc-

ess of succeeding as a foam-rubber i.

1-

in-

10 Japa-

nese holdouts were captured in his

progress upward

or virtue

explains as well as anything

responsibility of

was over on Guam, for Dougan. T.P., Navy Cook, f irst Class, the war was still hell. U.S. marines, disthe shooting

well attest

that once he fails in love he docs not fall

and given the

feeding 7,000 sailors. Although by then

satisfied with their

Since migrating to California 32 years ago.

Guam

when he was

II.

in love again

fell

this

man

time with a

neglected Cinderella of the industry, an

f-

extraordinary foaming petroleum deriv-

Urethane w'as developed by the Germans and first used by them as structural coring in the V-2 ative called urethane.

London in World some form or other -

rockets that terrorized

War

1

1.

flexible

as

Today,

in

or rigid, fcathcriiglit or dense

mahogany

urethane foam

packaging,

cushioning,

in

sound-dampening, tion

now

is

used

insulating,

fiotation.

construc-

and so forth. Teen-age America rides on surfboards made of ure-

thane.

When

she sings, Julie

Andrews

is

frequently surrounded by urethane stage props.

When

the

Viet

Cong

artillery

mucks up an airstrip, a properly compound urethane liquid and catalyst arc poured into each shell crater and. presto chango, the hole fills up with a dense, rigid

foam. (Any homeowner

templates using urethane to

LAUNCHED LAST NOVEMBER, REVAMPED COLUMBIA GOT HALF TEAR’S JUMP ON RIVALS

28

dug

in his

fill

who

con-

the holes

yard by neighborhood kids

and

dogs

their

hereby warned;

is

much of

too

little

the

if

a

wrong mixture

is poured in a hole, the homeow ner may end up with Mt. Rushmorc on his front

lawn.) In the 1950s entrepreneurs of sorts tried to cash in

now

on the miraculous

A great many of them

foaming urethane. are

all

in their financial graves.

Dou-

who

— says,

“The and

quieter

who was

it— and

rebuilt

be at the helm

slated to

the present campaign

in

Columbia is much She has almost no

new-

easier.

bow

quarter wave. There was a

noise

in

The bow used to grumble word I know to dcat the helm you and feel it, and now you Whether it is because of addi-

the old hull.

— that’s .scribe

it.

the future of the magic potion. Dougan is now employed by the Upjohn Company as president of their Chemical Plastics Research Division, which continues

shape.

I

Dougan

facts, figures

it

in his chair, but

new

after

he expected the

do not know." is no longer a grumbler,

Although she

her months of prepping for the imtrials,

new Columbia had

the

Her

chair, but

time his spectacles

that

in

about half a

He Jabs

to investigate the potentials of urethane.

troubles enough.

first

she broke a mast, deadlines were not

with them: he waves them

moon

met and miscalculations were made m her measurements, so that with some sails she was not taking full advantage of her allowance under the 12-mctcr rule. Worst of all. Helmsman Gerry Driscoll up and quit for reasons that he decently refuses to discuss and that still remain obscure in Skipper Dougan's mind. Although with the withdrawal of Driscoll he lost as fine a helmsman as the West

cmpha.si/c

pads on the

soft

Surveyor

legs

of the

land on the

satellite to

disease.

America’s Cup-itis. primarily because he started spending his summers south of Los Angeles in Newport Beach, a sailing

community where

saltiness runs

fortably ahead of godliness

com-

on the

of acceptable virtues. By the lime

list

Dou-

gan moved to Newport Beach on a perbasis he and his five children were so well marinated that he wanted

manent

buy an ocean-racing yacht of his own. considered two of the good secondhand buys then on the market the distinguished sea-roving yawl Bolero and to

He



the cutter

Nam

made a gem of the Dougan fired

Sang. Before he

decision Columbia, the old

ocean,

came up

for sale.

yacht,

“When

but

love

again

went Fast to look "even though she was covered with dust in Luders’ shed in at her."

he

1

relates,

Stamford she was very, very beautiful to me." Dougan postponed the conversion and, instead, entered old Columbia in the 1964 cup trials, banking on used sails and a 30-day-wondcr crew that had zeal and little else going for it. Hven after doing very poorly in the trials Dougan did not have the heart to carry out his plan to turn the old America's Cupper into the seafarer she was never meant

again.

(You

can't

buy

that kind of

happens only to Irishmen.) As he up to the present trials, Cunning-

It

faces

ham has only one doubt; whether he. a human now older and incapable of renovation.

still

justice to the

has what

do

takes to

it

new. redesigned boat.

Outwardly Skipper Dougan seems to be the type

who

could smile

through any troubled

sea.

nonbusincss days, when he

pour

If

sport aboard

faithful to this image.

Back

in

his

operating he

is

mid-May,

when Columbia broke her mast process of testing a new.

way

his

and on is

Columbiii.

in the

ill-fitting sail.

Dougan was in the cixkpit. As S20.000 worth of dreams, aspirations, aluminum

her true father, the new Columbia cu-

and Dacron came tumbling down. Dougan said simply 'Well. sir. there she geies." To appreciate Dougan in toto, to understand the ticking brain that

Although Olin Stephens

per Dougan; the water she

Comparing original,

when is

she

is

certainly

moves through

easy and uncomplaining.

the redesigned hull with the

Gerry

Driscoll, the

San Diegan

lenses

on

a

.

hind the smile,

it

'

is

lies

necessary to

be-

visit

CPR Division of Upjohn smoggy heat of Torrance, Calif, When the weight of business is upon

ntilc.

point.

his pants leg.

He He

and

He

forefinger.

the air

in circles to

polishe.s

the

rubs the nosc-

picce of the spectacles between his

thumb

folds the earpieces of

and out and in, and he occasionally chews on the end of one of them. Every now and again he reaches over with his starboard hand and tries to scratch his port ear. About once an hour the spectacles come to rest on his the spectacles

nose

in front

in

of his eyes.

Dougan claims

that he never loses spectacles, but he

admits that he wears out three pairs a year.

However love of his

well Columbia, the nautical

life,

fares in the

he

is

making first

coming

trials,

will go home something of a it a serious go this year, opening the door for the West and

Dougan

Dougan. Cunningham

drafted by

riously reflects the personality of Skip-

to be.

travel

winner. By giving

luck.

racing-cruising

blinded him.

fit,

willing to serve as Columhia'i helms-

and owned her two days later. He had every intention of convening her into a

in

all

When man

by wire

did not

sagging shores of southern California.

mid-April of 1964

in a bid

sails

Coast has. Dougan lucked out. It so happened that several years earlier Briggs Cunningham, the sportsman nonpareil who steered Columbia to victory in 1958, had left the hard-rwk Connecticut coast and taken up residence on the

was

for-

he always keeps both

The

came from Dougan’s plant. Dougan contracted the dread

and

occasionally leans back

feet firmly planted, as if

tional displacement aft or the

pending

for

talking to subalterns across

spouting

his desk,

mulas.

San Andreas Fault suddenly to open up underneath him. In a crisis his lower lip puckers into a Churchillian pout, and his eyes take on the intentness of a Tory bulldog who is about to plant a few teeth in the opposition. In the course of an hour Dougan may not move from his

realizing a quick profit as investigating

in

When

all.

the only

could hear not.

Dougan sometimes goes

as long as 10 minutes without smiling at

When you were

gan survived because he and his colleagues were not so much interested in

do

him, why,

lime in

healthy

cup defense, for the long and not altogether

the U.S.

life,

In the past,

its

a genuinely national

affair.

western sailors of financial

consequence have been reluctant to give it a try. some because they doubled a western boat could gel a fair shake back Fast, others because they did not feel

was that

it

competent crew would devote three months to the

po.ssible to recruit a

cause while their businesses went into the red

and

their

wives packed off to

Reno. Dougan simply ignored

all

the

ghosts of what might happen, confident that

if

he got a boat of promise the

protxr talent would

rally to her. Gerry Driscoll has this to say; "1 can remember

long ago, shortly after the war. there was talk of getting a California boat in the America’s Cup. but usually the biggest

talk

was right after a eup scries, when was easy. Pat Dougan deserves

talking

his office at the

a great deal of credit, because while

in the

others talked, he did something- Yes. Pat did something."

eNO

29

Round as ica's

circus tents or

shaped

ball fields,

ders, in

amoebas. Amer-

mighty candlepower and cantilevered upper

decks that remove the need Still,

like

newest palaces of sport boast symmetrical base-

who

there are fans

They

Fenway

for

view-blocking

pillars.

won-

dislike these architectural

love the old peculiarities: the short

Park, the center-field

monuments

in

left field

Yankee

Stadium. But the newcomers have personalities, too. Candlestick Park that

makes

ball

Dodger Stadium hard

infield.

in

is

called the “brickyard

The scoreboard screen

trodome leads cheers and

Shea Stadium, home is

engulfed

LaGuardia

in

a chilly wind

San Francisco has

and ballplayer do funny

in

'

things. L.A.'s

because

of the

New

its

managers.

York Mets and

Jets,

the roar of jets taking off from nearby

Airport.

And each

of the structures of the

'

60 s on

of

the enclosed As-

infuriates visiting

the following pages

is

ories of great catches, key hits

already rich with

mem-

and gobbled hot dogs,

STADIUMS OF THE Sitting in the

>eOs

middle of what used to be an

orange grove, Anaheim Stadium has brought major league baseball (and the All-Star this year)

30

to

the

home town

Game

of Disneyland.

Most the

meticulously

new

ball

situated

parks

0

is

dium (above). Home

the

famous

due

east

that

line

through

of

C. Sta-

the

plate,

mound and second base

are on

extends

the

Lincoln

Memorial, the Washir^gton Mon-

ument and the

Capitol.

New York

is

west

of

which

skyline

Shea Stadium

lies

The

eight miles (left),

between LaGuardia

Airport and the site of the 1964

New York Stadium

World's

in

parked cars

just

tangle

of

Fair.

Dodger

squats

(right)

huge spider

a

vast

like

web

freeways

and

a of

the

north of

large

buildings that denotes the center

of

downtown Los Angeles.

Eero Saarinen’s stainless-steel Gateway Arch, the broad Mississippi River and sun-splashed

Illinois

provide a spectacular backdrop for Busch Memorial Stadium

in St.

Louis, hard by the business district.

The Astrodome

in

Houston

reflected futuristically in a

(left,

highly

polished

tumes

mirror) cos-

parking attendants

its

in

spacemen's garb. Atlanta Sta-

dium

(right),

50c cab

a

ride

from "Five Points,” the heart of the

was

city,

built

weeks expressly league course,

ball it

The oldest

rapid

51

In

to attract a big-

club-which,

succeeded of the

new

is

posed to wind and fog on narrow hillside

shelf

of

doing.

in

stadiums.

Candlestick Park (below),

between

a

exits

raw

and San Francisco Bay.

DISIIUUS COUPUff.

The truth

will out.

K.Y.C.

Perfect summer drinks a craftsman’s touch.

demand

Seagram's Extra Dry the perfect martini

90 PWOf. WSIILIEO

m

CIW,

QlSTiUED FROM itUtlliON

Gl!>:t

When you make the drinks, when we make the gin.

gin, perfect for ait

summer

drinks.

W

hen Izaak Wallon wrote,

make

er did

a

"God

more calm,

nev-

quiet, in-

nocent recreation than angling." he expressed a truth of his age. The sport was. as Walton's friend Sir Henr>'

put

my

It.

"a

rest to

my

Wolton

mind, a cheerer of

diverter of sadness, a calmer

spirits, a

spiirt

commandos

like

1955 the International

passions, a procurer of conientcdness."

ing

what a

women

discovered

juicy apple the sport of fishing

especially big-game fishing-



really was.

Rver since the ladies began angling

in

earnest, there have been few activities less

calm,

less

quiet or less mmxrent.

brom the beginning, the female approach to angling

was unlike any l/aak Walton

ever dreamed

of.

Women

tackled

the

a

territory. By the lime the men reawhat had happened, the ladies were lirmly fastened into lighting chairs and had no intention of giving them up. The next step was predictable. In April

of unquiet thoughts, a moderator of

But that was before

establishing

beachhead, invading in force, storming

male

lized

AssiK'iation

Beach.

Women's

was formed

in

Fish-

Palm

Fla., a logical place for ladies to

assemble. In addition to an embarrass-

members

to almost .^00 before the or-

ganization was a year old, promptly added a few events of their own to the tournament roster. Men were not invited to participate. In light of that first all-fcmulc tournament, it was probably just

a.s

well.

Sixty-six initial

entries turned

IWFA

out for the

Tournament in was clear even be-

Billfish

January 1956, but

it

also ha.s

dock that the from chaise longue to fighting chair had not been made quite as gracefully as rumored. The gals showed up in what had to be the most unorthodox ar-

and fishing tournaments. The ladies of the IWTA. whose numbers rose from three initial

costumes ranged from long Johns, galoshes and fur parkas to silk coAitnuf
ment of money, mansions and nioguls. Palm Beach, in season, boasts what is probably the heaviest concentration of anglers anywhere in the U.S. belter than ns share of fish

The day that women discovered the rewards dedication they have taken over the record

of

big-game

book— hook,

It

fore they took off from the transition

ray of angling attire ever assembled.

fishing, the rout of

line

The

man was on. With frightening by VIRGINIA KRAFT

and charter captain

SCOURGE OF THE SEVEN SEAS

39

SCOUROe OP THE SEAS

eontlnued

pants and Chanel sweaters.

One wom-

from the

Western Hemisphere.

entire

tell

bill,

into cockpits, pushing temperatures to

from 86 to 50 boats, Mrs. Thomas Sherwood, one of the IWFA’s three founding members, Mrs. Milton Bird and Mrs. Joseph Dixon, the lone females in the tournament, outfished 14 teams and 194 anincluding Papa himself, who in glers three days aboard the Pilar did not catch

record lows and tossing the 32 small

a single

around on the ocean like kernels of corn in a popper. Keeping breakfast down was only one challenge; staying upright was another. Women were thrown into transoms, against bait boxes, down galley ladders. They were bruised, battered and bounced about for two days without letup.

one Havana daily put

been any more hazardous than some of

odd footgear on deck.

the other TTic easier.

weather did not make things any It was, as January in P'lorida often

can be, 10-foot

A

terrible.

raging norther sent

waves crashing across stems and

fishing boats

One woman

spent the entire tourna-

ment in the head. Another gratefully dropped everything and rushed shoreward when word came over the radio that her poodle was about to produce puppies. A middle-aged matron slept, incredibly, through two strikes and then woke up only long enough to be sick over the side. Another tossed sandwich and cigarettes overboard when a wave snapped her line from the outrigger, Still another froze after striking her fish and then watched transfixed as line whizzed off her reel until finally there was no more.

"Was

I

surprised!” she said later,

way

Surprised was not exactly the

to

describe the crews. "Five fish on, five

mumbled one captain. "Let’s go drunk." Most of them did, but they also managed to get the ladies through lost,”

get

the tournament.

At

sailfish, all

ditions that I-'rancis

the

score

caught under con-

would have discouraged Sir Even the most be-

Chichester.

The

fish.

IWFA

victory was, as

"a new kind of

it,

revolution."

The revolution did not end with

women

IWFA

so

was

by the time the

fast that

5 years old 23 of

or

not,

has learned

Soon

how

after their

IWFA

that

there

was

may

it

be,

no longer the The

is

of

eleganfiarum

angling.

too.

that,

IGFA

billfish

tourna-

was invited by the Club

Naufico huernacional de

la

to

send a team to Havana to compete in the International Marlin Fishing Tour-

nament

for the

Hemingway Trophy, an

annual event that attracted top anglers

40

arbiter ladies

records are

based upon weights, and in order to weigh a fish obviously it must be dead.

The ing

was not

ladies’ objection fish

—even a

fish

to kill-

the most conservation-

minded angler has killing

that

accurate estimate of

and

and brought the

it

is

high.

has been hooked, played

to gaff, they reasoned,

why

free to fight again? Certainly

moment

of truth

the

for

comes not when the mate

it

angler

when

the fish

is

kill

it

tests

at last test

ends here. For

gler's skill

fish

brought

of the an-

all

practical

has been caught.

To

only the efficiency of the male.

Bolstered by such irrefutable logic, the

not on

fish

boated but on

fish relea.sed.

The purpose is not to discourage members from making further bids for IGFA records- no woman would underwrite that kind of foolishness

age them to release not of record

size.

— but to encour-

fish that

are clearly

Informed anglers, and

its

length, weight

an obvious chal-

is

is

no point

in

has produced criticism of what call

less

an overem-

phasis on scores at the expense of sport. But, in spite of such criticism, the releasefishing concept has proved

an incalcu-

to conservation. Its

widespread acceptance

among

virtually

angling groups today can be attrib-

all

uted almost entirely to the early efforts

IWFA.

of the

Bouquets are equally owed the ladies for their pioneering efforts in the use of

tackle— although the sincerity of

light

their motives has

Nowhere

sometimes been quesin the battle

male angling have

women

of female

excelled as

dramatically as in light-tackle fishing,

and nowhere have their accomplishments proved quite so frustrating to men.

The

along

revolution,

light-tackle

with the female revolution, began

in the

mid ’50s and steadily gathered momentum along with the IWFA. Male anglers embraced the movement wholeheartedly. By the time they understood its full ramifications it was too late. Again they had been had. but good.

"Men just

thrusts his gaff

into the side of the fish, but rather just

before,

it

award-oriented anglers

vs.

most are left to rot dcKk or arc tossed to the sharks.

fish

Unless

ulous bookkeeping. Not unexpectedly

be eaten or

Even among edible species, waste It was too high for the women. After a

girth.

lenge to the record, there

pictures are taken, at the

is

boating the fish. But by releasing it she can earn points— the kind that eventually add up to prizes. Such serious angling for points demands remarkable discipline and metic-

to

eaten or mounted. After the

it

sailfish at 200 yards and with computer speed she will come up with a pretty

tioned.



can usually

but give her one glimpse of a leaping

objection to

is

are,

has a fighting chance

fish

the books long before

brought alongside the boat. The lady may have trouble figuring out the phone

little

mounted but, rather, to wasting fish. With the exception of swordfish, few billfish are

whether a

make

to

lable contribution

IGFA record book, impressive

But the

though

IWFA set up its own reward system based

to fish.

first

Fish

Association book.

changed

purposes, the

ment, the

mem-

Game

catches in the International

long the captains were also admitting,

nothing more formidable than a female

its

bers accounted for 27 of the world-record

alongside the boat. The

who

tour-

naments. World records began falling to

grudging captain had to admit that, if nothing else, the gals were game. Before reluctantly

fleet



not set

remarkably,

end,

its

stood at 82

winds that cut the original

IWFA members

most

The Cubans, it seemed, considered the ladies no threat, Ha! TTie gals cleaned up. Competing from a borrowed boat in high seas and strong

an climbed aboard in a full-length mink, another in gold lame slacks. Heads were rollercd. ribboned and ruffled with lace. Nobody wore high heels, it is comforting to report, but heels could not have

don’t have the patience for

light tackle,” says

Mrs. Helen

Lynch of Pompano Beach.

(Billie)

Fla.,

who

if her roomful of fishing an indication. "A man gets a

obviously docs trophies

is

big fish

on

to

light line

and he can't wait

hell out of it. Right away he it in. and snap! the line Then he turns around and blames on his own

whip

starts horsing

breaks. it

on

the captain instead of

stupidity.

Women

don't

fish that

way.

They know brawn never beats brains on the really light stuff, but try to to a

tell

that

man!"

Trying to tell anything about angling to a man can be, in itself, a herculean feat

—a

fact lhat

his fail

has hastened considerably

from the

lighting chair.

damning witnesses

The most

to the capitulation

are the Hshing-boat captains,

who see all,

and seldom mind telling all. “Clive some guy two weeks with an outdoor magazine and two days on a boat and he thinks he's written the book," says George Slaros. one of the

hear

alt

masters of the bori Lauderdale sporl-

bshing fleet.

"Women approach the sport They

differently.

what you

listen to

tell

them, then they go ahead and do what

you

say, exactly the

way you say

it.

They

don't feel they are losing their dignity

by taking directions.”

“No

matter

how much

they learn,"

adds Stares' brother. Bill, captain of the Wirnisong. ‘women keep right on asking questions. That way they keep adding to ‘

But no matter how good they and some of these women arc really good they never act like they knowmore than the captain. That's why women arc a lot easier to teach and to get along with on the water. It's also why

their skills.

get





they catch fish It

took men

when men live

don't."

years to win the

Key

Colony Beach Sailfish Tournament, and then the male victory was decided on the basis of time by breaking a tie with two women. When the late Dorothea Lincoln Dean won the Cal Cay Tuna Tournament in 1963, the upset was comparable to a George Plimpton kncKking out Muhammad Ali. The same year Dorothea went to Newfoundland where she boated five giant tuna in a single day for a total catch of more than 2,800

made her as wellQueen in that province. Last year's World Scries of Sport Fishing was won by another IWFA member. Mrs. Gloria Nicholson of Palm Beach. pounds, a

known

That

feat that

as the

city's

annual Silver

Sailfish

Tour-

nament. probably the best-known open on the Florida coast, has been won any number of times by wonien, as have most of the tournaments in which

contest

they arc eligible to

The almost them

fanatical

notice

One woman

determination

won among the profesOne woman

bring to angling has

much

as

It

is

an inviolate rule that no one but may touch any part of the rod.

the angler reel

and

line while a fish if

is

on.

The

rule

the reel falls apart, as

it

did to Mrs. John Stetson of Palm Beach

during a tournament 1

965.

With

at

Palm Beach in on her line

a sailfish lugging

and with nuts and bolts strewn

all

over

the deck, she calmly asked the mate for a screwdriver, put the reel back in

work-

now

women have

fought

fish

braces, in plaster casts, while shot

full

in

of

ited to the

novocain, in the throes of iml

Howard Babcock of New York. Mrs. LaMont Albertson of West I’alm Beach. Fla. and Mrs. D. Gordon Rupc of Dallas are among the finest freshwater anglers in the U.S. Indeed, IWFA member

the final stages of pregnancy

Joan Salvato has cast a fly 161 feet with a one-handed rod—just a few feel short

with rich relatives and have even aban-

of the men's record for this event.

of loved ones in order to go

variety

of illnesses

that

tie

mer.

and during ordinarily

hospitalize less determined an-

glers. Still others

have passed up con-

firmations, graduations

doned

miles off shore in treacherous

near-panic pleas of the guide to cut the

and head home while they still had a chance. A shark, most likely mule, put an abrupt end to the battle. While the professionals agree on the angling abilities of women, they seem less sure about what inspires a woman to lake up the sport. One thing is certain. She diws not do so because of the fish. There is probably no single, all-encomfish off

passing reason

one If

why women angle, but comes closest to

that doubtless

truth

is

the

the the

men.

husband

is

a fisherman, he

may

up angling to keep him company, or to give him a chance to show off what he knows in persuade his wife to lake

Other

a

six

water, the lady refused to listen to the

ing order and then prcxrccdcd to land the fish,

would

an empty

fill a team IWFA tournament. Another, from a 15-foot open boat off Marathon. Fla., hooked into a tarpon that appeared to be of record size. Five hours later, with the radio out. the hands of the clock past midnight and the boat

fishing

put a finger to her gear.

in

bridal suite 200 miles away, to for a recent

had an engine blow up while she was fighting a fish. She kept right on while the captain and mate fought the fire. Another, pulled to her knees by a giant tuna, cracked her mouth on the transom and lost a front tooth in the process. When the mate ran to help her. she told him in decidedly unladylike terms exactly what his fate would be if he so much as

applies even

interrupted her honey-

moon. leaving her spouse

sionals as has their prowess.

fish.

Such fcniininc angling skill is not limdeep sea. Women like Mrs. H.

women

that

vigils

and luncheons

outside the operating rooms fishing,

front of her. or because he ly

good

is

not especial-

at the sport himself but

achieve a

hopes

modicum of fame through

to his

wife or because he wants to get her so

hooked

some free time own now and then.

that he will have

to skip out

on

his

Besides the fishing husband

who

lures

his wife into the sport, there is also the

fishing

husband whose wife takes the eommurd

41

SCOUROE OF THE SEAS initiative.

or

or she

eoniinued

She may be jealous of his sport

feel left

out

if

she does not

may view

fish. too.

angling as a unique

opportunity to compete against him in

an area where she has a good chance of healing him at his own game, or she may be corrsumed by curiosity about any activity that

takes his time or captures his

attention or, though such rare, she

and If

may

women

arc

simply want to be w ith him

client. “The weather can on some of the tournaments boats do not get five and even six days at a stretch. If you don’t have a pleasant captain or mate, you might just as well fly home. There’s nothing to do out there but drink and read, and one can do just so much of either.”

lers

get so vile

of the tournaments and record books in recent years.

concerned, no price

"Let's face

way

says another,

it."

a gal really swing on her

gling offers a

zons.

It is

woman

even broader hori-

her entree to

new adventures

and new alliances. It is a thoroughly aboveboard excuse to get away from home and hubby as frequently as she wishes, to whip off to the islands or the interior or to one of a dozen resorts and spas where, alone, she might be viewed with suspicion, but where as an angler she is never alone. Her travels arc always complete with rods, reels, boat and crew a most respectable and businesslike



combination. The

fact that the captains

and mates on the top sports-fishing boats arc frequently young and handsome and that the husband.s of

women who

afford to fish such boats arc

more

can

often

than not old and faded though rich,

is

not entirely coincidental.

"Hishing

is

not

all

brce/cs," explained

one but iwo paid escorts call? Believe

me, a

one woman

in

de-

relationship of

agreeable after

hours, had better catch them fish or look for other jobs.

Dorothea Dean was particularly

nowned

for firing crews

a.s

re-

she

fast as

hired them, "Usually she hired a crew

at her

beck and

for three

woman

could do a

lot

rules arc simple: every gal for herself

and the stakes are high. Everything from sw imming pools to sports cars (SI, Sept, has been used

when they pay The captains

play.

how

with not

worse with her money." Within the lush though limited captain market, trading is always brisk. The

2. 196.1)

are

too high for a

more than

they hire, no matter

own

months

at a time." says Jakc«

many

Marston, one of the

captains

who

fished her. "But if anyone else caught more fish than she did. or caught fish when she didn't, that was. 'Goodby. boys.' She’d sign up another crew, and

sometimes she was paying off four crews at

once."

Money,

to bribe captains

obviou.sly as vital as a

good

out of one cockpit into another. TTie

captain to big-time angling, was never

most popular captains move from angler to angler, and the loot they pile up along the way can be considerable. Sev-

a

eral

women, obviously of independent

wealth, have even resorted to as the ultimate bribe.

matrimony

Marrying one's

captain or mate was definitely out a few it is currently in vogue in most exclusive angling circles. first-clas-s captain can make even a poor angler look good. Nobody knows

years ago, but the

sunshine and soft

fining the multifaceted

in this

women

these is

really top captain, but

they expect

"What

one-sided society can

other

her husband

not a fisherman, an-

Where

in the islands that the

out of the harbor for four,

to share his interest. is

who have been making clean sweeps

crew to female

A

this better

than the

first-class

female ang-

problem

to Dorothea.

She had more

than she could spend, and she

much of

.spent

so

on angling that even Palm Beach's Old Guard finally had to admit it

that she lived there, loo.

When some-

one asked her not long before her death two years ago if she ever fished for fun and recreation, her answer was an unhcsiiaiing "Good heavens, no! If you mean just to go out and fish, never." Dorothea fished with a record book in her hand and an all-consuming desire in her heart to become the best-known angler in the world.

She came very

close. In

the brief eight years that her entire fish-

ing career spanned,

won more

.she set

written

more

records,

tournaments, collected more

woman. She was

trophies than any other

up

in countless

newspapers and

magazines and was listed in IfVio'j If'/w of American h'omcn. Such rewards were not easily won. She fished with relentless, dedication, sometimes for weeks without interruption, wearing out

punishing

her crews, herself and, often, her wel-

come among

other

anglers.

Fishing

.seemed to be a compulsion to Dorothea.

She seldom

sat

she had a

fish

m the fishing chair unless on. and rarely did she

watch the baits us a more interested angler would. Most of the time when she

was not

lighting a fish she reclined in

the cabin, doing her nails or touching

up

her lipstick or reading a magazine.

What

li-shing

Dorothea

is

really

represented

house

in

which she

lived alone, every wall of every

42

to

pcrhup.s best indicated by

the fact that in (he

room

solidly covered with framed prints, notices and notations about feats. Fvery trophy, plaque and award she had c\cr won was prom-

was

clippings,

her fishing

The

displa>cd.

inently

open to her name— lay on a table in the living room. There is not likely to be another Dorothea

incoln

L

Dean

time, but several

in

some

angling for

wonKn

This deodorant doesn’t just protect you...

li'ho—

U/if/.t

it

actually builds

up

a resistance to odor.

since her death

have shown flashes of the incredible drive that pushed her to the front of the sport. The late Mrs. Patricia Church of Palm Beach, for a brief two years before illness forced her to slop fishing last win-

seemed destined

ter.

to rewilie all the

records in the book. In her fust year of angling

made an unprecedented

she

sweep of the

IWhA

annual awards, win-

ning not only the (Towninshield lease

Trophy but

Re-

the lop-weight trophy

Like Dorothea, she fished with a

well.

a.s

dedication dose to fanaticism, trolling

from 4 night.

in the

morning

until after

up

necessary, to pile

if

There seemed

be

to

mid-

points.

little

pleasure in the

much

pleasure in the

process.

Nor can

there be

fishing Mrs.

derdale

Da\

id

doing

is

C. Lake of Fort Lau-

Her goal

this year.

is

not even so grand as the Crowninshield

Trophy, the IWV-'A's No. prize. It is to win the organization's saillish release I

trophy, one of six that Mrs. Church w'on

1964 65. But for Mrs. Lake

in

it

is

evi-

enough to justify beaway from her four small children

dently important ing

weeks

for

at a time,

friends, her

turning her back on

home and any semblance

of

w hat

is considered a normal life in order under miserable confrom dawn to dusk. The mscslmcnl of at least S20.000 in boat, captain, mate, bait and motel bills seems almost

to fish daily, often ditions,

incidental. In

modern age of angling one

this

cannot

really take

tain-snatching,

though one can

too seriously the cap-

island-swinging, squar-

ing-ofT of the sexes

on

the high seas, even

feel a certain

sympathy

for the egos that find bolstering through

the sport of angling. But

of

women—

in spite

when

a handful

of ihcir extraordi-

nary accomplishments

—can

transform

Walton knew and loved into such a frantic production. one cannot avoid wondering if the once-pcaecful pursuit I/aak

angling has not indeed strayed too far

from

its

primary purpose.

Men. we

still

need you!

end

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A SMOOTH-STROKING CRIMSON

To

Becky

CRCW

TIES UP AN ATTRACTIVE

off to a torrid start in the

Orchard Beach. But Harvard, undefeated

tah

and rowing arc aboiil as synonas Illinois and mountain .And Curtis Canning, who

U ymous climbing. hails

from

City, had never he arrived at Camin the fail of 1964. after

.Salt

Lake

until

dropping plans to attend the University of Utah, where his father is a professor of sociology. ••When

1

went home

for

my

freshman year," Canning says. "I had to do a lot of talking to gel any of my friends to believe Christmas vacation

was taken seriously back and friends in Utah have learned a good deal about rowing since Curt found a scat on the Harvard varsity crew last year. One very close friend heard more than any of them about the s[H>rt. A 21-ycarold former high schtxil classmate of Canning's, she has just completed her junior year at the University of Utah and also has just changed her name from Becky that the sport

east." Canning's relatives

Petersen to Becky Canning. Last Saturflight home forhis marCanning carried with him what he ternted "a good wedding present." The gift? A Harvard victory of nearly two lengths over Vesper Boat Club of Philadelphia in the U.S. Pan American Games rowing trials on New York's Orchard Beach Lagoon early Saturday

Pan American Games rowing

caught up

at

Only four crews took part

in

trials

this year,

hands

ha-s lost

more than four

three races in its

years,

only

had

Pennsylvania's 1967 Inter-

full.

Rowing Association champi-

collegiate

ons were out to avenge earlier losses to the Crimson. And while Penn and Harvard were the

known

quantities in the

two crews entered by Vesper Boat Club of Philadelphia were the race, the

from the 50.

the eight-oared shells got starting line in the

A crew was not the combinahad brought home an OlympicTokyo in 1964. Only

Vesper's

away

approaching

and Harvard seemed to wallow beOver the first 500 meters the Phila-

hind.

delphia club led by as

much

as three-

quarters of a length. Parker's crew start-

ed to settle down in the second 500 meters and. moving into a 36-stroke beat, began to eat away at the Vesper lead.

Harvard took the lead

Near

the

it

at

about the

to the finish.

end the Vesper boat put on a Harvard stuck to a 36 count with Vesper just nipping

sprint, but

gold medal from

to

remnants of that boat were evident. The ageless coxswain. Robert Zimonyi, who steered thrc'c Hungarian Olympic crews

ning noted after the race, "but we really

Olympic reprewas once again wearing the

as well as the 1964 U.S. sentative.

Vesper colors, as were Bill Stowe, the stroke of the 964 Olympians, and Hugh 1

Foley, the

No.

2

man on

To Coach

that crew.

help his three veterans. Vesper

day night on the

Oietrich Rose had

with a complement of small-collegc row-

filled

his first

boat

ing products. Together only since the

second week

in

May,

had comAmerican Hen-

the boat

one regatta - the ley and finished first against less-thanstiff competition. But Harvard Coach Harry Parker was far from being overpeted

in



Thus the new Mrs. Canning's honeymoon was a trip back to Cam-

confident.

bridge in time for the resumption of

1965 (Harvard’s only rowing defeats

workouts for the Pan American Games Winnipeg. Man. early nc.xt month.

since 1963) were

evening.

York's

dusk. Vesper seiofT at a torrid cadcnceof

1.000-mcter mark to hold

mystery.

tion that

When

the

for eight-oared boats with cox-

swain, but Harvard, which

New

trials at

the halfway point and went on to win

riage.

in

HIS BRIDE

with love from all the Harvards

The Vesper Boat Club crew got

dipped an oar bridge, Mass,

PACKAGE FOR CURT CANNING (THIRD FROM LEFT) AND

two

The numbing experience of

losses to

Vesper

in

1964 and one

more than enough

keep the Crimson on edge.

in

to

win

in 6:1 5.4

Penn by half a length for second place. ••We've been taking good starts," Canhandicapped ourselves with this one." It was the first time Harvard had trailed any crew since a comc-from-hchind victory over Northeastern in early April.

The performance of Vesper's A entry over the

first

1,000 meters pleased the

usually expressionless Rose. "Everything

worked out up to 1,000, and then. Harvard was better, so wc have to

.

.

.

get

better."

Not thing

is

all

IS

lost for

Rose.

And

every-

not roses for Parker. For. as Rose

himself says.

"The war

is

still

on"

be-

tween Vesper and Harvard. The next battle will come when the two meet in

August in the nationals in Philadelphia. By that time Becky Canning should have a few more wedding presend ents from the Harvard crew. late

you really want to impress someone

If

with your car, tell him it’s paid for. Anyone can owe a couple of thousand dollars on a car. Getting the thing paid for is always a little harder. You know how it is: after two or three years you begin to get the feeling that trading the old

one

in

on a new one

will actually

save you money. What can save you money is a Volvo. Volvo -we keep reminding people -is the car that can gel you out from under car payments. Volvo is the car that’s driven an averyears in Sweden, where there are no speed limits age of on the highways, over 70.000 miles of unpaved roads and driving is virtually a national pastime. And while wc don't guarantee it. it looks like Volvo is going to be the car that lasts an average of years in 1

1

1

I

America. in

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tcK).

the last

Volvo the gallon

1

1

is

— even

with automatic transmission--and runs

away from every compact in its class. years to realize You don't have to keep your Volvo what a deal you’re getting. Keep it just six years and you’ll do all right. That gives you three years to pay for it. three years to make payments to yourself after you've paid for it. Assuming you haven't blown the money on a ^ .j~2 1

Hurope. you have

I

bank account. Instead of you owing the bank a few thousand, the hank owes you a few thousand. trip to

a juicy

/V

\

\

JvoLVO

/ Alfred Wright holes that resembled, at casual glance,

on

a patch of African veldt transplanted to

termittent flashes of sunlight since be-

the Montreal suburbs.

Mayor Jean Dra-

pcau wanted the Canadian Open so badly as a sideshow for Expo 67 that he dug 5600,000 out of the city treasury to remodel the course and added 5100.000 to the purse to

Beating 17

gram

greens

and a brown Casper wins the

Open

Canadian putting

on

an

with

$200,000 superb

eccentric

course

the Royal

Canadian

distilleries,

brought the prize mon-

ey to such a high figure that the tourna-

ment drew the best

field

49

of the year

money winners. But. unformoney can't do everything.

came

lo be

the line, had

pro

known somewhere along all

Ihc ntakings of

1967

happiest

golf's

one of

stopovers.

new bunkers

at

uncomfortable little

lo-

12 or 15 years

and building a

tine

new

Canadian springtime failed to coopNot frantic sodding or truckloads

erate.

of fertilizer could keep the course from

looking

under

like

ground And the 17th green was a

one

repair.

vast stretch of

city,

and their clamorous offspring, dogged oldsters and hirsute hippies every last one of them cranked up for the time of their lives. Out by the golf course, motels and drive-ins had sprung up like dandelions on a commuter’s front lawn. Even Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip were coining to Expo.

seemed the

ideal iKcasion for

It

some won-

and a gay old time to boot. Then the pros saw Montreal Municipal (5olf Course, and as far as they were concerned there wasn’t an exhibition on thtisc funny islands over in the St. Law-

derful golf

rence that could rival in laughs the setting for this third richest event in the

history of golf. That Bill first

Casper,

who

is

to say. laughs for

collected the 530.000

prize by shooting a stunning 65 lo

defeat Art Wall in a playoff.

The

reac-

tions of the rest varied from outright

Arnold Palmer’s ultimate in tact: we could disregard conditions, this would he a satisfactory course.” The cause of this non-acclaim was a ire to

•‘If

flat,

46

tree-studded, innocuous-looking 18

on the line, Opperman finally an uphill four-footer close for a tap-in, which made il five

is

a quarter of a mil-

U was

the

good

needed

putter,

R. H. Sikes,

was one of

several

who

four.

When

the threesome of

Arnold Palm-

Dave Marr and George Knudson arrived at the 17th. Knudson found him-

er.

self facing

an 18-foot downhill putt for he tapped the hall as and then watched it below the cup. "The trouble

his par. Queasily,

lightly as possible roll

20

feet

with you. (ieorge.”

Dave Marr

him. "is that you don’t

said lo

know how

to

read the dirt." Later Marr described 17

thing apart.

brown green

rounded on three sides by towering spruce, elm and maple trees, the green

Montreal, the swinging

when almost

lion

pine

Expo was

67.

but not

a

of

trees that will be SFWctacular in another

on a major golf course since sand went

interplanetary whatchamacallils of



ing doglegs into the fairways, placing a

out of style as a putting surface. Sur-

ents

putt rolled 12 feet

first



or something halted it. The next above the hole. The one after that went four feet below, which is fun on a miniature putting course,

grass

putt rolled four feet

putts for a triple-bogey 6.

and domes and

straining under carloads of footsore par-

His gentle

past the hole before a lonely blade of

lagged

cations, planting dozens of

in-

was a stage For example.

it

a tine tec shot to

within 20 feet of the hole on the high side.

enough

Thrusting out of the St. Lawrence River only a few brassic shots away was the raz/le-da//le of spires

hit

Montreal’s 5600,000 was spent on bend-

the

*

On Thursday

Opperman

tunately,

clubhouse. So far so good, e.xcept that

The 5200,000 Canadian Open, or ()mmum Canadien. or Expo Open, as il

Steve

of the top 50

lot

Bill

show

Golf Association how serious he was about itschampionship.This.whcncomhined with the 5100.000 put up by Sea-

long par-3 had received only

this

ing seeded.

for comedy-in-the-round.

first

to he seen

as "like pulling downhill on a

Howard



Johnson roof with the shingles.” Perhaps it was the course, and perhaps it was the strain of the players’ renewed brawl with the

PGA,

but the golf that

Monircal's crowds ol 20, IKK) a day saw was hardly of the championship quality that their good mayor had cmisioned.

Palmer played sonic of his most erratic in months. (Jary Player scarcely

shots

made

the cut.

and Doug Sunders and

Masters Champion Ciay Brewer both missed

It.

Instead of watching these luminaries,

a sports-minded refugee from

who was determined

hxpo 67

to play follow-the-

leuder would have found himself dashing between the likes of l.aurie

Hammer

and Roger Ciinsberg on Thursday, perhaps catching Steve Reid on Friday and Dale Douglass on .Saturday,

certainly

Douglass missed an eight-

at least until

inch putt at \1. The only vaguely familiar tigure was 43-year*old Art Wall, whose steady 67-70-70 had earned him a

two-stroke lead by Saturday night.

took a 45-minute thunderstorm on

It

Sunday to

much

the air of so

clear

inconsistency.

towers were

Television

blown over, tree limbs fell into the mud on the 17th green and some familiar ligures began to storm after W all. There was Nicklaus. who went out in 32 and closed to w ithin a stroke before a bogey on 17 undid him. And Julius Boros got

down

struck

did the tough-

at 17, loo. as

of the unknowns. Reid.

est

W hen made

Wall, play ing

in the last

group,

through 17 with a par lie appeared near the biggest financial success of his long career. A man whose luck had it

seemed 1959,

to

be nothing but bad since

when he was

money

the leading

.

.

.

flying to

and you're the

your favorite football game

pilot in

command! Impossible? Not

winner, he had overcome a long catalog

now, and you could have your private

of infirmities and was once again going

starts.

his quiet, gracious

way about the

As Wall was purring quite unnoticed,

17. Bill

birdied

it.

tour.

C'asper.

On

18.

a

Wall hit three sound shots that him w ithin 25 feet of the hole. Needtwo putts to win. he stroked the

par-5.

got

It

doesn't take years to

pilot's

become a good

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by piper.

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sale

pilot.

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ing only

feet past,

first five

and watched as Casper

sank a 14-footcr for a birdie.

needed

Now

Special

Wall

$5

his short putt, but the steadiness

of his whole four days was gone. He

Special Introductoty Flight Lesson ottered ty your nearby Piper dealer tor lust S5 will let you see what llying's like. With an expert

dejection as he walked away, confronted

with a playofT instead of the glory of his coniehack.

There in golf

is

than

no Bill

government-rated thght instructor, you'll lly in the modern low-wing Piper Cherokee, the plane with total Hying ease, "air cushion" landaerodynamic tines. Quiet, comfodable.

better bad-green putter

Casper.

On Monday

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he Visit

handled Monlrears 17 greens and one brown in beautiful Casper fashion, beat-

your Piper dealer. He's listed

and only FApo

t)peii.

PIPER Lock Haven, Pa

end

47

in the

Of write for '‘Learn to Fly" informalion

ing W'all’s ow n fine 69 by four strokes to win the 5Sih Canadian Open and the first, last

Flight Lesson

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missed and was almost speechless with

VACATION HINT.

In |ust I

week you can probably be

liyinf lolo!

Yellow Pages, kit.

Dept. 7-Sl

AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

(Mam

Oftices)

Any more rewacdini way

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tpend pari o' your vacation?

Mark Kram

BOXING

No weighty problems for Carlos When he defeated Sugar Ramos. Carlos Ortiz looked young and

LJis '

tingcfb

tapped against a

tall

fit

fruit

drink and %sith his other hand he

guided a long cigar, making you think of Alee Guinness relaxing

in Rio dc Janeiro London bank Fvening rolled across the Atlantic and then fell softly on the terrace. All the old fight managers arc gone, the man was saying, the ones who swung in a world of whispers and back-door deals. Their names tumbled out like remem-

after a deftly engineered heist.

bered songs;

Al Weill, the most disliked manager busted and

in

the history of boxing,

in

an institution. Blinky I’alermo.

is

who

had pieces of fighters he did not even know, is athletic director at another kind of institution. They call this one Lewisburg, and he has his position for the long haul. Jack

Hurley, with two-thirds of

stomach gone, one more time w nh his

with

a

is

make

trying to

it

young heavyweight

a

forgettable

name and

"And. of course."

talent.

said Bill Daly, the

second most disliked manager in boxing, "the Divctor (Disc Kearns) is dead, and so are his tunes.

After a couple of hours in your shoes your can feel like they're trapped in steaming

past this light

feet

I

I'll

tell

think

you,

I'll

if

I

can get

defend the

ti-

Ireland and back it up w ith a light Denmark. Lake a nice ocean voyage. The way used to be. After all. you got to enjoy hie. How many times you think he's gonna make it to the post? One day tle in

They feel hot and itchy. And hot, itchy, moist feet can be Step a 1 on the way to the painful cracking, peeling and kettles.

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may never

D -von WalKcf « T.«'o«n

I-

.

suffer

from

be over."

The end. despite Daly's somber mtxtd, di>es not

appear to be near. Carlos Ortiz, champion of the world since

lightweight

1962. except fora brief time in 1965

when

he loaned the

title to Ismael Laguna, is undoubtedly the most complete cham-

pion

in

boxing today. True, age tOrtiz

is

.^0)has slightly tempered his great talent. itchy,

P 0 Boi 1713, R»


burning feet ogoin.

U60)

48

but

was hardly evident

it

Bithorn Stadium

last

Ramos

night against Sugar

in

Saturday

they were just a blur. Ortiz

round.

It

was

until

1

8 of the fourth

knockout and

at

1

:

has a new partner

Ramos

left

a technical

sagging in a corner

An old favorite

steaming

San Juan. Puerto

in

With both hands chopping

Rico,

Ortiz' fourth straight successful

title

de-

fense.

The evening began

typically

enough

for a fight at a Latin location: before the fight

some gentleman cracked another

over the head with a chair. This incident

was not comforting to anyone who remembered the carnage of the first Orti/Ramos fight in Mexico City where the ring was torn down, guns were fired and

RACING

Ortiz had to leave the ring with a bucket

over his head. By contrast, the Puerto

Ricans comported themselves admirably. Except for a brief eruption, which

came when a Negro

tried to butt a

135 for

him

this time,

took

MOTOR OIL

Puerto

Rican in a preliminary bout, the scene was that of a happy mob of picnickers drenched with beer. Indeed, the crowd of 13.592. which paid $121,439. was almost passive at times. Ortiz, who weighed in at 135, an easy

command

im-

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mediately. His jab. which sort of shoots

up

was sharp and punishand he caught Ramos, a former who has become a small

after landing,

ing,

featherweight

lightweight, with solid right hands. Or-

won both the first and second rounds, it was obvious that Ramos, a good puncher who is not timid, was perfect champion. Ramos had trouble tiz

and

for the

The

ultimate

armchair AM radio..

connecting with his right hand, which

can be quick and deadly. Every time Ortiz jabbed. Ramos tried to wheel the right in. but the

champion would follow

his jab with a short step to the right side

and then-

wham-

he would club Sugar

downsweepmg right. Ramos did find Ortiz with

with a

midway

in the third

his right

round. Ortiz caught

solidly and his knees buckled, but he was out of danger quickly. In the fourth and final round Ortiz set Ramos up with a left hook, and seconds later sent him groping toward the ropes with a right cross. Ramos, daz.ed, managed to free his head from the ropes only to sink into a right uppercut from Ortiz that jacked him back up. He was then battered into a corner where Referee Zack Clayton, embracing Ramos, stopped the it

fight.

Not since his early fights with Kenny Lane and Doug Vaillant has Ortiz been eo/iilaued

49

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BOXING

ccHlInufd

SO Strong and

fierce.

A

natural welter-

weight from the waist up, Ortiz has had

an endless, lonely battle with weight since he first won the title. When he signed to fight Johnny Bizzairo he was

160 pounds. The night before the

fight

he was

still 139, four pounds over and an hour before the weigh-in he had

just

to endure the punishment of Turkish

order to get down.

baths

in

same

situation

Elorde

It

was the

when he fought Flash

November. He was so weak

in

for that fight he did not think he could

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But here, it is the only ‘top for about *5.00

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the deprivation

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mestic

money

is

sullen,

and naturally so. Ortiz, you sec. has always moved to the sound of trumpets. He likes to be around people who like to live and know how to live, and when he is pulled away from this atmosphere he finds ii unbearable. Yet now there seems to be direction to his

“WIOBEFOB •rue

go the distance, but Elorde. his skills considerably diminished, had nothing with which to hurt him. There was no weight problem for the Ramos fight. Ortiz had watched himself carefully for this one, and his body showed it. His skin had a pink glow to it, not the usual sallow color, and his face was not sunken. He was also quite garrulous. Usually, when he is in the

life

is

has learned wisely. His

life,

a reason for

and pain. His do-

once again solid, and he

how name

to invest his is

money

attached to a onc-

hour dry-clcaning service in San Juan that he hopes will become a chain, the beginning of a small business empire on the island.

"Make sure.” he said, "when the truck nice and clean and my name

N«w

KiBnliflc niothod givet

comes it is is up there

yov a

Bill

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Ramos

the fight. Bill?" he

was

asked.

»cienlifie

‘Well,

new method

he said.

wc have a problem with shirts."

"Wc

have to solve the

shirt

problem.”

"No.

Bill,

the fight.

supposed to be a

fight

You know

you're

manager."

"Oh. yeah.” he said. "Well, Carlos is 1 just hope the business is." it all seemed like a sad cor-

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fight.

Thoylo Corp., Dept. SO-9, S09 FtHh Ave.

Dealers, parts

nice and big." Daly hasa large part of the action,

of course, and he seemed more interest-

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of

POOL / Ted O'Leary Bohm. dismayed .spectators by strolling away from the table in the midst of a tense match for five minutes in the powder room. They came back with make-up restored to resume play. 'll pleases

Grandma shot out

the tights

me." Lassiter said of the

"A place where people meet to play pool should be like any female presence.

other classy meeting place— a country club, a theater or a fine re.staurant."

Qonie

of ihe poolroom proprietors on

hand

week

last

in Si.

Open pocket

Louis to watch

cham-

Last

week

Louis. Luther

Wimpy, who probably has played in as many murky poolrooms as anyone, conin music and carpets on the floor, a place where women can come and feel at ease.

the country’s best pocket-

billiard players

came to St.

Gleason’s movie The Hustler appears on

Lassiter, Irving Crane, Joe Balsis and Caras were there; also on hand were Red Raider Brcit. the Knoxville Bear

local television, business in their estab-

(Eddie Taylor). W'ccnic Beanie Slaton,

lishments doubles the next day. Never-

Machine Gun Lou Butera and Cham-

places

Congress of America, as long and respec-

pagne Eddie Kelly. Present, too. for the double elimination tournament were

younger."

the U.S.

billiard.s

pionship confided that whenever Jackie

theless the Billiard

whose

letterhead

is

table-looking as that of your

Communi-

Chest, has chosen to try to mute the

ty

more end

raHish aspects of the game.

this

To

that

year they added a new clement

a national championship tournament for

women,

the

first

held since a one-

58. of Springfield. Pa., four

times a world champion but mostly out

of competition since

won

the men's

his last title in 1949,

championship and

Mrs. Dorothy Wise.

52.

City. Calif, took S500

first

women's

division. Mrs.

S3,()(X).

of Redwood money in the

Wise has been

waiting a long time for .someone to put

on

a national event for

she could prove what

known

women

so that

some people have

— that

when

the

was 20 years

I

aton-Jefferson Hotel met most of Lassiter's tests

fora genteel place to play pool.

A

education

in

the high school in Eudora. 1

5-year-old from

Williamsion. Mich.; Susan Sloan,

who

spacious

would have

cigarettes

and philosopher as well as a cheerful hypochondriac and perennial champion, reacted Lassiter, a bachelor

two of whom. Miss Gorecki and Mrs.

was dominated by

a

decor of the palace

room were

tables in the corners of the

at a pocket.

Wimpy

it

fitted the

only slightly smaller rose-colored chandeliers.

to be a systems analyst;

hall,

of Versailles. Suspended over the four

an IBM computer school in Beaumont, Texas, where she is studying and 19-year-old Jackie Gorecki, a Cirand Rapids office receptionist w ho had to brush the shoulder-length blonde hair out of her blue eyes almost every time she aimed a ball attends

cordially to the intrusion of these aliens,

is

some of

to think of in

Room of the venerable Sher-

chandelier over the center table that

probably

she

me

went

I

The Gold

Rockhurst College

the best lady pool player in the country.

for years

frightens

It

la

Kans.; Chari Fate, a

timer in 1935.

So the 1967 tournament named two champions, both of them grandparents.

Jimmy Caras,

and gray-haired; San Lynn Merrick, a teacher of speech at in Kansas City; SheiBohm, a nurse's aid in RiKhestcr, Ind.; Betty Jo Hcmbcr. who teaches physical •Mrs. Wise, gentle

tinued. ’ll should be a place with piped-

The room's golden walls were broken by a series of mirrors flanked by gold-brocaded draperies. The carpet was

and flowered, and

thick

there wasn’t a

spittoon on the premises.

Among

the

spectators, nearly 1,000 of w hom turned finals on Friday evening, filter outnumbered cigars 200 to 1. The setting might have dismayed a romantic, reared on tales of taciturn pool

out for the

hustlers playing for fabulous stakes in

smoky

dives.

It

was

as

an Old West

if

buff had gone to Abilene

in

search of

shoot-’em-up saloons of the old

the

cattle-trail days,

and

the

only to find them gone

town engrossed

in talk

new Eisenhower Chapel. Blue blazers worn with

about the

bluc-and-silver

striped ties were required garb for the

players (the

women wore

red coats).

So

there the male contestants were, looking

nothing so

like ly

much

band of slightwho had de-

as a

ravaged veterans of

life

cided to play a sardonic joke and dress

up

like

a college football team on the

No

road.

conformist. I.assitcr wore his

blue blazer reluctantly after proclaiming that he

sweat

shirt.

would far rather play in a As it turned out. Wimpy

might have been happier

showed up into

DOROTHY 52

WISE. BEST OF

THE LAOV PLAYERS. STUDIES TABLE DURING FINAL MATCH

the

for the finals at

last

if

he hadn’t

all.

He moved

night easily enough, al-

though

fretting frequently

sinusitis

and announcing

over a case of

that his doctor

had just discovered that he had high blood pressure. In a double elimination tournament, the championship match pits an undefeated player, in this ease Lassiter, against

who has lost once hut has then emerged as w inner of the loser's bracket. The best of the losers tries to w in everything by beating the undefeated player twice. This turned out to he C aras, who, in order to win the tournament, played 12 matches, winning 11 of them, while Lassiter was playing only eight. In the final day of the tournament C'aras was faced with the seemingly insuperable task of playing and winning a player

four matches. F.arly beat Dallas

West of

afternoon he

in the

l.ovcs Park.

111.

Cham-

Later he bested Defending

69.

50

I

pion Irving Crane of Rt>chester. N.Y. X2. Iinj.shing

1.^0

run of 4.L Then

all

out the

game

with a

he had to do was beat

one cvcningWhile Wimpy spent most of the evening silling m a chair eating cherry drops and bewailing his health, Caras was busy making run after run. Caras moves briskLassiter twice in

makes

ly,

m

contrast

"Why

should a

his shots rapidly,

to the leisurely Lassiter.

professional player hesitate?” said Caras.

know what want

"I

I

.And he did, beating

to do,

Wimpy

game. "I'm a money player,”

the

and

I

do

1.‘'0

it.”

S2

in

fidtdle

you roam. The Kodak Instamatic 804 Camera

lets you pay attention to the .sights you’re seeing instead of the camera. Drop in

the film cartridge. Then wind the spring motor— and the advance automatically after each shot.

film will

Your 804 adjusts it.self for the speed of the film; makes the correct outdoor exposure setting for each picture; warns you when to use flash; switches to fla.sh spee
I‘rict

lo

rhande trilhout nolife.

first

Wimpy

told

during the intermission. "Well.” replied one of them, "there's

his suppt'rters

SJt.OOti at

start

stake here, so

why

don't you

playing?”

"I don't

mean

I

play for other people's

Wimpy. "I only play for way feel tonight.

money."

replied

myown.

Besides, the

I

1

wouldn't bet 5C that I'm breathing.” Wimpy fell behind in the second game, then seemed to rouse himself and w

run of 49

ith

a

went ahead of Caras 12.1Then Wimpy missed, and Caras

121.

balls,

played a safety, facing Lassiter with an

almost impossible four-ball combination shot.

Wimpy

could have responded with

a safety of his

own, but instead went for it and had to while Caras ran out

the combination, missed

watch

in frustration

game without missing a hall. Not une.xpectedly. Mrs. Wise became the second women's pocket billiards champion in U.S. history, the first since the legendary Ruth McCinnis ("Ruth once ran K3 balls on me." Lassiter rethe

called).

Mrs.

Wise,

however, had

to

struggle hard to beat Miss Merrick 7570.

Don’t while

"Tve been waiting 20 years

for this eonli/iued

53

Kodak Instamatic 804 Camera

POOL

Castrol with

fonilnued

chance,” said Mrs. Wise, “and

came

toil late.

almost

it

In pocket billiards the im-

portant things arc the eyes, nerves and leg muscles, I swim and ride a bike every day for the leg muscles but I can’t do much about the eyes and the nerves. I've played a lot of exhibitions around

liquid tungsten.

No

wear... any where.

the country,

He w as so on First

it

was the

Dozens of cars

in

streets of London.

through the mountains and deserts of

stop-and-go

Australia. Over 12,000 miles of dust,

traffic.

Each car was driven around the clock

grit

and blistering heat. Again, wear

-10,000 miles or more. Wear was

was

negiigible.

negligible.

In all

Then we went to northern Norway during

We

its

left

coldest winter in 100 years.

the cars out

in

the open and

started each one over 1500 times (with a

minimum 60-minute

starts).

In

each

case

wait

between

the

ice-cold

engines turned right over.

Next we took

a little

“pleasure" trip

we

we were unable

measure wear

engines lubricated

in

with Castrol with liquid tungsten. it

last?

We

to

How

don't know. Every

time we try to find out

it

sets another

record. Castrol Oils,

champ and

III.

once

I

beat him.

humiliated he jammed his hat

head and slamnted out the door

his

so hard he tore

women

really

men; we

it

know

olT a hinge. "Vou

shoot billiards as well as

just mi.ss

more often.” game no

In utter dedication to the

tested 35.000 cars over 200

million miles. Yet

long will

usually against a town’s

lop male player. In Rockford.

played the town

Inc.,

Newark,

N.

sas City, Mo.. Palo Alto, Calif.

J.,

Kan-

one

in St.

Louis excelled Miss Gorccki,

finished fifth. A couple of years ago when she wus out with a boy he sug-

who

He whipped

gested they play ikhjI.

and Jackie, who says

her,

she’s tried almo.st

every sport but archery, wasn’t happy.

She decided to keep playing until she improved. ‘‘In a few weeks," she said. "I

knew all

I

hall

hours a day

over a parking

in

water

in the

become

was

well

Now she

prac-

an oldtimc pool

lot in

"It’s the sort of place

it's

game

that to play this

ever wanted to do.”

tices five

Grand Rapids.

where they keep ’

ash trays,” Jackie said. ‘but just like

home

to

me.”

After being eliminated by Miss

Bohm,

Jackie sat silent alongside the table for several minutes.

Somebody asked

her

if

she’d he back for next year’s tourna-

ment. Looking more into space than

her questioner. Jackie said,

‘‘ril

at

be back

and back and back and back, and before I get through I’ll beat them all." Don't bnd bet against it.

JACKIE GORECKI; TEMPORARILY A LOSER

54

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ANOTHE» »'-'iO>^ CAR SII..N or int OCtAOON.

(§) V^l^i'.'P'rtTTk

Jack ami Sally Hanson make heauiifully cut pants for Jackie Kennedy, Audrey Hepburn and so lOs that they live a beautiful

many more beautiful size

life, liy

day

their

backyard

is

headquarters for a Hollywood sport-in. By ni^ht their ouw discotheque. The Daisy {right),

is

a Beverly Hills drop-in

for the likes of Dickie Smothers {greeting Jack), Bobby Darin, Peter Sellers

-and an a.s.sortment of beautiful size lOs

WITH THE JAX PACK LIFE

BY

DAN JENKINS

CONTIMUeO

56

JAX PACK

E

eonitnued

very night and most every day in the technicolor

man named

of a

Jack Hanson

They pour down from

rains

it

dream

life

girls.

the heaven of Beverly Hills with

those exquisite faces, luscious figures and that long, serious

They

hair the color of ravens or oranges or sunlight. actresses

and

dancers and models, heiresses and

starlets,

Hanson

conveniences, and Jack

relishes

them all—every

unimpoverished one. He sees them

slinking, shiny,

are

the

in

evenings, either Twiggy-eyed or smoldering, at his brutally

The Daisy. He

them

and buses carried

sketched what they ought to look

at the tennis

And

siders to be the perfect existence.

matches

he studiously,

sin-

and ever so southern-Californialy asks, "Can you imagine a world without beautiful women or tennis?”

cerely



Well, a lot of guys operating

probably can. but Jack Hanson not. really, of

for himself

sketched on

He

not of their world.

is

any world except the one he keeps creating

and the beautiful people.

It is

an amazing world

And

their figures better,

look

fitting pants,

Women

the players." he says. But he

lasting contribution to the world;

of fannies

though

That

is

company

pretty tough

known

New

yet in the

Hanson, who

for

not

is

Morality Belt, but as of

two or three lawn parties ago —one of them for Super Squirt, or Twiggy - he was holding his own. He was still drawing envious stares

coachwork by

J,

in

1934 Rolls-Royce with

his

Whitney Gurney ("They say

its

that's very

The

tones toward his massive white Pola Negri used to

Every rich

squirrels

gin cards

tm’ pipe

man

drill site.

Jack Hanson

because they arc wrong.

He

is

convinced beyond a shadow of

He seems

alive.

at

a beauty freak. Jill St.

turncd-on with the times than the

more

amused

is

Jackie Kennedy.

And

at

to

thus he

the finish line of the

John

that he

feel

is

He may

be

right.

He

hasn't been

when he was playing shortstop in the Pacific

team

yet.

the time,” he

weren’t

more

Mayo — "The

says— he used

attractive.

They

to

best

wonder

didn't dress

Wc

shop.

mind,

who was also now the chief

designed a

Hills

lot

a sort

a close friend of

designer of Jax.

of things



in the

awful

in

to

to dress, she

have dinner

in

kitchen at La Scala. Near his shop is

the intimate booths

at

Newman, Zsa Zsa Gabor. of young ladies who look

— and

most

Beverly

and

Arc dc Triomphe of Hollywood

the

may

almost any balmy night one

lot

lion girl

c.specially

those low-cut knit dresses.”

like

Hanson showed Marilyn Monroe how

home, La Scala

likely arc.

likes

Wood and

Natalie like the

But back

his res-

glance

and sec the

an

Dodge Rebel-

in

the kitchen,

ah ha. getting special attention from the manager, Manuel Tortoza.

at

Years ago.

Los Angeles Angels

Coast League on a team that included Lou

in baseball at

If

in

of Paul

will rule.

wrong

for the

Novikoff. Eddie Waitkus and Eddie

why women

in the

showed him the in-most way

be a force, allowing only the fun

will still

people into The Daisy, from which they

is

the early

in

made us, it was Marilyn," says Han"She wore our things constantly, everywhere, and was

always

more

secure in

World Conquest Derby.

customers

his best

"If any one person son.

La Scala

of the world, and

rest

know and

vi-

look

varied, of course, al-

of purchasing power that includes

Jack and his wife. Sally,

around

he

is

days was Marilyn Monroe,

is

And

his ffagship

who can

Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor and

On

all

from

York. Palm Beach.

to be weighted slightly in the direc-

Marlene Dietrich, One of

taurants.

them

the thought that southern California will ultimately nip

Red Hiina

Row

of Murderers’

has his freak-out. There are golf nuts, fiends, travel buffs, social

of Hanson’s shops

would seem

it

I

mini or mod. depending on the clientele.

hip.

clientele

with her

and those who simply do nothing more than plop down on country club tables and talk about set-

on a

therefore

Beverly Hills where

in

live.

and car addicts, spa

boat, ski

in five different, genteel

home

New

tion of the two-yacht housewife, At the top there

impressive." he says), wearing sneakers, a sweat shirt and

a baseball cap, and honking along

to please

it."

So much so that Hanson’s em-

all right.

it,

love

Beverly Hills to

in

haughty or

that well

should display

"Most everybody likes make some snug-

could

brating with a group of groovy salesgirls

named "The most important men young lady

women would

I

Southampton. San Francisco and Chicago, each one

Hefner and Jack Hanson."

that a

women

no other reason than

pire of exclusive shops reaches far out

my father, Hugh

it

for

if

just thought if

I

the

love

Jr. said recently.

vital to

as

"1 got a few sus-

like.

cute broads." he says.

at

that, don’t they?

Sinatra

Nancy

So

slacks.

around the league,

him. "Jax clothes arc actually the result of the fact that like to

America arc

Hanson has become so

baggy

those presplcndor days, convinced that he

in

would one day make a

presses in factories

drill

of leisure, recreation, elegance, pleasure and status.

58

some of

picious glances from

Hanson's simple idea was that

afternoons

when women

the early 1940s,

the Angels

Sacramento, Oakland and San Diego. Hanson sat and

to

glorification of the female bottom.

in the

and softball games he organizes to round out what he con-

in

in

Joan Crawford with broad shoulders out

like

to here, or like Charlie Chaplin with

the trains

in

sees

have made him wealthy. He sees them

is

he decided. This was

looked cither

sportswear shop, Jax, buying the hip-slim pants that

private club. his

right,

will

be Jack and Sajly.

Hanson got from La .Scala in only

the a

Los Angeles Angels

little

longer than

doublcheader: a few years. With the

it

to the kitchen

takes to play a

money he made

play-

opened a small shop on Balboa Island Slocked with pants he had designed and that some kind ing baseball, he

ladies in the

county had .sewed for him. Unable to afford

advertising, he began to con

around town into becoming

some of the belter-built girls shopwindow models. Well,

live

you know California

wore ihc pants

in

way

to

show off for you. They and the crowds came. The Hanson was on his

They'll

girls.

the window,

crowds also started

buy

— and Jack

often

was

wood

the girls

and do not wrinkle around the backs of the knees.

a crease

While these simple innovations streamlined Hanson past everyone

else in the industry, they

who hung around

Sally. I-ike

windows most

the

Hanson, she had come out of Holly-

High, but a few years

later,

she knew something about clothes;

and she at least,

also thought

she knew what

anyone

el.se's.

“The

fact

Hanson's

form of the

He

hired her. and they built the business together. After is still

Hanson

new item

it

is

takes a hard look at every

the designer, but to

make

sure

jazzy enough.

What

the

to

women's sportswear would un-

later.

But Hanson did

women

will

it

first,

and thousands of

And. them

is

finally,

sizes

can be fit

try to

do

and

The

make

made

the pants

of Hanson

to put anything in pockets, anyway. the pants legs trim without

making

they arc lined and in consequence hold

better than

to the precise

lOs and, to u lesser degree,

volume business," he

u

less general.

A

size 10 in

a variety of size lOs.

Hanson deplores

the idea of

Our

10

usually be for

Webb

some

most is

making

who

princess or duchess

jewel for

it,

says,

"so our

stores has to be

for the perfect 10."

special pants for the

One supposes

less-than-clegant figure, but he will.

David

best.

fit

revealed very sim-

made

designed for and

niftiest size 8s

“We don't

dead of night and promise to wear

it

is

curvy broads."

to

side to

no room he

skintight

styles are

sell

revolu-

docs

tighter, he eliminated pockets; in a pair

pants there

we only

first

still

the back. Snugness began there. Next, to

even

atfiucni

is,

was move the zipper from the

argue that he

tionary thing he did

sooner or

else

basis of that secret

size 12s.

able to

Hansons did

doubtedly have been done by somebody

The

by Hanson.

ply

convinced Hanson that she could design them better than

seven years they got married. Sally

suffice to explain

why women marvel

continuously over the fact that they seem to

xhe liked to wear. She liked to wear Jax pants, and she

he.

do not

the true secret of Jax pants, to explain

to immortality.

One of

agree to have it

it

it

will

pay a

will

delivered

only

in

in front

the

of a

group of happy banana smokers on Sardinia.

“hven today,

the only advertising

broad walking down the Neither Jack nor Sally

more.

we have

street in a pair frets

is

a iiirncd-on

of pants," he says.

much over

the business any-

Sally, a perfect size 10, creates the pants

on

herself conllnutd

When the gang gathers

to

watch Tony Curtis pitch sofihall,

girls

wear Jax ami La Scuta Owner Jean Leon, talking

to

Jack.sportsa Dodger cap.

59

J

A X PACK,

continued

i»n

IKIIr«j^i

The Hanson Sunday

ritual starts with

a

".i

tennis

tournament

with muslin and a mirror. She remembers

on her

ahem,

that they were,

line that

we wanted

when

“There was

Who

needs

it?

in

what was once Pola Negri’shackyardhul

dawned

bisque, about six blocks

sweater

erly Hills Hotel,

down. All

We didn't, as a mat-

of fact," she says. For Jack the realization came in an

at the Beverly Hills

shop one afternoon,

and Jack answered.

Jack.” Hanson

never met Sinatra. “1 want

to do.

who ought

Why don't

Hanson

you

said.

"Dean’s got

to have a job to give her something let

her help out in your store?”

didn’t have to ask

Dean who, although he had

nc%er met Martin. "Clreat idea," said

on foot

patrols the neighborhood, bouncing

much of the

time, tanned

and

and trim

for 4H years, smiling

and

energetic, eager for his days to be high-

by hip conversations, such as the following between

two screenwriters

at Naic-n-Al’s.

“1 used to be. I’m

Cary Grant now,"

“No. not after the "Who’s open?"

first.

I

“Uh. Laurence Harvey McQuccn.”

Hanson promptly.

Since that time the Beverly Hills shop has had a

number

Says Hanson, “This

is

from the Beverly Wilshirc Hotel, which has that drugstore

else

S500 hairbrush for

sale,

half a

block from

curiously specializes in lobster

don’t want to pay the

is

open. And,

really fun. I’d never leave

body would ever want to he

is

place that his

Hanson

bills.”

think, Steve

except that Sally likes

it,

Europe once a

York, for some reason, though

The

t

the greatest place in the world.

It’s

to travel. She likes to get to

Hamburger Hamlet, which

said the other.

“All month?”

Nancy and Tina, and Dean Martin’s three daughters. Deana. Ciail and Claudia. The shop is perfectly located for all of the fun people. It is right on the corner of Wilshirc and Bedford, two blocks

60

Bev-

Delicatessen.

of interesting salesgirls, namely Frank Sinatra’s daughters,

with the

at the

The Daisy and

“Say. aren’t you Jack Palancc, the actor?" asked one.

you to do me a favor," Sinatra

a daughter

now Jack and Sally'sown country club.

from the Polo Lounge

specializes in television executives,

blocks from La Scala, four blocks from

lighted

have to ask Frank who. although he had

which

a short order of scrambled eggs and lox from Nate-n-Al’s

casual, alert

said the voice. “Frank.” didn't

five

Hanson

altogether different way.

The phone rang

is

it

this

to carry, and they turned us

of a sudden wc thought; ter

rich.

in

I

year,

can’t imagine

New

and

New

why any-

York, or go there."

likes to be

more than anywhere

huge nco-southern-style house on North Beverly

Drive, the one with the all-white hitching post by the curb.

The house

is

quite a place to be.

It

is

an old Hollywood

treasure, reflecting everything that was. it

symbolizes the success of Jax.

He

and to Jack Hanson

believes that he stole

it

for 5200,000. paying cash, as he does for alntost every-

He owes no

thing.

one. All of the stores arc paid for. includ-

brownstoncon

ing the

New York's 57lh .Street and the West

Los Angeles factory where the clothes of other

made and

are

a lot

McQueen

one of Hollywood’s notable hermits. He did

is

turn out for Twiggy later on. and he was out this night, but

normally he appears only to race his motorcycle on Sun-

He explained that every man had to make his own scene. He hides in his home in Brentwood, and it used to days.

be easier than

it is

now.

"Yeah, man," he

real estate.

“Jim Ciarncr moved

said.

in next

door

As enchanted with the movie business as the next man who went to IISC. Hanson who is becoming a producer

and brought the heat."

-

that Hal

whole society of tennis worshipers arc accustomed to dropping by. racket in hand, thirst in mouth, hunger in

followed her, and that now. per-

stomach. Han.son. a good player himself, quickly organizes

glories in the big hou.se

I’ola Negri, the silent-film

Roach, the studio

bo.ss.

and

its

grounds,

in

the fact that

queen, once lived in

it,

haps as Mickey Mantle came after Joe DiMaggio

Yankee

outfield,

it is

house

Inside, the

is

in the

There

books. 1 here

Is

is

Instant tournaments.

things.

Jack Hanson's turn.

sorts of pairs

Segura, to the

a cozy library with bookshelves

and

One

Newmans,

Court feuds

will

even weeks, the stakes

increasing from SIO a corner to 5100.

is

which has a

ceiling high

enough

for a

pop

a coppery kitchen with a gas stove the size of

Among

Hanson's possessions the stove ranks up

there with the '34 Rolls. Downstairs there

basement

a

is

game room complete with pull-down movie screen, a collection of Meissen china, a bar, sofas and some Steve McQueens and John Dereks and other fun-world decorations like occasional Linda Hvanscs and Susan St. Jameses.

When

Daisy.

Got

to be at

The

outside.

Beyond a court-

birth of the blues, the

the large

swimming

get into

the pool

is

in

at-

bygone days. To one side of

a formal garden leading la/ily to an arbt>r under-

neath which

wrote about

.sits

in

the dollhouse that

F.

The Last Tycoon. Past

all

Fitzgerald

Scott

of this

is

a sort

of mini country club, which consists of another guest cottage,

shower room and

The

Dai.sy. That's

where

it

all

happens.

whole U.S. has wound up trying

Hanson bought the property on Rodeo Drive

where the original Romanoff's had stood and

He

discotheque.

money,

to

Daisy.

In 1963 Jack

really,

his

built

did so without the intention of

making

but only because he wanted a place to go

night. All of the

good Hollywood

or "slipped.'' places like Ciro's.

spoi-s

had

McKambo,

who can

at

either folded

the Crcsccndo-

"Thcrc wasn't a meeling place anymore." he where the alive people

lighted tennis court.

con-

all

After 191 years. 10 wars, a couple of depressions and the

is

tacked Rudolph Valentino

Samantha it

games are over and everyone has sped away in his or her Rolls. Bentley, K.xcalibur. Mercedes or Ferrari, the Hansons lake a nap and then head for The

surrounded by white statues and has a mosaic of a

squid designed into the bottom, one that might have

And

the daily tennis

is

pool.

they end. others

an unending supply of baked

hams, meat loaves and beverages.

The overwhelming splendor is

When

Spectators will change from a cluster of

hggars to another of Sonnys and Chers. tinues. with Sally hauling out

yard flanked by guest cottages It

used to be

develop, and challenge niaiches will

stretch out over a period of days,

start.

police),

There

u caboose.

who

Paul and Joanne,

attracted flollywood's nobility, an explosion of flashbulbs

fly.

likely to discover all

is

on the court from the Panchos. CJonzaIcz and

occasions as the spring party for Twiggy (an evening that

and the

as he does by

next-door neighbors.

real

a formal living room, used mainly on such

much by day

A

decorated with startling good taste for

an cx-shortstop. There arc antique desks, chairs, tables and cabinets.

Jack Hanson entertains as night,

says.

"A

place

contribute something could

get together."

O

There ne

recent evening as

Hanson was

entertaining a

normal Thursday group - Steve and Ncilc Mc-

Queen. John Derek and Linda F>ans. Rako the Parisian

model and

a visiting

New

a touch of air pollution

Yorker who

fell

the scene lacked

he flicked on the lights and sur-

veyed the magnificence of his backyard.

You

he asked. sure could.

could also imagine the parties (hat

might go on there now. or should. Put in a

few-

do/cn

Barbara Parkinses, maybe, pipe out the old stereo, and hello

from Hollywood, guys.

Steve

you go

McQueen to relax?"

still

fees

Hordes of celebrifrom the entertainment and sports fields are members,

ties

but hordes are not. and

in.

said, "It's groovy, Jack, but

A it

lot is

of V

isitors

in.

Hanson has taken

who have

do manage

great delight in re-

tried to talk their

to talk their

with a proper introduction from a

way

way in. but usuDean Martin or

Leo Durochcr. or with dream girls on their arms. The Daisy, on any given night, is a noisy, fren/ied circus of the most gorgeous women imaginable, with Jack Hanson a

holding court

where do

that

have gone from 5250 to 51.000.

hundreds of people who think they have

something to "contribute" and want

ally

You

now. of course. The Daisy sw ings so much

fusing entrance to several

’Can't you just imagine the parties that used to go on here'?”

is

Hanson's membership and there arc

at a

boss table in the center of

it

all.

It is

a

place where this great montage of thigh-high miniskirts and

glued-on Jax pants are doing the skate, the dog, the

stroll.

JAX PACK

coAilnufd

the swim, the jerk, the

bomp, the monkey,

the

fish,

the

slip,

the

duck, the hiker, the Watusi, the gun. the slop, the sway, the sally and the joint. Like

all

good Beverly

Hills

children, Daisy dancers never even sweat. If

arc other treats.

Doing an

Peter Falk or a

Tony

room

will

floor, there

bar

Irish coffee at the

be a

will

Curtis. Shooting K-ball in another

Omar

be a Richard Conte or an

around the

gallcried. Scattered

the noise room, will be the

Sharif, properly

main room,

tables in the

Zsa Zsas. the Joan Cohns, the

Oleg Cassinis, the David Hemmingses, the Ryan O'Neals

and

17 different varieties of textured-hosed teen-agers, each

capable of saying, ‘'Well, hi.” and making

fully

‘Where's the

like.

Compared And.

Aldcn gazed

sound

other discotheques arc slums.

Norman

lloor. swirling with

dance

human

decor, and put

it

Hanson's

perspective

all in

with a joke.

"Oh.

those young

girls,

I

am

its

popcorn machine

and sham.” he

going from casting

office, willing to sell their

how happy

whom

dated Sue Lyon,

I

there

is

said.

"Think of

office to ca.stmg

souls for a part.

can't

I

you

fell

to be a part of it."

anything that delights Jack Hanson as

being in his

New World

rumble

at

The Daisy

much is

it

as

the

weekly softball game he has arranged between a couple of

power-loaded

outliis

Raskin's

called

Raiders and

--

big

surprise— The Daisy.

Jean Leon,

membered

who owns La for his

or how' to play a cheerleader

it.

The other

SMU

at

hospital the

a tiny residential

in

a best-of-seven

playground called Barrington

nearby Brentwood. The diamond

l-icld in

— which

some spectators think

is

sits

hard by a

prophetic

— and

games are catered voluntarily by good old Manuel

Torloza from La Scala, drinks and popcorn.

throw

a

a

TV

who

When

brings ice cream, coffee, cold

a clutch series ends, the losers

party, and the following

Sunday

new

a

series

once suggested that Raskin’s Raiders

perhaps seek a different opp
won

a scries.

Producer Jimmy Harris (Paths of

The Bedford Incident), a Raider mainstay

dory.

LAflila.

center

field, said,

"What? And not

get to see

Tony

in

C'urtis

try to pitch?”

The

lineups arc frequently as

Raiders,

who are named

and friend of

for

Mike Dante

lumber broker

a

The show-biz

Harris', has a fairly set team.

at short.

Bob Kaufman

amusing as the games. The

Jimmy Raskin,

the pitcher.

Doak Walker's

during

producer now.

Aaron

best re-

box scores and

Spelling,

day.

who

statistics.

in partnership with

Danny

The

rest

of Hanson’s team

is

flexible,

and

all st>rts

of

of whom are Anthony FranciBobby Darin, Mark Goddard. Michael Ryan O'Neal. Peter Stone and Tom Stern, who is better known at present as Samantha Eggar's husband. Samantha often leads The Daisy cheering section, and is joined by Anne Francis, Suzanne Pleshcttc and Nancy Sinatra. The closest that one team ever came to sabotaging the other was when Jimmy Harris, who used to date Nancy Callan.

Boots Are

Made for

make

a recording

titled

These

Walkin'. "That’s the kind of intuition

up against.” says Harris. The games proceed smoothly enough, and arc generally won by such scores as 19 3. 28-27. 12-10. Every now and

they're

when

Sunday comes along, like the one showed up to make some shots Most of

the television crews

for local viewing.

them had been

players were very excited.

The

of cameras

in front

ail

of their

lives

but not,

Hanson made cenain a larger named Annette and Jocelyn were on

of course, as athletes. Jack

number of dream hand, and

his

girls

whole stable of players

in their freshly laun-

dered red-and-white shirts with The Daisy inscribed on them.

all

the

first

inning was about to begin, the Raiders were

swinging their bats with a venom, and. out on the

mound, Aaron Spelling, the producer, was taking serious windups and delivering his rainbow pitches. The girls on the sidelines were posing casually on the lawn, all in Jax pants, their serious hair billowing ju.st right. The cameras were in position. Just then Jack Hanson saw something wrong, and went to the mound.

What he did was, he yanked Aaron Spelling before the game even started and put in Tony Curtis to pitch. Better

Norm Alden

at first.

Actor

Actor Richard Laporc

in right.

Writer

Only Jack Hanson could have subbed an actor for a

Dave (Fireman) Wolper No one knows

producer. Only he, only now, and only in his beautiful

types include Harris, Actor

catching, Producer

pitching and Pancho Gonzalez at third.

exactly what Jerry Bakalrian docs except play

62

man

celebrities get to play, a few

As

When someone just

Left Fielder

is

little

Thomas, one who turns out shows faster than he gives up singles, and this means no one rides him too severely.

begins.

had

is

can't pitch terribly well but keeps is

One

Scala. a wiry

game, when he showed up with five knowing what position he would play

first

different gloves, not

then, however, a special

Every Sunday they meet, engaging series', at

noted for two things.

Jack Hanson's lineup has two noteworthy weaknesses, but everyone agrees they arc lovable.

Sinatra, advised her not to f

is

Harris discovered, and

an elaborate awards banquet he wins a prize

at

1961 Chevrolet between two Rolls-Royces.

osa. Peter Falk.

town with

this crazy tinsel

for a heart. It's all alabaster all

He once

Spelling all

one night, a good actor named

at the

scented, glowing

it

acid'.'"

The Daisy,

to

sitting there

the second baseman. Dr. Steve Zaks,

each year

for Unconscious Hostility, having persisted in parking his

one can remove one's eyes from the dance

left field.

But

for the

world.

show, he

said.

Can anybody

in

without Jack Hanson?

southern California imagine a world

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Fifth

WEEK

BASEBALL’S

HERMAN WEISKOPF

by

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Manager

(3-2)

Grady

"After

Hatton:

to

Brown was hurt trying tc make a when he angril> slammed his

first.

Menke's herner, Dave came in the dugoul and kicked things around, and after that he pitched pretty good." Good enough to beat

catch, Kalinc

ever done."

I want to do is get the ball up in the air and watch it sail out of here." Santo watched

General Manager Joe Brown of PiiisBiiRaH (1-6; called a clubhouse meeting and told his men. "If we don't win the pet^riant it won't be because we've been mismanaged. We will place the blame on

two

25 players

CHICAGO

(7-1)

a^ntinucd

climb and tied fur

game

against the

Ron Santo home run.s.

said. It's

i(s

implausible

Ikforc a

place.

first

Reds “This

in is

Wrigicy Field. day for

the Braves 4

a great

hot. the air

is

muggy, and

I'm going to uppercut every swing

I

lake.

All

balls sail uut of there that day. giving

him four homers for the week. st. toui-s (.V5) pitching was racked up for 27 runs in three losses to the Giants, and then the Cardinals frittered away the rest of their lead games at the (they were in first place by start

who

had to return to St. Louis to attend Reserve meetings. Cincinnati (1-6) tried a little of its only win came when the Reds backed Milt Pappas’ five-hit pitching with IX hits to beat the Dodgers 14-0. Mel Queen, suffering from acute indigestion, resorted to taking

pills

NLw YORK

spill a

ll-run

his players bat out

(4-4)

first

four-game senes. But the offenweek was the Giants' inning against the Cardinals.

Siandmgi. Chi4S'?9. SiL4&

1

,

number of

innings could be played; the day before even

Denis Menke's homer off Dave Giusti of the Astros apparently helped the Braves

3S.

SF

Pbil

36 38.

41-36

LA

29.

rather than win. Explained hou.sion

.Minnie

liever

to the Angels

Baseman Al Weis of Chicago (4-3) was lost, probably for the season, when he

-Second

"I

have never

suffered a torn cartilage in his knee in a col-

with nothing done about it." Home runs continued to be the undoing of Jim Nash of KANSAS CMY (2-5). who gave up two of

them

as he lost for the seventh time. Nash.

12-1 last season,

gave up only

six

homers

in

rank Robinson of the Orioles

127 innings then, hut this year has already

(Robinson suffered a bram concussion and double vision and was sidelined, toe). But

given up 14 in 113 innings, bai iimori (3-5)

Wayne Causey.

eighth

lision with

F

Weis's replacement, beat

the Orioles 3-2 with a three-run despite a lengthy injury

list,

homer and.

the first-place

While Sox. in the middle of an tX-gamc sequence against the Twins. Tigers and Orioles. opened up their biggest lead of the season. DFTROIT (3-3) lost both Al Kalinc (broken hand) and Gales Brown (dislocated wrist) and was as close to eighth place as

one-run games and briefly fell into (3-4). place behind nfw York Yankee hitting was still a thing of Ihc past. The team batting average sank to .215. the lowest in either league and only three points above the alhime modern major league low set by the While Sox in 1910. lost three

SUndinit. Ch> 43 29,

Mmn

B«s 39

Cim

39-34 34. B4lt 3 5 39, NY 34 39.

38 37

KC 34

43.

34,

Dtl 3939-39. 44

C»l

Wllh 32

showed up for a "big" doubleheader against the Orioles. That might have been a fans. Barely 14.0(XS

understandable (hat when

Bill

Rigncy. Ihc man-

and II borrowing some magic from nearby Dis-

blessing, for the last place Angels lost 16 4

I

Then, as

26 games, reached ..500 and were only 2Vi games out of second place. No one conUibutcd more during this upward climh than Minnie Rojas. He was called on to relieve 14 times, gave up 1 hits in 26H innings, had an ERA of 0.31, won four games and saved eight others. These accomplishments have been gratifying for Mincrvino Alejandro Rojas, who at 20 was a soldier in the Cuban army, at 26 was toiling in Ihc Mexican l.cague and now. at 28, is the most effective reliever in baseball. Although softspoken Minnie says little, Kigney. still gainfully employed, is always ready to serve as his spokesman.

a reliever

who could throw

strikes

A month ago Ihc Angels were in last place al] that Rigney had going for him was a tenuous vote ofconridcncc from a disenchanted front office Last year the Angels finished a promising belter.”

and about

hoping to move up even higher

in the

Dean Chance to the Twins Don Mincher and Jimmie Hall. Chance became and

standings, traded

early pitching sensation of Ihc league, a flurry of

Rojas (hdou) winning one

seen a pitcher use the spitball so flagrantly

ager of the California Angels, speaks of Relief Pitcher Minnie Kojas he does so in superlatives. Kigney

"fve never had

who

game and saving two more, edged toward the first division. Said Gil Hodges of Wash-

claims that Rojas "has been Just about perfect" and says unabashedly that in his 12 years as a manager,

sixth and,

Uhlacndcr. Tovar,

ington (1-5) after a 4 3 loss and Pitcher Jack Hamilton:

CmO-

38 36, Pill 36-36, 33 42. Hou 29 47. NY 27 45 All

AMERICAN LEAGUE

HIGHLIGHT It IS

two of

let

as well as gulps of air

rained out before the rci)uircd

lose

price."

which he

sive highlight of the

1

Tovar and Ted

when their bats did not, cifvh.and (4-3) owed three of its victories to scoreless relief work by George ( ulver and John O’Donoghuc. plus a three-run pinch-hil homer by Fred Whiitkld. CMitokstA (4-2), with Re-

they

from an oxygen tank between innings, yet lost to the Dodgers 3-0. Chico Ruiz spent for a pair of custom-made alligator S3 spikes. They were no help; a grounder went through his legs and allowed the Dixlgers to beat the Reds 7-5. In all. los ANOtLt.s 14-3) took four of five games from the Reds, with Claude Osteen, who later won for the llth lime, and l>on Sutton pitching shutouts. ATLANTA (2-2) had a had week. The Braves led the Astros 5but the game was

2-1 and 3-2 on tic-breaking hits by Cesar

Manager Wes

the

in

SAN tRANC-tsco

everything, but

Home runs by Tony Conigliaro enabled Boston (4-2) (o win three games, hut MtNNi-soTA (5-1) stopped ihc Red Sox

Westrum pointed out the mistake to the umpires, and Jose Pagan’s two-run double, which hud seemingly pul the Pirates in front 5 -4. was nullified, phiiaou pmia (5-3) and (5-3) Amasscd 48 runs as

of turn.

The CardiTim Mc-

bat into the bat rack. "That." said a cha-

grined Kalinc, "is the dumbest thing I’ve

played center licld and third base last week, ha.s played second third, short and all three outfield spots this season. Tight pitching by Jim Kaai (two wins, one a shutout) and Dave Boswell earned the Twins to victories

inadvertently

nals were missing three players-

Carver. BssbTolan and Alex Johnson

who wouldn’t pay

But Manager Harry Walker had to hlamc

himself for a loss to the Mels

of the week) by committing a scries

ol costly errors against the Mels.

2.

for

the

not even

homers by Mincher could placate Angel

if

neyland. the Angels began winning.

I

hey

won

l'7

of

their next

1

65

PAM KRCSF.

•wiMMiNG

|7.

world record holder

in the 500-yard freestyle, swam the 400-meter freestyle in 4.36.8 to cut 1.2 seconds off the world mark at the Fort 1-auderdale (Fla I Open Swimming and

FOR THE RECORD

Dising Championships.

BARBARA riRRFU,

TRACK A PIKLO

a

19-

year-old sprinter for the Los Angeles Mercuretles. ran the lOO-meicr dash in 1 1 I at the National A

AC

Women’s championships

MOTOR SRORTS

UILL STIRKIT of Owcn^buro, K>

BOATiNS

dfONt hii 29-foot hemi-powercd boat. Mitt Chrytlrr Crfw. (o v.clory the Wofid’v CTiampionihip Race (nr unlimiled hydroplanes on (he Detroit Ri\ er ipatr 32).

m

-

his

POOL

BILL TUCKt K of Los Angeles rolled a 9,095 to defeat Bobby Cooper of Fort Worth by 67 pins in the 527.500 I Paso Open tournament.

ROWING

total ol

I

CARLO'S ORT IZ retained his world lightweight crown with a over Sugar Ramos of .Mestcu the fourth round of a title bout in San Juan, Puerto Rico (page 2S).

BOXING

TKO

m

HARVARD’S undefeated varsity crew heal the Vesper Boat Cluh of Philadelphia by a length and a half at Orchard Beach. N.Y. to qualify as the U S. entry for the Pan American Games in August (page 44). In the single sculls will be JOHN NLTnN

of the Long Beach (Calif.) Rowing Asso-

ciation.

who outdistanced clubmate John Van Blom

by a few

EAST

utes to

weighls

remained unbeaten against muldlewhen he scored a unanimous decision over Lester of San Francisco in a scheduled 10in Oakland. Calif

rounder

BILL Casper

shot a 6-under-par 65 in beat Art Wall by four strokes in an 18-holc pUyolT for the 5200,000 Canadian Open championship in Montreal {page 46).

France’s

CaTHFRINF. I.ACOSTE.

22.

became

the

ever in the history of the U S. Women's Open Golf Champiotuhip. Hot Springs, Va. (page 34).

m

HARNESS RACING

RFECT FREIGHT

(531.80) -PI a three-guartcr-lcngth victory over 70-1 shot the mile-and-a-half 5100,000 United at Yonkers, N.Y . while the odds-on favorite Ruqwepine broke stride in the stretch and finished fiflh.

won

He Sweet

m

Nations Trot

HORSE RACING

-France's 20-1

shot

TANEB won

New

CARAS. 58. a four-tune national Springlield. Pa . defeated 4B-yearold professional Luther Lassiter of F.lirubeih Cilv. N.C. 150 82. I SO- 123 in the finals ol the t'.S Open Pocket Rillurds Tournament in St. Louis (page S3).

Former World Welterweight Champion LUIS RO-

Jimmy

ormula

champion from

DRIGUEZ

GOLF

I

JIMMY

LLr TAVLOR JR of tX>»ney, Calif- shattered the late Donald CampbcH's 276.33 mph world waterspeed record as he averaged 2B5.2I27 ptph for the two one-milc runs in his i
JACK BRARMAM

Australian

Repco-Brabham to a Vi-Up I Zealand’s Denis Hulme in the 219.5-mile Grand l*rix of !- ranee in I.e Mans drove

victory over

feet.

in Santa Barbara, Calif to equal the world record TbNNESStb STATE, however, look the team title for the second year in broke the 800a r>>w as MADFI INI melcr national mark 2 03 6 and the Tigcrbcllcs the 800-yard medley relay (I 41.7), set another

MANMNfi m

m

as'AussieVoN^c’i AR KF 'belle«d"Michel* Ja”*s 1965 two-mile mark by 2.8 seconds with a clocking 19.8 m Vacsieraas. Sweden, and JCDY POL-

ofS

LOCK. also of Ausiralu. cut .1 second off Ann Packer’s KOU-mcier run with a time of 2 01 in Helunkt, Finland. MILEPOSTS

NAMED

Ashcad coach of the American Bavkclha II Association's Denser fraiKhise. BOB Bass. 38. coach and athletic director at Oklahoma Baptist University for the past 15 years. Bass, soled

1967 NAlA Coach of the Year, compiled a won-losi record of 275-143 and gained ihe 1966 national championship.

SENTENCED: To

GERMANY

took four evenls wxhin 40 mindominate the Henley Royal Regatta in Henley-oo-Thames, F.ngland. as the heavyweight crew of Leipzig’s S.C. W'issenschaft Club defeated London’s Tideway Scullers by two and a half lengths for the Grand Challenge Cup. Il was Ger-

DHFK

many’s

third straight victory in the event. Comell's favored lightweights retained the Thames Cup for

BRIT-

the only U.S. win. while Eton College gamed AIN'S one triumph the schoolboy eights.

m

mcni terms N.J-.

two consecutive life-imprivonfor a triple tavern slaying in Paterson. 30, a

RUBIN (HURRICANE) CARTER,

former middleweight boxing contender.

SYNDICATED-

America's No.

NPSl PITTSBURGH (92)iied Baltimore 2 2 and St. Louis 3-3 and moved back into the EgsIern Division lead. BALTIMORE 190), hack in second place, lied one and lost one. as did ATLANTA 184). less

.

PHILADEl PH1A

games

to

its

(65) added two more wmstreak of five— a 4- I loss to 1 I he. In the Western Division

YORK (57) and a OAKLAND (107). streak

ended

in

a

I

)

and

tie

its

with

seven-game winning

ChKago, was

way

still

ANGELES <91 which look a then tied the Cluefs ST. CHICAGO (70) each ued one, and

out in front of LOS ime from Atlanta 2

POUlS (83

NEW

though I

1.

I

1

.

I

Thoroughbred,

for a record 54,8 million by OwnOgden Phipps. DIED: DON HAYES, 55. presidcnl of the Du Quoin Slate Fair who. wiih his brother Eugene, was instrumental in moving The Hambleloiuan to Illi-

nois. with his wife

SOCCER

I

BUCKPASSF.R, er

Ruby, 52; near Henderson, Ky.

DIED:

m a small plane crash,

PRIMO CARNERA.

60. former worldcirrlsosis of the

heavyweight boxing champion; of liver,

m Sequals. Italy, a month afier he Icfl Califor-

nia "to go home 10 die." He won (he title from Jack Sharkey in 1933. lost ii less than a year later to Max Baer. An amiable man considered by many to be an boxer and of managers,

inept

a publicity creation

hix

he nonetheless won 86 of his 100 fights, including a knockout of Ernie Schaaf, who died aficr the bout.

.

his lirsi race of (he year in taking the mile-andnine-sislecnths 5230.000 Grand Prix dc Saint-Cloud at Sainl-C1oud. France, by a nose over Nelcius. another French 4-ycar-old

With British Champion Lester Piggotl up. RIBOCCO. favored in the held of 23. earned U.S. Owner Charles Engelhard first-place money of SI61.308 when he took the mile-and-a-half triah Sweeps Derby at the Curragh by one length over thirdchoice Sucaryl.

George U Widener's I966 star performer BOLD HOUR (58), with John Rotz aboard, gained his second consecutive win as he finished ooe-and-ahalf lengths ahead of Tumtga in the one-mile 556.200 Saranac Handicap at Aqueduct.

FACES

IN

THE CROWD LRRfiY HINSON

of East Tennessee State, who averaged 71.3 for 20 rounds of golf in regular-season play, heat

Johnny Barlow of Lamar Tech by three

NCAA

strokes for the College Division Championship in Paducah, Ky. with an eightunder-par 276.

of

jump {6'7Vi’) as well as two state marks: Ihe 120-yard high and high

180-yard low hurdles.

MAUREEN BECHooLT, 14. the U.S. Archery Champion from Loveland. Ohio, became the youngest shooter ever to win a position on the national team, when Junior Girls'

she scored third highest in the women's division at the U.S. tryouts in St. Louis.

RUSS CEL COTTO, of

DOMINIC PISCITELLI, 40.

trampoline artist to lake every major title of the year- when he won the world championfirst

coma sweep of the sU

London

to

coveted awards.

66

all-state

the Middletown
teammate Wayne Miller in I96<6 was the

— who

plete

an

in basketball for

took to trackat the JunOlympics in Lawrence and set a national age-group record in the ior

a Uni-

sophomore, followed

ship in

17.

guard

Topeka (Kans.) High,

Michigan

DAVE JACOBS, versity

PRESTON CARRINGTON,

singles matches doubles) as he

the fifth

Middies straight

and 40 paced

to

their

DUSO

League championship.

of North Haven. Conn, gained overall honors at the Canadian Championships Skeet

in St. Janvier,

QuebK,

Can. His wife Arlene look the ladies’ title, his son Kevin, 3,

and

won

attention by blasting a few shots on Dad's

12-gauge shotgun.

THE READERS TAKE OVER

WJroLE OPEN CONTENTION

of all

I

think that the vice-president in charge

we put on

of "what shall

Sirs;

Ncvxsr before have read an article in your magazine as prejudiced as Alfred Wright's I

article

on Jack Nicklaus' U.S. Open

victory

June 26). 1 am one of the first to admit that Jack Nicklaus IS one of the finest golfers in the svorld. But let's be fair, shall we? Several ol -Mr. Wright's comments abisut Arnold Palmer were cruel (/oc/( Deliver! the Crusher.

and unnecessary. Loyalty and admiration for individual athletes are fine until one loses sight of the qualities and talents of other athletes, too. In

my

opinion, this

what Mr. Wright has done.

precisely

Charles Gary .Marion,

»s

week"

really

the cover this

must have gone to a

ble to find the ugliest picture

Jack

to

is

me

I

lot

of trou-

ever saw.

a clean-cut, all-American-

looking guy (maybe slightly overfed). Rut picture

this

me — bad

piring in the recent series."

Possibly

men who

it

angle, etc.

You must have had

City,

ALI LCONT.)

Army. Mrs. Jack lNCiRA.M

president belongs to Amie's

Sirs;

would like Tex Maulc (/

Jacksonville

1

RUNNING ROOM Your

am

picture story (Brigh/ Facer

was very

interesting,

of the and I

sure that the track future of the U.S.

is

demning

already given

greatest golfer of all time, Jack Nicklaus.

all,

he

It is

who

really

is

I admit that Arnold Palmer has more class than any other golfer, but that doesn't win

golf tournaments. Jack Nicklaus

is

the great-

and should be getting the applause he

est

I

is

(he finest high school hurdler in the

nation. Bill not only

won

the 120-yard high

Ben BRowNiNti

Menlo Park.

Calif,

There is surely little sense in the arithmeby which you, and others, claim that

I

Marvin G. Caswell

his religious at

up- and there

is

what

on

his beliefs

He

against him.

is

when

he's

more

think he's a fine example of a

for standing

much

blowers' national high school record in the Sirs:

come.

sincerity toward cannot be denied. Look

record time but was also on one of the

120-yard highs.

so often displayed

is

The man's

country

winning relay teams and won the GoverTrophy for The Most Outstanding Athlete at the national high school meet in California. Bill also has equaled Richmond

and

Russell

Bill

against a minority.

hurdles and the 180-yard lows on a curve in

nor's

deserves.

commend

attitude that

hands of some fine young men. was very disappointed not to see the picCenHigh School in your selections. After

beliefs

tral

Alfred Wright about time that someone

like to congratulate

the golfing public

to

Am Not H'orried About Ah, June 19). This article should be read by everyone in the country—// they could read it with an open mind. There is great openmindedness here and not the quick con-

ture of Bill Tipton of Pontiac (Mich.)

in the

would

his article.

told

not be able

will

Mo.

the

I

on

They

were misquoted.

CHARLE5 M. Bi.RTON Kansas

better pictures, or maybe this particular vice-

Future, June 26)

Sirs:

unfair to write thus of two

is

arc deceased.

to say that they

very poor photography to

is

Sirs;

Ia.ms

Ohio

"Managers Pepper Martin (San Diego] and Swrecney [Los Angeles] praised the um-

Bill

to

man

a whole

criticized so

is

defending his country, a country that gave him so much- a country for

not

that

gave the Negro so much

give

him equal

rights.

it

When

forgot to

he gets his

maybe we can expect from him what we would expect from people like me, who can eat anywhere, sleep anywhere and find a job anywhere. Hut I happen to be

equal rights, then

who

Pontiac. Mich.

white. Until then,

Sirs:

quick to condemn and criticize get up and look in the mirror and say. "I am fair." How

let's all

of us

arc

tic

Nicklaus' score at Baltusrol consliluics an

Open

record.

Quantitative comparison

tween courses

proper

was

is

totally

test is

on

recorded

scores

among and

be-

different

golf

meaningless.

The only

strokes vs. par. Nicklaus' 275

under par

five strokc-s

or

five

strokes

many

conspicuously absent-

How much

under par was Hogan's 276 at Riviera in 1948'.’ By how much has any Open winner beaten par in the 67 years of Opens? don't know, but do know that the

Valoi.s.

I

refer to Bill (Pea-

nut) Gaines of Clearview

On May

20.

broke Jesse Owens' national high school

100-yard-dash record- Running

con-

in his

was clocked at 9.3 seconds. thus bettering Owens’ 34->car-old 9.4 mark. As if that were not enough, two ference meet.

Bill

1

I

this test is the alltimc

Open

weeks

later

he repeated the

MlCttAfL R. Kll TINO Pittsburg. Kans.

under;

five

year |948 1937

1956 1953 1967

71

72

Guldahi

Baltusrol

72

Oakmont

72 70

Manero Hogan

Oakland

Baltusrol

Hills

Mistrs 8

Nicklaus

7

6 5 5

-I;D.

Hated to see Jack Nicklaus gel the death by being on (he cover of

.SI,

kiss of

but most

N.Y.

Muhammad

Ali

is

man

a sensitive

of high

same traits of purpose, dignity and conviction so commendable in whites that arc intolerable to white America il possessed by Negroes. principles; indeed, he has those

Boh Van Court Oakland,

NCAA

Calif,

VS.

AAU
Sirs:

SOMEBODY LOVES THEM first

pari of the

JiKko Conlan

series

(Nohoi/y Lover an Umpire. June 26) was

most enjoyable. However.

I

should

like to

ntentiun a few instances to show that this feeling

is

not universal.

Robert Burncs. executive sports editor ol the St. Louis Glohe-Demnciui. oltcn goes

tling. In

a San Diego paper

When

the

International

Amateur Basketball Association lailcd to renew the privileges of arranging international

Sirs;

out of his way to praise umpires, He is especially appreciative when he sees them hus-

Sirs;

Jr.

Sirs:

Right you are!

The name Hogan

par

cour.se Riviera

Al Tamberiiii

the luturc" indeed!

N^ausau, Wis.

• These arc the live best under-par Open scores— either tying or beating Jack's

it'.’

feat, establish-

ing himself as one of the "brightest faces of

OioBY Whitman

of us can do

Regional High

.School in Mullica Hill, N.J. Bill

better than theoretically faultless golf.

champion by champion.

Your array of high school track scars was indeed impressive, yet one young man was

m

April or

May

of 1945 appeared this incredible sentence:

hud previously granted the AAU was the winner (SroRECARO. Jure 19). But bas-

competition

it

U.S. Basketball Federation, the

was the loser. The fans at the World Amateur Chamin Montevideo, Uruguay (where lABA met) wanted to know- where the good U.S. basketball players, absiut whom they had read, were. They repeatedly asked, "Why weren't they on the team representing the U.S.?" The answer is obvious. The team ketball

pionship the

eonfinutd

67

19TM MOLE

conlinutd

Now representing the U.S.

was

selected by the

As you want

to

Possible

To

Shrink Hemorrhoids

AAU. understand and maintain the status quo. say. the Russians

And Promptly Slop

CtiftoRi) B. Fa(.an

Itching,

Relievo Pain In Most Cases.

President, Basketball Federation

Science ha.s found a medictition with the ability, in most vase.s to relieve

of the U.S.

C'hicago

and shrink hemorrhoid.s. In ca.sc after case doctors proved, while gently relieving pain, actuiil reduction took ])lace. The secret is I'rrppain, itfhint:

Sirs:

As volunteers teaching basketball Peace Corps program

m

in

a

Montevideo, we

had the opportunity to observe the world chantpionship. Uruguay worked hard to make it a success, and the attention attracted by the event was evidence of the growing interest in this sport the world over. recently

It is

sport,

aratiiifi

.

fection. Just ask for Preparation

H

Ointment or Suppositories.

unfortunate that, as founders of the

we in the U.S. do not show the same The mediocre team sponsored by

SUPPORT RED CROSS

interest-

the

H

It also .soothes irritated tissues jind helps pivvent further in-

AAU

finished

fourth

behind Russia.

Yugoslavia and Brazil, all of whom brought good teams, worthy of international competition.

Aside from the poor play, what disturbed us even more was the poor sportsmanship

and outright rudeness displayed by the American team. The coach and players were constantly harassing and complaining to the referees during the games and, by such ploys as trying to change men already designated in a jump-ball or frcc-throw situation, the coach sought undeserved advantages. After

losing the

first

game

against Yugoslavia,

one U.S. player was seen in a newspaper photo the next day making an obscene gesture at the crowd. And during the singing of the Uruguayan national anthem closing ceremonies several

Sports Illustrated

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE

in the

members of

Te

the

The

hissing

and booing

(in contrast to the

about your lubtcripiion. change of adiiMtineni. complaint, or

write

xdareu,

U.S. team were Joking w ith their teammates.

billing,

renewal, eddreu:

I

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 540 N. Michigan Ave.. Chicago. III. 60bl Chorle* A, Adam». Vice President AllarM ptriem oddreu hbtl In ippce Mow, Ihii will kelp la Idtniify joo and aceuraltly. I

cheers and applause that greeted the other teams) that the Americans received as they left thegymnasium were Justly deserved. The

American team destroyed much of what we have tried to teach in our two years here how to play good basketball and, more important. how one should conduct oneself both on and off the court. Must this petty quarrel continue between the NCAA and the AAU? Musi a coach and team of such poor caliber and preparation represent the U.S. in international competition? The U.S. has every reason to be proud of Us basketball and the example it offers to the rest of the world.

We

feel

it is

only Just to demand, therefore, that U.S.

To

2

a new subtcripHan- cheek boi: renewal. Ute form below for your (o SPORTS ILLUSTRATED al addre» given above Rates: Continental U.S. I yr.SS.OO. Alaska. Canada. Hawaii. Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands yr/SIO.OO. Military perI sonnel anywhere in (he world: 1 yr/Sd-QO. All other: I yr/SI4.00.

O

order

new,

rildreu.

Q

.Mail





ATTACH LABEL HERE WITH ALL INQUIRIES: When yon are movlny, please give us five weeks Prim your name end new address and Zip Code number below and mail to SPORTS notice.

ILLUSTRATED al

SUBSCRIPTION

strive to

make

sure our country

is

rep-

resented in any international competition

with the very best the sport has to offer.

James C. Loustalot CiiRisroPHtR Wii.is

Paul Lechowick Timoihy N. Murphy Edward J. Schwarz Michail L, Cook Jack Galloway David Roni rts

City

Sute

Zip Code

Rich Nieto Montevideo, Uruguay Titleists arc sold

through golf course pro shops only.

ACUVIMI SOL^

68

SERVICE

address given above, Please note your tele-

phone number below.

basketball oilicials also share in this pride

and

Telephone Number

Tip a canoe and kersplash for you

when you race over hurdles "Otif Hroijj; move in a lippy Maori dugLMnoc ami »ncr )oii go." Ciordon Rehcr. friend <*!' Canadian Club "Afler da\s of pr.icticc t»n New Zealand's

1

2



surged forward lioni ihe slatimg

mark Stioke

tor slr«»ke

matched ms

I

opponents

.IS WL' swept ilown the swift stream. tew iriiintphani nunnenis. I w as sure hen the hurdle loomed ahead.

I

or

I

would win.

.1

I

Waikalo Ri'cr.

New Zealand

in sure

1

Hul then

iticks cr.ifl

I

And

die race

'

1

I'd

made

Maori friends challenged

me

niaslcred the

a mistake. to a

eanoc

Ms hiir-

accepted’

\l\ friends lonk uie

4 ashore

to a local tavern

for a drink of ihcii

fasoritc whisky

Canadianf

and mine

lub."

Why

this

whisky's iiniscrsal poptilanty It has the hghmcsN of .Scotch roiif

the

smooth

satisfaction

No *nhcr

whisky tastes quite like it. You can stay with il all eycning l»>ng in short ones before dinner, in tall ones after. Enjoy of Bourhon.

Canadian lightest

“I

paddled

riiih

whisky

Ihc world's tonight

fiiriiiusiy to clear

3 ihcohsiacle.

The other canoe o\er Hul mine hit the hurdle a glancing blow. In a Hash I Was floundering in ihc water!

glided

'•f

"The Best

In

The House'**

in

87 lands

New Benson & Hedges

lOO’s

are a lot longer than king That’s a good idea.

size.

a good idea

I

I

fiocussa cioiBettes

is

New Benson & Hedges

lOO’s menthols

are a lot longer than king size menthols,

And

that's

a good

idea, too.

I

a good idea

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