The history and topographical survey of the county of Kent

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THE

HISTORY AND

TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEY OF THE

COUNTY OF KENT. CONTAINING THE

ANTIENT AND PRESENT STATE OF CIVIL AND ECCLESIASTICAL

IT,

;

COLLECTED FROM PUBLIC RECORDS, and other authorities:

ILLUSTRATED WITH MAPS, VIEWS, ANTIQUITIES,

See.

I

THE SECOND EDITION, IMPROVED, CORRECTED, AND CONTINUED TO

THE PRESENT TIME.

By

EDWARD HASTED,

Efq

S.A.

F. R. S. and I

LATE OF CANTERBURV.

Ex

his

ommhus, longe funt

humatiijjitnt qui

Cantunn

incolunt.'*

“ Fortes creanturfortibus et bonis, “ Nec imbellem feroces /irogenerant."

VOLUME

X.

canterbury PRINTED BY

IV.

BRISTOW, ON THE PARADE. M.DCCC.

TO j

THE

REV.

EDWARD

HASTED,

riCAR OF HOLLINGBORKE.

MY DEAR EDWARD,

I

certain

you

will accept this

pleafure, as a Imall token of

my

Volume, with

parental affe£lion to yoti,

have ever been an example of duty and it

you

will find a defcription

the greatelt

filial

affedlion to

me

who j

in

of that part of the County in the

near neighbourhood of which you received the early part of your

Education, under our mofl: amiable and

much

refpcdted Friend,

the late Dr, Beauvoir, whofe talents as a gentleman and a fcholar are univerfally

for that

known.

To

his -inftruflions

proficiency of Learning

A 2

you was indebted

which introduced yon with credit

m

(

ci edlt to its

be a

Member

;

'

;

of that Univerfity, which has ever held

pre-eminence, as the

dom

*

IV

firft

feminary of learning in

where your mind was enriched with

this

king-

that further progrefs

of knowledge, and with thofe menial accomplifliraents which has enabled you to

fulfil

with propriety the paftoral charge

com-

mitted to your care, to the benefit as well as the univerfal fatisfa<5lion

of the flock entrufted to you, by the mofl reverend and

highly refpedable Prelate, to whofe liberality

vancement

to it; but

your

fiiavity

of heart, at the fame time that

of manners, and benevolence gains

it

you owe your ad-

you the friendfnip and

ellecm of the refpedable neighbourhood, in which you are fo happily fituated, endears you to

may, by the

blefling

all

who knov/ you.

That you

of Providence, long enjoy the fruits of

your goodnefs and amiable condudf,

is

the fervent prayer of

my

dear Edward,

Your

tincere well wiflier.

And LONDON, (uLi

I,

1800,

'

ever affe£lionate Father,

EDWARD HASTED,

\

,

INDEX. XUc

letter

Appendix of additions and corre^ions to the ninth and tenth volumes, added at the end of this volume.

A

refers to the

A.

Abbot,

john,

Upper Each, roiigh, 123

in

;

pojjejfes

Woodnelbo-

Tlioinas, 384

;

Rev. William, 397; Mr. Ramf442, A. Abbot’s, of gate, 123, 400, 401, Abbot’s wall, in '1 hanet, 266. ^col Achole FARM, in Thanet,

279, 306, 345. Thanet, 31^*

Acholt ville, in

Adam, Thomas,

303. Addelam, noiu Deal, 2, 4. Adelold, 2, 137. Adifliam, MANOR of, 145,147;

182 ; Alkins, of Canterbury, 129. See Alland, Allen, Grange. Aldelond. Allen, John, 345.

All

Tha~ 238, 245 ; church of, 236, 247. 245 ; All Saints church, in BreadSAiNTs,y^!ari/?/g/’, in

borough of,

net,

ftreet,

118.

Jlterages, what, 289. Amber found in Thanet, 220.

Ambry or Almonry farm, in Monkton, 260. Amulets, Britijh, found in Thanet, 229.

Amyand

parijh of, 429, A.

JEfiuary, near the Ifle of Thanet, 2 18. Agar, Hon. Gertrude, 350.

Claudius, 176. Anchorefs, one at Sandwich, 201.

Anglo-Saxon

architecture, cu-

Aimolde. See Hamwold. Aiflabye Rawfon poffejfes Dane

Anlaf, the Danijh chief, 296.

Court SEATjinTilmanftone,

Anl'chitill, the archdeacon, 4.

82.

Antiquities found,

Albineto Albini, William de, 88, 136, 138. Albrincis, ; Simon de, 28 ; family of, 435, 436, A. Alcher, earl, 368. Alday’s, of Sandwich, 180.

Ai.delond, Allan

\i,Grange,

in Minjler

281. Alexander, Alexander,

LL. D.

350-

Alga, or fea-weed, 224 Alkin, Thomas, pojjefes the

White Friars VOL, X.

in

Sandwich, b

rious ffiecimen of,

76.

229,

230,

329, 330, 3&3, 368, 432, A.

Appleton, Thomas, 1 14, 131, 139, 284; Appleton’s, 143. Apulton, district and manor of, 57, 58. Archer's Court m a N o u , in hit-

W

field,

436, A.

Arcis, William de, 430, a. Arden’s, 86. Arderne, Thomas, 180. Arundel, Albini’s, earls of, 136. AJh, parifliof, 429, a.

Alhenden, Thomas, 397. Athanaton,

»

.

INDEX.

vi

Athanaton,

noiv

Barham,

Thanet.

Athol, Strabolgie’s, earls of, 30. Atte-Hall’s,

1 12. Aubcrville’s, of Weftenhanger,

25, 28, 435, A Augufline, lands in Thanet^ 266. Avere, William, 33. .

Avercom,

fervice

of,

260.

Auften’s, 308, 401.

A u Hone,

ienement of^ in St. John’s, in Thanet, 339. Awflyn’s, or Aftyn’s, 82. Ayerfl, Robert Gunfley, clerk,

389-

Ayling, John, clerk, 259, Aythorne. Eythorne.

434, A.

parlfli of,

Barne’s, of London, 138. Barnes, Elizabeth, 131. Barnfoie, borough and hamlet of, 36, J23. Barracks ereded at Deal, 13,

Thomas, 279.

Barrett,

Barrowe, Ethelred, 328, 344. B A R s o N , pari/h of f, 440, A church of, 431, a. Bartholomeio' s gate, in Thanet, 362.

Bartlett’s, ton, in St. nety

Th one-

alias

Nicholas,

inTha-

240.

Barton-field, inCanterbury, 196.

Barton’s 131; chantry in Sandwich, 2 1 5.

B.

Bacun, John, 41 r. Backhoufe, J. H, prefent reHor of

Barville, Great and Lit-

Deal, 23. Badk'fmere’s, 30, 31, 63. Baia?, r.onft of, 362. Baicnx, Odo, bihiop of, 4, 38, 5G 57’ ^7» 7^» 74* 88, 125, 130, 153, 135, 137, 155, 156. Baker, John, 324, 360; Baker’s, of Caldham, 96, 350.

Bathing in the fea at Margate, 321

Balam, Anthony, 54. Baldock, Mr. 1 32, mill-court,

in

Ham-

Woodnelbo-

rough, 442. Baldpates,

tle,

in

coins

fo

;

;

machines

for, 323.

warm

ones at Margate, Ramfgate, 387. Battely, Dr. liis ^ntiq. Rutu^ Baths,

323

;

pinee,

at

410.

Baugh, ifaac, leffee of Bekcfborne parfonage, 431, a. Beacon, one, in Thanet, 357. Beagrims, in Sandwich, 197. Beake, V>J\\\\zrn, pojjejjes Saperton,

Roman

Tilmanfone, 82, preferable

in

VVickhambreaux,

429, A.

calied, in Thanet, 230. Bank«, Sir Jofeph, bart. 26.

Beal:;,

Baptifts, meetifigs fovy 166. Barfield. See Barville.

Beaumont, drowned.

Barfrefion, Amicia de, 72. See Barfon. Barfrifton.

Bede, onerable, 218. Bedford, Mrs. lefee of Newland grange, in St. Laurence, 382.

I

Bargander

frequents

Thanet,

232. Bargar’s.

Benjamin, inventor of the bathing at Margate, 323.

K

admiral

Bafil

15.

Bckefborne, parifli of, 431, a.

See Bargrave’s,

Bargrave, Ifaac,

lejfee

of Eaftry

court, and refides there

105 ; dean, account of ibid. Bargrsve’s, 86, J04 ; account of 105, 115, i 16, 117,

Belknap’s, 31. Belmont seat, near Ramfgate, 378. Benchkin, John, 141, Benflcin’s, of Woodnelborough,

138, 139. Bert’s

,

,

vu

INDEX. Bere’s, alias Byer’s, 250, 303,

Bookey, Mathew, cl. 143

capt.

;

William, 400. Borlafc, Dr. his hiftory, 330. Beresford, Gilbert, prefent leBor

of Fordwich, 427* a Berewic, J. de, iter

.

273,

of,

333 * Berry, Thomas, 131.

19,

255. 232. Boteler, William, 74, 1 12 poffeffes and refidts at a houfe at ;

Katherine,

1 1

;

Hartanger manor, Barfon, 75 a farm at Clyvefend, in Thanet, 385. Betshanger, parijh of 44, in

pojfefs

;

Bifrons seat, in Patnxborne, 105. Billingdey,

Samuel,

59

;

Bil-

lingfley’s, 86.

B IRCHINGTON,

[larif of, 227,

236, 258, 294, 312, 345, 444, A. chapel of, 259, 262, 263 ; church of, 31 1. Birchington, Stephen, tnonk of Chrifi-church, 234. Bijhopfborne parifli of,

434, a,

Bix, William, 129. Black wand, home byt.be mayor of Sandwich, 164. Blanch, John, 205. Blaxland, Henry, 244. alias

Bottler’s, of

Hothe manor,

444, A. 140; Blechenden, Thomas, John, 307; Blechenden’s, 143, 258, 259. See alfo Blvchenden. Blengate, hundtcd of, 236, Blonie, Elizabeth, 287. Blychenden, Thomas, 138.

Bobdale i\sood,\n'T^zr\cK, 225. 5 rcBuckland. Bocoland. Bodkins farm, in SwaleclitTe, 192.

Bolder flints, 210. Bolingbroke, George, vilcount, 41, 283, 284, 381.

4.

Eythorne, 69

Brook'firtet, account

of,

;

of

99

;

of Heronden, accou 7it of, 107, 109, 137, 138 ; of Eaftry, 116, 1 1 7, 44 1, A, Bowdon, Sir John, 65. Boxley, manor of, 121. Boyman’s, of Sandwich, 2ir. Boys, Thomas, 21 ; Chrifto^ pher, 27; Edward, of Betfhanger, 39; Boys’s, of the

fame, 40

Bing’s, 350.

Blean,

lath of,

Brook-ftreet, in Eaftry, 99;

Henry, 53 hon. Sufan, 283. 53,59; Peregrine, ot, governors Bethlem hofpital,

Bertie,

Boro wart,

Botany,

,

account of, 45, 48

Edward, 173

;

John, 172; Boys’s, of Fredville, 68 ; of Eythorne, 68, 73, 77 ; of Barfon, 76; of Denton, 77 ; of Hoad, 73 ; William, of Tilmanftone, 79; of the fame, 86 William, of SandStaten wich, J12; borough, with Gore farm, in Eaftry, 113: account of Colhim, ibid. 44-*» ledions for Sandwich, 122 Boys’s, of Sandwich, 134, 181 ; account of, 441, A. Jo^n, of Betflianger farm, Sir

;

;

;

A., pojfejfes Each Woodnelborough

438, a. 440,

FARM, 442, A.

in

histreatife on the flute

cf agricultme in Kent, 223. Brabant, perfecution for religion in, 160. Bradley’s, of Sandwich, 211. in Bradflozv, Broadftairs.

Thanet,

See

Bradftow, our lady of, 365. Bradhall, William, 239. Brandon, Philipp prefent curate of Upper Deal, 14.

Brandred,

vm

INDEX.

Brandred, manor of, 5. Bray, John, junior, lieutenant of Sandowne caftle, 13. Braybrooke, Robert de, 41 1. Brent, Edward, 173. Breton, William and Eiiab, pojjfefs

Downbarton manor

and Shoart, 239 ; Bartlett’s, alias Thoneton, in St. Nicholas, 240; Richard, 301, 421. Brett, John,

Jerom,

Wye,

66

240

Charles,

;

;

1

Brett’s,

76;

of

46.

farm,

Brimfdale

p4

in Eythorne*

-

Britons,

in

Thanet, 229, 230.

Broadgate, alias Brockmans MANOR, in Birchington, 303, Broadley, John, 113 fejfes Upper hales,

Mrs

;

in

pojThanet,

241.

Broadstairs,

ville

of,

227,

364. Brockhull,

Thomas, 134. Brockman, John, 303. Brockmans manor. .S'rrBroad-

gate. Brewfe, William de, 429, a. Manfton Brome’s, 433, a. Brice, Richard, MANOR, in St. Laurence, .Brompton hamlet, in Thanet,

381. Bridget, Peter, 360. Bridges, Sir Brook William, fojjejfes South, alias Upper

Hamwold,

in

Woodnefbo-

rough, 134 ; leffee of the demefnes of Monkton manor, 236; reJideszS. Gunfton, 431, A.

lady, pojfejjes

flon hoiife and park,

Gun-

and

re-

Jides there, ibid.

Bridges, Mrs. Mzvy,/ioJJeJ/es a

houfe in

St. Nicholas,

237*

of St. NicholasJohn, court FARM, 241 ; Thomas, 443, A. Bridges’s, of St. Nicholas,237, 240,243,244, lejjee

243

;

John pojfejj'es

Frofts, in

Nicholas, 242 ; of Glamorganflure, account of, 237 ; St.

John, 243. Bridges’s, of

35 ^Broode-fiairs,

Sec al/o Brydges. Bridewell and Bethlem hofpi-

governors of, poJJ'efs Garlings farm, in Thanet, tals,

314. Bridle roads, frequent in

Tha-

net,

Brightlingfea, in SufTex,

Sandwich, 132.

amem*

Birchington,

296. Brooke, Samuel, 308

;

Robert,

Fdward, 383, 349 399 Mathew, clerk, 401 ; 384; >

J

Brooke’s, of Margate, 350. Brooi-fieet, in Eaflry, 99.

Brooksend manor,

in

Bir-

chington,

304. Brotherly’s, 401. Broughton’s, of Sandwich, 21 1, Browne, Sir Thomas, 65, 73. Mifs pojfcffes Chapei-hill 73 houfe, in Thanet, 314. Browne, James, 343 Edward, 441. A. Browne’s, 401, Bryan, William, 112. Brydges, Samuel Egerton, 279 ; Gatehurft, in Denton, ;

;

433, A.

Wootton, 433, a.

in

S'rf?

Bridges,

Buchard, William, 186. Buck, Robert, 389; Buck’s, of Yorkflure,yio^j a moiety of Ellington, in Thanet, ibid. Buckett, John, 397. Buckland viLLE, and farm OF, in PTwdnejborough. III, 130 ; tithes of, 131, 138. Buckland barns, in Woodnefbo rough, 131. Buckland,

;

INDEX. BucklanJ, pari (li of, 437, a. duller, John, 301 VVilliam, 307. Buka ark. Great and Little, in Deal, 12. Bunce, Wilder, firefent redor of :

Ham, 44

;

ment's, in

Sandwich, 215.

vicar of St, Cle-

IX

Camden,

earl, 447, a. Canary feed, Town in Thanet, 222. Cannon, John, junior, lejfee oi parfonage, 28 Walmer James foffejfes a moiety of Lydde Court In-grounds,

148.

Bunce, William, clerk, 21 1; Bunce’s, 42. Burdett, Edward, 14. Burchett, Jofiah, 175, 176,212. Burkett, John, cl. 259. Burial ground, antient Roman one, at Eaftry, loi ; at Margate, 331.

Canons, a//ajChiltern Langley, priory of, 39, 303.

Canute, king, 154. Canterbury, archbiflrops

of, 5,

58, 79, 130, 155, 156, 192, 426, a. 427, A. 430, A.

Baldwin, 42, 118, 260; Corboil, Becket, lo-j., 183 141 ; Cranmer, 28, 187,382; Edmund, Cuthbert, 271 ; Juxon, Iflip, 260 ! 18, 42; ;

Burr, John, 3 7. Burton, Francis, 271. Burley, Sir Simon de, 39, 41 1

1.

;

Langham, 120, Meopham, 69; Moore,

Burville’s, 86.

28, 61, 247

Bulhy, Thomas, 244. Bufliell, John, 131; Benjamin, Birchington parlejfes of fonage, 309, with VVood parfonage annexed, 311. Butler, Henry, 431, a. Butts for archery, in Eaftry,

261 ; 208, 387; Moreton,8i, 158 ; Parker, 191, 212, 227, 238, 268,297, 310, 313; Peckham, 5, 119 Reynolds, 60; Richard, 259; Robert, 403 ; Stigand, 4; Stratford, 238 ; Theodore, Theobald, 288 270; Wake,- 1 3, 86; War-

101

;

in

Thanet, 237.

Byrch, Rev. William Dejovas, 279; Byrch’s, of Canterbury, 434, A.

212;

Whitgift, ;

Wulfred,

65.

Canterbury,

archbilliop

Comt,

of,

and Deal Prebend mano.rs, 5, 6 ; patron of Deal chajpel, 4 pof-

Casfar, Julius, 6, 7, 24. Casfar, Sir Thomas, 66.

Afli,

1

Callis grange,

360, 375, 376. Calonne, M. de, 435, a,

Gon-

;

of tithes in Deal, 22 ; the advowfon of Deal reftory, ibid, the parfonage and advowfon of Walmer curacy, 28; South-

fejfes

in Thanet,

Calthorpe, 88, 94. Qzxx\bY\Agt,/cholarJhips\n

ham, 342;

Winchelfea, 245

Jtojfefes

C.

o/

;

;

Byer’s, alias Bere’s, 250, 303, iVe Bere’s. 383.

Callys,

;

a portion

wood,

in Walde.rfliare,

58

;

vylle

and Cai us college, 192; in at. John’s college, 235,

the parfonage and advowfon of Walderfliare, 60 ; the

296.

parfonage and advowfon of Tilmanftone vicarage, 86 ; the advowfon of Ealtry vicarage, 1 19 ; Word, Minnis, 14s; the parfonage auid advow fon

Cambridge, prefident, &c. of Queen’s college in, pojfefs St. Nicholas court, in Thanet, 241.

;

,

;

INDEX. rowfon of

Nicholas vi-

St.

camge, ?<47 ; the advowfon of Alonkton vdcarage, 261 ; the advowfon of Minfter vicarage,

291

;

Salmeftone, 336 ; the ad-

with Deane, vowforr of St. John’s vicarage, 354; the advowfon of St. Peter’s vicarage,

the

376 advowfon of St. Laurence vicarage, in Thanet, 405. ;

Canterbury, fee of, 5, 103, III, 238, 245, 239, 336, Canterbury, archdeacon of, /
Sandwich, 2 I

212 I

;

1

2.

archdeacons, Gheaft, Redman, 213. fchool, fcholarjhips

I.

for,

233. - deans of, 1 92, ' dean and chapter of, 147, 191 ; pojfejfes Eaftry MANOR, J04; parfonage, 1 19, and MANOR of the almnery of Chrift-church, in



.

Eaftry, ibid. Monkton manor, 256; parfonage, 260 Aldeland grange, in Minfter,

Brookfend manor, ; parfonage of Birand 305, Caley’s chington, 309; grange, in St. Peter’s, 360, OlTunden grange, 361, 37a in St. Laurence, 381,

282

;



priory of Chriftchurch, in, 63, 103, 106, 117, 147, 149, 154, 155, 156,245,239, 304, 341, 409, 414, 415 ; priors of, 256. St. Auguftine’s monaftery in, 2, 130, 137, 208, 236, 265, 266, 272, 278, 281, 283, 333, 340, 351, 360, 374, 38G 382, s84> •

385,404,407, 409,412,414, 415, 418.

Canterbury, hofphals in, 361, 372.

mayor and commonalty

of,

^effees

of Caleys

grange, in Thanet, 361, 372, 45 ^> ^* Cantey’s, Nicholas, 349Cantium of Ptolemy, where fitu"

ated, 357.

Capell’s, 86, 109, 385, Cardiffe, Thomas, cl. 348.

Carey, Sir Philip, 275, 276, 278 ; John 285. Carra way’s, 401. Carricke, a great one funk in Sandwich harbour, 159. Carter, John, 8.

Cafaubon, Meric, cl. 263 count of^ 292,293.

;

ac-

Calby’s, 401.

Cafon, John, 143

;

Cafon’s,of

Woodnefborough, 140. Caftillon, John, D. D. 293. Caves in Thanet, why made, 225. Caylas, count, hii antiquities, 33 ^* Cecilfquare at Margate, 322. Celts found near Margate, account ofy 229. Ceoldred, king of Mereia, 122. Cerdice, Saxon chief, 406 Cerdices Oran, 407. Chadwick, Robert, 47.

Chambers,

Samuel,

JheriJft

knighted, 448, a. Chambers wall farm, 243.

Chamberlains Feemanor, in

Deal, 2.

Champneis,

William, 92 ; Champneis’spfl^J^Hingleton, in

Woodnefborough, 137.

Champneis’Sjof Weftenhanger, ibid.

Chancellor, lord, 447, 449, a,

Chaplain,

INDEX. Clapham, Chriffopher, 301, Clare, honor of, 75.

4 444. A. Chapel bottom, 339. Charlton^ parifli of, 437, A. Clieap.row, in Minfter, 285. Chetuilopex, or hargander ^ frequents Thanet, 232. Chenoltone. See Knolton,

Clarke, John, 92. Clements, Nathaniel, 277, Clerk, Richard, D. D. 285, 292.

Chefmunds wood,

Cleveland, John, 176. Cleves, lady Anne nf, 12. Cleybrooke’s, of Thanet,

3

i

»

Thanet

ia

225. Chelterfield,

Philip,

of,

earl

2S0, cl.

244,

of, 30, farijh e/',

92,

34^j 443 » A, Chiche's, 240. Chilham, barony

Chillenden, 95»44'.A.

hamlet,

in

St.

Lau-

Hartangtr, in Barfon, 73. Chrift-church, manor of the almnery of, 1 19. Chr ijlians-court w A r m, inWoodnelborough, 123.

Chukch-gate

farm,

in

Wocdnejborough f 126,

Church, William, 234. livings, differently ejli-

tnatedin Eaft and

WefUCent,

43.

Chute, Arthur, 240. Chychele, Wm. archdeacon of Canterbury, 341.

Cinque

in

233,

Cleymoixl, John, cl. 239. Clff Eiul, Great and Little, hamlet, in St. Laurence, 378 MANOR, 385. Seealft Clyvefend.

Clinton, William de, 180,200,

339

Chrift’s hofpital, governors of, po^efs a rent charge out of

Ciliedene.

Thomas, 348. seat, Monkton, 256.

Cleve-court

Cliffend, in Minfter, 232. 26c. Clifford’s, 48.

rence, 378. Chijllet, parifh of, 428, a. Cholwick, Mr. 434, a,

Church

Cleve,

;

Chillenden’s, 96. Chilfott

Clare’s, earls of Gloucefier, 26.

342, 348.

Chewney, Nicholas,



XI

Chaplain, antient, ftipend of, 290. CJtafiel hill houfe^ in Thanet,

See Chillenden.

Ports, jurijdi^lon

-

Clitherow’c, 131. Clyvefend^ in Minfter, 265.

Clyvesend manor, Laurence, Cliff’s

385

;

Cnolton, ville of, 137. See alfo Knolton. Cnute, king, 272, 278, 414. Cobb, Francis, 324, 444, a. Cobb s, of Margate, 350. Cobham, Henry Brook, lordwarden, 390.

Cobeham, John de, 231, Cocks, Thomas, 45, 48. Coenulph, king of Mercia, 64, Coin, gold one, found at

Woodnelborough, 124; Brifound in 1 hanet, 230 j Roman, 332, 368. tifli,

236,250,296.3 10,312, 355, 37 /j 386, 388, 389, 407,

Coldred,

0/',

155,

wardens of, 12, 39. *46, 165, 178,204,205, 39D, 41a.

St.

a Ift

end.

Colby’s, 52. Cold Friday borougli, ftreet, 123, 124.

I, 9, 24, 29, 121, 152,

in

See

of,

122



435, A. for.

tifications at, ibid.

Colebrooke’s,ofChilham caftle,

SSC257. Coleman’s,

,

,

xii

IND X.

Coleman’s, of Muifler,

287, Sarre

pojfejfes

Mathew, 41, 42.

Wm,

Conant, John, prefent majler

I94

2

«

5

chantry, in

of

fodlor

»

Sandwich,

.

^

Conftantine, emperor, coin or,

229.

Conway, Capt. 391. Conyngham, Ellen, countefs dowager of, pojfejfes Minfter abbey and manor, 277. Conyngham, earls and vifcounts 176, 276; account of, 277, 328.

in; Cooke’s,

Cooke, William, 374

Statenborough,

112.

Coomhe

HAMLET,

in

Wood-

neiboroiigh, 123,

Coppin, John, 348, 435, A. Thomas, 399 Coppin’s, of Deal, 21. ;

Coptliall,

in

and baron,

ill

confer

quence of the negledl of,26^. CouRT-s FAIRS, alias Peg-

well,

manor of, 281 ; HAMSt. Laurence, 378*

George, account

126; of,

» 39 Courts, Thomas, 56, Cowell’s, 244, 350, Cowfield, Henry, 180. Cowper, Peter Lewis, earl, poffeffes the tithes of Chamberlain’s Fee, in Deal, 22 ; Feldcrland and Upton farms, in Word, 145 ; Clyvefend MANOR, in Thanet, 385. Cox’s, of Tilmanftone, 80, 8r

86 Coxens, 401. Crawthorne, Bertrine de, 186. Crayford, Edward, 240; Cray.

ford’s, of Mongeham, 83. Craythorne, borough of, 36, 78. Creflemer, Drue Aftley, clerk,

115.

Hamode, 25, 106, Crevequer’s, 141, 250, 179; barony of 125, 127. 251 ; Crickett, Richard, Appleton MANOR, in WalderCrevequer,

-

Cook/borough, in

4, 5 *

-

of St, Petedsy in Sandzoich, 209. Condie’s, 67, 198, 200. Condie's

leet

of,

Coul'emaker’s,

Colyfwood, in Thanet, 22^. Combes, Bartholomew, 21 r. fchool,

Court

LET, Coufemaker,

239. Colt, Stephen, 21. Colubels, Ranulph, 72,

Sandwich

Thanet*

Deal Pre-

Court As bend, manor

Collard, A mbrofe,/o^^rWafchefter farm, in Minfter, 279, 443, A. Ambrofe, 343. Collins,

in

Pillar,

363-

351. Collard, Henry, MANOR. 251.

Collet,

Countefs

Wickhambreaux,

39 ; Crickett’s, of Sandwich, 200. Criol, Nicholas de, 26, 27, 28, 40 ; Criol’s, 26, 27,250, 382, ftiare,

402. Corbie’s, of Boughton Malherb, 280. Corn gavel, rent, in Thanet,

Crifpe, Henry, alias Bonjour, ftory of him, 299, 300, 348 ;

2 7 5 * ^ 7 ^" Cornhill, Reginald de, 280. Corporations, inimical to ftran-

Ciifpe’s, of Thanet, i8t, 233, 241, 257, 258; cf Quekes,

gers, j6i.

Cofnan, John, 92

;

Anne Gertruy,

account

305.

297, 307, 308, 420. of,

304,

306,

Mrs 429, Cromwell,

,

INDEX. Cromwell, Oliver,

r/;f

288

natic ^

of Thanet, 225, 231,271, 272. Danes and Saxons, battle of, 364, 368. Danfon, Thomas, 200. Dare, Mrs. pofeffes a houfe in Felderland, and refides there, 154, 197

the notedfa-

account
293 j Richard, 369. Ciilmer’Sjof Thanet, 365, 372,

374

;

-

.

Cultivation, high fate of

in

in

f

St.

of,

nor, houfe andadvowfon of redoiy, 92, 94; Shrinkling MANOR, 106; Sandowne MANOR, 130; Wickhambreaux man or, and advowfon of redlory, 429, a. Francis, cl. 68 ; Sir Thomas, 88 ; Thomas, 1 75 ; D’Aeth’s, barts. of Knolton, 87 ; account 3^, 9

j

,

93, 94.

Dandklion, family

in

Thanet, 337 See

ibid.

of,

Daundelyon. Dane, Robert, 65

;

alfo

Thomas,

manor of 5. Deal, boatmen of, their dexielity in faving fhips from

wreck, 17. Denne, John, cl. 372. Deanries, new ones, inftituted and abolilhed, 404. Deer, Domneva^s,_/fory of, 269, 296. Degnez, John, 429, a. Dekewer, John, pofeffes the

Middle pa rm, in Heronden, 109; John, 183, 196, 200, Dekewer’s, of Sand371 wich, zoi ; of Hackney, 373. Deleway, Thomas, 254. ;

Dene manor, ;

in Thanet,

338,

chapel, 3 14.

DeNN-COURT

MANOR,

in

Woodne(borough, 132,184,185,

304.

Dane-court SEAT,

14.

Deal Prebend,

346 j

John,

of, f ; formerly a metnber of Sandwich, 152; Upper, village

»

Narborough, pof

;

Deal, TOWN and port

D. North-court manor, 80, and South-court, in Tilmanllone, 8i ; Knolton ma-

234

Auguftine's,

Dawney, hon. Henry, 92,

Scot, a

fejfes

i

See alfo Dandelion. 349. Dawes, Bethel, 20, 21.

Saxon cuftom, 260.

Sir

Hackling FARM, Word, 145; William,! 5

132. Dauling’s, of Ringwold, 32, 33. Daundelyon, Marcellus,«iJ<5 «)r of

at Cuftoms, efablijhment Margate, 328. Cuthred, king of Kent, 64. Cymene, the Saxon chief, 406; Cymenes Oran, 407.

D’Aeth,

infeft the Ifle

Dare’s, of Fenderland, 117, Darell, Robert, 300. Daubridgecourt, Sir Nicholas,

72 ; Curling, William, 344 ; Curling’s, of Thanet, 233, 401 ; lejfees of Tilmanftone parfonage, 86.

Church

5

100

Thanet, 223, Cumberland, duke of, 448, a. Curbefpine, Ralph de, 51, 57,

Cyrie Scent, or

xin

Dane Pits, in Walmer, 25. Danes frequent Sandwich, 15 3,

prote^oVf

299. Cullin’s,

244. Culmer, Richard,

;

in

MANOR,

manor

Tilmanftone^ in

Thanet, 359. VOL. X.

St,

Peter's,

and Denne’s, 304. 81 ; in

c

Denton, parifli of, 92, 434, A, Derine, fon of Sired, 4.

Dcring,

;

.

.

,

INDEX.'

XIV

Dering, John, of Egerton, 105 ; Sir Edward, 42, 55. 148,431, A Charles, hffee of OJunden grange, in Thanet, 381 ;
Dudley and Ward, John, count, 407, 421.

Dudfmancoinb manor,

.

35 ^Dilnot, John, 3. Difgavelled lands, 68 , 73* 2 80. Dixwell, Sir Bafil, 77, 91. Dockfey, William, 140, 145. Dodmorc, Ralph, 112. Dodfworth, Rev. Francis, 293;

vif-

5.

Dumpton HAMLET, in Thanet,

^

397 35 Dun-flreet, in Thanet, 229.

Mr.

Dundas,

Secretary,

447,

449, 451, A. Dunkirk, vilie of, 425* a. Dutch Admiralty, agent for^ 1. at Deal, Dutch, parfitnony of, to fave 1

the

fiilp

Dutch,

duties, 18.

fettlers

at

Sandwich,

162, 168.

Dyge, John, 65.

prcfent vicar of Minjler, 294. Dola, nozv Deal, 1 Domitian, Roman emperor, coin of, 230.

Dyneley^s, alias Dingley’s, 126,

Ermenburga,

Each, alias Upper Eacii MANOR, in Woodnetbo-

Doinneva,

alias

daughter of Ermenfred, 102, 268, 270, 271, 278.

Dover, town and port of, 155, 236,295,296, 310,312, 325, 355, 437, A. members of, 29 mayor and jurats of, 366.

Dover

caftle, lands held of, 35,

38, 44, 51, 58, 72. 75, 77, 125, 126, 127, 130; conftables of, 24, 56, 41 1, 412. Dover, Richard, fuffragan biflijp of,

39, 303.

Dpver, Fulbert de, 30. Douglas, Sylvefter, 56 ; Rev. Air. his Ncenia Britamica^ 122.

Dowden, John,

131.

Downe BaKTON MANOR,

in

Thanet, 238, 240. Downhainford,/ya«
Downs,

channel of,

Downs houfe,

in

(

148.



Drake, Francis, 173. Drapers hcfpital, in Thanet, 34 S* Druids, injlruments 33

£.

of,

E.

'

rough, 123

FARM,

Each End, ibid. fame, 442, a. near Sandwich,

;

in the

Eadburgate, 156.

Earthquakes,

felt in

Kent, 14,

374 Eaftanores, Eaftanfcore, now Stonar, 406, 409, 410, 414. Eafierige, nozn Ealrry, 102. Eafl India Company, agent for, at Deal, 1 1.

Eastry, A.

hundred of 35,439, a. of, 98, 441,

parijh

fireet, borough of.^b’,

manor,

436, A. church of, 150, 151. Eaftry, Henry de, prior of Chrifi’Ctmrch, account of, 101. Eaton, Richard Monins, clerk, 32. 33._

Ebb feet,

5

Word,

aS2, 284, 380, 384.

found,

in Thanet 229, 230, 265, 266, 409, 410. Edburga.St.abbefs of Minder, 271, 278. Eddius Stephantis, i 54, Edgecumbe, Richard, lord, 54, Ediva, queen, 255, 258.

Ducarel’s, 47,

Edolph’s,

.

;

.

.

XV

INDEX. Edolph’s,

Radigund’s,

of St.

33*

Edlworth’s, 427, a. Egbert, king of Kent, 102, 248, 268. Eleanor, queen, 156. Elector Palatine, embarks at Margate, 320. Ele£trurn, amulets of^ found in

Thanet, 229. 131, 21 1. Eleham, parljhof, 198. Ellington, in Thanet, 388.

Elgar’s,

Ellington, family

in

mas's, '

alias

hofpitccl,

St,

Sandwich,

Thomas,

Elmington, in

244. Everden’s,

of

423, Nicholas, 134, Nicholas,

St.

244. Evers, Thonaas, 397 ; Ever’s, 401. Ewe, countefs of, 89, 136, Enuell, parilli of, 436, a. Ewell, Robert, cl. 76; Ewell’s, 77-

Eythorne,

parijli of,

183, 215, 216,

Elmton

parifli of,

62, 92,

borough

of, 37 .

F.

Fagg, Thomas, 41

manor,

liam,

234

42

,

;

Wil-

Sir John, prefent

;

ThaJohn, heirs of, 397. Fairs and wakes, origin of, 344. •vicar

of

Nicholas, in

St,

net,

428, a.

Elmfton’s, 372.

Elware, Thomas, 114. Elys, Thomas, of Sandwich, 132, 198. 133.

Falkland,

Emma,

queen, 134, 197, 410. Emptagc’s, of St. Nicholas,

Carey’s,

vifcounts,

278. Sir George, 173. Farbrace, George, trultees of,

Fane,

lefees of

Elys’s,

Court AHi.

Dudmanfcombe and Brandred manor, 3. Farnaby, John, 68.

244.

England, Mr.

the organ builder^

441, A. Epps, Thomas, 239. Ermenfrid, brother of king Egbert, 268.

Ermengitha, filter o Domneva, 268, 271

Dna del, 284, Eftenburge. S’reStatenborough. Eftre, in Huntingdonlhire, 101 Efpine,

Eftrea, noio Eaftry, lath of, 72, 103 ; hundredof, 15 5 » church of,

Everard’SjOf

Ermenfrid,

183;

Eythorne, 67.

Elmft one,

cl.

St.

Tho-

chantry, 215.

Ellis,

Evans, Owen,

440, A. Lowr;-,

Elfex, 298,* 304. Ellis's

of

Exeter, John, 359.

of, ibid,

George, of Upton, in

Elliot,

Ethelred, fon 102, 268.

1

1

7.

Ethelbert, king, 410. Ethelbright, fon of Ermenfrid, 102, 268 Ethelred, king, io3>i34* 258 . c z

Farrer, Jofias Farrer, ftofcjjc: Cleves-cpurt, in Monkcon,

257, 293 1 Updowne, in St. John’s, Margate, 315. Falliam’s, 20.

Fleppington, of A. 433> Fawlkner’s, 117. Fayernelfe gate, in Thanet, 313. Fealt, fumptuous one,\w the Mote park, 449, A. Fector, John Minet, ftojfeffcs Updowne place, in Ham, 42

FaulTett’s,

seat, in farm, Green Eythorne, 63; Grove main the fame, 64

Peter, pojfeffes a

;

nor,

in

VVoodnefboiougb*

130J Fector's, account of, o^. Feibuiough,

IN

xvi

upper half hun-

Felboroiigh,

dred

428, A.

of,

Felderland, or Fenderland, borough and hamlet of^ 36, lOO,

145 Fellows, Edmund, cl 308. Felons, formerly punijhed drowning 1 46. ’

by

i,

Fenn, Edward, 239. Fennel, growingin Thanet, 232. Ferrers,

Thanet, 248,

at Sarre, in

43 7>

ftone, 81, 82, 86. Folet, William, 79, in, Folkeftone, barony of, 179.

Foreman, \A\ke, poffeffes MANOR and advpwfon, 421,

;

422.

249Field,

Fog, Thomas, 27. Fogge, Sir Thomas, 39 ; Richard, 84; Fogge’s, of Repton, 26, 40; of Tilman-

Henry, 128. Rev. John Shirley,

277-

Ferry

Fleta de, family of, 314. E'lorentinus, St, 287.

Fontibus, Ingelram de, 75. Forbes, John, M. D. 349. Fordwich, a member of Sandpar iff of, 427, A. wich, 132

Feoffees houfes^ in Minfter.

Fermor,

EX.

Charles

Sir

Ventris,

A.

Wm.

241

Limne, 243

John,

;

Mr.

of of

cl.

68

Eliza-

;

Mr. JufficS, 423. Fowell, John, D. D. 129. Fox, Hon. Charles James, 301, beth, 70

Fienes, John de, 38, 44. Finch, Nathaniel, Jergea7it at law, 1 74 ; Mrs. poffeffes St. Nicholas court farm, in

Thanet,

Forfter,

;

338, 364-

Fox, General, 446, 447, a. Foying, emplxyment of, in Tha-

Monkton

net, 228, 362. Francis, Michael, 134.

in Thanet, 367.

French, burn and plunder Sandwich, 136, 137, 158, 171, 197,200; burn Stonar,

;

leffee

parfonage, 260 j Finch’s, of Sandwich, 180. Finglejham, in Norborne, in. Fifh, monjirous one, call on fliore

Margate, 327. Fitz-Adam, Simon de, 75;. FiJJtery, at

Fitzbernard’s. 38, 39, 40. Fitzgerald, Captain, 92. perjecution for religion

160.

in,

William, 128, 129; of St. John’s, in Thanet, 314.

Fleet,

Fleet’s,

Fleet in

HAMLET, Thanet,

in St.

John’s,

Sandwich, 157, 1 7 1. Flemming, one murdered at Stanar, 416, 41 7. Flemmings, fettle at Sandwich, at

Great

HAMLET, rough, 123.

in

cl.

74.

411.

Frenchbourn,Chriftopher, 346. Friend, Anne, 114, 441, a. John, leffee o/^Brookfend manor, 303, 444, A. Captain George, 307. ^ Friga, Frilket

Saxon goddefs, 124. wood, in Thanet, 223.

Froghill, in St. John’s, gate, 346.

Mar-

Frosts,

3 14.

Fleets, royal ones, rendezvous

208. Flemmings,

Freeman, Thomas,

a?td Little,

Woodnelbo-

in St. Nicholas, in Thanet, 242, 243. Frynne’s, alias Friend’s, 117. Fuller, Thomas, of Staten-

borough, 112, 1 13, 116, 441, A. Edward, 234; Fuller’s, of Statenborough, 113, 117.

F tiller’s

earth, falfely fuppofed to be found near Ramfgate, 78. 3

Fuluetby,

-

INDE 5P* Fulnetby, Thomas, 197. Furnefe, Sir Henry, 167, 175, 195, 200, 381 ; Sir Robert, 301 ; Furnefe’s, of Walder-

40; account

54, 59, of 283 ; 148, 149, 60, 83, Sandwich, 205. Fyltner, Robert, 205. Ihare,

G. Garden of Kent, where,

147.

Sandwich^

161, 168. Garland’s, 240. Garling ville, farm and

let,

in St. John’s,

ham-

Margate,

MANOR,

314, 329, 34s; /7//rtjWESTGATE, 5
GATE. Garling

432, A. Garrett, Thomas,

in

Petham,

ftojjelfes

Up-

per Court, in St. Laurence, 383 ; Nether-court, in the fame, 384; Mark Seilers, ibid. John pojjejfes a moiety of Ellington, in St. Laurence, 389; Garrett’s, of St. Laurence, 401. Garrow, William, pojD'e(fes a houfe at Pegv¥ell, in bt. Laurence, and rejidet there, 378. Garwinton’s, of Bekefborne, 341.

Gafon, John,

167; Gafon’s, of Apulton, 96. Gatehurjl, alias Gattridge, in

Denton, 435, a. Gaunt, Robert, 33. Gedding, borough of, 36. G'ttv\zA^,Jlreamof, zi8. Gcjitlctnen

Gibbs, William, 141. Gifford, Walter, 128. Gilbert, Thomas, 203. G\\Y\nghzn\,priorofChrifi-churc7r^ in Canterbury, 341.

Thomas, of

Gillow,

St.

Nicholas,

St.

NiNi443,

farmers, in Thanet,

Thanet,

in

A. Gillow’s, X40,

443, of St. Laurence, 401.

244

Gipps, George, prefent re^m
Gipps, George, truftees of, /Oj^BofTeoden MA N0R,42(j, A. a feat in Harbledovvnc, ibid, the eftate

green,

CoThanet, 361,

occupier of

leys grange, in

A. Mrs. lejfee of barre parfonage, 252 ; Anne r^des at

Gallia hatchets^ 330. fettle at

Gibbon, John,

cholas, 238 ; lejfee of St. cholas parfonage, 247,

Fynch, John, 239.

Gardeners,

Xvli

of St. Grego-

priory, 426, a. Poldhurft portion of tithes, ibid.

ries

Newhoufe, in 7 'hanington, Thanington manor and parfonage, and St. Dunflan'.s parfonage, ibid. Rufli borne tithery, 427, a. Goldftone parfonage, 430, a. Giltoa parfonage, ibid. Nackington parfonage, 432, a, Mrs. re-

fdes

a\.

Harbledovvnc, 426, A.

Glouceftei',

duke

of,

448, a,

Glover, John, 3^0. Goddard, Chriftian, 114. Godfrey’s, 258.

Godvvyn,

earl,

15.

Golding, Captain, 30©. Goldwell, Thomas, 32. Goldfborough, John de, 65; Peter de, 127. Gollefberge, manor of, 153, Goodnejlon, pari (h of, 431, a. Sands, account of^

Goodwin

222.

George, Edward, refdes at Statenborough, 441, a. GefUing, ivaterof near Sandwich, 146,

Gookin’s, 3,33.

Gordon, Mr.

his

Itin

Scpicnt,

300. Core

M

;

,

index;

xvm Gisr
HAMLET,

PA u

228. Guldeford, George, 67

fame, 113*

in the

Gor e

Guile Riares, in Thanet, what,

lOo;

in F.afrry,

inBirclnngton^2'}i(>,

k'HY)

246, 294, 295. Coie-Jinct, in

H. Hackenden downe, or banks, in Thanet, 3.36, 363, 368. Hacket, Ofbern, 1 35 ; Hackefs,

384.

Goviere, Robert, 411. Gray’s, 374.

133.

Greadier’s, 244.

Hackling, borough

Green, Jenkin, 215 Thomas, eh 294; Mr. of Camberwell,

of,

;

th /culptor, 59. farm, in Ey thorn e, 64. in

Sandwich,

210, 21 5.. Greenall, Robert, c^. 60. Greenfldeld, Henry, of Sandwich, 184; Greenfliield’s,

153

-

Green with

governors

hofpital,

358 . 359

Grey, Gen. Sir Charles, 446, 447, 448. A. Grove, Sir John, 128, 204, 208; Grove’s, of Tunftall, 127, 141. WeoJneJbo-

in

rough, 127.

Griibbe, Robert, 67. Guildford, George-Augnflns, earl of, captain of Deal caftle,

Walderfhare

>3.

MANOR

and

HOUSE,

park and farm, in 63 ; the alternate

36; Eythorne, prefenta-

tion of Eythorjie rectory, 70 ; Barville, in Tilmanftonc, 83;

Lydde-court

out-grounds, of Salnreftone

149 ; lejfee grange, in Thanet,^ 337 Francis, earl of, 83, 149 earls of, account of,

* ;

55.

tees

of,

119, 301

of, Irjfee oi

foliage, 151.

;

Word

trufpt^r-

36, 14^,

in

Word,

-

in

St.

Lau-

Hale, Upper and Nether, in St. Nicholas, inThanet,z^o. Hales, Sir Chriflopher, 68, u a ;

Thomas Pym, 1 26 dame Mary jiojfeffes Church-gate FARM, in Woodnefborougb, Sir

;

Edward,

Sir

James,24i

;

193

Hales’s, of

Tea-

terden, 3. Halfnod’s, of Sandwich, 211. Halles,

Thomas,

135.

Halhcandane hamlet, in Laurence, 378. Ham, parijh of, 37, 439, A.

H ammill, alfo

tithes

of,

133.

St.

See

Hamwold.

Hammond, William, pojfejfes a FARM in Chillenden, 95, 96; Hammond’s, 360. Hammonds, a//«j Tewkers,

in

Woodnefborough, 133.

Hamwold, Hamolde,

HAMM

1

l

L , « borough ,

and manor, in rough, 122,132;

alias

diJit idt,

kVoodneJboalias

Upper, 133.

Hamwold, COURT,

Guildford, Catherine, countefs

dowager

439, * 45 Hains HAMLET, rence, 378.

ibid.

-

Grove manor,

FARM,

A.

Crcen

chasitry^

Gtil-

Gurney’s, of Shottenden, 351.

Monkton, 254.

Gore’s, 308. GofliaU’s, of Afli, 282, 284,

Green's

;

deford’s, 69.

Ham mill-’ fame, 134, Nicholas, 243,

alias

in the

Hannis’s, of St. 244.

Harbinge, rooms fo called, in St. John’s holpital,in Sandwich, 1S2. HarlledoTCTtf

.

Hiirbhticii'n,

panGi

of,

INDEX* 4a 5, a. Hartanger manor,

hofpital in, 361, 372. borough of, 36, 106.

Hardenden,

Hardiles, land^jin VVoodnefborougli,

1

14, 139, 284. parifli of,

Hardres, Upper,

72,

432, A. Louver, ibid. Hardres, Robert de, 75.

Hardwick, earl of, pojejfes Durapton.ia St Peter’s, 356.

Hardy,

Jofiah, 92, 429.

Harley

Thanet, 363.

tow'er, in

Hon, Thomas,

Harley,

445 ’

ibid,

*

Henry and

John, pcjfejfes Poweies, in Minfier, 283 ; Harnett’s, 287, 401. Harpnr, Sir }i{zrry fiojfefes and rifdei at Stone, in St. Peter’s, in

Thanet, 357,

H.arritigton, lady,

Harr i/on,

447, a.

fViiliam, prefent vicar

St. Jahn’f, in Jkatitt, 351;.

Harvey, Underdo wne, Brimfdale thorne, O4

farm,

fiojO'eJfes

in

Ey

Capt. John, 99, 113; account of his glorious conduB, 109,110; Airs. Judith

;

pofefj'es

Upper Farm,

HeriKieujin Eaftry, 109;

Henry Wife

refdes

at

the

lame, no; Anne, 115; FicharJ, 149 ; Reverend Richard, n6; Richard, preJent vicar of EaJIry, 121 ; Richard, jun. Jirefent vicar of St. Laurence, in Thanet, 406 ;

prefent

430,

IVingham, A. Sir Flenry, K. B. curate

44U

«/'

76.

Hartanger, William de, 7.5. Plarty’b, of Birebington, 233. Halliiigs, Laurence, 340, Hatchet, 13 i, ' Hatcombe, Robert, 41.1. Hatton, Michael, 82 ; Sir Robert, 173; Hatton’s, of Dane

court, 85.

Haul’s, 343. Hawker, John,

3, 112, 44T, A. Hawker’s, of Saudwien, 2 1. HawkeHey, ATarthn, 397. Hawkms, Tliomas, 374. Havvkftiiil clofe,in Walmer, 24, Har.vleyfquaie, in Alargate, 523. Flawley, Sir Henry, foff^jjfes Dene MANOR and Flengrave, in St. John's, in Thanet,

or* Barviile,

account of, 82 117; of Combe, 145, 239, 240. Harwood, in Bedfordfliire,nuns

of Eailry,

341.

Hay, George, LL. D. 176, Hayward, Gervas, 82, 13S; John, 112; Hayward’s, of Saodwich, 199, 211 Hearne, Air. the antiquarian, 530. Fleafledcn fliare,

downe,

Walder-

in

50.

Hegyihe

Thorne.

thorne. Hegliigdale, in

Ey-

See

Thanet, 269,

270,

Roman

Helena, the

emprefs,

coin of, 332. Helpelfone, baiTJfof Sandixsich, \\\.

Hemming,

the

Danl/A

chief,

396.

'

Harvey’s, of Eythorne, account of, 64; of Dane-court, 69; account of, 82 ; of Barfon, account of, 73 ; of Barfield,

of,

/b .S-sr-

1

.

Harnett,

fon, 74;

tithes of,

-'^IX

;

Hemmings bay

in Birchington,

ibid.

Hengift, the Saxon 265, Hetigrave,

in

St.

chief,

230,

John’s,

in

Thanet, 338, 340. Henley, Anthoiiy, 33.

Ken-

,

.

INDEX.

XX Hennebrigge,

Thanet, 416,

in

Hoo HAMLEt, in Mihfter, 280, Hooper, Capt. 326 ; Hooper’s,

419, 421. Heiiniker, William, 244; Sir John /io£e(fes and rejides at a

Hooper’s

houfe at Broadftairs, in Thanet, 360. Jlepesflete, in Thanet, 229, 230, 416, ^ee alfo Ebbs-

gate, 326. HofpitalUy unexampled of lord Romney, at the Review in the Mote park, 446, a.

hamlet,

in

Eaftry,

100. jK2;«(?,parifli of,

427, a. church

Heron, Thomas, of Chilham 251,

H ERONDEN, DEN,

hamlet, at Mar-

Hougham’s, 127,199.

196,

200 j

of Sandwich,

Hougham, Robert

de, 126.

Boughafu, parifli of, 436, a. Howard, of Effingham, Tho-

mas, lord, 231, 257.

Howdell, Rev. Mr. 133.

of, 246, 247. caftle,

hill

Hougham, Solomoh,

flete.

Herculaneum, city of, 330. Plermit, one at Sandwich, 201. Heringod, Sir Stephen, 339. Hernden

4or.

Horfa,

the

Saxon chif,

230,

265. alias

borough

and

Ha R DENdijiridl,

in

Holpitals, naval

Hoth, chapel

Eaftry, io6,

Heronden’s, account

of,

107.

Herfon hamlet, in St. Laurence, 378. Hertinge. See Hartanger.

and

military^

erefted at Deal, 13; of,

247,

Hilda, earl, 368.

Huffam,

Stephen, cl. 244; Huffam’s, alias Hougham’i?, of Sandwich, 180. Hugeflbn, John, 32 ; Hugeffon’s, of Provender, 26, 309, Huggett’s, of Thanet, 357,

Hewett, Thomas, cl. 353. Hey, William, 176; Thomas, 430, A. Heynes, John, cl. 307. 373 Heyre, vicar Michael, of Hughes, Mrs.429, A. Hughes’s, Woodnelborough, 140,141, ^ 37 -

-

Hillboroiigh, countefs of, 363. Hill, John, 140, 1 41,

Hunt’s, 96,

of Sandwich,

Hungerford, Sir Walter, 65. Hunter, Mr. Jurgeon, of Mar-

Hlyden. See Lydde- court. Hipwines Fleet. See Ebbs-

Huntingdon, William de Clin-

Hilpurton,

baililf

141.

flcet.

Hockley, John, 20, Holben, 'I'homas, 61;. Holman’s, of Ramfgate, 400, 401 Holland, fJenry, 52; HenryFox, lord, 301, 314, 338, 362, 364. Holland, the fliorteft palTage to, 320. Holnis, Edward, 32. Uohjiuood, John, cl. 433, A,

gate, 339.

ton, earl of, 339,

Hufbandry,

in Thanet, excellent 223. HutcheJJon, Thomas, cl. 428, a. Hutchinfon, Col John, 13. ftate of,

I.

Jacob,

Stephen Long, prefent vicar of alderjhare, 6 1 ; Ed-

W

ward, 84 ; John, cl, 349, - 444, A. James, John, cl. 21,48 ; Peter, cl. 400 James’s, of WockI; nelborough,

,

XXI

INDEX. nrlborough, 123 128, 134.

;

JulPs/o^^

account of

filhery,

366.

Kelly,

parifli of,

429* Iden’s, of Sandwich, 180, Jeffrys’s, of Sandwicli, 205.

Oxney, 33, 374,

Jeken’s, of 437. A.

Jemmett, William, 127. Jenkin, William, 234 ; Robert, c\,ibid, Jenkins’s, 435, a.

WigJenkin, HAMLET OF. more. Jenkinfon’s, of Sandwich, 205. ferufalem^ S. Johannis Patriarchies 181.

Henry,

Jellard,

129

occupier

;

of Alland grange, in Minller, B romp282, 443, A. ton,

ill

St. Peter’s,

Thanet,

356Impett, Catherine, 114, 441, a. Infanta of Kent, 39, 303, 339. Infirmary for Jea bathings at Margate, 323. Inis Ruim, now Thanet.

Henry, 234;

Mr.

Johnfon’s, 109 ; of 345 Laurence, St. 233, 383, 384, 400. Jones, Nicholas, 20. Jordan’s, of Sandwich, 200. Joy, the flrong man of Kent, ac;

count

qfs

See Ebbsfleet.

Ipped’s Fleet. Ireland, Robert Vere, duke of,

of Bridge, 67 trixborne, 342.

;

of Pa-

Ifliam’s, 26.

lllington, at,

Jull,

70

Richard

;

and William pojfcfs Lower farm, in Hernden, 109 ; Richard, 116; Kelly’s, of Hernden, 109, 401. Kelp, burning of, in Thanet, 224, 327.

Kempe, Robert, 239

;

Sir

Ro-

bert, 400.

Keate, George, 345. Kennet’s, of Minfter, 1 12, 287. Kent, Sir Charles, pojfejfes a moiety of Sevenfeore farm, in Minfler, 279.

Kentish volunteers, review OF, by the Kings in the Mote Park, 446, a. Kerby’s, 308, 374. Keriel,

Sir

Thomas, 26, 40,

250, 383 ; Keriel’s, 26. Keufe, Philip le, 279. Kien, Col. Chriftopher Erneif, 126, 139. III. at Stonar, Charles Ild. lands in

41 1 ; Thanet, 362

William II Id. emrefides at Quekes, 301 barks and lands at Margate, 320; George III and lid. the

fchool and hofpital

372.

Thomas Godfrey, pojfejfes Poulders farm, in

Great

Woodneiboroueh, 132. VOL. X.

fame,

mount,

king William’s Thanet, 230.

ibid,

in

patron

Ham

re(Sory,

43 ; Chillenden rectory, 97,; the alternate prefentation of St. Peter’s redtory, in Sandwich, 208. Kings of England embark and land at Sandwich, 157, 171. King, Mr. heirs of, pojfefs -a houfe at Sacket’s hill, in Thanet, 356. Kingsgate HAMLET<7W£^SEAT in Thanet,

d

;

;

King,

379*

3 '* Ifaac’s,

Daniel,

King Edward

Joad’s, 401.

Johnfon,

Wood* Jull’s,

;

K.

Ickham, Thoma^de, 334. Ickham,

123

141.

Jarvis, Peter, 196, 200.

Iceland,

a houfe in

nelborough,

362.

King’s

,

KxU

INDEX.'

Ham, Kingsd OWN, f, 29, 30.

King’s

See

Ham.

ville

and hamlet

Leitrim, Robert, lord, 27^. Leofrune, abbefs of Minfter, 272.

Kingsforcl’s, 32.

Lefter’s,

Kingjion, parifli of, 434, a. Kite's, of Sandwich, 21 r.

Letfom, John Coakley,

Knatchbull, Sir Edward, 26. Kneller, Sir Godfrey, the painter, 56, 435, A. Zachary, ia. Knight’s, 126.

Levifo.n, Sir John, 240. Lewis, dauphin of France, 231, 410. Lewis, John, cl. 287, 294 ; his Hifory of Thane t, 327, 330, 331 Lew’knor, Sir Robert, 389, Leyborne’s, 39, 302, 339.

Knighthood, commiffion granted, to

compound

for,

234.

Knighton, Henry, 290.

K NOLTON,

0/, 87, 44O, 82, i 30. Knowier, Robert, 287 ; Gilbert ,349 j Knowler’s, 244.

A.

M ANOll,

Lamprey, Thomas,

clerk,

423,

increafe, in the va-

lue of, 132.

Lane, Thomas Bateman, 63. Langdon, Weft, abbey of, 28, 60 ; abbot of, 58 ; [larijh of,

435 Langdon, '^z‘^,parifi of, 437, a. Langley, William de, 136, 150; Langley’s, of Knolton, So, ’

8r, 88; account 106, 138.

of,

89,93,94,

Lanfynby, Robert, 370. Lapis Tituli, where fituated, 408. Laurie, Gen. Sir Robert, 63, 446’ 447» A-

Law’s, 4or. Leapidge, John, 330. Ledes, prior and convent of, 42, 76,97, 141,142,232: caftleof,

128.

Leigh, Sir Francis, 116. Leith, George, of Wal-

mer

caftle,

iTier

MANOR,

24

;

Lilly, Hannah, 82. Linacre-court, 30. Lincolne’s, 342.

John, 84;

Walmer

Lace^ William, prefe7it reSlor of Idnolton, 94.

pojfef'es

26, 27.

Wal-

M. D.

323-

Lifle, Sir

L.

445» Lands, great

330.

of 27,

Lille’s,

caiile, account of,

Litchfield’s, 43.

Lithered’s, 401. Littleborne, parifli of, Littlejey,

428, a. near Stonar, 421.

Lomea,

i/landof,

16.

Longevity, inflancesof 71.

London, port

entrance of,

of,

*53-

London, Henry de Sandwich, billiop of,

London

clofe,

I 79, 180. in Walderfliare, 30.-

Londoners, claim the feignory of Stonar, 410, 414. Long, Alexander, 397 ; Martin, 397, 400. Longueville’s, 91.

Lort, Mr. celts,

his

obfervalions

on

331.

Lovejoy, Mrs. Elizabeth, her charities,

\, 3

376; George, Lovehys-Jh eet

70, cl.

in

3 7

1 ,

37
372.

Woodnelbo-

rough, 123. Lovelace’s, of Betherfden, 147. Loverick, Thomas, 198 : Sir William, 200. Lovetot, John de, 417.

Lower farm,

in

Hern den,

in

La/hy, 109.

Lower

,

a

,

index. Lower Hammill,

Hain-

See

wold.

L.

S.

A. meaning

of, in

charters,

147.

hamlet,

Lucas Dane

in St.

John’s, in Thanet, 315. Lucas’s, 384. Lucius, king, 258. Lundeniuic, 153. Lunthy, John^ pre/ent reHor of Barfon, 78.

Ly DDE COURT MANOR,

in

Word, 147; IN-GROUNDS, 148; OUT-GROUNDS, Lydden valley, near Sandwich,

Malm A INKS,

Lyde, apud

le,

Lynch, George, M. D. 103 John, 134; John,

;

LL. D.

archdeacon of Canterbury 183;

Gratian, 374. Lynches, or balks, coveteous cufom of diminifliing them,

share, MANOR OF, 52 ; manfon of,^o. Mann, Sir Horace, 177. Man/lon loood, in Thanet, 223 ; green, in St. Laurence, 378.

Manston manor, /« rence, 380.

Manfton’s, of St. Laurence, account
Thomas, 192; Manwood ’s,

Manwood’s

M. Macdougal, Capt. refides at Ripple, 437, A. Machines for bathing, convenientoneszX Margate, 323. Magminot’s, 51, 58. corporation

of,

448, A, fliare,

in

doivne,

Vv alder-

31.

Marlborough, John, duke of, embarks and lands at Margate, 320.

Maldry, a houfe for lepers, in Sandwich, 216. Mallet, William de, 9a. Malmains family, of Walderaccount of i

25 j

1

* 7,

I

74 > >8o, 199,

51,

hofpital, near

painter, ^ 6 . alias St.

Margate,

Thanet,

in

130*

d 2

John’s, of,

borough,

ville,

TOWN

parip

312; and

OF, 227, 236, 313,

315Marinis, or Marney, John de, ’

Marfli, Henry, 135 ; Marfh’s, of Canterbury, 132, in hamlet, Marfiborough

Woodnelborough, 122, 123, u)6. Marfliall, William, ving MANOR, in

borough,

127;

Shel-

WoodnelRichard,

247. Martin, John, cl. 21 1. Mafon’s, of Monkton, 233,234. Mafter, James, 193. moiety Matfon, John, of Netheriche, in Woodnelborough, 124 John, 440, A. Maundy’s, of Sandwich, 200. ;

Mawer, Kaye,

cl.

427, a

Maximinianus, Roman emperor, coin of, 332. Maxted’s, 401.

58*

Can-

terbury, 361, 372. Maretti Carlo, the celebrated

45

265.

Maimage

XXlU alder-

240.

147*

Lyden, hamlet of, in St. John’s, in Thanet, 314. hymington hamlet, in St, Laurence, 378.

Maidftone,

W

alias

143, 172, i73»

146.

67,

'

^

,

;

INDEX.

XXIV May, John, lain’s

pojjeffes

Chamber-

Fee, alias Deal

ma-

l^OR, 3. Maycott’s, 384.

Barham,

434 Mead, Mr. 66. Meard, George, 350. >

Meeting-houfes for Diflenters, 14, 166, 325, 346, 365, 387. Mennes’s, of Sandwich, i8o. Merchant adventurers, comjiany o/'inftituted, 162.

Meredith, Richard, 174. Merksfleote, near Sandwich, 156. Merrett, Solomon, 277. Me^ri weather, Edward, 75 Merriweather’s, of Eythorne, 64; of Shebbertfwdl,435, A. Methodifls, meetings for,^ 166, 356, 443, A. Milburgh, ville of^ in Thanet, 310. Michell, John, 175, 185.

Middle farm,

in

de,

Montfaucon, his antiquities, 330. Montague, hon. Edward, 174; Montagues, eaiis of Sandwich, account of, 177,1 78. Monyngham, John de, 72, Morrice, Salmon, 46, 48 ; James, c\, poJJeJJesGrt2d Betf« hanger manor, 47; advowfon of redlory, 48. Morrice, prefent rehlor of Be^ianger,

49 Morrice’s, j

Heron den ^

of

Mount, Charles-Henry,

lord,

Moyes, Nicholas, 134. Moyle, Sir Thomas, 39, 40, 303.

Moyne, Euflace renewed,

Mill-ftreet, in Eaftry, 99. Milton^ parijh of, near Canter-

bury, 426, A. Minet, John, cl. 63, 68. Minfliall, Sir Richard,

le, the French admiral, 231, Mullets, good taking of, atBIrchington, 296. Mutterer, hamlet of, in St.

John’s, in Thanet, 314,

N.

lord

26.

parijh of 227,236, ^^4> 334) 443 > A. MANOR of, ,

Nariington, parifli of, 432, a. Napleton’s, of St. Nicholas, 44, 244, 401.

332 , 334 359 . 3 So> 382 ) 4 J 4 , 418 abbey of, 231, 248 ; church of, 351, 374, 375,

Narborough,

402, 403,404, 405

Nash-court,

)

;

;

vicar of,

336.

'

Sir John, 80 ; Narborough’s, of Knolton, account of, 91, 93, 106, 150, in

St.

John's,

in Thanet,

Mockett’s, of Dandelyon, 308, Mongcham, parifh of, 5, 438, a. Mo;iins, w-ard,

282

account

46. Mofes’s, 384, 401. Motte, Stephen, 147.

276.

109. Miles, Mr. 442, a.

Minfliull,

Monins’s, of the fame, ibid. of, 227, 236, 253, 443, A. manor of, ?97; vicar of, 242, 3 ii; vicarage of, 308, 309. Morocftone. See Monkton.

Monkton, parijh

Maydeacotiy Little^ in

Multibus Jiatiitum 234.

Monins, John, pojfeffes the advowfon of Ringwold, 33;

;

Robert,

Ed58 ; Edward, 70, Monins’s, of Walder68

;

Sir

fliare, account

341, Naval ca?np of Julius Caefar, 7. Neame’s, 137, 244, 308. Nennius, the hiforian, 408.

Nether-court, rence, in Ihnnct,

in St.

Lau-

382, 384.

of 52, 53, 60.

Nether*

;

,

INDEX. water of, in Thanet, 2*9, 220, 237.

Kitheygong

North Sea

fifliery, 228. Northvvic, William de, 97. Northwood, in Thanet, 225.

t

Nether Hale,

St. Nic/io-

in

Thanet, 241. Netheriche. See Each

Sir Roger de, 418; Northwood’SjofDane-court, in Thanet, 233. Norwood H A m L ET, in St. Peter’s, in Thanet, 356.

Northwood,

las^ in

End.

Netherfole, Chriftopher, 342

William, 428, a. Neve, Gabriel, 360. Nevinfon’s, of Eaftry,

;

Norwood,

Valentine, 21 1; William, 240 Alexander, 346 ; Norwood’s, of Danecourt, in Thanet, 341, 342,

104

account of lo^*

;

"New Cut, begun near Stonar, 160.

Newenton, Henry de, 385. Newing, Mr. pojfejfes Fogges-

343, 348 j account of, 359, 372. Notfield, Richard, 349,

Mongeham,

court, in Great 438, A.

Nottingham

Newland grange, NewLAND3,

in

XXV*

Laurence,

St.

caftle, 13.

Nowell’s, of Sandwich, 200.

in

O.

Thanet, 382, 405.

Obelilk, large one, a tioted fea mark, in Thanet, 238. Obolallon, Robert, 358. Odiarne’s, of Sandwich, 211. Offa, king of Mercia, 147.

Newman,. James, 342.

Hew ftreet hamlet, in Woodnelborough, 123. Nicholfon, Francis, 32, Nierembergius’s, hiftory, 101. Nijhett, Nehemiah, prefent vicar of Tilmanfione

Okenfold, Edward, 242. Old Wood, in Woodnelborough,

87.

Noble’s, of St. Thanet, 374.

in

Peter’s,

Oliver’s, of Sandwich, 201;. Omer, Elizabeth, 373; Law«

ITonington, parifli of, 431, a. Norfolk, Sir William de, 42.

North, Frederick, florthborne,

MANOR

rence, alias

parifli of,

438, a.

near the Goodwin Sands, 19. Olbern, Thomas, 96. Olborne’s, 94.

OF, 44.

North-court

manor, manor,

80;

‘Tilmanfione,

in /«

OsSUNDEN grange,

Stourmouth, 428, a. Tsorth

Down, Raft and Wefi,

hamlet,

in St. John's,

344

in

Mar-

of,

count 0/, 3 7 5 ibid,

Northmoiuh,

in

;

Thanet, ac^

light houje there,

alias

Genlade,

in Thanet, 219, 226,

248,

249. JTorth fiream,

146.

near

Sandwich,

St»

Oxenbridge, Sir Robert, 39, 40 ; Oxenbridge’s, account

Thanet,

-

]Torth Foreland,

in

Laurence, 361, 405. Ower’s, 86.

gate, 315.

Northduwne yi?zV,

Homer, 429, a.

Orchard, Lybbe, 259. Ordnance, old piece of, found

lord, 56.



40.

Oxenden, Sir Henry, 184; Henry, 287 ; Sir George, 212; Richard, 434, a. Oxenden’s, 41, 174, 175, 176,

Oxford, Vere’s, earls of, 31. Oxford univerflty, chancellors of, 56} prefident, &c. of St, John’s college in,

poJJefsX.hc

advowfon

»

*

,

,

,

INDEX.

^XVl

advowfon of Barfon reftory, &c. of Cor77; prefident, pus Chrifti college in, pjfefs Nether Hale, in Thanet, fcholarfliips, 241 ; 239, founded in Lincoln college ^

Patrixhorne, parifli of, 431, A.’

MANOR OF,

139. Paulin, Michael, 374. e?nploy 7nent of, Paultring, Thanet, 228. Pawlyn’s, of Thanet, 357 *

ill

Payne, William, 349. Peake, Edward, 172 ; Peter,, 43^ See alfoYt]^^, See Offun173, 174. Ozingell grange. Peck, Thomas, 32. den. in, 191, 193* Oxneyf parifli of,

Pegwell, or Court stairs,

MANOR

P.

in

Packe, Dr. 24. Palmer, Herbert,

92

;

lady,

430, A. Pamflet,

OF,

in St.

Laurence f

Thanet, 281, 37 ^*

PtgsNtWhzy ,

fifhery at

378. Peke, Thomas, 46, 143 Peke’s, of Sandwich, 180. See alfo Peake. Penchefter, Sir Stephen, 163. Penceftre, Stephen de, 41 7> 418. Ptnda, king of Mercia, 268. Pendrick, Francis, 287. Penny gar el rent in Thanet, 273, ;

Daniel,

373;

Pam-

401. Paper, manufacture of^ brought into England, 160. Papillon, David, pojfefes Elflet’s,

mington

manor,

thorne, 68 prefentation

;

the

Ey-

in

alternate

Eythorne

to

re£fory, 70. Papillon, Philip, prefent reCor of

276,332.359Pepperricjs,

near Sandwich, 146,

152.

Eythorne, yo.

Paramor, Thomas, 239, 240,

Pepys, Samuel, 174.

John, 3, 1 13, 441, A. ; Paramor’s, of Statenborough,

Percival, Anthony, 73. Perkins, Sir George, 26.

account of,

Perot, Richard, 172; Perot’s, or Pyrot’s, of Knolton, ac^ count of 88, 149; Perot’s, of

342

1 1

2,

1

1

1 *

7

»

St. Nicholas, 233, 242, 244 ; of Minfler, account of, 280, 287 ; of Thanet, 234. Parboe, Edmund, i8i, 193;

Parboe’s, 133. Parcar, John, cl, 140. Pariflies', parts of feparated, 50.

Park £«//farm,

Ringleton, 136; account of, 442, A. Perronet, John, 351. Perfecution for religion abroad, 160.

Eythorne, Petham,

432, A. Canterbury, 279. ^3 Parker, Sir Philip, 174; Capt. Petley’s, of Sandwich, 199. Robert, 397; Parker’s, 401. Fetman, Thomas, poJJ'effes Ham MANOR, 41 ; Petman’s, i 17, Parmehed, in Upper Hardres, Pettit, Colonel James, ^ 287 ; 434 Sarah, 346 ; Capt. John, Parry, William Fox, 349. in

parifli of,

Peters’s, of

*

*

Edward, Partheriche, 174; Partheriche’s, 119. Patera, Roman, found, 433, A, Pattinfon’s, 86,

400

;

Pettit’s,

lyon, 233

;

of

Dande-

account of,

337,

349 Pett,

,

;

INDEX. Edward,

JPett,

rejides at

Monkton, 257;

in

Alland grange,

282;

in

Cleve, of

lejfee

Miiifter,

Pett’s,

244. Peyton, Sir Thomas, 87, 173, 174; Peyton’s, ofKnolton, 80, 8r, 88; account of, 90, 93, 94, 106, 131, 130.

John,

Philipott,

174;

Pluli-

P^ggott,

John, prefent vicar of Thanet, 377, Picks’s, of Tilmanftone, 86. Pierre’s, de la, or Peters’s, of St. Peter's, in

Canterbury, account of 129, See alfo Peters.

company

of,

Deal,

at

I r.

Pincerna, William, 88 ; Tho> mas, alias le Boteler, 107. Pincerna, William de Albini, 136. Pirot’s, 75, See alfoYtxoX, Pitman, Robert, prefent reblor of Chillenclen,cf,, Pitt,

7 -efides

436, a.

right hon. William,

the at

Pitt’s,

W aimer cafUe,

24 447, A. Sir William,

275, 279. Fix’s, or Picks’s, 83. Pity, our lady of, her chapel in

Thanet, 365. Plague, at Sandwich, 171, 208. Plot, Dr. 408 Pliimtre, John, pojj'ejfes Barfon

MANOR, Poic:tiers,

Poole, John de la, 431, a. Port, baro7iy of, 38, 44, 72. Portus Rutupma, or Rutupiee,

218. Pot, William, 73. Pot-afli, made in Thanet, 224, PowetEs, in Min/ler,zz 6 282. ,

Powell. John,

pott’s, 66, 314. Philpott’s, of Word, 150. Philips, John, 32.

Pilots,

Xxvii

74.

301,338,364;

Powell’s, 307,

Powle, Sir Richard, 300, 304, Powlet, lord John, 33. Poynter, Capt. refdes at Upper Deal, 14. Poynter, James Methurft, and Ambrofe Lyon, //o^} Ring. wold MANOR, 32, 436, A. Pratt, John, prefent viqat of Monkton, 264. Prefbiterians, meetings for, 166. Prefon, parifli of, 428, a. Piill,

caught in Pegwell

fifli,

bay,

378.

Probus, Roman emperor, of 33 »• Pudner, Humphry, 330, Puget, John, 430, a. Pulford, William, cl.

Purdew,

coin

432, a;

Jofiah, 437, a. Puteiis Thunor, in Thanet, 270,

Puttocks downe, near wich, 203. Pyott,

Edward,

Walmer

Sand-

lieutenant

of

24;

Mr,

in St.

Lau-

caftle,

438, A. Pyrot’s.

See Perot’s.

Pyf?tg H AMLET, rence, 397.

William de, 4.

Polders,

Q.

Poulders,

or

Great

and Little, in JVoodne/borougli, 131, 132. Poltman’s M A N-o R, Polton.

Quekes,

PoLTON MANOR,

in the

fame,

Quek, family

of,

Queen Anne’s bounty, governors

s/",

alias

237, 297, 306.

ibid.

pa'i/h

Quex manor

306.

P oltman’s, of Woodnelborough, Quekes, 138.

alias

and SEAT OF, inThanet, 297,

436, A.

of,

77, 202. -

I

Queen-

,

;

^

I

iNDt5^.'

xxvlli

/hr "wool

Qiietnbovough, at,

157.

Queeii-court

manor,

Oi-

in

pringe, 132.

Quince, John, 397

* >

401.

R, iKaguJets, the great,

Kaimnell, refides

131; hon. Charles, 174; dame Elizabeth, 349. Richardfon, Nicholas, 181. Richborough, port and haven of,

rough,

296.

and Brook-

lP\\ovc\^%, /lojffcffet

at a houle in

99 ; lejjee oi Word Minnis, 146; Gibbon, 381 ; Rammeil’s, 117. Ramley, abbey of, 102 llreet, in Eaflry,

53 »

*

5 ^*

409. Ridlingweald, See Ringwold. Ring, antique gold one found at Ealfry, 1 1 1 ; at Minfter, 267. Ringeley, Sir Edward, 90, 93, 113, 200. Ringjole. See Ringwold.

Rmglemere hamlet, in nelborough, 123.

Rincleton manor, /« Wood-

Ramsgate, ville aWtown

nejborough,

OF, 227, 236, 377, 385 ; RIER fl«^/HAICBOU R OFjiyO,

Ringslow,

39 ®Ramfgate, a member of Sand-

438, A. Herbert,

148 ; William, 43?, a. Raterfbuigh, 326, Rawe, George, cujiomer of Sandwich, 21 1. Rawlinfon, Dr. 154,

Raymond,

Sir Charles,

357.

hamlet

of, in

Thanet, 356. Reculver, a member of Sandwich, 152; church ol, 245, 308 parijh o/\ 428, a. Rede, Sir Edward, 211. Redwood’s, 401. ;

perfecution Relig’on, abroad, 160. Requefts, courts of, 14.

Review,

tithes

5

131, 138.

alias

hundred

236

of,

;

TENET, 277. See Ringleton.

Ringfton.

royal one^

at the

0/, 5, 29. OF, 438, A* parijh of, 437, A. Rither, Sir William, 66. Roaring gutter, near Sandwich,

Ripple,

MANOR

167. Roberts,

William,

poJJf^JJe^

Quekes,in Birchington, 301 Fleet, 314; and Dandelyon, in St. John’s, 338; Kingfgate SEAT in Thanet, 364 ; ,

Ann, 397.

Read, Capt. Martin, 400, Reading-Jireet

of,

137

135»

Ringwold,

wich, 152.

Rampfton, Frances, 21 1. Rand, Nordafli, 83 ; Judith, Randolph,

Wood-

'

Robinfon,

down

J

.

captain of San-

13; Henry, 233, 257, 296 ; Nicholas, caftle,

258.

Robinfon’s Treatife

on

Gavel-

kind, 284.

for,

Rochefter, dean and chapterof, pojfefs a penfion from Ham church, 43 from Chillen-

Mote

den church, 97 the tithery of Hammill, 135; and the parfonage and advowfovi of

;

;

paik, account of, 446, a. Reynolds, I'homas, 373^ Reynolds’s, 109.

Rich, Elizabeth, liojjejfes Buckland Barns, in Woodnelbo-

the vicarage of

Woodnelbo-

roiigh, 142 ; the parfonage of Sane, in Thanet, 252.

Rochefter,

N

;

XXIX priory of, 333, caftle, lands held of,

l^ochefter,

135 ; 134.

Rockingham, Lewis, 55 ,

earl of,

Rogers, John, i6o Jolin,

Rogers’s,

;

113,

Thomas, 147. Rolling, Thomas,

A.

441,

71,

122,

332,432, A.

330,

Sir Richard,

149;

Sackville’s, 84. Salifbury, Montacute, earl

Wm.

331,

289, 333.37o> 375>3/6,398, 405.

See alfo anti-

Review in the

park, 446, a. Rooke’s, of St. Laurence, near Canterbury, 421, 423.

Roper, John, 282, 380. Rolemary, hedges of, in Thanet, 232.

255

;

Thanet, 273

curious ones,

;

works,

at Stonar,

412, 413.

William 341. Sanded Bay, near Sandwich, Salter,

159. Sanders’s, of Thanet, 233.

See

Saunders, Sandford, Henry, 345. Sandhurll, Johnde, 80,81,89, alfo

136, 149.

land^

in

Thanet,

224.

Sandowne Deal,

Rowe, William, 241. Rowntree, Leonard, 372. Rucke, James, 251, 257. Ruffin, John, 69. Ruiflt’s, 251, 257. Ruochim, muj Thanet. Rufe, Jofeph, poJ[eJj^cs Belmont sEAX, near Ramfgate, 378.

13,

Richard, 20.

Rutton’s, of Sandwich, 199. urbsy

408.

Rutupinusy

Tortus ^

153, 165, 408, 409.

near

manor,

in

146.

Sandwell, Jeffry, 279 Sand%vich, 54, 412, 442, A* members of the port of, 24 cuftomers of, 8 r.

Sandwich, tow Rate,

Rullia, trade to, 386. Rutter’s, 45.

castle, 146;

Word, 149. Sand Doivnes, near Sandwich,

OF, 152

Rutupenjis,

in St. Peter’s, in

John'sy in Thanet, 274, 284,

Mote

Rutupia

Sackville,

Saltpits, in

liberality at the

Ruffiei.,

hill,

7, 64,

quities.

tilth

Sachet's

Salmesxone, Salmanjlone, GRANGE MANOR, in St.

Roman Jlations, 102. Roman Coddy, in Ringwold, 30. Romney, lord, his unexampled

Round

John,

198,

clerk,

ANxiauixiEs,

101,

;

of, 31.

216.

Roman

350

35 ^J. 372 5 John, 374; Ri. chard, 360 ; Sacket’s, 244.

Thanet, 356.

83, 149.

134* Rolfe,

Sacket, Stephen,

;

and

pory.x

former and prefent

154; Walloon manu-

fadurers fettle at, i6o ; incorporation of, 162 ; foil; 168 ; haven, ibid, barons returned to parliament, 172; earls of, 177; family of de Sandwich, 78 ; priorv, 180 hofpitals, 182 fthools, 190, i

;

S.

Sabulovicuniy

»S 3

noio

194; charities,

Sandwich,

195; ecclejurifdidion, 197 ;

chantries, 215.

-

VOL. X.

fiaffical

e •

Sandwich,

;

INDEX.

’XXX Sandwich, town and port

of,

9, 231, 236, 250, 386, 387,

389, 407, 410, 41 1 , 416. Sandwich, mayor and jurats of, 9, 120, 121, 416, 418, 419,

420

alternate

the

pojfefs

;

of

prelentation

St.

Peter’s

rectory, in Sandwich, 208. Sandwich, governors of St. Thomas’s, alias Ellis’s hofpital in, pojfefs Denn-court

MANOR,

hofpital in,

413 Sandwich,

Woodnetbo-

in

rough, 132. Sandwich, St.

St.

Bartholomew’s 120,

130, 157,

Clement’s, /«-

413.

Sandwich, haven of, 8, 391, 392, 414. Sandwich, earls of, 177. Sandwich, de, family of, 178 ; Kalph de, 39 ; John de, 141

Henry

de, 186, 189, 193, 302, 314; Sir Nicholas de, 186,187,189,384; Sir SiSir

mon

de, 204, 339.

Sandys, Sir

Edwyn,

58, 91. Santon, Francis, 66, 75.

173;

Thomas,

Saperton, in Wickhambreaux,

429, A.

SarRE, PARISH, or VILLEOF, Thanet,

236, 248, 249; a member of Sandwich, 152; MANOR OF, 250 marthes inclofed, 158 ; feriy at, 219, in

;

226. Saunders, Francis, 2S6 ; Bartholomew, 287, See alfo Sanders. Sawbridge, Samuel-Elias, poffejjes .

-

.

W

nelborough, 124. Saxons, fleets of,

HanrwoJd,

mill-court, in

alias

Ham-

Woodnefbo-

rough, 1^ ; Sawbridge’i.,of Canterbury, 135, Sawkins. Jacob, JoffeJfes a moiety of Nafli-court, in

153

»

Saxons and

Thanet, 230; Danes, battle of, 364, 368. Say, Robert, clerk, 426, a. 438, A. Saye’s, 51.

Sayer, Edw'ard, 129

-

ri/h in,

Thanet, 343; Chapel-hill houfe, 444, A. Sawkins’s, 397 , Sawyer, Joice, 133. oodSaxon names, abound m

;

Sayer’s,

of Sandwich, 211. Scoraflon, noiu Stonar, 410. Scorier’s, 131. Scott, Edward, of SufTex, 40. Scrinkling, Sir William de, 106.

Scudamore, Thomas, 128. Sea bathing, fajhion of, 386. Sea gates, made in Thanet, 313. Sea woofe, taken upinThanet, ibid, confequence of, 327; trial concerning it, 328. Sea’s, 240. Segrave, Sir John de, 179. of ChrillSelling, William, church, 118. Selfon, Seljlone, hamlet Eaftry, 36, 100. Selvcfton, in the fame,

of, in 1

14.

Septvans, Sir John, 200. Serre,

St.

Giles’s at, in

Tha-

net, 248.

Sevenscore farm,

in

Min-

flex, 278, 285. Sewers, commiflion of, for the eaftern parts of Kent, 146. Shebberijkvell, parifli of, 435, A. Shelburne, earl of, 276. S)ht\\,

fraia

of, in Thanet,'’232,

378.

Shelving, alias WoodnesBOROUGH, MANOR OF, I25, 126, 127. Shelving’s, 125, 126.

Shelvy’s,

7

XXXI

index.

SoUnus, the Roman writer, 21 7 > ai8. Solly’s, 132, Solly, John, 205 199. 200, 350. hamlet of, Somerfield,

Shelvy’s, of Sandwich, an. Sherbrooke, Richard, 66.

Sheriffs court,

Hope

or

;

m

u\HQK^inMinJler, aSo, 378, Shillingheld, Guido de,6;.

Woodnelborough, 123. duke Somerfet, Henry Beaufort,

106. Shingleton v)ood, in Eaftry, Shriukling. Shipton, James, cl. 37** Shirley, lady Ann, 55. SflOART, in St, Nicholas, See

alfii

of,

in

chapel

(f,

Jilmanftone, 80.

of,

62, 63, 65. South ftream,

Shinglk-

Southwell, Richard,

i 3 » 359 * brought into manufacture Silk 160. England, Simons’s, 374. Simpfon, John, 398.

I

47 *

Shrinkling, chapel of, Sladden’s, 135, i 4 <*

1 1

ot Spencer, Nicholas, cu/iomer 21 1 ; Sandwich, 140, 141, Alban, 389; Adam, 399 » Sandwich, of Spencer’s,

.

,

137.

7.

Spelman,

of

_

rear-admiral, 21

1 ;

;

Francis,

St. Vincents, in fofefes 5 Thanet,^ 314 John’s, in ot moiety Sarah pojfcjfes a NaDi-court, in the fame,

.

372;

Spracklyn, Luke, 349 Adam, of his of St. Laurence, 389 > unfortunate end, of Spracklyn’s, cholas, 399 388, 389, St. Laurence, 233, 5

144* Thomas, Weftenhanger, 147, i 73 » Thomas, cl. 348; William,

rough,

Henry, 344.. Ralph, 411.

Sprat, John, 195, 19^*

VKooaneJbo-

of

Sir

Spigurnel, Sir

Smalton, Thomas, cl. 44* Smith, George, cl. 77;

James,

Smith’s, of t'hornton, 85 ; Smith’s, 1315 of 148; Weftenhanger, ;

Sandwich, 199; of Thanet, 360. Soles,

,

Southwood, in Thanet, 225. PeSowell-freet and hill, in St, ter’s, in Thanet, 336. Speke, George, 56.

33.

coaft,

*397

.

SouthSouthwold, Wulderjhare, 58. wood, in

.

...

.

the Signal houfes, erefted near

Philip.

,

alias

Sidley’s, of Aylesford,

C.43;

.

Sandwich,

near

146.

‘®5>

Sigeburga, abbefs of Minlter,

vicar

in

South Langdon, borough of ZT

15®*

Sibertefuualt, 4.

pre/ent

manor,

South-court

-

Shrinkling, alias ton manor, is

*

Southerden, Stephen, 129. South-court, borough of, 36.

428, a. Shovel, Sir Cloudefley, 91, 93

borough

305.

Somner, George, 342, 349

Thanet, 239. Sholdon, parilh of, 438, Shorte, Darell, 400. Shottento/i,

*

,

399

.

c, .

1 0 01 Sprailing-fireet h a m l 5 t , Laurence, in 1 hanet, 378. 116; Catherine, Springett, .

Springett’s,

1

1

* ,

in Thanet, St. Auguftine, lands

410. hospiSt. Bartholomew’s tal, in Sandwich ,183. ^

brotherhood of St. Catherine,

in

Sandwich, 201.

John de, 45.

St.

e 2

,

»

,

,

XXXll

IN DEX,

St. Clere,

John, 65.

Thane t,

parifli of,

426, a.

248. St.

Dmjian,

church St.

London, 118. James’s land, in Thanet, of, in

344* Imarus, 347.

Margate,

St. John’s, alias of,,

in

Ihanet, 312, 227,

236, 237 » 295 ’ 33 5 345 , 444* A. chapel of 288, 289, 334> 336 St. John’s hospital, in Sandwich, I 82. St John of Jerufalem, knights >

of, 85, St. John,

John de, 38,43, 72: John, 54. St. John, John, vifcount, 41, Henry, vifcount, 283, 381 ;

54-

St.

Laurence,

parijh

of,

in

Thanet, 227, 236, 377, 445, A. chapel oj, 288, 289, 291, 334. 335* 336, 35«6t. Ledger’s, 125, 126, St. Leger’s, 141. St, St.

Margaret, pari/h of, 4. Margaret at Cliff, parifli

of,

2^ ^ 22 )

Mildred's Lynch, in Thanet,

220, 263

;

account

of,

269

;

m Thanet, 270. Mildred’s lands, in Thanet, 266 ; abbefs of Minfler, 266, 271, 278. St. Nicholas, parifi of, in Vianet, 227, 236, 237, 443, A. church of, 308. ABBEY,

St.

St.

Nicholas

282, 284, 380, 384, 402. St. Pancrace, church of, in London, ii8. St. Peter’s, parijh of, in Tha-

court,

236, 295, 312, 333, 336, 345* 355* 445* Apd oj, 288, 289, 331. St. Peter’s fchool, in Sandw'ich, 216. St. Stephen's, parifli of, St.

Thomas,

Sandwich, 183; chantry,

in

21 St.

427, a.

alias Ellis's hofpital,

3.

Thomas

s houfe, in the fame, U)l. Stadtholder, the, 448, a. Stalls, in the chancels of churches^ ufe of, u;, 238,

283, 286. Stanhope, Henry, lord, 280. Stanley, William, cl. 438, a. Stanley’s, ibid,

parijh

of,

429, a.

Statenborough

seat,

Eafry, 36, iii. Statenborough, Simon de, Stanton, H. de, iter of, 2,

436, A. St. Margaret’s flreet,in Tilmanftone, 84. St. Martin’s priory, in Dover, St.

Thomas, 398;

St. Nicholas’s,

net,

St.

parijh

Nicholas,

St.

in

St, GileSf alias

in

Thanet, 241 ; titheiy of 242; FARM, in the fame, 241.

in

m. 236,

273* 333church of, 432, a. Stepenburga. See Statenborough. Stephens, Oliver, 123, 138 143; Philip, 176, 177;

Stelling,

Anne

liojfejfes

the

tithes

of

Buckland and Ringleton, in Woodnelborough, 131, 138; of Woodnelborough parfonage, 143. Stevens, Thomas, 330. Steward, John, hermit, at lejfee

Sandwich, 201. ^ Stewart, Jofeph, lejfee of the H'hite knars, in Sandwich, 1S2, 199

j

Stewart’s, 200.

Stink,

^

INDEX. Stink weed, a pernicious one^ in Thanet, 232. StipviSf alias Marjhhorough hamlet, in Woodnelborough, 123. Stock’s, 401.

Sutton, parifliof, 437, a. Sir William, 90.

Swan,

T. Taddy, Edward,

Tambs, Thomas,

Stonar,

parijh of, 226, 236, formerly a 7nentber of

406 Sandwich,

132;

formerly

St.

;

in

land

in,

Clement's Jia~

rijh,\n Sandwich, 214; cut at, 266 ; reftory, trial at

law concerning

423. Stonore, feveral of the name it,

of, 41 1. Stone,

HAMLET

OF, in

Pe-

St.

ter^s, in Thanet, 357. Storm, tremendous one, in the

Downs,

15

;

dreadful ones

Margate, 328. Stormefton, diftridl of, 84. Stour river, decay of, 58 at

1

in

124. Strangford,

;

ri-

vifcount,

148. Street borough, in

Minder, 264,

.

428, A. Taylor, David, ders,

in

End hamlet,

in

Ey-

Poul-

T

net, 217. Tenche’s, of Birchington, 233. Tenet, John de, monk of St.

Augulline’s, 234.

Tenet, alias Ringdow hundred, 277Terry, Ralph, 134; Richard, 234; Mrs. pojjejfes Sheriffs court, in Minder, 281 ; Terry’s, 132, of 234;

Monkton, 259 alias

Hammonds,

427, a.

Stukeley, Dr. the antiquarian

33 V Suckling, Sir John, 173. Suffolk, Ufford’s, earls of, 90. Sutton, Sir Robert, 173; Sir Richard, 176.

in

Woodnelborough, 133.

Teynham, Ropers,

thorne, 64. Stringer, George, lieutenant of Deal cadle, 13. Strode, John, 174. Slurry, parilh of,

/loffefes

Woodnelborough,

132 ; John, 175. Tedald, William, fon of, 4. degraphs, ereded near the coad, 13. Tenacre, or Tancre, John de,

Teukers,

2Q2 Street

ibid,

Tang, Mary, 444, a Tappenden’s pojjefs Northcourt MANOR, in Sturm juth,

4S-

Woodnelborough, Philip,

44r, a.

Tanet hundi ed, 272; Manor,

Teneth, Tenet londe, wozyTha-

ver, 218 ; new cut acrofs it at Stonar, 41 3. Stourmouth, paridi of, 428, A. Strafford, devifees of the earl of, pojfefs a moiety of Netherich

FARM,

Wed-

Garling manor, in Birchington, 304; Hannah, 370.

of Kent,

418.

pojfejfes

gafe, alias

Stokes, alias Stokys’s, 134.

Stokho, Robert,

XXXlil

lords,

282,

380.

Thanet,

Thanaton,

island

OF, 102, 217, 443? -A* hu 7i-m dred of 236; earls of, 235.

Thanet manor,

noisj

Minder,

268. lha7iington, paridi of, 426, a,

Thatcher’s, 281, 388.

Theatre,

EX. at

eftabliflied

Theatre,

Mar-

gate, 323.

Theobald’s,

1

1

7.

miliain.frefent vicar of St. Mary's^ in Sandwich^ 203> Thompfon, Richard, 41, 114; John, 68. T/iotnas,

Thomfon,

George, 358

Sir

;

Thom43^> fon’s, of Sandwich, 1 80. Thorefby, Mr. the antiquarian, Rev.

Wm.

I'omfon’s, of Ramfgate, 400, 401. Tondrefley, Reginald de, 75.

Toomer, Mr.

poffefjes

Twitliam

hills, in Afli, 43'^*

Tonge, William, 84. Trapps, Joan, 191* 192* of 18, Trmity-houfe, 238. Trippe’8, of Sandwich, 180, Troward’s, 350* ®f St. Laurence, 389.

330.

Thorn, William

de,

monk

of

St.

Auguftine, 234; Nicho-

las

de, abbot

of the fame,

Tucker. John,

Thokne manor,

Minfler,

in

283.

Thorne, Henry de, 283

;

Edile

Formian

Thourne. See Thorne. Thunniclam, in Thanet, 270. Thunnor, a fcophant courtier, his tragical end, 102, 268 ;

imita-

tion of, 362. Tumuli, or barrows, Roman, 7, 64, 7t» 3^3* 368.

270. Tunftall, James,

Thunors hyfepe, in Thanet, 269,

270.

Thurbarne, James, 174, I7S> John, Jergeant at laiu, 185. Thwayts, E, 336. 137,

cl.

294.

Turkill, the Dane, 410.

19S; Eliza-

Turner, David,

Turner’s, of the White Friars, in Canterbury, 68, 70 ; of Thanet, 342, 343. 350-

beth, 397

269.

ville of,

Villa,

Tunnors leap, in Thanet, 209,

de, her tomb, 286.

Tickenhurft,

74.

count of

Tully’s

ibid.

cl.

Tufton’s, earls of Thanet, ac-

;

Turftin, 125.

Twew/rVjHAMLETjinSt. John’s, in Thanet, 314. antiquarian,

Tiddenden, Sir John de, 79. Tierney, Thomas Michael, 85.

Twyne, Mr.

Tilman’s, 374.

Twyfden, Roger, 60. Tyler, Rev. Robert, 400,

Tilmanstone, 440, A. Tilmanftone,

Sir

78

Roger



Tochi, 125. Toddy, I'homas, 344. Tohe, John, prefent vicar of Patrixbornc, 431, a. 432, a.

Tomlin, Peter, 350;

Sarah,

Dane-court, in Tha360 I'omiin’s, of St, John’s, in Thanet, 350.

pojj'efes jiet,

;

248.

U.

V.

de,

79> 2 r 'Timms, Thomas, p'f/eni curate of IVaimer, 29.

the

Valence’s, 141.

Vantfume

river, 218.

Verall, John,

141.

Vere boat, in Sandwich, 157* Vegetables, produced in great plenty, at Sandwich, 161, 168. Vereift, Mrs. pofejfes a moiety farm, in of Sevenfeore

Minder, 2795 Henry,

ibid,

287.

Vender’s,

XXXV

INDEX. i8i,

of Lydde Court In-grounds, in Worde and Eaftry, 14S ;

Fille Wood, in Tlianet, 225. Villa Regales of the Saxons,

Walker’s, 397. Walleran, Robert, Jheriff of Kent, 254* Wallis, Jane, 330. Walloons, at Sandwich, 162.

Venier’s, of Sandwich, 199, 205. Ufford, Robert de, qo.

3,

where placed, 102. Umfry’s, 399. Vincent, Samuel, 279. Vincents hamlet of, in John’s, in Thanet,

Walmer, St.

3 14.

Waltham,

Vineyard, formerly, at Quekes,

of,

vicar of,

A. <>/• 433 Walton, Thomas,

23}

3,

336 ;

parlJls

»

302. Viol, Strangford, 84

Thomas,

Underdown,

308

W

;

See Walderftiare.

reviewed in

Volunteers, Kentijh,

Mote Park, 446,

68.

cl.

Walton Farjn, 442, a. al vvorthfliii'e. Walwarefcere,

Underdown’s, 359. the

JiariJh

formerly a member of Sandwich, 152.

in

See W^oodnefWanefberoe, n borough. Waiifon ^Farm, in St. Margaret at Cliff, 436, A. Wantfume, river of, 138,218,

St.

219,237,248,231,266,280,

a.

'

Vortimer, king, 122, 408. Vpdowne, hamlet of, in Ham, in Eaftry, 100 38, 41 ;

UpDOWNE-Pl ACE SEAT, farm, in Ham, 41 ;

408, 409.

John’s, in Thanet, 315. See Hale. Uphall.

Upper Court,'

in

St.

Warden’s, 80. Warden's of the Cinque

Law-

316, 447 » Warley Lee, poJfeJfesUix.i\t Maydeacon, in Barham, 434, a. Warm fait water baths at Ramf-

rence, in Thanet, 3S2.

Upper Each.

Upper Farm, DEN,

Each.

See

alias

HerN-

in Eaftry, 109.

Upper Gore-end, in ton, 235.

Birching-

gate, 387. Warner’s, 129.

Upper Hale, in

Nicholas,

Warwick,

St.

in Thanet, 241. See Upper Upriche.

Upton, John, 33

;

Each

429, A. Upton Hamlet, in St. Peter’s, in Thanet, 336. Urns, Roman, found, 433, a.

Watemle, Sibilla de, 76. Water fpout feen in the Downs, *

5*

Watfon, Hon. Arabella, 33,

Way

borough,

in Minfter,

264^

292.

W.

W’^ebbe, Robert, 65

Wakes

or feafts, on dedication of churches, account of, 344.

WaLDERSHARE,/<2?7^0^,

1 38. in Minfter,

279. de,

cl

5 O,

A.

440, Wales,GeorgePrince of, 448, a

Walker, Win.

earl of,

Waschester,

Thomas

Ports,

.

poJ/eJfes?imQ\^ly

37 2 ^

;

Michael,

-

Weddington,

Weed,

in Afli, 196. one, lately

mifchievous

found in Thanet, 232, Weldon, Stewart, 277. Wellard, Charles, 63. ’

Welle

l N

XXXVl

TNDEX.

Welle, Wm.atte, 128. IVelh hamlet^ in Eafiry, 100. Weils, bifliop of, 419.

Wilkes, John, 66 fejfes

nor,

Wendejlone hamlet.^ in Eaftry, 100.

IJ'^enJlone alia*s

Wentworth’s, 251, 257. We/lbere, parifli of, 427, Weftbrooke,

in

a.

John’s,

St.

in

Thanet, 313.

Gar

Mary, pofCourt ma-

ibid,

Wilkins, Robert, 281. Willes, lord chiefjufke, 423. Williams, Walter, 92; Sir John, 275, 276, 279. Willis, Cornelius, cl. 373. Willow Wood, in Thanet, 223.

Weftcliff, pari/hof, 436, A.

Westcate, MANOR, in

;

Eythorne

Wood,

See alfo

alias

Wood-

g Birchington, 302 Wefigate, Robert de, ibid. Weflley, Rev. John, 443, a. Weftwood, in Thanet, 225 Whales calf alhore in Thanet,

church. Willowes, Thomas, 240. Wilfon, Rev. Wm. Worcefier,

297 > 329* 368. Wharton, Benry,

V/ind -mill, Margate, 326.

alias

Whitaker, Mr.

i

294. Hijlory

his

of Wingham,

of, 431, one,

priory

fy in

Sandwich, 181. V/hite, William,

lejfee of Deal Prebend manor, 6; Sir John, 80, 442, A. 374; White’s, 126, 244, 250, 383, 401 ; of Canterbury, 136; of Sandwich, 199. See alfo Whyte’s,

Whitfield, Robert, 363, 364. Whyte/s, 123, 128, 138. See alfo White’s. ferjea 7it at

parifli of,

Wainlborough. borough.

Whitbread, Samuel, 131,

Wiat, Edwin,

133.

_

cl,

Manchejler, 330.

White Friars,

400; Wilfon’s,

Wimlmgfwuld, parifli Windebank’s, 239.

law,

See

a

.

at

430, a.

Woodnef-

Wippedsfleet. See Ebbsflect, Wife, Henry, 113, 205. Witherden’s, 374. oden, the Saxon idol, 1 2 1 , 122. Woodnelberg, Afcelinade, 141. Woden Iborough. See Woodnefborough. Wollets, of Eaftry, 130, 131.

W

Wood,

Woodchurch,

alias

Thanet, 92, 225. 227. 236, 255, 310, 444, A. chapel of, 259, 262, 263 parfmiage of, 309, 310. Wood, Edward, 166, 201 ; pa7'ijh

in

of,

;

301.

Wickenden’s, 39. l'V^ickha77i

Breausy

Wood’s, of Sandwich, 180.

pari 111

of,

428, A, 429.

Wicomb,

in Biickinghamfliire,

hofpital op,

372.

Wickham Bujles manor, in Wootton, 435, A. Wi^more hamlet, in Evthorne, 64.

Wigmore, John, 230.

W, id’s.

374. Wil lord’s, 8b.

\\

00 D N E S Jl O R O U G H, 121,

442,

pa7-ijh of,

A. parfonage

of,

138.

Woodward, Leonard, pojfejfes Stoneheap farm, in Norborne, 438, A. oo\,

157

faple for, ;

at

at Sandwich, Queenborough, ibid.

Woollen manufacture brouoht ° into England, i6o.

Wooton, Hen. poJfefes'Thovnc

manor,

ill

Milliter, 284.

W

lot ton.

;

;

,

XXXVli

INDEX.' Wootton^ parifti of, 435, a

Wylde, John,

.

WoikVtpariJhoft 14$, 442* A. Wordfworth, Jofiah, 278, 287. Worth-ftreet, borough chapel off 117.

36

of,

>

;

Wotton’s,

Wrigglefvvorth, Mr. poffejfes hoiife in Ripple, 437, a .

Wright, rence,

Wm. cl.

46, 48

;

a’

Law-

60.

6, 1 16 ; John Wyborne’s, 211,

Wyborne, James, de, 72

;

Wynchelfea, John, 20X. Wynne, Sir Thos. 362.

Y.

Wotton, Edward, lord, 33, 105 t Sir Edward, 9* Henry, 173; Dearie 258; John. 304, 381 32, 380.

147.'

Yenlade, Yenict, in Thanet. See al/o (jcn\ A •

z.

Zouch, Edward, lord,

31 7,

390

^

38

(

)

ADDRESS TO THE PUBLIC. TT HIS EDITION being

now brought

apologize for at firft

its

of the H'flory of the County of Kent

to a conclufion, the Editor has only to

having exceeded the number of Volumes

him ; but from the accumulated valuable much more than could ever have been expelled,

propofed by

information,

which he has during the courfeof it received from numerous correfpondents, his materials from time to time increafed fo

much,

that he found his intentions

pradlicable,

though he

perufed, the

Reader

is

confident,

more and more iinwhen thefe Volumes are ftill

will not only chearfully acquiefee in this

exceeding, but will find himfelf highly fatisfied in the ledge gained

them.

The

by

thefe

know-

communications difperfed throughout

encouragement

this Edition has fo univerfally

met with, cannot but be highly gratifying both to the Editor and the Publljher of it, who return their moft refpedful thanks to the Public for their patronage of

it.

The Hijiory of Canterbury was defigned, as has been already made known, to have been added at the end of this r enth Volume, but as in that cafe, it muft have been on fo abftra£led, fo very concife

forded but

little, if

have met

in

it

any

neral claim

fatisfa<5Iion to

expeded from

was made to

was made

j

to

it,

and

it ;

at

on

who would

this idea a uni-

the fame time a ge-

to have a compleat Hiftory

and Church of Canterbury. acquiefeed in

the Readers,

the confiant difappointment of not finding

that information they verfal objeflion

and mutilated a Plan, as to have af-

—This

of the City

claim could not but be

comply therefore with

it,

the Editor moft refpedfully

(

^9

)

refpeflfully informs the Public, that

a complete His-

tory OF THE City and Church of Canterbury illujirated

with MapSy Views of the Cathedraly &c,

different

eminent

Oilavoy

is

now

Artifts, to

be comprized in

in the Prefs, the

firft

Two

Folumesy

Volume of which

already printed, and will be publifhed in a few months,

the remaining one as foon as

by

ilfc.

poffible afterwards, to

is

and

which

he requefts the fame kind patronage he has already experienced

to

the

feveral

Volumes of

this

Hiftory

already

publifhed.

London, July lo, i8oo.

DIRECTIONS

\

Any ERRORS

or

MISTAKES,

in the

former

edition^

or

com-

munications towards the imjirovement of thefe volumes^ willy at any tuncy in future y he thankfully received y if dire Aed

/oW. Bristow,

Parade, Canterbury.

DIRECTIONS TO THE BINDER. 1

.

To face

titky

woodnesborough church

...

and MOUNT.

3.

Map Map

4.

Tomb of

a.

of of

EASTRY HUNDRED. ringslow hundred. DE THORNE.

I

Note.—

this

Volume are given likewifeythe

Map epcoRNiLO

bewsborough hundreds; and the map of romney MARSH.— LATTER f which is to be inferted at p. 253, in Volume

f, 374,

the

in

eighth, and

which

guards

the

are

former

left

in

Vohtme ninth, at

at thofe places for that purpofc.

dd-3tl©

y

THE TOWN AND PARISH OF DEAL Lies

adjoining to Sholdon north-eaftward, being written in antient writers, both Dola^ and Dale ; in

Domefday, Addelam, taking its name a low open plain upon the feafituation

the furvey of

from

its



Ihore.

This parish,

with the town and borough of Deal,

was formerly part of the hundreds of Cornilo and Bewfborough, as appears by the furvey of Domefday ; but before the middle of king Henry Ill/s reign, it was efteemed within the liberty and jurijdi£iion of the cinque "ports and on fome difputes in king Henry VI. ’s time, ®

fays, Cafar ad Dola helium pugnavit . Baxter thinks place was antiently fo called from the crookednefs of the Ao/ being the fame in the Britifli, as Ao^o5ln the Greek.

Nennius

tliat this

fliore

i

VOL,

X.

B

relating

TOWN AND PARISH

2

being rated to the fubfidy with the reH: of thofe hundreds, the king, by his letters patent, in the i6th year of his reign, again united it tothat jurifditftion, as a member to the port of Sandwich j acrelating to

'

OF

cordingly

its

continues a feparate jurifdi6lion

it ftill

thofe hundreds within the limits and ports, having

own

its

jurifdidtion of

its

The manor

from

of the under the

liberties

conftables and officers,

ownjuflices.

of Deal,

alias

Chamberlain’s

fee,

of the canons of the prigry of St. Martin, in Dover, of whom it was held as a prebend, by the abbot and convent of St. Auguftine ; and it is accordingly thus entered under the

was part of the antient

general

title

Domefday

of the ‘'canons lands, in the furvey of

j

Beitjberg .

poffieffions

hundred and

in

Cornelai hundred

— In

Jddeldj the abbot of Sl AtiguJUne holds one fulingy and there he has three villeins and /even borderers y with one canicate and a half. Jt is zvorth thirty /hillings. In the "

time of king Edzvard the Confejfory forty /hillings. His predecejjors held it as a prebend in like manner. This eftate was afterwards allotted by the abbot to the ufe of the chamber of the monaftery, quired the name of Chamberlaif s fee.

whence

it

ac-

In the iter of H. de Stanton and his fociates, judices itinerant, in the year 1313, being the 7th of king Edward II.’s reign, the abbot, upon a (puo zvarrantOy

claimed and was allowed fundry liberties therein mentioned in this manor, among others, and view of frank pledge, and wreck of the fen, in like manner as has been already mentioned in the defeription of the other manors belonging to the abbot and convent, in the former parts of this hiftory.’’ And the liberty of the view of frank pledge was in particular further confirmed by king Edward 11 in his lothyear. After which, king Edward III. in his 36th year, by his charter of in.

•’

Dec, Script,

col.

2015 to 2018, See

vol. v. p, 421.

fpeximusy

»



.t^,.'

'l:>

O WK

AC C A

.

(^f ' '

/

^Aiij'm
Sa/n, oLown

tl.^

*^>r—

XWtnn hd Boo,b i

hy

f/c/yyvarci ./jeal

&

Printed bv S-P^dhot PoinkeriiiTy

D^AL.'

J manors 'and

poflefiions

fpeximusy confirmed all their oiven by former kings, and by another the feveral liberties and confirmations made by his predeceflbrs,

among which were thofe before-mentioned, and king Henry VI. likewife confirmed the fame. By a regifterof this abbey, made in the time of ab6th year of the above reign, lands here, belonging to the Chamit appears, that the berlain’s fee, confifted of 1 2 1 acres of land and up-

bot Fyndon, about the

1

wards, befides a portion of tithes within this parilb. After which, this manor remained with the monafyear of that tery till its final difiblution, in the 30th

was, with the other revenues of it, furrendered into the king’s hands. After which, I find nothing more of It, till the 4id year of queen Elizabeth, when it was granted by her as parcel of the manor of Ripple, toj. Hales, efq. ofTenterden, and he dying/, p. devifed Chamberlain’s fee to created a his nephew, Edward Hales, efq. afterwards reign,

when

it

baronet, and he alienated it in king James I. ’s reign to Thomas Gookin, gent, whofe grandfon Richard Goopaffed it away to William Verrier, of kin, in

1699, Sandwich, and

John, in 1712, conveyed it, one moiety to John Paramor, the elder, and the other moiety to John Hawker, of Sandwich; both thefe moieties came afterwards into the polfeflion of Mrs. Jane Hawker, widow of John above-mentioned, Mr, Paramor’s niece. She remarried John Dilnot, efq. of Sandwich, who furvived her, and by marriage fettlements continued polfelfcd of this eftate, wliich he afterwards, by the defeription of the feite of the manor of Chamberlain’s fee, with certain lands, and a portion of his fon

the erreat tithes arifing from certain lands wfithin this parilli, alienated to Mr. John May, gent, of Deal, who is

the prefent proprietor of

it.

north part of Deal town, from Chapel-lane, for the moft part built upon the walk of this manor.

The

B

2

A

is

court

y

TOWN AND PARISH OF

4

A court leet

and court baron is held for this manor, the whole fee of which is within this parifh. borfholder is chofen at the court of it, whofe jurifdidlion extends over this manor. The manors of Court-ash and Deal prebend, are two manors fituated within this parifh ; both which were in early times' part of the pofTcfTions likewifc of the canons of St. Martin’s priory, in Dover, under the general title of whofe lands they are thus entered in the furvey of Domefday :

A

In Cornelai hundred. In Addelaniy Anfchitil the arch, deacon holds one fulingy and there he has in demefne two carucates with fix borderers. Stigand, archbifhopy held this land.

To

this fame Anfchiiilly the bijhop

and

acres of land at Addelaniy

of Baieux gave fifty

other fifty acres at St.

Margaret where he has one villein and half a carucate. Thefe one hundred acres were of the prebendsy as is tefiified. In the whole it is worth eight pounds. In the time y

Edward the

of king

And

a

Confeffory

feven pounds.

In Sibertefuualt y William of : PoiBiers holds half a filling and twelve acres y and in Addelam half a fulingy twelve acres lefs, and there he has two villeinSy and three bordererSy with one carucate

and an

litile

half.

further

The whole

worth

is

fifty five fhillings.

In

the time of king Edward the Confeffory four pounds. And again : In Cornelai hundred In Addelam Ade*



lold holds three rody

and

there he has three villeinSy and eight border erSy with one carucate. It is and was worth

feparately fixty floillings. He himfelf held of king Edward the Confefjor.

it

in the time

In Beujberg hundred and. in Cornelai hundred. In ddehy William y fon ofTedaldy holds half a fuliug and half a )pk6y and there he has in demefne one carucate

A

and two

villeinSy

and two

borderers.

It is

Edward the

fhillings.

In the time of king

(hillings.

Derincy the fon of Sired, held

worth

fixty

Confeffory forty

it.

The

DEAL.

5

of Court-Ash was certainly Included in the above defeription, and feems afterwards to have come into the pofleflion of the prior and canons of St. Martin’s, and to have remained with them till the final difiblution of their priory, in the 27th year of king Henry VIII. anno 1535, when it was furren-

The manor

among the reft of their reveniieSj into the hands, who afterwards granted the priory, with dered,

king’s all

its

lands and polTeffions, including this manor, fubject neverthelefs to certain exceptions therein-mentioned, to

the archbifhop of Canterbury, part of whole pofieflions it continues, the archbifhop being the prelent owner

This manor has a court leet and court baron held for it, being demifed with the manors of Dudmanfeomb and Brandred, on a beneficial Icafe. .The family of Hodgfon, of Dover, were leffces of it for many years, from whom their intereft pafled by fale to Sampfbn Farbrace, gent, of Dover, who at his death gave it to his Ton, Mr. George Farbrace, the truftees of whofe two children are at prefent entitled to the intereft of this leafe. This manor extends into the pariflies of Upper Deal, Lower Deal, Mongeham, Ringwold, and Walmer. It comprehends within its bounds only a fmall part of the town of Deal, at the north end. But the manor of Deal, alias Deal prebend, included likewife in the above defeription in Domefof

it.

day, appears not long afterwards to have become part of the revenues of the fee of Canterbury, though by

what means

1

have not difeovered, and to have been

appropriated to the archbilhop’s table, from which ufe it was however taken away, and granted from time to

time by feveral archbilhops to different perfons, and continued fotill king Edward I ’s reign, when archbiIhop Peckham fully reftored it to the former ufe to which it was appropriated.*^ Since which it has conti®

Tower

Rolls, pat. 18

Edward B 3

I.

m.

38.

SeePrynne,

p. 423.

nued

TOWN AND PARISH

6

nued part of the

pofTeflions

OF

of that fee to

this time, the

archbifhop being entitled to the inheritance of it. This manor, with the demefnes of it, exempted

from

great tithes whatfoever,

all

is

likewife demifed

by

the archbifhop, on a beneficial leafe, (the wafle in Low'er Deal, between the fea and the fea valley there,

advowfons of churches, and the fcite of the king’s buildings being excepted) to James Wyborn, efq. of all

Hull,

Sholdon,

in

terefl in

it

pofTefifor

The of the

to

of

who

Mr. William White, of Deal,

the prefent

it.

wafle of this

fcite

has lately parted with his in-

manor comprifes

of Deal town.

A

the greatcfl part

court for this

manor

is

held at the court lodge, oppofite the redor’s houll*, in Upper Deal.

Most authors

have agreed in opinion, that Julius Csefar, in his firft expedition, landed ibmewhcrc near this place, after having been repulfcd by the Britons, in his attempt to land at Dover. Dr. Halley has proved in a difcourfe, which he publifhed on this lubje6l, that the cliffs, mentioned by C^efar in his Commentaries, were thofe of Dover; and that the plain and open lliore. which he next arrived at, was that along the downs here, where he made his landing good ; fome have conrendedthat he landed to the northward of- the prefent town of Deal, on fome part of the fand downs but there is a greater probabi.

;

between where the windmill of Upper Deal now Hands and Walmer caftle, where there are remains of intrenchments flill vifible. lity that

On

the

a
fpot was,

the fourth night, after Csfar’s arrival, a great

ftorm having damaged and deff royed many of his fhips of burthen, and filled the gallies, w'hich w'ere drawn on ihore, with the tide; he caufed the remains of his fleet, with great toil and labour, to be hauled further up the fliore on diy land, and inciofedit with his camp, within the fame fortification.

Where

DEAL.

7

Where this naval camp was, can only be conjecSome have fiippofcd it to have been on the tured. fame fpot where the fouthern part of the town

of

Deal

others think, that the cut, now called the Old Haven, mid-way on the fand-downs between Deal and Sandwich, is the place where Cailar

now

ftands;

whlllt

fecured his fiiattered fleet ; and at this time, upon the fhore about Deal, Sandown, and VValmer, is a long

range of heaps of earth, where Camden, Lambarde, Dr. Plot, and fomc others, fuppole this fliip camp to have been, and whicli the former fays, in his ti nc was called by the people Rome’s work, that is, the work of the Romans ; whilft others will have it, that they are only fand hills, brought together by the force of the weather.'*

Next

year,

when

Caefar

made

a fecond expedition

moft probably landed at or not far from the fame place he had done the year before ; fo that in whatever particular fpot this naval camp, or where he landed, was, it was all the fame as to his route from hence afterwards for as he could not crofs the great marfhes to Great Mongeham, Norborne, or Ham, he muft neceflarily march to Upper Deal mill and Ripple, in purfuit of the enemy, and accordingly from thence

hither, he

-;

Maimage, Barville, Eythorne, Barfton, and Snowdowne, to his main camp on Barham Downs, along all which route there is a by

Little

Mongeham,

Sutton,

continued courfe of Roman works and intrenchments, and tumuli^ mounts, or barrows, moft of which are taken notice of in the deferipfion of thofe parifhes, and of

Barham Downs

in particular.

But after Caelar’s taking his final departure from Britain, nothing further occurs relating to tiiis place, the Romans afterwards confiantly ufing the pert of Richborough upon all occafions, when they failed to this part of the coaft, till the time of their wholly abandon^

Camden’s

Brit. p.

248. Sec vol.

i.

of ihishiftory.

TOWN AND

8

PARISH OF

and the haven of Sandwich, after that, on the decay of the port of Richborough, in great meafnre fucceeding to it. During all this time, the fpot where great part of the town of Lower Deal now hands, was an open plain, and the only village here, was that now called Upper Deal, which was compofcd of the habitations of a few poor filhermen only, though at a lefs diftance from the fea than at prefenc, owing to the great increafe of beach thrown on this fhore afterwards. Leland, who wrote in king Henry VIII. ’s time, feems to confirm this, for in his itinerary,® he fays, “ Deale half a myle fro the Ihoie of the fea, a Finfsheher village Hi myles or more above Sandwic, is upon a flat fhore, and very open to the fe, wher is a foITe or a great bank artificial betwixt the town and fe, and beginnith about Deale and reniieth a great way up toward S. Margarets Clyfe, yn as ing

this

much

idand

that

;

fum fuppofe

Caslar landed

made

to

of the

where Surely the fofle was

that this

aperto Lit ore.

is

kepe owt ennemyes ther or

fe,

or

I

think

the place

to defend the rage

rather the calling

up beche or

pible.”

Even

fo late as the year

ingto John Carter,

1624,

a

houfe,

now belong-

on the weft fide of the Lowerftreet, (the furtheft at this rime from the fea fliore) is defcribed in a deed of that date to abut ad le fea bank verfus orientem.

efq.

And

further, in a chancery

fuit,

in

1663, a witnefs, of the age of feventy-two, depofed, that he well knew the valley of Deal, and that for fixty years paft, and before any houfe was built in that valley, which was certainly where the Lower-ftreet of

Deal now is. But when Sandwich haven likewife decayed, and the royal navy of England increafed, as well in number as largenefs of flHps, and the trade of Britain likewHfe,the channel called the Downs, oppofite to Deal, as the onlv f

See vol.

vii.

of this hiftory, p, 125, •

,

fafe

DEAL.

^ and commodious road in thefe parts, became the general rcfort and rendezvous, not only of the men of war but of the trading fhips, as well of our own as other nations, failing from and towards the river Thames, and the metropolis of England. This of courfe brought hither a continual fupply of fafe

,

the (lores neceffary for the (hipping, and quantities of provifions. It occafioned a great refort of fea farin» people, pafiengers, and others, on their account, fo tha't a new town arofe along the (bore, which, in oppofition to the

more

Upper Deal, New, alias Lower

antient village, fince 'called

acquired the name of the town of Deal.

The

parish of Deal, fo early as the year 1229, anno 14 Henry HI. appears to have been efteemed within the liberty of the cinque ports, and annexed as a member of the port of Sandwich, and it was expre(Ted to have been fo In the general charters of the cinque ports time out of mind ; neverthelefs, in king

Henry VI/s

time, there arofe difputes concerning the alfelfing it to the general fubfidy of the county at large upon which that king, as a mark of his favour to fo thriving a town, determined the difpute by again an-

nexing and confirming it by his letters patent, in his i6th year, to the jurildidlion of the cinque ports.'’ The borough of Deal was at that time governed by a deputy and alTiftants, nominated by the inhabitants of it, and appointed by the mayor and jurats of Sandwich, and it continued fo till king William IJI.’s reign, when violent difputes arofe between the inhabitantrof Deal and the corporation of Sandwich, which in great mealure originated from the former having grown wealthy by the rcfort of (hipping to the Downs, in the wars of the preceding fifty years. They began to feel the inconvenience of reforting to Sandwich upon every tri^

See Boys’s Coll, for Sandwich, p. 824.

Jeake’s Charters,

p. 25, 120, 122, 126.

fling

TOWN AND PARISH

xo

OF

which was heightened flill more by their own importance. This produced a reftleflhefs and impatience to cavil on every occafion, and they fcized the opportunity of the mayor of Sandwich’s having too violently prefled for a marker, purfuant to the lords juftices reviving an old flatute for the payment of toll, &c. as the ground of petitioning for ayi exclujive chmter of corporation^ to render them independent of Sandwich ; w^hich, after much felicitation, a ftrenuou? oppofition being made to it by the latter, they at lafl; obtained, in the year 1699, anno 11 king fling occafion

William

for jiiflice,

III.

was made a free town and borough of itfelf, and a body corporate and politic ; and now by it confifts of a mayor, twelve jurats, and a commonalty of twenty-four common-council, or freemen, together with a recorder and town clerk, two fergeantsat-mace, bearing filver maces, a clerk of the marker, and other inferior ofHccrs. The mayor, who is coroner by virtue of his office, is eleefted annually on the firft Tuefday in Auguft. Thofe of the jurats, who are juf-

By

this charter,

it

tices within this liberty, are fo, exclufive of the juflices

of the county of Kent, and hold a court of general feffions of the peace and gaol delivery, together with a' court of record. The corporation has liberty to purchafe and pofTefs lands in mortmain, of the clear yearly value of one hundred pounds, and it has other privileges, moftly the fame as other corporations within the liberties of the cinque ports.

The town

of Deal hands clofe to the fea-fhore, which is a bold open beach. It is built, like moft other fea-faring towns, very unequal and irregular; and conflfls of three principal flreets, parallel with the fea, which no doubt once flowed hill farther into the country than at prefent, the towm handing mohly on beach pebble, with which the furface is covered for fome (pace round it and when the wind blows a horm towards the fliore, the hreet next the fea, called Beach;

hreet.

H

DEAL.

feems frequently threatened with immediate deftrudtion from its violence. The town is very populous, confifting of near three thoufand fouls, the Inha-

ftreet,

moft part, either fea-faring, concerned in the bufinels of the fhipping, or the relpeftivc offices under government j and in the time of war, when the fleets of the royal navy and the Eafl; and eft- India fleets lie in the Downs, this place is remarkably full of buftle and trade. The wealth of it was much greater a few years ago than at prefent ; the great contraband commerce, formerly carried on here, having been in a great meafure annihilated by the reftraining ads lately pafled, though there is flill fomc traffic carried on in this way. Befides the private yards here for the building of vefbitants being, for the

W

and boats, there is a king’s naval officer, with ftorehoufes and quantity of ftores, for the fupply of the navy and here are agents for the Eaft -India company

fels

;

and Dutch admiralty, conftantly refident. Here is an office of the cuftoms, under a colledor, comptroller, furveyor, and other inferior officers and here are in waiting conftantly a number of flcilful pilots, ufually called Deal pilots, belonging to that corporation of them mentioned before, under Dover.^ Thefe pilots, like thofe of Dover, are divided Into two clalfes, called the Upper and Lower Book ; the former confifting of twenty-four, and the latter of twenty-five; thefe arc appointed for the fafe diredion and guidance of fhips into port, and up the rivers Thames and Medway. There is a market held in Deal on a Tuefday and Saturday, weekly, by the above-mentioned charter; ;

but vegetables are very fcarce here, being moftly brought from Sandwich ; and a fair likewife twice in each year, now by the alteration of the ftile on the and 6th of April, and on the 1 th and lathofOdobcr, 1

*

See an account cf this corporation of pilots under Dover,

vol. ix.

for

;

TOWN AND PARISH OF

12

for cattle, goods, and merchandizes, with a court of

Piepowder during thefe markets and fairs. The air of Deal is exceeding healthy, on which account numbers refort to it in fummer, as well for pleafure as for the benefit of bathing, for which purpofe there have been of late proper accomodations made and an aft having pafied, anno 3 1 king George III. for paving, lighting, and otherwife improving this town, it will probably foon equal at leaft thofe towns in this neighbourhood, which have had the benefit of the like afts.

King Henry VIII.

in the

year 1539, built for the defence of this coaft, three feveral cajfles, not far from each other, at Walmer, Deal, and Sandown ; each

having four round lunettes of very thick flone arched work, with many large port-holes. In the middle is a great round tower, with a ciftern on the top of it, and underneath an arched cavern, bomb proofs the whole is encompafied by a fofie, over which is a drawbridge. Before thefe three caftles were built, there were between Deal and Walmer cafile, two eminences of earth, called the Great and Little Bulwark ; and another, between the north end of Deal and Sandown cafile, (all which are now remaining;) and there was probably one about the middle of the town, and others on the fpots where the cafiles were erefted. They had embrafure for guns, and together formed a defenfive line of batteries along that part of the coafi, when there was deep water, and where fhips of war could approach the fhore to cover the difembarking of an enemy's army. Soon after the building of the above cafiles, the lady Anne Cleve landed here, on her intended marriac^e with king Henry VIII. Thefe, together with othel-s built in this county and in Suflex, with the captains of them, were put under the government of the lord warden of the cinque ports, by the aft of 32 Henry VIII. There are handfome apartments fitted up for the refi-

dence

N

DEAL* dcnce ofa family

Deal caflle, which (lands almoft clofe to the ioiith end of the town. The right hon. George Augudus, earl of Guildford, is the prefent captain of Deal caftle, and George Stringer

is

in

lieutenant under him.

DOWN E

CASTLE, which (lands about half a mile from the oppofite, or north end of the town, has lately ^ been made barely habitable. S-A

The

prefent captain

of

cadle is J. Robinfon, and John Bray, jun is lieutenant under him. Colonel John Hutchinfon, member for Nottinc^ham the long parliament, and continuing in it tilt this

efq.

in

the redoration of king Charles II. and governor of Nottinghani cadle, died in Sandovvne cadle, after eleven months imprifonment, without any accufation brought forward againd him in 1663. Since the commencement of the prefent war, among other precautions for the defence of this part of the coaft, two additional forts have been built between Sandowme cadle and the mouth of Sandwich haven. telegraph has been erected here, which correfponds with one at Betllianger. Three fignal houfes have been built, one at St.

A

Thanet ; another near the South Foreland, and another near Dover cadle j and near this town* though in Walmer parifh, there have been ereded barracks both for the infantry and cavalry, and royal miPeter’s, in

and naval hofpitais. I'he town of Deal became fo populous Anne’s reign, that the inhabitants petitioned

litary

queen to have a chapel of e afe hv divine fervice, for which an ad was obtained in the 9th year of that reign it was dedi; cated to St. George the Martyr, and confecrated, together with the cemetery adjoini ig, by archbilhop Wake, in 1716, who gave lool. towards it, and feveral contributions were added by the inhabitants and neiohin

bouring gentry towards it. By the ad, the chapel -wardens were enabled to lOol. per annum, by a duty, on Waterborne

raife

coals,

brought

14 brought

TOWN AND PARISH

OF

maintenance of a chap-' lain, to be nominated by the archbilhop, who was paThe whole expence of tron of the mother church. building of it was 2554I. and upwards. The duty on into this town, for the

1727; the annual average of coals brought in is about 3000 chaldrons. By tliis adl the minUler is to refide at leafi: ten months in the year.— Philip Brandon, A. M. collated July 5, 1786, is the coals ceafcd

in

prefent chaplain of

it.

town a handfome meeting-houfe, between which and the ftreet, is a piece of ground on each fide of the walk up to the houfe, which is ufed as a burial-place, having many grave and head flones

There

erefted

is

in this

in it.

There was a licence granted, anno 4 James II. Edward Burdett, for the building of a conduit-head

to in

New Deal. In the 12th and 13th years of king William III. an aeft pafied fpr furniflfing the town of Deal with water, for which purpofe there

is

a building for raifing frelh

water, to be fupplied from

the north ftream,

ereded

from the north end of the town. In the year 1786, anno 26 George III. an ad pafied to efiablifli a Court of Requefls here, for the recovery of fmall debts in this town, and the feveral adjacent parifiies mentioned therein. About a mile weftward from the town of Deal, is THE VILLAGE OF UppER Deal, the aiiticnt village of this parifh, and the only one within it, as appears by Leland, in king Henry VIII. ’s time. In it is fituated the church, and clofe to it the parfonage-houfe, and on the other fide of it a good houfe, now the refidence of Capt. Pointer. The country round the village is fine, open, and uninclofed, and being high ground, has a beautiful view of the adjacent country, and the

at a fmall diftance

Downs. There was an earthquake in England, in the year 1692. which was much more violent towards the fea than

DEAL. than further from

thrown down by

it ;

1-

there were, indeed,

no houfcs

nor peiTons killed ; it reached more particularly Sandwich, Deal, Dover, Sheernels, and Portlinouch, and the maritime parts of Holland, Flanders, and

it,

Normandy

the walls of

Deal cafUe, which are of an extraordinary thicknefs, fliook fo much, that the perfons living in it expedted they would have fallen ;

on their heads.

A

water- fpout was obferved in the

March, 1701

Downs

here in

which in our northern climate at that time of year, and during weather both cold and windy, was thought very unufual. The channel of the fea, adjoining to this fliore, is called the Drowns. It is noted for being a fafe and commodious road for the greateft fleets of fhips, and of the largcfl fize. It is about eight miles in length, and about fix wide, and is not unfrequently fo filled with men of war, and with merchant fliips of our own as w’ell as of other nations, which rendezvous here, both on their arrival and going out again, that it appears at times alrnofl: entirely covered with them. Though the Downs are efteemed a fife road for fliipping, yet r.t a high wind from the weflward of the fouth, it is far otherwife, that wind blowing diredl on the Goodwin Sands ; a particular inflance of which, the mofi: fatal that ever happened to the royal navy of ;

Britain, occurred in the year 1702, in w'hich, on November 26, a moft dreadful and tremendous ftorm be-

gan about eleven o’clock in the evening, and continued with the wind at wefl-fouth- weft till feven next morning, during which thirteen men of war were loft, of which, the Reftoration and Stirling Caftle, third rates; the Mary, a fourth rate, and the Mortar bomb were loft on the Goodwin Sands, with the greateft part of their crews feventy men only being faved from the Stirling Caftle, anti one from the Mary, in which latter rear;

admiral Bafil Beaumont himfeif perifhed. In

tOWN AND PARISH

l6

OF

In 1699, Sept. 9, the Carlifle, a fourth rate, one of Sir George Rooke’s fquadron, blew up in the Downs,

and one hundred and thirty men pcrifhcd. Prince Charles, afterwards king Charles TI. came into the Downs, in Augufl; 164S, with a confiderable the 1 5th fleet, and whilft he lay there, he attacked, on of that month, the town of Deal, and the forces under Colonel Rich, intrenched there for its defence ; but his force was foon put into diforder and entirely routed, with confiderable

lofs.

On the line

opposite side of this channel, in a parallel with Deal, are the Goodwin Sands, concern-

ing-

the origin

of which, there are

various opinions

fome affirming them to have been an idand, called LomeayOnct the eftate of earl Goodwin, whence they took their name, and to have been

among

the learned,

deflroyed by the fea in 1097 ; whilft others, with a greater probability of truth, fuppofe them to have been occafioned by that inundation of the fea, about the

'

time of king William Rufus or Henry I. which was fo great and violent, as to drown a great part of Flanders and the Low Countries, before which, this fhelf or find was only a kind of ffiallow, lying between the Englifli and Flemiffi coafts, and was fo far covered w'ith water, as never to lie dry, but had fo high a fea running over it, as never in the leafl; to endanger the failing over it, the fame as in the channel elfewhere j but fo much of the water between the two Ikores having flowed beyond its ordinary bounds, and gained fo much more room over thofe parts, the lea ufually lofing in one place what it gains in another, this flielf or fand, for want of that fufficiency of water which before entirely covered it, became fo near the furface of it, as when it was low, to .appear part of it dry, and to admit of people’s landing on it. As to the name of this fand, no one feems to know whence it arofe, though fome, who contend for its cxiftence in earl Goodwin’s time, fuppofe

it

originated from fome part of his

fliips

having

deal*

17

having been wrecked on them, or at leaft firfl: dlfcovered by fome of them. However that be, it ferves to diftingiiilh it from the many otlier fands hereabouts. As to the Goodwin Sand, it is much the largeft of them all, and is divided into two parts, though the channel or fwatch between them is not navigable, except by fmall boats. The length of both of them, from the fouth fand-he.ad over aaainft Walmer caftle, to the north land head over againfl: the North Foreland, is near teri miles, and the breadth nearly two. This fand confills of a more foft, fluid, porous, fpongious, and yet withal tenacious matter, than the neighbouring fands, and confequently is of a more voracious and ingurgitating property fo that Ihould a fliip of the largefl: fize ftrike on it, in a few days it would be lo wholly fwallowed up by thefe quickfands, that no part of it would be left to be feen ; and this is what makes the ftrikingon it fo much more dreadfully dangerous than on any of the neighbouring ones, which are of a much more hard and Iblid nature.*’ Notwithflanding this, feveral fliips, which have had the misfortune 'to run on thefe fands, have been got off, though this has been but feldom. A Angular inflance of this was in 1690, when the Vanguard, a man of war of 9a guns, having been driven on fliore on them, was, by the afllduity and dexterity of the Deal men, fafely got off without any material damage. When the water is off, thefe finds become exceeding hard and firm, infomuch that many land, and flay hours ;

on them

fummer but when the tide begins to cover them, they become foft, and foon float, to and fro with the waves, and when they retire fettle for pleafure

the fame as before.

in

The

;

occafion on the rednefs thev ^ *

water

and **

is

its

plainly difeovered

neighbouring

See Somner’s

from the

tfee

town of Deal

fliore.

Roman

Ports, p.

20

et feq.

Lewis’s Thanet,

p. 168.

VOL. X.

c

-

Misfor-

l

-TOWN AND PARISFI OF

6

In 1699, Sept. 9, the Carlifle, a fourth rate, one of Sir George Rooke’s fquadron, blew up in the Downs,

and one hundred and thirty

men

pcrifhed.

Prince Charles, afterwards king Charles II. came into the Downs, in Auguft 164S, with a confiderable fleet, and vvhilft he lay there, he attacked, on the 1 5th

of that month, the town of Deal, and the forces under Colonel Rich, intrenched there for its defence ; but his force was foon put into diforder and entirely routed, with confiderable

lofs.

On the line

opposite side of this channel, in a parallel with Deal, are the Goodwin Sands, concern-

ing the origin of which, there are

various opinions

fome affirming them to have been an idand, called Lomeay once the eftate of carl Goodwin, whence they took their name, and to have been

among

the learned,

defiroyed by the fea in 1097 ; whilfl: others, with a greater probability of truth, fuppofe them to have been

occafioned by that inundation of the fea, about the time of king William Rufus or Henry 1 . which was fo great and violent, as to drown a great part of Flanders and the Low Countries, before which, this fhelf or find vvas only a kind of fhallow, lying between the

EngliOi and Flemifli coafts, and was fo far covered with water, as never to lie dry, but had fo high a fea runnina: over failing

'

over

it,

it,

as never in the lead; to

the

fame

endanscr the

as in the channel elfewhere

;

but fo much of the water between the two (bores having flowed beyond its ordinary bounds, and gained fo much more room over thofe parts, the fea ufually lofing in one place what it gains in another, this flielf or fand, for w'ant of that fufficiency of water which before entirely covered it, became fo near the furface of it, as

when

low, to .appear part of it dry, and to admit of people’s landing on it. As to the name of this it

w-as

no one feems fome, who contend fand,

time, fuppofe

it

to

know whence

though for its cxiftence in earl Goodwin’s originated from fome part of his (hips having it

arofe,

;

:

'

-« Y— GOODWIN SANDS r.

i.VTKRESTING DISCOV E It

Sir Tliomas \N iat, a Keniisli kiiiglit of large possessions, was capitally executed for Itigli treason in tlie bloody reign of our Itrst Queen Mary, His father, of the same tianie, was an elegant

and was said to be also much versed in the early traditions of Kent, and curious in collecting ancient chronicles of the history of that county. In the succeeding and happier reign of Elizabeth, when no suspicion of treason could be scltolar,

excited by the search, the learned William Lainbarde, and subsequently other curious enquirers into the same amusing matters, made many researches in Wiat’s mansion houses, and examinations of papers deposited by him for security with secret friends, in order to discover some of the old printed books and manuscripts which his

had collected, and which were believed to have fallen into the son’s possession. But jio good success attended them. Recently, however, the accidental stroke of a spade, in digging away the soil for the purpose of reitairing the foundation of part of the old buildings at Allington Castle, (formerly one of Sir Thomas Wiat’s mansions,) has discovered a father

thin iron chest of considerable size, greatly corroded, and containing a mixture of earth and

matter, produced by decayed paper and parchment. In carefully handling and examining the present contents, one small fragment of parchment alone was found to be in any thing like it whole condition. After a patient and skilful process of damping and pressing, it was found possible to decipher a part of what has been written on it and this title has been plainly made out; “The Cronicell of (Jiles Ilowstede, Bror. of the Holy Bror.hd. of Set. lUidgunde att Langton, consarning



Kent land.” Nothing more can be deciphered, excepting a

small part near the bottom of the opposite side of the parchment, where, with very little aid of invention in supplying chasms, this story can be read. It seems to afford a very good lesson from the dead to the living, on the danger of cutting through ancient embankments, and breaking'down long established institutions

GODWIN SE BANKS.

' ,

The stone

tlie Godwin books, and the grete rodesledelharbyeforankcringof sbipps, is this. Bfore three liamletts or villages ware thare, of a good bigness, whare tlie se now flows, with a fair chorcb to evye one. But the land was lowo, and hemmed in of natur to the se side bv a straunge high clift of cbauk.like a walle, the wiche kep out the se tide. I'he lande was of grete richness, and the people was many and had a plentie. 'riiare was one thin parte

of the

clift

of

walle, ye

wch

the

Erl

Godwin

at

his

charge did ever keep sound by strong fencemeiits; and neer tharunto stud alt high uppon the toppo, as itt wod pitch down to the se, a small auntient chord) dedicat to Set. Gawulf of blessd. mem whare was a holio shrine moch honord of Xtn. marners with gifts and vows. Once nponn a daie aftr harvest, when the peple was full, thay did, in wicked foolishness and idleness, and for no i-eson given, set to, and i)i one night and a daie, bioke dene throw the thinn pte of the chnuk clift and al the Erl’s worke of care for yr glide, til the so, the wch was highe, cam in, and in two daies more coverd the whole flatt lande, and drowned al the people and the three pshes and thare chorches ; and at the next Evn-nox the whole chauk clift was dene sweept away and the chord) and holie shrine of the blessed Set Gawulf with it; the wch had long bin a grete gude to mar’nors for a see merk and soe the dry lande has bin so lharafler, to tech to foolish men not to meddle with the works :

:

wch the Lord alm’tie in his wisdom and g’dness, and thare own gude forefathers, have don for them. 'J'his is the legend of Godwin bankes by the coste of Kent lande, the wch was yrtofov pt of yt lande. / ^

TOWN AND PARISH OF

l3



Misfortunes happen fo frequently on thefe fands, that the wrecks becon:ie a valuable prey to the Deal boatD men, who keep a conftant look-out for them ; but though they look upon the wreck as their conftant property, yet it muft be owned, to their praife, that they hazard the moft imminent danger of their own to preferve the lives of the unfortunate fhipwrecked crews, who otherwife muft inevitably perifh. Notwithftanding

of deftru6lion, foreign veffels, efpecially the Dutch, through parfimony, to fave the dues payable to the Trinity-houfe, from all Hiips paffing through the Downs, frequently make their pafiage along the channel, on the other fide or back of the this terrifying profpe6l

Goodwins, and frequently are

loft

on them

in

the

attempt.

To

prevent as far as pofiible fuch continued cataftrophes on thefe fands, the Corporation of the Trinityhoufe, a few years ago, formed a defign to ere6t a light-houfe on them, and fent down feveral experienced engineers to try the poffibility of it, but after penetrating with their boring-augurs to a very great depth, the fudion was fo great as to prevent any difeovery of what it underneath confifted of j but from the eafy penetration they were convinced that the fame glutinous and fpongy materials continued invariable as far as they could reach with their inftruments, and as they judged it impradicable, the defign was wholly given But for the fafety of navigation a floating light over. has been placed at the back of the north fand head. Notwithftanding the dangers that arife from thefe

Goodwin

Sands,

it is

Downs fands may

they which conftitute the

to be a road for fhips.

At low water

thefe

be confidered as a pier or break- water in all the eafterly winds j and even at high water it is too fliallow over them to admit the great feas fo pafs without being much broken and dlfperfed, efpecially in ftormy weather.

From

the fuuation, therefore, of the

Downs, with



19 wkh thofe fands on one fide, and the coaft of Kent on the other, it is only the foutherly winds that can annoy them, which are much moderated by the proximity of the coaft of France, and Hill more ib by the firft part of the flood-tide running fouthward and meeting the DEAL*

feas;

it is

therefore not

till

the tide turns to the north,

(which is at or about quarter flood) that the combined force of wind and tide make the great eftort to break the fnips from their moorings. A very extraordinary piece of old ordnance was the Goodwin dragged out of the fea in I775 Sands, by ibme fifliermen, who were fweeping for anchors in the Gull-ftream. From fome of the ornaments, it may ftirly be judged to have been caft probably about the year 1370, which is not long after the very firft introdu6Hon of thefe formidable inftruments of war into Europe. It was feven feet ten inches long, and though of fo large a fize,,was manifeftly iifed as a fwivcl-gun, and was fo contrived, as to be loaded not j

mouth, but (like a ferew barrel piftol) at the breach, by putting the powder and ball into the chamber, and then clofing it up. From the fituation, however, of its trunnions and fulcrum^ it niuft have been extremely difficult to traverfe,and the charging it muft have been a very tedious operation, full as troubleiome as the piece itfelf was unweildy.‘ There have been several scarce plants oblerved in this parifh and its neighbourhood, b\ the boat the

tanifts,*‘

among which

the

more

Fiicus JpongioJm nodojusj

fea

Deal and Sandwich. Fucus Dealenfn pedicular is

rare ones aie,

ragged

ftaff

betwixt

ntbrifalio.'^

See an account of it printed in the Archaologia, vol. v. p. 147, where an engraving of it is given. See Merrett’s Pinax, p. ii, 33, 59, 66, 67, 80. Rail SyGough’s nopfis, p. 49, 332, 341. Jacob’s Plantic Fav. p. 6. '

Camden, '

p. 60. Merrett’s Pinax, p. 40.

Ibid. p. 48.

c 2

Rhamneidis

;

TOWN AND PARISH

20

Rhamnoides friidlifera foliis

OF

fatiris^ baccis leviler Jla-

buckthorn on the Tandy grounds near Deal and Sandwich." i)ilene conoidea, narrow-leaved campion. Salix arenaria, Tand willow on the land-downs near velcentibus,h\\o'
j

j

Deal."

buckthorn, or fallow thorn

Hippoph^e rhamnoides, near

Sandown

caflle.'’

Diant bus cariophyllus, clove pink and Sandown caftles, plentifully.^ Geranium maritinum, fea -crane’s downs."

gilliflower; at

bill

Deal

on the fand-

;

water violet, or gilfuiower

Hottonia palujiris,

in

dikes near Deal.® Brajjica oUracca, fea

cabbage

on the

;

between

cliffs

Deal and Dover.^

CHARITIES, TO THE TOWN AND BOROUGH OF DEAL. Richard Russell, by will in 156S, (confirmed by

deed in and land at of a hoiife Foulmet, part in 1675) gave the third Sholdon, to the poor of Deal, now vefted in Thomas Bayley, mariner, of Deal, and

is

of the annual j)roduce of los.

Nicholas Jones,

gent, of Deal, by will in 1623, gave fmall tenement, to the iile of the poor of this parifli,

Samuel Fasham,

efq.

by

one

1729, gave 50I. to be out in bread on New Year’s day, in

will

at intereft, to be laid for the benefit of the poor of this parilh; which is vefted in the mayor and jurats. N. B. The annual produce is not now paid, nor can it be difcovered when it ceafed.

placed out

Mrs Johanna Fasham,

by

1730, gave 20I. to be be diftributed among the poor of this parifli upon Candlemas day, which money was vefted in truftees, N. B. This produce has not been paid or laid out in bread, fince the death of Bethell Dawes, efq, p’aced out

in

at intereft,

will

in

to be laid out in bread, to

whom the original trufl: was vefted, Mr. John Hockley, furgeon, by

will in 1735, gave to which fum, 30s. to bedifbread or money, among so

truftees the annual fiim of 2I. los. of

tributed

on Good Friday,

n Rail Sytvop. p. 445. q Gough’s Camden. *

r

either in

o Jacob’s Plants Fav, p. 100. Jacob’s Planise Fav. p. 42,

P Ibid. p. 96. »

Ibid. p. 47.

Ibid. p. 15.

poor

1

2

DEAL. who do

poor widows,

not receive alms, and 20s. to be paid to

the chaplain or curate of Deal chapel, ior a lermon, and adminillering the lacrament on that day, and in ds^fault thereof, the whole to be diflribiited among the poor widows to be paid out ;

of Flower Marth,

in this paridi.

The Rev. John gave 94I. after

rector of Deal, by deed Old South-Sea annuities, the

James,

4s. 6J. ftocic in

deducing the

neceO'ar-y charges, to

in

i

775 f

interelt,

be diftributed annually

on Nov. 1 7, at the rate of 2s. 6d. each, among fuch poor inhabitants of this parifli, not receiving alms, as the reClor fliould think proper ; winch ftock >s vefled in the rector of Deal for the time being, and

is

of the annual produce of

Bethel Dawes,

2I. 12s.

8d.

by will in 1775, gave Sol flock in the the clear yearly dividends 3 per cent. Out South-Sea annuities, to be applied to buy bread, to be given by the mayor and jurats to the poor of the town every Eafter Monday yearly, in luch proportions as they fliould think proper; which ftock is now of the annual produce of 2I 8s. Stephen Colt, of Surat, in the Eaft-Indies, by will, gave 50!. towards piirchafing a houfe for the ufe of the corporation and of the poor of this parifli. Part of the houfe purchafed by his benefaflion, is now made ufe of as the court-hall, and the mayor for the time being always paid a rent for it, which ufed to be applied to the ufe of the poor but this has been dropped for efq.

;

many years. The poor There

is

a

conflantly maintained are about 1 33,- cafually 31. workhoule, in which there are Conflantly about forty-

eight perfons.

This parish

is

within

the

ecclesiastical

JURISDICTION of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Sandwich.

The

church, which is exempt from the archdeacon, is dedicated to St. Leonard. It is a handfome large building, having a tower fteeple at the weft end, with a fmall

wooden cupola or

church there

mas Boys,

is

efq.

turret at

the top.

a brafs plate againft the wall for

Tlio-

in

In the middle fpace of this church

Coppin fomb, ereded by

ried underneath

the

Nonington, who atthe ficge of Bologne, and

of Fredville,

tended king Henry VIII. at died in 1560. the

In

is

a tomb, called

that family,

who

lie

bu-

it.

The

TOWN AND PARISH

22

OF

of this church was antiently appurtenant to the prebend in this parifli, which was part of the polfcnions of the priory of St. Martin in Dover," on the dilfolution of which, in the 27th year of that reign, it came into the hands of the crown, and it was,

The advowfon

granted with the fcite and other poffenions of the priory, afterwards to the archbilliop and his fucceflbrs, in whom this advowfon has ever lince continued, the archbifliop being the prefent patron of it. This church is a re(5lory, and is valued in the king’s I fuppofe,

books at 19I. 10s. and the yearly tenths at il. 19s. In 1378 here were three hundred and forty- eight communicants, and it was valued at one hundred and In 1640 here were five hundred twenty pounds. communicants, and it was valued at only one hundred pounds.

The

re6tor

is

entitled to about a third part only

of

the great tithes ot this parifli. I'he other two thirds belonging to the two portions of tithes, belong to the archbifliop and earl

Cowper,

as before

mentioned.

All the lands in Deal, except thofe comprized in the leafes of Deal prebend and Chamberlain’s fee, pay

The demefnes

of the manor of Deal prebend, in Deal, are demifed by the archbifhop, Earl Cowper is entitled to free from all great tithes. the great tithes of the manor of Chamberlain’s fee, within the parifh of Deal, being an eflate in fee j but the tenants in the town of Deal pay no tithes to earl tithes to the. re6lor.

Cowper. That part of bifhop,

was

for

the great tithes, belonging to the arch-

many

leafe to the reftor

;

years demifed

but in the time of

queen Anne’s reign, the run out, and was never renewed.

re<5lor, in



leafe

See Leland’s Itinerary, vol.

on

a

beneficial

Henry Gerard, was fuffered to

vi. p. 6,

CHURCH

t

DEAL.

23

CHURCH OF DEJL. PATRONS, Or by uhom lirejented. The

Archb'OhoJi

RECTORS. Fdiniind Ibhuty S. T. B. indu6l. Sept. 1662, obt, 1677. Henry Gerard A. M. ind lifted

*

Oftober, 1677, obt. 1710."’ JVilliam Colnett, S. T. P. Feb. 19, I 71 1, refigned 17 1 7. Robert Lightfoot, B.D. Jan. 26, 1717, obt. Nov. 1726. Herbert Randolph, A. M. Nov, 26, I 726, refigned February, 1730.*

A. M. Feb,

William Geekie, 730, refigned John Herring, A. I

figned

1

753.^

M.

1753, re-

755.^

yohn Jatnesy A.

Nov.

1

26,

M.

1755, obt.

1775.

yolm Backlioufe,

S.

T. P. Jan.

1776, obt. Sept. 28, 1788.^

Edward

Beckingham

A. M. 1788, obt

Benfon,

July 10,

1795.*’

y. H. Bacihoufe,

M. A.

1795,

the prefen t reft or.

w And vicar of Lid by difpeafation,

as

was

his fucceflbr, and a fix

preacher of the cathedral of Canterbury. * He refigned this reftory for that of Woodchurchjof which he died rector in 1755, and was buried in Canterbury cathedral, y

He

dary of Canterbury, in v/hich cathc. dral he lies buried. * Afterwards reftor of Mongehain. * By difpenfatlon reftor of Ickhain, archdeacon of Canterbury, and mafter of Eallbridge hofpital. He was a good benefaAor to this redlory, by new building the parfonage-houfe.—

He

at times held the reftories of

lies buried in the chancel. b Alfoafix preacher ot Canterbury

Woodchurch, Chevening, ami Southfleet, which laft he held at the time of

cathedral,

his death in 1767, being then likewife

Ixning,

and

formerly

vicar

of

in Suflolk.

archdeacon of Gloucefter and preben-

W LIES

A

L'

M

E

adjoining to Deal fouthward, being probably

fo called (luafi vallum maris^ that fication

R

made

againft the fea.

c 4

It

is,

the wall, or torti-

was once part of the hundred

'

LIBERTY OF THE CINQUE PORTS. hundred of Cornilo, but was very early made

24

branch and of the cinque ports, a member to the port of Sandwich j neverthelefs, king Henry VI. on feme difputes arifing concerning it, again annexed and confirmed it to that jurifdidion, in which it ftill continues. The village of Walmer is fituated on rifing ground, about a mile from Deal fouthward, and about half a mile from the fea-fl)ore, at the ending of the chalk cliffs, clofe to which is Walmer cafile, built with the neighbouring ones of Deal and Sandown, all ol the like fort, by king Henry VIII. in the year 539, for the defence of the coaft. George Leith, efq. is the prefent captain of it, and Edward Pyott his lieutenant. Walmer castle Hands beautifully pleafant, clofe to the fliore, having an uninterrupted view of the Downs and the adjoining channel, as far as the coafi: of France, the naval commerce ot the whole world palling before it. The apartments towards the fea have been modernized, and handfomely fitted up, and have been made ufe of for fome time part by the conftable of Dover caftle and lord-warden, for his refidence in thefe parts. The prefent conllable and lord- warden, that a

1

gieat mhiijier of Jlate^ the right hon. William Pitt, whofe birth within this county refledls additional

honor to it, Ipared from

refidcs at his

it,

whenever

momentous

his

time can be

care of the public welfare

of the Britifh empire.

Towards

the village of

Walmer

is

a flat,

many

feet

lower than the high-water mark, which the beach thrown up along the Ihore has fenced from the fea, and which probably when Ctefar landed on this coafl, might be all covered with water. Round Walmer church, which Hands at the fouth end of the village, on a rife, is a deep tingle fofle. Here Dr. Packe fuppofes Csefar fought his fiiH battle in the fea, and fet his men on fliore.

-1

here are other vifible

marks of intrenchments

at Hawkefliill-clofe, near the caHle to the

fouthward,

and

WALMER. called Dane Pits, on

'

25 old down,

the and on the place nor far off from it.** This pari is noted for the falubrity of its air, and the beautiful profpeds over the Downs and the neighbouring channel, as well as the adjoining country, which is for the mod: part uninclofed corn fields. The foil in the low part of it, between Deal caftleand Walmer-fireet, is underneath a deep rich loam ; to tlie fouthward, on the hill, it is open down land. The There is not any woodland. vallies in it are fertile. The high road from Deal to Dover pafles through the village, which is called Walmer ftrect, and is very neat and prettily built, having feveral genteel handfomc houfes in it, which are much reforted to in the fummer feafon, for the benefit of lea-bathing, the healthinefs of the air, and the conveniency of its fituation in the neighbourhood of Deal and Dover. Leland, in his Itinerary, vol. vii. p. 125, gives the ¥

following defeription of this place, as in his time, viz. king Henry VIII. ’s reign :

Walmer

about a mile from Dele fliore and looke as from the farther fyde of the mouth of Dovre the (bore is low to Walmer lb is the fhore all cliffy and hy from Walmere to the very point of Dovar caftcll, is

and there the (bore fallech flat and a litle beyound the towne of Dovar the fbore clyvith to b’olkeftane. From Walmer to St. Margaretes ij and 2 miles to Dovar.” There are at prefent about feventy houfes in this parifh, and 800 acres'of land. There is no fair. The manor of Walmer was antiently part of the poffeffions of the eminent family of Auberville, who held it by knight’s fervice, of Hamo de Crevequer, as of the manor of Folkeftone. At length. Sir William de Auberville, of Weflenhanger, left an only daughter See more of Coefar’s landing on this coaft, and his future movements, under Deal, p. 6, of this volume. **

and

LIBERTY OF THE CINQE PORTS.

26

and heir Joane, brought him this

who marrying Nicholas de

Criol,

of her inheritance. The Criols, or Keriels, bore for their arms, Argent^ two

chevrons^

and a

cftate as part

canton^ gules

;

in imitation

of their fu-

perior lords, the Clares, earls of Gloucefter, who bore Or, three chevrons, gules.'' From him this manor de-

by fuccefTion to Sir I'homas Keriell, for fo their name was at that time in general Ipclt, who was flain at the fecond battle of St. Alban’s, in the 38th year of king F lenry VI. in aflerting the caufe of the He left two daughters his coheirs, of hoLifc of York. whom Alice the younged, married John Fogge, efq. of Repton, afterwards knighted and on the divifion of their inheritance, this manor was allotted to him, volved

at length

and he by

will devifed

it

to his fon Sir

Thomas Fogge,

fergeant-porter of Calais, both under king Henry VI 1 . and Vlll. whofe daughter and coheir Anne entitled her

fecond hufband Henry Ilham, efq. to the podcnion of but his fon Edmund Ifliam leaving an only daughit ter and heir Mary, die carried it in marriage to Sir George Perkins, whofe daughter Mary married Sir Richard Minfliall, of Chefhire, afterwards created by king Charles I in his i8th year, Baron Minfhull, of Minlhull, in that county, and they together joined in the fale of it in the 2d year of that reign, to Mr. James Hugeffen, of Dover, who died podefied of it in 1637, and in his defendants it continued down to WilliamWeftern HugelTen, efq. of Provenders, who died in 1764, leaving three daughters his coheirs j the youngeft of whom, Sarah, died unmarried, and under age, in 1777 ; upon which the two remaining daughters and coheirs became entitled to it, of whom Dorothy married Sir Jofeph Banks, bart. and Mary married Sir Edward Knatchbull, bart. and they, about the year 1789. joined in the fale of it to George Leith, efq. of ;

'

See an account of thefe fort of bearings of coats of arms, in

vol. V. of this hiftory, p. 297.

Deal,

WALMER. Deal, the prefent owner of

it

27

A

court baron

is

held

manor. The manfion of the Ciiols is fituated not far from the fide of the church yard. The ruins fhew it to have been a large venerable manfion, with towers all built of bolder flints and alhler tione, and as

for this

fuppofed by Nicholas de Criol, in Edward I. or II.’s In the church' yard feveral ftone coffins were reign. difcovered a few years ago, fuppofed to have belonged to

fome of

this family.

CHARITIES.

A PERSON UNKNOWN

gave to the poor of this parifli, part churchwardens and overfeers, the prothe in vetted of a houfe, purchafe of coals, for fuch as do not the in duce to be laid out value of il. 3s. annual receive alms, now of the

Walmer

the ecclesiastical

jurisdiction of the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of is

within

Sandwich. church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, confifts of one ifle and a chancel j there is no fteeple, only one fide of the antient tower remains, but there are two fmali bells in it. There are doors on the north and fouch Tides of the church, with circular arches, with, zig zag and nail headed mouldings ; and the weflern

The

between the body and the chancel is On a likewife circular, and full of fimilar ornaments. grave-ftone, at the entrance of the chancel, is an inicription to the memory of Anne, wife of Chriflopher Boys, captain of Walmer caftle, and daughter of I'homas Fog, efq. by whom The had ten children. She died 1680. Againft the north wall is a monument for William Lifle, one of the equerries of the body of king James and king Charles. Alfo of Edmund Lifle his brother, fewer of the chamber of queen Elizabeth, king James, and king Charles, having been twenty-one years captain of Walmer caftle, lineally defcended from the lords de Lifle and Rougemont. William and Edmund both died in 1637, leaving Nicholas their broface of the arch,

LIBERTY OF THE CINQUE PORTS.

28

of their antient inheritance of Wilbiirgham Lines, in Cambridgdliire ; arms at the a fefSy between two chevrons^ fable^ with quarteringsther, poffefTor

Jn the pariOi regifter

is

entered

:

— 1637.

1 /ifle, gent. do£ius fenex an

73 vixit Ciclebs JIudiis hi1 637. Mr. Edmd Lifle, captain of the caftle. The church ofWalmer was antiently part of the poireHions of the family of Auberville, of VVeftenhanger; one of whom, Sir William de Auberville, fenior, in king Richard I.’s reign, having iounded WeftLang* don abbey, as has been more fully mentioned before, gave this church to it in pure and perpetual alms, which gift was afterwards confirmed by Simon de Aibrincis his defeendant, and in the 30th year of king Edward I. by Nicholas de Criok'* After v\hich, this church continued with the abbey of Langdon, to which it was appropriated, till the diffolution of it in the 27th year of king Henry VUI when it was, among the reft of the pofidkons of the abbey, granted in the 29th year of that reign to the archbiihop Cranmer, who, though he not long after exch.anged the feite of the abbey and armbens —

other pofldfions of it with the crown, yet he retained the advowfon and parfonnge of this church, among others, by a particular exception in the deed ; fince which it has continued part of the pofTeftions of the fee

of Canterbury, the archbiftop being both patron and proprietor of the appropriation of this church. Mr. John Cannon, jun. of Deal, is the prefent leflee of this parlonage. The church of VValmer has been long fince efteemed as a perpetual curacy, and continues lo at this time. Jt

not valued

in the

king’s books. In 1578 here were communicants eighty one. There arc at prefent about three hundred and fifty inhabitants in this parifii. In 1640, the ftipend to the curate was eight pounds. is

Archbiihop Juxon augmented the Ifipcnd 20I. per t

See Dugd.

Mon.

vol.

ii.

p. 622,

623.

annum,

,

WALMER.

29

annum, anno 12 and 13 Charles II. fince vvliich it has been augmented by the governors of queen Anne’s bouncy.

It

is

now of

value of

the yearly certified

tliirty-two pounds.

CHURCH OF H^JLMER.

*

patrons, Or The

CUR AXES,

by ivho?n prejented.

A.

Thomas Paramore^

Aichhijliop

M.

ia

1680.®

John Ramfey, A. M. in 1702. Edicard Lloyd, A. B. obt. April I

1741-'

1,

Fd'usard Goodall. Sayer Rudd, M. D. 1752, obt.

Gh?-*

..

,

,

John Maximilian Delangle, I77I-'

refig.

Robert Philips, i 7 71, obt. 1798.'’ pre1 homas lintms, 179^» tent curate.

*

was f

Alfo reilor of Eaft Langeion, as his fucccITbr.

And

reflor of Ripple

and Beifhan-

g He took his degree at Leyden.— He was vicar tf Weftwell. And re
gtT, by difpcnlation,

OR

W

N G

r

R

O

L

D,

parilb to

now ufually called, Ring j ole lies the next Walmer, fouchward; being written in antient

records,

Ridling-zveald.

ville

as

it is

has been, as

It

well as the

or hamlet of Kingfdown, within the bounds of

it,

long fince efleemcd part of the cinque -ports, and a member of the port ot Dover; to which it was again united and confirmed by king Henry VI. and continues fo at this time.

This parish the northern

is

hills

fituated

of

on high ground, adjoining

this part

of uninclofed common chalky, but much of it

fields is

of EallKent, in a country of corn; the foil is moftly

fertile

land.

The

high road

from

LIBERTY OF THE CINQUE PORTS.

30

from Deal

to

Dover goes through

which The pa-

the village, in

the church and parfonage-houfe is fituated. rifli is both healthy and pleafant, with beautiful prof-

pe6ts over the Downs and neighbouring country.-— About half a mile eaftward from the village of Ring-

wold, within the bounds of this parifh, is the ville and hamlet of KingJdowHy which adjoins to tlie fea-fhore, and appears to have been, in early times, a place of Ibme account, by its being mentioned by name with Ringwold, in the charters of the cinque ports. Jt is now a fmall fifliing village, where on the fide next to Walmer, the poor fifhermen by a capftan wind up on fho re their boats, commonly called Kingfdown boats. In the valley between the two downs or hill fides near this, there are the remains of an antient camp. Darell fays, this place was formerly called Roman Codde, and vulgarly Romny Coddy, which he interprets Romano-

rum fortitudo^ no fair.

the fortitude of the

The manor

of

Ringwold,

Romans.

There

is

the time of the Conqueror, was in the pofTefllon of Fulbert de Dover, as part of his barony of Chilham, in whofe defeenclants,' and in the Strabolgies, earls of Athol, this main

nor continued in like manner as Chilham, till it was forfeited by one of them to the crown, where it (laid till king Edward II. in his 5th year, granted it to Bartholomew de Badlefmere, who in the 9th year of it obtained the grant for a market weekly, on a Tuefday, at his manor of Ridelingwold, and a fair there, on the eve, day, and morrow after the feftival of St. Nicholas, and free-zvarrenXxk^yNi^t within all liis demefne lands within the

1

it.

Plis Ton Giles

2th year of king

fifters his coheirs,

de Badlefmere died

Edward

III.

f. p.

in

leaving his four

and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of

See Rot. Efch. Hen. Ill'' ^ um. 23 7. Inqulf. poll mort. anno 38, 19, nona pars Elc. ejufd Regni. See more of this family at large under Chilham, vol, vii. p, 270. *

Is(

.

William

WALMEK.

31

of Salifbiiry, furvlvlng, who became entitled to it for her life ; fhe afterwards married Hugh de Defpencer, who in her right became poffhe furvived him likewife, and died anno fdled of it pofTefTed of this manor, held of 33 king Edward III. the king in capite, by the fervice of finding a man

William Montaciite,

earl

;

armed

to the

guard of the fea-coaft, whenever the fame

be neceffary, for all fervice. Upon her death, this manor, on t!ie further partition of the inheritance of the fifters of Giles de Badiejinere, 'was allotted to Maud the eldeft, wife of John de V ere, fl-iould

earl of

Oxford, who

in

became pofTeffed of holding this manor in capile

her right

it,

as and died the next year, of the caftle of Dover. His grandfon Robert, ear] of Oxford, was by king Richard II. created Marquis, and Duke of Ireland ; but he was afterwards banilhed the realm, and all his pofleffions, excepting his entailed lands, confifeated, which latter only were to remain to On the confifeation of the duke of his right heirs.'"

Ireland’s unentailed eftates, this

by grant

common

to Sir pleas,

manor afterwards came

Robert Belknap, chief

who was

juflice of the

likewife attainted and banilhed

of that reign. In the 2d year of king Henry V. on the petition of Sir Hamon Belknap, his fon, the parliament enabled him in blood and land to his father, notwithflanding the judgment made again!! him, and he was reinftated His three fons, John, William, and in this manor. Henry, each fuccefrively inherited this manor ; the latter left one fon Edward, and four daughters ; the former rcfidedat Wefton, in Warwicklhire, and in the beginning of king Henry the Vlllth’s reign was kniglited. He died in the 12th year of it, anno 1520, into Ireland in the

f p.

on which

i

ith year

on the partition of their ^

became his coheirs, and inheritance, Anne, the youngell,

his four fifters

See ejore of the Veres, earls of vol. vi. of this hiftory, p. 471,

Oxford, under Badlefinere, entitled

LIBERTY OF THE CINQUE PORTS. fRtitled her hufband, Sir Robert VVotton, to the poffedion of this manor,' whofe dcfcendant Edward, lord Wotton, conveyed it not long after that to Sir Thomas

32

Edoiph, of

St.

that reign, iiad

Radigund’s, vdio, in the 13th year of a confiimaiion of the grant of free^

demefne lands of this manor. His grandfon I'homas Edoiph, cfq. alienated this manor zvarren within his

to Francis Nicholfon, efq. and he, in

1702, palled it away to Edward Holnis, gent, of Bramling-court, who by his firft vvife had three daughters; Mary, married to john Philips, a dilTcnting minider ; Thomafine, firfl: to Enoch Kingsford, and fecondly to John Hugellen ; and Bridget, to Zachary Kingsford, and they, by his will,

became

entitled to this

manor

in

equal

fliares.

At

length VVilliam Kingsford, efq. of I'unford, the grandfon of Zachary above-mentioned,

of the whole of

manor,

becoming

polTelfed

1762, together whatfoever in this parilh, to Mr. Tho. with all his lands who died in 1790, leaving two Peck, furgeon, of Deal, this

fold

it

in

daughters his coheirs, who marrying two brotliers, James Methurft Poynter, and Anibrole Lyon Poynter, cfqrs. they are now’ become, in right of their wives, court baron the prefent polleflbrs of this manor.

A

is

held for

it.

Ring WOLD diction of

is

w'ithin the

ecclesiastical juris-

the diocefe of Canterbury,

and deanry of

Sandwich.

The

church, which is dedicated to St. Nicholas, is a handfome building, having a tower Heeple at the well end, in w'hich hang live bells.

monument

In the chancel

is

a

mu-

Richard Dauling, clerk, patron and redlor. He died in 1679; arms, On afejs, three acorns. Another for Richard Monint. Eaton, clerk, patron and rebtor, eldell fon of Richard Monins, clerk, by Mary his wife, fifter of John Daulinge, cfq. late patron, obt. 17703 arms, Gules^ three crefeents^ or. In the north ral

for

%



See an account of the Wottons, vol. v. of

this hiftory, p.

400. ifle.

y

y

UlNGWOLD. an antlent grave-flone, coffin-Hiaped, on which is a crofs patonccy on a griece of three feps. Two graveftoncs for the Edolphs and Gooktrns; arms on the former, lozenge i ermine^ on a bendy three cinquefoils imifle,

A

A

chevron, paling the fame arms. On the latter, arms, ermine y between three cocks impaling ermine y on a bendy three cinquefoils.

Jekens’s, of

In the nave feveral memorials for the

Oxney.

Biafs plates for Elizabeth, wife

of Robert Gaunt, obt. 1580 ; for Willia Avere, alys and anne his VVyfisj he died anno 1405; and for John Upton, obt. 1530. The fteeple is built of flints, with the corners and arches over the windows of red brick> and a date, in figures of iron, 1628. In the churchyard is a remarkable fine yew tree, which meafures upwards of twenty feet round. The church of Ringvvold was antiently appendant to the manor, and as fuch the advowfon of it pafTed through the fame feveral changes of ownerfliip, down to Edward, lord Wotton, who alienated it to Sir William Sidley, of Aylesford, afterwards created a baronet^ in whofe defeendants it continued till it was at length

ofDaulihg; one of whom, Richard Dauling, gent, of London, preat length by, Mary, daughter of fented to it in 1679 John Dauling, clerk, it pafied in marriage to Richard Monins, clerk, prebendary of Briftol, mafter of the: king’s fchool in Canterbury, and re6tor ofRingwoldj who died pofiefied of it in 1750, on which it came to his eldeft ilirviving fon of the fame name, who afterwards took the name of Eaton, and was redtor of this parifli. He died unmarried in 1770, and his younger brother John Monins, efq. now of Canterbury, fucceeded to this advowfon, of which he is at this time proprietor. The reftory of Ringvvold is valued in the king’s books at 13I. I2S. 6d. and the yearly tenths at il.ys. 3d. In 1578 here were fixty communicants. In 1640,000 hundred and feventy communicants, and it was valued fold in Charles II.’s reign to the family

;

VOL. X,

.D

at

'

p

y

LIBERTY OF THE CINQUE PORTS.

34

at feventy-fix pounds.

now

of the reputed clear

There are nine acres of glcDe land

value of 250I.

belonging to

It is

it.

CHURCH OF RING WOLD, PATRONS, Or

RECTORS.

by luhom lirejented.

J. Dcring and

others y

hac vice.

Richard Daulingy

clerk,

obt,

I67Q."’

Richard Daidingy gent, of London

Ward

Slater, gent,

Richard Moninsy

fohn Monins y George

clerk,

efq,

Gijijts, ejq^

hac vice.

John Daulingy A. M. June 19, 1679, obt. I 727. Richard Mcnins, A. M. Nov, 4, 1727, refigned 1747." IfaacTealey Dec. 7. 1747, refjgned 1748“ fohn Hicksyjun. A. B. Sept. 30, 1748, obt. 1754. John Tucker, A. M. March 14, I 75 5, refigned i 758 . Richard Monim Eaton, A. M.

Feb. 27, 1758, obt. i77o.‘‘ John Tucker A. M. March 24, 1770, obt. Dec. 12, 1776.'' Robert rhilijisy A. M. Feb. 20, 1777, refigned i 784.* George GippSy A, B. July 1784; the prefent reftor.

«

See Reg. Roff. p. 1035. n Likewife vicar of Alkham, and dying in 1750 was buried there. o He was, as well as his fucceflor, reftor of Charlton by Dover. P Second matter of the king’s fchool in Canterbury, and vicar of Sheldwich. q Alfo reftor of Charlton. r The fame as was reftor here before. Sec his feveral preferments under Thanington, Milton near Canterbury, and Sheldwich.

Mr.

Tucker was a

charailer-, his benevolent .

mejl

worthy

difpofition

and goodnefs of heart, the honefty of which was open and undifguifed throughout life, gained him the univcrfal love and efteem of every one,

and by

will ever

make

his lofs regretted

and fuch indeed were all who knew him. • Afterwards vicar of Bekelborne, and curate of Walmer. his friends,

THt

THE HUNDRED OF Lies

EA.STRY

Bewfborough record of Domefday it is almoft

the next weftward to that of

laft-defcribed.

In the

within the

left

or lath of the

HUNDRED CONTAINS WITHIN

ITS

BOUNDS THE

tliroughoiit

it

faid to lie

fame name. THIS

PARISI ES OF 1.

2.

Ham. Betshanger.

4.

Waldershare. Eythor N E, /«

5.

Barfriston,

3.

7. 8. 9.

11.

12.

Denton."

son. 6.

.

Word. Worth, Woodnesborough, in jiart And

10.

Bar-

Chillenden, Knolton. Eastr Y, in fart alias

.

Tilmanstone.

u The church of Denton is in this hundreci, a part of the parilh is in that of Kinghamford, under which, though wrongly placed, a defcription of this parilh may be found, to which the reader is referred, vol. ix. p. 358.

D

2

And

eastry hundred.

36 And

the churches of thofe pariflies, and likewife part of the parifhes of Nonington, Wootton, and Staple, the churches

of which are in other hundreds. Txoo confiables have jurifdiiflion over this hundred, which is divided into the upper and lower half hundred of it.

half hundred confifls of the parifhes of Eaftry, Worth, Tilmanftone, Upper Eythorne, (that hundred;) as is fo much of the parifh as lies in this much of Wootton as lies in this hundred, that is, the

The upper

borough of Gcdding, not including Wootton church, and as much, of the borough of Barnfole as lies in Staple.

lower half hundred confifts of the parilhes of Woodnelborough, Chillenden, Knolton, Ham, Betfhanger, Walderfliare, Barfon, Denton, and part of

The

Nonington, not including the church. This arrangement is according to the nomination and jurifdidlion of the conftables. That for the upper half hundred being chofen at Eaftry court. That for the lower half hundred at the court of quarter feffions. Eaftry-court are likewife chofen borfholders for Eaftry-ftreet borough'; the borough of Felderland in

At

Worth, which comprehends Statenborough, and fome adjoining lands in Eaftry; the borough of Worthcomprehending the remainder of the parifh, excepting the borough of Hackling the borough of the borough of Craythorne, Barnfole, in Staple Tilmanftone, comprehending the lower ftreet there ; Barville, See. and the borough of Gedding, in Wootton ; the borough of Southcourt, comprehending the ftreet

;

;

i*..

remaining part of Tilmanftone, the borflaolder for which is chofen at the manor of Southcourt ; all which are in the upper half hundred of Eaftry. Within the feveral pariflies likewife within this hundred, the following borfholders are chofen for the diftridls in them, which belong to other hundreds, viz.

one a/i'as

Adifham court for the borough of Hardenden, Hernden, comprehending Selftone, being the re-

at

maining

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_

EASTRY HUNDRED.

37 malning part of Eaftry, reputed to be in the hundred'of Dowuhamford i one at the fame court for the borough of South Langdon, in Eythorne, within the fame hundred ; and one for the borough of Lower Eythorne, at Wingham court, being reputed to be within that hundred. Notwithftanding thefe boroughs are in other hundreds, yet the conftable of the upper half hundred of Eaftry ufes jurifdiftion over them, and perfons refiding in them have been indilcriminately appointed to ferve that office.

HAM. THE

pariffi

of

Ham,

in the

hundred of Eaftry,

lies

the next to that of Northborne, defcribed before in the

hundred of Cornilo, north-weftward. It is written in the furvey of Domefday, Hama, and in feveral records. Kings Ham. There was no borfholder chofen for this parifh or Betfhanger,

one was appointed

till

at the

within thefe few years,

when

petty feffions to a 6l for both

parifhes jointly, which' they have continued to lince.

7'he conftable for the

do ever lower half hundred of

Eaftry always afted in that capacity before. This parish lies at the northern boundary of the uplands of Eaft Kent, fo far it is both pleafant and

having beautiful views of the adjoining open country, the town of Deal, and beyond, the Downs, and the reft of the channel as far as the coaft of France. The village, having the church adjoining to it, contains only four houfes. It isplcafantly fituated on high ground, the hill Hoping towards the north-eaft. There are about five hundred acres of land in this parifti j the foil of it is in general fertile, confifting partly of chalk and partly of a rich loamy earth. The grounds, which are moftly arable, are open and uninclofed, at the extremity of which, towards the eaft, is the high road to j> Deal, 3 hevalthy,

:

EASTRY HUNDRED.

<^8

ground falls toHam bridge, over the fouth dream, which direds its courfe from hence towards Hackling, Worth chape], and fo on to Sandwich, through which town it runs into the river Stour. In this part of the parifli the lands are marfhesand pafture, and the country becomes damp in a foggy unwholefome air. About three quarters of a mile fouth ward from the village is the hamlet of Updowne. This parifh is about a mile and an half from north to fouth, and not much more than half a mile the other way. There is no fair. The manor of Ham, at the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, in the 1 5th year of the Conqueror’s reign, was part of the polTe (lions of Odo, bilhop of Baieux, his half brother, under the general title of whofc lands it is thus entered in it Deal. wards

Northward of the

village, the

OJbern^ [on of Letard^ holds of Ehe It zvas taxed at one filling.

In EJlrei hundred. ihe bi/hopy

Hama,

arable land

is

zjcith

In demefne there

one villein,

demefne there

is

and tzvo

is

one carucatCy

borderers, andtzvo fervants.

In

one carucate, zvith one villein, and tzvo

In the time of king Edzvard the Confejfor it zvas worth ffty fhillings, and afierzvards tzventy fhillings, now fxty Jhillings. Ehree thanes held it of king Edward,

borderers,

and

tijuo fervants.

Four years after which the bifhop was difgraced, and this, among the reft of his eftates, was confifcated to the crown ; and the king having put Dover caftle under a new order of government, this manor was granted,

among

other lands, to

Hughde

Port, for his

under John de Fienes, in the defence of it. Thefe lands together made up the barony of Port, and were held by barony, by the iervice of performing ward there for the defence of it. In king Flenry III.’s reign this manor was held by knight’s fcrvice of his defcendant John de St. John,'^ by John Fitzbernard ; foon aftiftance

: See

more of the

St. John’s,

under Tunfiall. after

i

HAM. which,

39

appears to have been feparated into moieties one of which was held by Henry de Sandwich, heir of Ralph Fitzbernard, in king Edward I.’s after

it

manner as above mentioned, as it was by Ralph de Sandwich afterwards ; foon after which it pafled into the family oFLeyborne, in which it continued till Juliana, daughter of Thomas de Leyborne, reign, in

,

ufually ftiled the Infanta of Kent, died poflefled of in the 41ft year of

king Edward

III. leaving

no

it

ilTue

by either of her hufbands, when it efeheated to the crown for want of heirs, among the reft of her eftates,’' where this manorremained till kingRichard II. granted it to Sir Simon de Burley, knight-banneret, warden of the cinque ports ^nd knight of the garter, but he being attainted in parliament in the loth year of that reign, and afterwards beheaded, it became again vefted in the crown, and the king, in his i ith and 2 2d years, fettled it on the priory of canons, a/ias Chiltern Lang-

where it remained till the fuppreftion of that houfe, anno 30 Henry VIII. when it came into the king’s hands, and was next year granted, with the feite of the priory and other eftates and lands belonging to it, to Richard, bifhop fuffragan of Dover, to hold for his life, or until he fliould be promoted unto fome ecclefiaftical benefice of lool. yearly value, which happened before the 36th year of that reign, in which this moiety of the manor was granted by the king to Sir Thomas Moyle, to hold in capite, who alienated it in the 2d year of king Edward VI to Sir Robert Oxenbridge, who becoming poftefted of the other moiety in right of his wife Alice, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Fogge, enjoyed the whole of this manor, which his defeendant palled away at the latter end of of queen Elizabeth’s reign, to Edward Boys, cfq. of ley, in Hertfordfhire,

Bctfhanger. Dugd. Bar.

vol.

il,

p. 14.

See Leyborne, vol.

iv.

of this

hiftory, p. 498.

D 4

The

EASTRY HUNDRED.

40

The other moiety

of this manory which In the 20th year of king Edward IJI. was held by Richard,

fon of John Fitzbernard, paFcd from him into the fa-

mily of Criol, and Sir Nicholas de Crydl, or Keriell, died pofTcfied of it in the 2d year of king Richard II. and from him it devolved at lengtli by fucceflion to Sir l^homas Keriell, who was flain in the 38th year of king Henry VI. in afierting the caiife of the hoiife of York ; on whole death, his tv. o daughters became his coheirs, and on rhe divifion of their inheritance, this jnoiety of the manor was allotted to Alice, married to Jolm Fogge, efq. of Repton, afterwards knighted, and he in her right became pofiefled of it, and by his "1

homas Fogge, fergeantporter of Calais, both under king Henry Vi I. and VIII. one of whofe two daughters and coheirs Alice, upon will deviled

it

to his fon Sir

the divifion of their inheritance,

hufband Edward Scott,

firfi;

carried

it

to her

of the Moat, in SufTex, and afterwards to her fecond hufband Sir Robert Oxenbridge, who having purchafed the other moiety of this manor of Sir Thomas Moyle became entitled to the whole of it. 'Fhe family of Oxenbridge was feated near Winchelfea, in Suflex ; in the church of which, Camden fiiys, there were the effigies on tombs of three knights templars lying crofs-legged, one of which, he fuppofes, was for one of the family of Oxenbridge. His defeendant pafied away

efq.

this

manor

above-mentioned, end of queen Elizabeth’s reign, to Edward Boys, efq. of Betfnanger, whofe defeendant, Edward Grotius Boys, dying f. p. in 1706, gave it by will to as

at the latter

Thomas Brett, LL. D. redor of this pabeing rifli, the fon of Thomas Brett, gent, of Wye, Letitia, by the only furviving fiftcr of Jeffray Boys, efq. of Betfiianger,the father of Edward Grotius Boys, his kinfman,

above-mentioned. He not long afterwards alienated it to Sir Henry Furnefe, bart. of Walderfhare, whofe fon Sir Robert Furnefe, bart. of the fame place, died poireffed of it in 1 733. After which it became,’ efq.

with

HAM.

41

with his other eftates, at length veiled in his three daughters and coheirs, and on a partition of them,

anno 9 George

among

this

11 .

manor was wholly

allotted,

Anne, the eldeft filler, wi 4 of John, vifeount St. John, which partition was confirmed by an a6b pafled next year. After which it defeended down to their grandfon George, vifeount Bolingbroke,^ who in 1790 fold it to Mr. Thomas Petman, of Eallry,and he is the prefent owner of it. A court baron is held for this manor, which claims over fome few lands of trifling extent in Chillenden. Updowne place isaTeat in this parifh, fituated in the hamlet of Updowne, in the north-weft boundary of it, adjoining to Eaftry. This feat, for beauty of fituation, for heakhinefs of country, and extent ofprofpc6t,

others, to

ftands almoft unrivalled, even in

where pleafantnefs and beauties of to conftant admiration. '

The

thefe

parts,

fltuation are entitled

profpeeft

from

it

com-

mands a delightful view over the adjacent countr}^, the North Foreland, Ramfgate, the town of Deal, the Downs, and the adjoining channel. The eftate formerly belonged to Mr. Rich. Thompfon, of Walderfliare, who alienated it to Capt. Thomas Fagg, of Dover, who firft fitted it up as a gentleman’s

Me

died in

1748, and was buried in this church. After whofe death it w'as fold, according to the direflion of his will, to Sir George Oxenden, hart, of Dean, and he conveyed it to his fon Henry Oxenden, elq. who, as his father had before, refided here occafionally, and made fome improvements to it j and refidence.

afterwards pafled laid out

it

away

much money

to

Matthew

Collett, efq.

who

in the further beautifying

of it, making it, and purchaling an farm, adjoining which he added to the grounds of it. He died pofleflTed of it in 1777, and was buried in the feveral plantations round

y See a full account of this family, vol. der Beckenham. .

i.

of this hillorv, un-

nave

42 Dave of

this

EASTRY HUNDRED. church, after which his widow became en-

and refided here, during which time fhe pLirchafed of Sir Edward Dering, bart. another fmall farm, part of the Furnefe eftate, adjoining to the former in this hamlet; but fhe alienated the whole of her eftate here in 1778, to John Minet Fc6lor, efq. of titled to

it,

Dover, banker and merchant, who in 1786 enlarged his property here by the purchafe of an eftare, called Updowne farm, in this hamlet; fince which he has added confiderably to the fize and improvements ot this feat, and has imparked the lands round it, and he is now the poffelTor of it, and refides here occafionaily.^ There are no parochial charities. The poor conabout four, cafually two. This PARisnis within the ecclesiasti cal jurispiCTioN oiiht diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of llantly relieved are

Sandwich. church, which is dedicated to Sr. George, is It confifts of a nave and but a fmall mean building chancel, having a fmall wooden pointed turret at the

The

which is one bell. In the chancel are feIn the veral memorials for the Bunces, of this pariih. nave, a memorial for Thomas Fagg, efq. obt. 1748, set. 65. Alfo for Lydia his daughter, obt. 1737, ^t. two months. She was murdered by her maid, who was hanged for the faff. A memorial for Matthew Collet, efq. of Updowne-place, obt. 1777. The church of Ham was granted by archbifliop Baldwin, about the latter end of king Henry II. ’s reign, at the petition and prefentation of Sir William de Norfolk, lord of the foil, to the prior and convent of Ledes, to hold to them in pure and perpetual alms. After which, archbifliop Edmund, in 1235, g^'^^nted to them, in the name of a perpetual benefice, forty fliillings yearly from this church. At the time of the diffolution of the priory there feems to have been only a penweft end,

in

See more of the Fe£lors, under Eythorne.

fion

I

HAM.

43

of twenty niilllngs yearly paid by this church to it, which penfion was granted by the king, in his 33d year, among other premifes, to his new-founded dean and chapter of Rochefter, where it now continues. With the priory, this church continued till the dif. folution of it in the 3 ift year of king Henry VIII. fince which the advowfon of this redory has continued in the crown, the king being at this time patron of it. This redory is valued in the king’s books at 5I. 6s. 5ld. and the yearly tenths at los. 7’d. In 1588 here were communicants twenty nine, and it was valued at fifty pounds. In 1640 only twenty communicants, and it was of the fame value. It is now computed to be of the yearly value of fixty pounds. There is fome glebe land, but no parfonage-houfe. It feems not improper to remark here, that the value of church livings in the two divifions of Eaft and Weft Kent are differently eftimated by the refpedive courts of quarter feffions, viz. In Eaft Kent, the court, in all valuations of church livings, as to parochial and other afleffments, never allows the ftipend of the curate as a reprife or out going, to be deduded in favour of the incumbent j whereas in Weft Kent, the court, on the contrary, always deduds it in his favour, and allows it to him as a reprife out of the yearly value of fion

his living.

CHURCH OF HAM, PATRONS, Or

.

RECTORS.

by vihom jirefented.

The King

'James Burvtll, clerk, Aiiguft 8, 1661 , obt. 1678. John Pljmley, A. B. June 17,

1678. obt. 1734.®

a

In 1729 fuppofed to be the archdeacon’s court put reAory under fcqucftraiion ac-

He was

corciingly; but he was then

dead, and

vethampton, and enjoyed

the

foine years atcerwaids.

at

Wol-

this reitory

PATRONS,

-

EASTRY hundred,

44 PATRONS,

RECTORS.

The King

2iichlas 29. ^

Carter^ S.

1734, obt.

T. P.

Odober 23,

1774 -"

Wheler Bunce, A.

M. Nov.

1 1,

1774, the prefent redor.= b In 1755 he had a difpenfation to hold the reaory of Woodchurch with

c And vicar of St. Clement’s, Sand with, by difpenfation.

Ham, and v/as likewife curate of Deal chapel.

this of

B

E‘

WRITTEN

T

S

H A N G

E R,

in antient records, BeiteJJoangre, lies

the next parilh fouthward from Ham. Betshanger is a pleafant and healthy lituation. It is very fmall, containing about 260 acres of land, the foil of which is much the fame as that of the

neighbouring parifhes, but

much

inclining to chalk. are only three houfes in the parifh. The courtlodge, or manfion of Betfhanger, fituated in the bottom of a valley, having the church near it,

There

the farm-houfe of the Betfhanger eftate, and a farm-houfe in the northern part of the parifh, formerly belonging to the Napletons, but now to John Minet Fedor elq. The road from Canterbury to Deal runs alonc^ the north-eaft fide of it, at a fmall diffance from the manfion, round which the hills rife, which are arable, moflly open, and uninclofed.

The MANOR over this

paiifli,

OF Northborne claims paramount fubovdinate to which

OF Great Betshanger,

is

the manor

fo called to diftinguifli it

from the adjoining one of Little Betjhanger, in the parifh of Northborne. This manor was among thofe Jands which were affigned to Hugh de Port, for his affiltance under John de Fienes in the defence of Dover caftle and together made up the barony of Port, being held by barony of the above caftle, by the ;

fer-

vice

;

BETSHANGER. vice of performing

ward there

4^

for that purpofe.

It

was held of his delcendants, the St. Johns, by knight’s fervice, by a family named De Marinis, or Marney one of whom, John de Marinis, pr Marney, obtained a charter of Jree-zvarren for his demefne lands within this manor in the ill year of king Edward III. after

which it did not continue long in this name, for John de Tenacre, or Tancre, foon afterwards appears to have become poffelfed of it, and he fold it before the 20th year of king Edward III. to John de Soles. How long it continued in his defeendants I have not found, but in the reign of king Henry IV. it was become the property of Rutter, from which name it paffed about the beginning of king Edward IV.’s reign, into that of Litchfield, in which it continued fome time. Phiiiport fays, their arms were in his time in the windows of Dane-court', in Tilmanfione, viz. Bendee of Jix pieces azure ^ and ermine. Roger Lych.feld died in the 4th year of king Henry VIII. after which it came by tlie entail in his will at leno;th to his three daughters and on the divifion of their inheritance this manor was allotted to Alyce the eldeft, w'ho entitled her hufband, Thomas Cocks, efq. cuftomer of Sandwich, to the pofiefiion of it, and he at the latter end of that reign alienated it to John Boys, afterwards knighted, and of St. Gregory’s, in Canterbury, who dying /, p. in 1612, deviled this manor to Fdward Boys, elq. his nephew, one of the fons of his brother Vincent Boys, of Bekefborne, wlio refided in this manfion, (which he moft probably rebuilt, the arms of Boys with the quarterings being over the man^

;

tle-piece in the hall, carved in ftone) for near fifty years, and was buried in 1649 in this church. His

Ion

John Boys,

manor, and was a member of that long parliament, which began in 1 640, efq. pofielTed

this

in w'hich he zealoufly fided with thole

who

were ene-

mies to the king and the eftabliflied church. He died in 1678, and was buried here, having been thrice married

;

EASTRY HUNDREO.'

^^6

he had Edward, John, and other children j and by his fecond he had Letitia, married to Thomas Brett, gent, of Wye; Jefferay, of whom hereafter; Hiomas, redor of Betfhanger, married

;

by

his firft wife

and mader of Catherine-hall, Cambridge ; and two more daughters. Elis two fons by his firft wife Edward and John, afterwards lucceeded to this manor^ but both dying /. p. the latter in 1698 left this cftate Boys, efq. of Canterbury, a bencher of Grays-inn, whofe only fon Edward Grotius Boys, efc]. of Canterbury, died poflefled of it in 1706, and was buried with his an-

by

will to his eldeft half-brother, Jefferay

of Boys bore for their arms. Or, a griffin fegreant^ Jabky within a bor dure, gules. Edw'ard Grotius Boys dying he by will gave this manor to his kinfman, the f. p. Rev. Thomas Brett, redor of this parifli, the fon of Thomas Brett, gent, of Wye, by Letitia, his father’s eldeft furviving filler, and he about the year 1713 alienated it to Salmon Morrice, efq. a captain of the ceflors in this church.'*

'

This btanch of the

fimiily

royal navy, and afterwards promoted in 1733 to the rank of admiral. He almoft rebuilt this feat, in which

he afterwards refided till his death in 1740. Ele was the fon of Captain Morrice, of the royal navy, and a younger fon of the family of that name, of Werrington, in Dcvonlhire. At the time of his death he was vice-admiral of the white. He lies buried under an elegant marble monument. In a fmall building adjoining to the church, with his wife Elizabeth, daughter of William Wriglit, efq. a commiftioner of the navy, by whom he had tw'o fons and four daughters. The

who married Sarah, daughter of Thomas Peke, efq. who died in 1732, in his father’s life-time, J. p. and William, who became

fons were,

Wryght Morrice,

efq.

See an account of the branch of this family fettled at Fredville, vol. xi.of this hiftory, p. 2 58. and of Sir John Boys, of St* Gre<^ory’s, under Bleane, vol, viii. p. 528. ^

his

(

BETSHANGER.

47

was

fettled by his father at Betfhanand afterwards rcfided at Canterbury. He died in 1758, having married Mary, ekieil daughter of Robert Chadwick, efq. of Northfleet, a captain in the royal navy, \vho is ftill living, by whom he had four Tons. William, a lieutenant-colonel of dragoons, who

his father’s heir,

ger,

poflefled the

manor of Betthanger, &c. on

his father’s

death, and died unmarried at Putney in 1787, and was buried at Betlhanger; Robert, who died an infant. The Rev. James Mortice, clerk, vicar ofFlower, in

Northamptonihire,

and

now

who became

his brother’s heir,

manor and feat of Bctfhanand is redor of this pariih. He married Maria, fecond daughter of Adrian Ducarel, merchant, of Lonis

polleffed of the

ger,

don, (brother of .the late Andrew Coitee Ducarel, LL. D. of Dodors- Commons) by whom he has ilfue two fons,

Frederick-Edward and Andrew-Ducarel, and

three daughters, Charlotte- Elizabeth,

Mary-Marga-

and Theodofia- Frances. The fourth fon, Thomas, was bred to the navy, of which he was a lieutenant, and having retired from that fervice, now refides in Monmouth fliire. The arms of Mortice are Gules, a Hon rampant, regardant, or. 'There is no court held for this manor, and indeed at this time, it has only the

ret,

reputation of being one.

There

are no parochial charities.

The poor

con-

about two, cafually as many. This parish is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocejeoi Canterbury, and deanry of Sandwich. The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is a ftantly relieved are

fmall

mean

building, confilling of a nave and chancel, both which are kept uncommonly neat. Over the

fouth door

a circular arch with a zig-zag moulding. Under it the figure of our Saviour. This feems much older than the church, which fliews no fgns of antiis

There is a fmall wooden turret at the weft end, in which are three bells. .In the eafl window of quity.

the

EASTRY HUNDRED the chancel are thefe fliields of arms, Sahle, on a chevron, 'he tween three flags, attired, argent, a rmdlet of the Chequy, or, and azure, a fejs, gules, Jirfi, for Cocks.



hordure of the lafl, for Clifford. In this church are buried many of the family of Boys, formerly poirdfors of the manor and rcfidents in this pa ri(h, whole monuments and grave-flones are flill reall ivithin a



maining in it. Within a covered building, connecfted with the church, erecled for the purpole, is an elegant marble monument, made by Scheemaker, with the arms of Morrice and Wright, erecled to the memory of ad-

who

died in 1740; and of Elizabeth his wife, daughter of William Wright, efq. a commiffioner of the navy, obt. 1733. Behdes the above, there is in this church a mural monument miral

for

Salmon Morrice,

efq.

John James, A. M. redor of

this parilh

and Deal,

obt. 1775.

This church, which is a rectory, has always been appendant to the manor, and continues fo at this time, the Rev James Morrice, owner of Betihanger manor, being the prefent patron and redlor of it. This redory is valued in the king’s books at 7I. 14s. It is now a discharged living, and is of about the clear yearly value of fixty pounds. In 1588, here were thirty communicants, and it was valued at forty pounds. In 1640, here were twenty communicants, and it was valued at fixty pounds. It has no parfonage-houfe or barn, nor any other glebe but the church-yard, which is very fmall, tliough it appears by the king’s books, taken anno 26 king Henry VIII. that there were then feven acres .of arable glebe belonging to it.

CHURCH

.

EETSHANGER.

49

CHURCH OF EETSHANGER. PATRONS, Or

RECTORS.

by ’lohom /irefented.

Family of Boys

foh Boys,

A.

M. September

30,

1597, obt. 1625.® John Socket, A. M. March 22, 1625, refigned 1628.*^ Mofes Cafiel, A. M. Auguft 13, 1628, refigned 1644.. Nicholas Billingjlcy, A .Isil Nov, 23, 1644, refigned July 4,

1651. Robert Scudder,

John Dod, A.

1

6

c;

t ,

660. 1661,

ob.

M. Nov.

1

9,

ejected 1662.®

Thomas Brett, 1662, obt. 1680.'* Thomas Boys, A. M. Sept. 27, 1680, obt Dec. 1702.' Thornas

Family of JMorrice.

LL. D.

Brett,

April,

1703, deprived Jan. I7i6.‘‘ Ed-war d Lloyd, A. M. inducted July 17, 1716, obt. April 1 1, 1741.*

A.

James Lavaure, 1741, obt.

John James, A. B. obt.

Nov.

M. May,

Nov. 1743. 27,

I

Dec.

I

743 >

775.'"

John Kenrick, A. M. April 5, 1776, obt. April 8, 1793." James Morrice, Sept. i 793* tbe prefent re£tor.° k Likewife reftor of Rucking, of as well as this rcftory he was

Alfo reftor of Great Mongeham, by difpenfation, and dean of Canter-

which

bury.

deprived.

He refigned this reftory for Great Mongeham. S He was ejefted by the Bartholo-

curate of Walnicr,

e

f

raew

aft.

Caiamy’s Life of Baxter,

286. h Likcwife curate of Sutton. 1 Mafl'erofCatherine-hall, in Cambridge, and curate of Sutton by Dover. He lies buried in this church.

p.

VOi.. X.

1

Likewife reftor of Ripple, and

ra Likewife reftor of Deal, and lies buried in this church. n And reftor of Ripple by difpen-

fation.

o Patron of this reflory

;

collated

by the archbllbop on his own petition.

F

WALDER

EASTRY HUNDRED.

50

W

A L D E R

S II

A R E

IS the next parilh foiitliward from Betflianger lafldelcribed, being written in the book, of Domefday, VValwarefere^ and in iome other antient records, both

Walworth(loir and Walwarefloare^ taking its name moft probably from the zvolds^ or open downs, among which it is htuated. A boiiholder is appointed for this pariOi, including the didritfl of

Apulton,

at the

court leet of Walderlhare manor.

This parish is among the high hills

fituated

in

a healthy country,

near the eaftern boundary of the

county, next the fea, from which it is diftant about five miles, and near as many from Dover. It lies about a mile and an half northward of the great London road, and extends about two miles from north to Ibuth, but it is very narrow acrofs the other way. It contains in the whole about icoo acres of land, the rents of which are about 600I. per annum. The whole parifli belongs to the carl of Guildford, excepting Southwood and Healleden ciown j London dole, part of Linacre court, and Appleton. There are eight houfes in it, befides one in tl»e diftridt of Appleton, which is entirely feparated from the reft of it by the parifhes of Norborne and Weft Langdon intervening, as has been already noticed. In the fouthern part of it is Walderlhare park, well cloathed with trees, having the houle in the vale nearly in the centre, and the belvidere at the fouth-w^eft corner, on high ground, with a beautiful profped: from it, the w'hole of it ftands much in need of modern tafte and improvements. The church is lituated near the middle of the eaftern fide of the parifh. At the northern boundary is Malmains farm, (the antient manfion of that family in this parifli, though

now

only a mean farm-houle, belonging to the earl of Guildford) and an

open

»

WALDERSHARE. open uninclofed down, called Matmage do'tvn, corruptly for Mahnains down. The country here has much the fame face and foil as thofe of the neighbouring pariOies, a wild and mountainous afpedl:,and a poor chalky loil. There is a fair held here on Whit* Tuefday yearly, for toys and pedlary.

Walder SHARE,

time of taking the furvey of Domefday, in the 15th year of the Conqueror’s reign, was part of the polfelTions of Odo, billiop of Baieux, the king’s half-brother, of whom it was held by Ralph de Curbefpine ; accordingly it is thus entered in that record, under the general title of the bifliop’s lands

at the

:

Ralph de Curbefpine holds of the bifhop tzvo fulings in IValzvarefere. The arable land is .... In demefne there is one carucate and an half, and fourteen villeins, zjcith tzvo carucates and an half. Of this land, Robert has half a fuling, and one carucate there. In the time of king Edzvard the Confejjor, it zvas zvorth /even pounds and ten JhiUings, and afterzvards fifty In EJIrei htmdred.

Wluuard held it of king Edward. Four years afterwards the bilhop was difgraced, and all his poTefTions were con h (bated to the crown ; foon after which, upon the king’s new^ arrangement of Dover caflle, this manor, among other lands, was affigned to Gilbert Magminot, for his afliftance in the defence of it, and together made up the barony of Magminot, being held by barony of Dover caftle,

/hillings, nozv

by the

feven pounds.

fervice

of performing ward there from time

to time.

Of the Magminots, and

defcendants the Sayes, the chief lords of the leignory, this manor was again held by the family of Malmaines, of eminent account in thel'e parts, who were poireffed of manors called after them, in Alkham, Pluckley, and Stoke ; their relldence in this parifli likewile being called by their name. •John de Malmaines is recorded in the BattleE a abbey t

their

52 abbey

EASTRY nUKURED.

having accompanied the Conqueror to England, and to have been prdent at the battle of Haftings, being ftandard- bearer to the Norman footmen. From him delcended the feveral branches of this family feated in different parts of this county, who were many of them men eminent for the offices of truft and honour, which they at different times held. They bore for their arms. Ermine on a chiefs gules, three right hands coupedy argent which fliield is carved in done in feveral places on the roof of the cloyfters of Canterbury cathedral. Several of this family lie buried in the Grey Friars church, in London. From roll, as

y

•,

the permanency of them here, not only their manf on in this paridi acquired the name of Malmaines,P but

W

manor itfelf became Filed in records, aldershare, alias Malmaines. From John de Malmaines above-mentioned, who firff held this manor in the reign of the Conqueror, it defcended down'to FJenry Malmaines, efq. of Walthe

derlhare,

who

died poffeifed of it in the 46th year of king Edward III. leaving an only daughter and heir Alice, but it feems fhe inherited only a part of this manor and edate, which Ihe carried in marriage to

Henry Holland, of Solton,

near Dover, and he died poffeffed of her intered in it, in the 19th year of king Richard II. leaving Jane his daughter and heir, mar-

Thomas Goldvvell, of Godington, in Great Chart, who entitled her hufband to it, and from him it defcended down to his grancjfon of the fame name, ried

to

who, about the beginning of king Henry VI.’s reign, alienated his part of it to John Mcnins, efq. who had before become poffeffed of the oth : part of this manor, by his marriage with the daughter and heir of Colby, who inherited this edate in right of his wife, daughter and heir of Thomas, fon of John Malmaines, P

See before p. 50,

of

WALDERSHARE. ot Stoke,

who was

53

Henry Malmalnes before-mentioned, on whole death in 46 Edward III. it detccnded to him, fo that he became then poifefl'ed of related to

the whole of this manor.

John Monins, or Ajonyn^

as the

name was fome-

times (pelt in antient deeds, was delcended from Sir Simon de Monyn, of the caftle of iVlayon, in Normandy, who attended William the Conqueror in his expedition into England, and bore for his arms, Gules, three crefcents^ or, at this time.

the coat-armour of his dekendant

John Monins,

e(q. afterwards refided at

Walderfliare, where he built anew manfion, about a mile Ibuth-eallward from the antient houfe of Mal-

maines, in which he afterwards relided, as did his defcendants dovvn to Sir William Monins, of VValclerfhare, in

who was

1643,

eldefl Ion Sir

who

created a baronet in 1611. He died lucceeded in title and eifate by his

Edward Monins,

(erved the office of Iheriff

Charles

I.

and died poUetl'ed

bart. of Walderfliare, in

the 2

of this

ift

year of king

manor and

eftate

1663, leaving five daughters his coheirs. On his death, this manor and feat devolved on his two elded

in

daughters and coheirs, Sufin, married to Peregrine Bertie, fecond Ton of Montague, earl of Lindfey ; and

Jane

John, Ton and heir of Sir Norton Knatchbull, bart. the former of whom left two daughters and coheirs, Mary, married fird to Anthony Henley, cfq. of the Grange, in Hampfhire, father of the lord chancellor, earl of Northingron ; and fecondly, to Henry Bertie, third Ton of James, earl of Abingdon and Bridget to John, lord Powlet, afterwards created earl Powlet. On the death of Sufan, the elded daughter and coheir above-mentioned, late wife of Peregrine Bertie, decealed, who feems at her death to have been podefled of the whole of this manor and eflate, it became veded in her heirs and truftees, for the ufe of her two daughters and coheirs, and they, in the reign of king William and queen Mary, joined in the faleofic E 3 to to

;

EASTRY HUNDRED. to Sir

Henry Furnefe,

bart. of Walderfhare,

whore-

Inigo Jones, and inclofed a park, round it, which he planted in an elegant manner with avenues, according to the tade of that time. Sir Henry Furnefe was the elded fon of Henry after a delign,

built this feat,

as

it is

faid, of

Furnele, of Sandwich. His next brother, George Furnefe, was in the Eaft-lndia Company’s fervice, whole He fon Henry Furnele was of Gunnerfbury houfe. died in 1712, leaving by his fird; wife Anne, daughter of Robert Brough, efq. one fon Sir Robert Furnefe, bart. His fecond wife was Matilda, widow of Anthony Balam, efq. by whom he had a daughter Matilda, married to Richard Edgcumbe, afterwards cre-

Edgcumbe. Henry Furnefe,

ated lord Sir

the elded; fon,

became

a capital

merchant, and by his indudry and abilities role to eminence, wealth, and honours. Being always active, and zealous in fupport of the Revolution, he was favourably didinguilhed by king William, and the Whigs in general, and the miniilry patronizing him, it gave him weight and confequence, and ferved to enable him in the various branches of trade which he carried on, the

more

fpeediiy to acquire thole riches

which he afterwards accumulated. fice

He

lerved the of-

London in 1701, and was in 1707 baronet. At his death he bequeathed a hand-

of iherid' of

created a

fome legacy

for charitable ules to the ieveral parilhes

Sandwich, as may be further feen in the defeription of that town. He bore for his arms, Argent, a talbot in

hound, feiant, zvithin a bor dure, fable. Sir Robert Furnefe, bart. his fon, redded here,

died pofied'cd of

this'

manor and

and

1733, being for this county. He feat in

time knight of the Ihire had been three times married, firll to Anne, daughter of Anthony Ealam, elq. by whom he had a daughter Anne, who married the hon. John St. John, fecond but at length only furviving Ion of Henry, vifeount at that

WALDERSHARE.

55

death lord vilcount St. John ; Sir Robert married f'econdly, the hon. Arabella Watfon, one of the daughters of Lewis, lord, afterwards earl of Rockingham, by whom he had Henry, his iucceilor in title and effaces ; and Catherine, afterwards married to Lewis, earl of Rockim ham ; lalfly, he married lady Anne Shirley, daughter of Robert Shirley, earl Ferrers, by whom he left an only furviving daughter SeSc.

John, and

after his

married to Edward Dering, afterw'ards Sir Edward Dering, barr. Sir Henry F urnelc, bart. furvived his father but a Ihort time, dying abroad in 1735, under age, and unmarried, and this, among the rdt of his eftates, by virtue of the limitations in his grandlina,

father’s will,

became

veffed in his three

filders,

as

the

daughters and coheirs of his father Sir Robert Furnefe, in equal fhares and proportions, in coparcenary in tail general. After which, by a decree of the court of chancery, at the inffance of the parties, anno 9 king George II. a writ of partition was agreed to, which was confirmed by an adf pafled fpecially for this purpofe next year, by which this manor and fear, with Malmaines and other premifes in this parifh, were allotted to Catherine, wife of Lewis, earl of Rockingham, who died'/. 7). in i745> leaving her furviving, who then became pofieired of this eflare again in her own right. She afterwards married Francis, earl

of Guildford, by

whom

fhe had

no

ill'ue,

and

i766,devifed it, among the reft of her eftates, to her furviving hufband, who died in 1790, and w'as buried at Wroxton, in Oxtordfhire, befide the counHe was the only furviving fon of tefs his late wife. Francis, lord Guildford, and by the death of William, lord North and Grey, lucceeded as his heir to the former of thole titles, the latter becoming extind, bearing the title of Lord North and Guildford ; and

dying

in

1752, he was fuither advanced 'to the He married firft title of Earl of Guildford, in Surry. Lucy, daughter of George, earl of Halifax, by whom he E 4

on April

8,

— EASTRY HUNDRED. he had Frederick, who became his heir;

^6

his

wife was Elizabeth, relid of George, vifcount

fecond

Lew-

he had two daughters, whom he furvived, one of whom, Louifa, married to John Peyto, lord Willoughby de Broke ; and a fon Brownlow, now lord bifliop of Winchefter, who married Mifs Banider. He married thirdly, Katherine, Countels of Rockingham,asabovc mentioned, who died f.p. Upon the earl of Guildford’s death in 1790, in his 87th year, he was fucceeded in titles and eftate by his eldeli foil Frederick, lord North, and knight of the garter, who became (the I'econd) earl of Guildford, a nobleman well known as having continued the prime minider of this country during the late unhappy American war. He died in 1792, in London, being at that time lordwarden of the cinque ports and conftable of Dover cadle, lord lieutenant and cuftos rotulorum oi Somerfetfhire, chancellor of the univerlity of Oxford, recorder of Gloucefter and Taunton, &c. He was buried in the family vault at Wroxton ; the whole univerfity attending the funeral proceffion with great folemnity His Lordlhip married as it pafled through Oxford. Anne, daughter ot George Speke, eiq. of Dillington, in Somerfetlhire, by whoiD he left three fo'ns and three daughters; the former were, George-Augufius, Frederick, and Francis ; the latter w'ere Caroline, the elded, married to Sylveder Douglas, efq. and Anne and Charlotte who are unmarried. The elded fon, GeorgeAugudus, fucceeded him in title, and in this edate and feat of Walderfhare, being the prefent right hon. the earl of Guildford, who drd married Mils Hobart, daughter of the earl of Buckinghamihire. She died in 1794, leaving only an infant daughter Maria. He married fecondly, in 1796, the daughter* of Mr. Thomas Coutts, banker, ot London, by whom he has ilham, by

whom

two daughters. In the houfe of Walderdiare w*as a portrait of Sir Robert Furnefe, by Carlo Maretti, painted at Rome,

and

WALDERSHARE,

^7

and there is now a portrait of him there, marked F. T. his hand relling on a book, intided Monumenta Komana. There are there iikevvife two family pidurcs by Sir Godfrey Kneller ; the one ol Sir Robert Furnefe with his firft wife and their daughter the other of Str Robert and his lecond wife, with their fon Henry and daughter Catherine.'^ A court leet and court baron is held for this manor ;

*

of VValderlhare.

'The

Guildford bears for his arms, Azure a lion paffant^ or^ between three jieurs de lis^ argent. For his lupporters, •J'wo dragons, fable,Jcaled, due ally gorged and chained, or ; and for his creft, on a wreath of its earl of

^

—A

dragon^ s head erafed, fable, fcaled, ducalh gorged and chained, or. Motto, La %;ertue efl la feuie colours

noblejj'e.

Apulton

a diftrict efleemed to be within this parilh, though feparated from the reft of it by a part is

of the parilhes of Norborne and Weft Langdon intervening. It is fituated northward from the other part of VValderlhare, and appears by the furvey of Domefday to have been at that time part of the poffeffions- of Odo, bifliop of Baieux, under the general title

of w'hole lands

it

is

thus entered in

it

:

The fame Ralph (de Curbefpine) holds of the bifhop, Apletone. It was taxed at one fuling. Lhe arable land is Ik demefne there are two carucates, with fix borderers. In the time of king Edivard the ConfefJ'or, it was worth one hundred Jhillings, and afterwards ten fallings,

now

forty fillings,

Afeored held

it

of king

Edu'ard.

Four

years after the taking of the above furvey, the bifhop of Baieux w'as difgraced, and ail his poftef-

were confilcated to the crown ; foon after w'hich, both thefe manors were granted by the king to GiU fions

^

for

See more particulars of the Furnefe family, in Boys’s Coll, Sandwich, p. 484. bert

EASTRY HUNDRED.

58

Magminot, for his afTiftance in the defence of Dover calile, being held by the fervice of ward to it, and with other lands made up the barony of Magminot. Of the family of Magminot and their heirs,

bert

manors were again held by the eminent family of Malmains, who continued in the poU'effion of them, down to Henry Malmains who joining with Simon, earl of Leicefter, in rebellion againfl; king Henry HI. would have forfeited all his lands, had not the abbot of the adjoiningmonaftery of Langdonintercededfor him and gained his pardon for which I'ervice his delcendant, Sir John Malmains, through gratitude, gave the two manors of Aplcton and South wold, by his will, after the death of Lora his wife, who held them in dower, to the above-mentioned monalfery," and thefe

;

they both continued in the abbot’s poffelTion till the ifl year of king Richard III. when the abbot exchanged Southwood with Robert Monins, efq. for other lands elfewhere ; but Appleton was, on the fuppreffion of the abbey, in the 27th year of king Henry VIll furrendered into the hands of the crown, together with the reft of the poffeffions of the monaftery ; and the kingfeized on Southwood, then in the pofteffion of

Edward Monins,

efq.

as part of

them,

and unjuftly alienated from it, and afterwards granted both Apleton and Southwold, among other premifes, 29th year, to the archbifhop of Canterbury, who in the ft year of queen Elizabeth exchanged Appleton again with the crown, but he retained Southwood, which has ever fince continued part of the poffeftions of that fee, and remains fo at this time. his

in

i

But the manor of Appleton,

or /ippultony as

isfometimes written, was afterwards granted to Sir Edwin Sandys, of Northborne, in whole defeendants palled away to it continued, till it was at length it

^

Philipott, p. 21

najleiio de

1.

See par. 6 Edward

Langdon pro terrh

II.

pars 2,

m.

14.

Mo~

in Appleton.

Wickenden

j

WALDERSH ARE.

<59

and Robert Wickenden, gent, of Dover, died polfelled of it in 1686, and by liis will gave it to his I'on of the fame name, whofe defcendant Mr. Micholas Wickenden, of the fame place, dying without iifue about fixty years ago, deviled it to his lerVVlckenden

vants,

who

;

lold

it

to

Mr. Saiimel

Cillingfley,

of Lon-

don, whole widow marrying Richard Crickett, ellj. entitled him to the polfeffion of it, and he continues There is not any court held for the prcfent owner. this

manor.

are uo parochial charliies. The poor conftantly maintained are about lix, cafually four.

There

This parish

is

within

the

ecclesiastical

JURISDICTION oiiht diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Sandwich. The church, which is dedicated to All Saints, is a fmall mean building, confiding of a body and chancel, having a wooden turret at the weft end, in which hangs It is almoft overgrown with ivy. I'hereare one bell two additional buildings on each fide the chancel, each of vvhich communicates with the church by a door broken through the walls of it. That on the north fide has in it a moft magnificent pyramidical monument, erefted by Sir Robert Furnefe, hart, in

.

of his father Sir Henry Furnefe. Four female figures, in white marble, as large as life, fupport the bale ; on the four fides of which are infcriptions to the memories of Sir Robert his father, his fifter

memory

Matilda, his three wives, his fon Henry, and his daughters Anne and Catherine, all buried here ; the whole finely executed by Mr. Greene, of Camberwell. In the building, on the fouth fide, is a large altar-

tomb, on which are the figures of a man and woman, made out of all proportion, and conl'picuoufly abfurd, and an infcription to the memory of the honorable Sufan Bertie, fourth daughter and coheir of Sir Edw. Monins, bart. of Walderlhare, and wife to the hon. Peregrine Bertie. Over it are banners, pendants, &c. In

EASTRY HUNDRED.

6o

In the chancel, againft the fonth wall, is a monument for Sir Edward Monins, and Elizabeth his wife, obt.

William Monins, bart. of Walderand for his wife Eiare, his Ton and heir, obt. 1642 Jane, daughter of Roger Tvvy fden, efq. of Roydonhall, in Pcckham, in Kent, obt. 1640, and two of their children. Near it are two grave- Eones, pointing out the burying-places ot Sir William Monins and his wife, and for Edward, eldeft fon of Sir Edward lady Jane Monins, bart. obt. 1640. In the eaE window are painted feveral female figures, which fcem fingularly

1602

;

allb for Sir

j

;

indecent, at any rate very improper, for the place.

la

the body is a memorial for Laurence Wright, A. M. vicar of this parifli and ElmEed, obt. 1 707 ; arms,

A

chevron^ between three hatchets.

bert Greenall, A.

M.

late vicar

A of

memorial this pariEi

for

Ro-

and rec-

BlackmanEone, and curate of Nonington and Wimlingfwold, obt. 1770. The church of alderEiare w^as antiently appendant to the manor, and continued fo, till one of the family of Malmaines gave it to the neighbouring abbey of VVeE Langdon, to which it was appropriated by archbiiEop Walter Reynolds, in the 16th year of Edward II.® In which Eate it continued till the fupprefiion of that motor of

W

naEery, in the 27th year of king Henry VIII. when it came with the reE of the poflelfions of it, into the king’s hands, whence this appropriation, together wdth the advowfon of the vicarage, was afterwards granted to the archbiOaop of Canterbury, part of whofe poflefI'he appropriation is fions it continues at this time.

demifed on a beneficial leafe. The Monins’s were formerly leEees of it, afterwards the Furnefes, and now the earl of Guildford, In the time of king Edward III. there were of the endowment of this church, one mefruage, one garden, *

Ratificatio fuper appropr.

A. D. 1322, Regift. Reynolds,

diA Eccl. Monaft. de Langedon, f.

13S’,

Lamb, library.

and

,

WALDERSHARE.

6l

and nine acres of arable. It is valued in the king’s books at 5I. 8s. but is now a dil'charged living, of the clear yearly value of twenty-five pounds. In 1588 here were thirty-three communicants. In 1640 here were the like number, and it was valued at thirty -eight pounds. Archbifhop Juxon augmented, this vicarage twenty pounds per annum, anno 14 king Charles II. There is no vicarage lioufe, and only one acre of glebe land, adjoining to the church -yard ; but by the king’s books it appears there were formerly two acres.

CHURCH OF IHALDERSHARE. PATRONS, Or

VrCAHS,

by 'ivhom Jirefented.

Laurence Wright^ A. M. March 23, 7684, obt. December 1 1, 1707. Stephen Hobday, M. Jan; 10, -'

A

1708, refigned 1729.“ John Arnold, A. B. June 1729, refigned 1738. Richard Edborough, A. B. 0 3 . 6, 1738, obt. Sept. 1739. John Kirkby, Dec. 8, 1739,0b. <

May 21, 1734.'^ Charles Saunders, LL. B. June 8, 1 754, obt. 1755. Robert (Sreenall, A. ij. May 2, 1755, obt Dec. 7, 1770.* Bladen Doivning, A. B. Feb. 9, j

>771, refigned 1799.^ Stephen Long Jacob, A. 1 799, the prdent vicar."'

t

C AtkI vicsr of Elmded. He lies bcried in thischurch. “ Likewifc re£for of Lower Hardres, and refigned this vicarage on being Collated to that of ft. Diiniian’s, Canterbury ; he died in 743'"r He was toon afterwards by difpenfation reftor of fcldcf manftonc, as 1

was X to

his fuccclior.

He

fame time the rcilory of Elackmanltone, and v/as collaf'd at the

M.

in 1764 to the curacy of Nonington^ with U’lriilingfwold. He lies buried in this chinch. y He was collared in 1777 to the re6lory of Ivychurcb, which he religned in 1789, on being prefented to the redlory of Bledon, in Somerfet-

Ihire.

z

Vicar of Beauxfield alias VViili-

field.

F.YTHORXE,

;

JEASTRY

62

Y T

E

HUNDRDED.

H O

R.

N

E,

COMMONI.Y

pronounced AythornCy lies the next parifli vveftward from WalderOiare, being written in the Saxon codicels, HegylheThornCy in later records Egheand now ufually Eythorne. This parifh, which is divided into the two diftri(Ts of Upper and Lower Eythorne, is accounted to lie in the hundred of Ealfry, the conlfable of the upper half hundred of which exercifes jurildiflion over it j notwithflanding which, the former being the fouthern part of this parilh, within the borough of South Langdon, fometimes called Socage T^tigdon, is reputed to lie in the upper half hundred of Downhamford, the borlholtborney

der for which

of Adifham,

the court leet of the manor within which manor it is; and the latter, is

chofen

at

or northern part is within the borough of Eythorne, and is reputed to be within the upper half hundred of

Wingham. This borough of Eythorne takes within its bounds lower Eythorne-ffreet, comprehending the church, Elmton farm, and Eythorne-court manor and lands, the whole being within the hundred lafl mentioned at the court of which a borflioldcr is appointed for it. Neither Elmington, ufually called Elmton, nor Streetend, were formerly included in this borough, both having been lately added to it, to ferve particular purThe road between Pitfidd, and Brincele, is pofes. the boundary of the demefne lands of the manor of Eythorne-court, and of the lands it claims over, being properly the line which divides the tw'o boroughs.

Eythorne

lies

in a hilly uninclofed

much covered

country,

tlie

and pretty barren for the moft part of it. It contains about The fouthern part, from its fitua1 244 acres of land. tion, is called Upper Eythorne, comprehending within foil

of which

is

chalk,

with

flints,

WALDERSHARE. it

6j

the boroiish of South Lanmlon, in which

is

hamUpper

a

Another hamlet, called Eychorne-hreet, comprehends the rorllal, among the hollies on it is one, which once belonged to a tolerable large hirm, called Park End, now belonging to the earl of Guildford, the greacefl part of which has been long hnce taken into Walderfhare park. At a fmall dihance fouthward from the above forllal, is a fmall leat plealantly (ituated, built in 1762 by Peter Fedor, efq. of Dover, who occafionally refides at it. Mr. Fedor, who bears for his arms, Fer/, tivo doves in pale^ (irgents beaked and legged^ gules the upper one holding an olive branchy or, is polfelTed of much landed prolet, called

the Green.

^

perty, difperfed in different parifhes in this parr of the

county, and, as has feription of

Dover,

been already noticed is

in

the de-

a very confidcrable banker and

merchant of that place ; his mother was the daughter of Mr. Minet, who with his five brothers and three fifters, came over from France on the revocation of the edid of Nantes, in 1686, having facrificed their fituarion and propeity in that country, for their attachment Mr. Fedor married Mary, elded to their religion. daughter of John Minet, A. M. redor of Eythorne, defeended of the fame family, by whom he has three Ions and three daughters, John-Minet Feflor, of Dover, banker and merchant, and of Updowne-place, in Idain, efq. who married Anne Worthley Montagu, ihe only daughter of Sir Robert Laurie, bart. of Maxwells town, in Scotland, and M. P. for Dumfries. JamesPeter, likewife of Dover, and in partnerlhip with his father and brother, as above-mentioned, who married Frances, daughter of Thomas Bateman Lane, efq. of Dover, by whom he has iffue, and William, who is unmarried. Alicia-Hughes, married to Charles Wellard, efq. of Dover, Mary and F.lizabeth, both unmarried,

Mr. Fedor

has, by the feveral additions he ha. at dif-

ferent times

made

modious

retreat

to this feat,* rendered

from

his

it

a

mod com-

mercantile bufinefs, and by hi>

EASTRY HUNDRED.

64

of the Green farm, in this parilh, has The houfe is greatly added to his property round it. beautifully fituated, having a view over Walderlhare park, and a fine one beyond it over the adjoining channel, and the Bologne hill on the coafi: of France. Further northward is the borough of Lower Eythorne, comprehending Eythorne-court, and Lower Eytliorne-ftreet, having the church and parfonagehoufe within it, the two fmall hamlets of Wigmore, (formerly Jenkin) and Street End. Ac the northern boundary of the parilh is Elmington, but lately accounted within this borough, and a farm called Brimfdale, belonging to Mr. Underdowne Harvey, the fon of Thomas, late of Eythorne-court. Thcfc Harveys of Eythorne-court, branched off from Richard Harvey, of Weft Studdal, the original ancefior, about two hundred years fince, of the family of this name difperfed over this part of Kent. The father of the above-mentioned Thomas Harvey firft came to Eythorne-court as tenant in 1711, and his grandfon Philip Harvey ftill remains fo. This parilh is long ar.d narrow, being niore than two miles and a half from north to fouth, and not more than three quarters of a mile the oth.er way j at the foutli extremity of it are fevcral lines of a Roman entrenchment, as has been already mentioned under his late piirchafe

Shebbcrtfwell.

There

a

large

barrow, or /»fnulusy about a quarter of a mile eaftward from Eythorne-court wood, near the road leading to VValderfi:iare. A fair is held here on Midfummer day, for pedlary,

A

is

&c.

branch of the family of Merriweather, formerly

refided in this parifli.

CuTHRED, the confent

king cf Kent, about the year 807, with of Cocnulph, king of Mercia, gave to

fEthelnoth, his minifier, three plough lands, in the place which was called aet Heyghe 7 borne, for a com-

petent fum of money, that

is,

three thoufand pence, free

^

EYTHORNE. free

from

all

65

fecular fervices, with the liberty of giving

them during his life, and of leaving them death to whomever he would.

after

his

After which, this cftate appears to have come into the pofleflion of archbiflmp Wulfrcd, who in the year 824, gave it with the lands of Langdune, (molt probably the borough of South Langdon, in this parilh), in exchange for Bereham, to the monks of the priory of Chrift-church. How long it remained with them, I have not found, in all likelihood it was wrefted from them, during the period of thofe troublefome times, before the Norman conqueft ; for not long afterwards it appears to have been in the polfenion of the family

of Badlefmere, in which it continued till Bartholomew de Badlefmere in the 15th year of king Edward II. being attainted, this manor of Eythorne came into the hands of the crown, and it continued there till it was granted by king Edward III. to Sir John Bowdon, who in the 1 8th year of that reign, conveyed it to Johnde Goldfborough, after whofe death it was paffed away to Thomas Holben, and he in the 12th year of the next reign of king Richard II. alienated it to Ro-

who fold the reverfion ofit, to JohnDygge, ofBerham; after which this manor appears to have come into the poOeffion of Robert Webbe, who in bert Dane,

the 4th year of king Henry VI. alienated it to John St. Ciere, and he tranfmittcd it by fale to Sir Walter Hungerford, of Heytfbury, anceftor to thofe of Farley

whofe arms were, ^able^ two hars^ argent^ in chief He again fold it about the latter end of three plates. the laft-mentioned reign, to Sir Thomas Browne, of Beechworth caftle, comptroller and treafurer of the houfehold, who in the 27th year of it, obtained the grant of a fair on the day of St. Peter ad vincula yearly, in this parifti of Eythorne, and another foon afterwards for liberty to embattle, and impark, and for free caftle,

*

Saxomm

VOL, X.

Codicelli, in the

F

Surrenden library.

warren

EASTRY HUNDRED.

66

warren llkewile, within this manor, with other liberties, and in his defeendants the property of this manor continued down to Sir Thomas Browne, of Beechworth caftle, whofe lands were dijgavelled by the a6ts of the ift and 8 th years of queen Elizabeth. He in the 1 6th year of that reign, alienated it to Francis Santon, whofe fon in the a8th year of the fame reign, fold it to Sir William Rithcr, of London, during whofe time, anno 42 Elizabeth, an afiife was held to prove by verdift, between Forth and his wife, late w'ife of Santon, and Rither, alderman of London, to find if thefe lands were gavelkind^ on a writ of dower when there were many rolls of the archbifhop produced to prove they were held of the archbifhop by knight’s fervice, and a Sir verdicl was given accordingly for the plaintiffs. V/illiam Rither gave it by will to Sufan, one of his daughters and coheirs, then the wife of Sir Thomas Ctefar, one of the barons of the exchequer, afterwards remarried to Mr. Thomas Philipot, fecond fon of Sir John Philipott, of Compton Wafeelin, in Hampfliire,* whom fhe likewife furvived, and at her death gave it ;

by her fecond huffand, Mr. Villiers Philipott, who at the latter end of king Charles I.’s reign, conveyed it by fale to Mr. John Brett, of London. How it paffed afterwards, I have not found, only that after fome intermediate owners it came into the poffcflion of Richard Sherbrooke, efq. of London, who owned it in the beginning of the prefent reign, and at his death devifed it to his fifter, married to Mead, by whom fhe left an only daughter, who marrying John to her only fon

him to the pofleffion of it, and his only daughter, Mrs. Mary Wilkes, is at this time owner of this manor, now ufually called EythorneWilkes,

court.

of ftone * it

efq. entitled

The ;

very large and antient ; it is built the walls are very thick and ftrong ; they are houfe

is

See an account of the Philipotts, in

Philipott,

p.

84.

ibid. p. 57.

much

tYTHORNE.

much covered with ftrongeft I ever faw.

67

of which are the In the windows are feveral fhields

ivy, the ftems

of arms.

A

court baron

is

held for this manor, which claims

over the whole borough of Eythorne, excepting Elmington.

Elmington,

iifually called Elmiofiy

the northern boundary of this

is

a

manor near

which has but part of which at lead parifli,

been reputed within it, was at the time of the taking the furvey of Domefday, in the poflelfion of Odo, bifliop of Baieux, under the general tide of whofe lands it is thus entered in it i The fame Ofherty (Ton of Letard) holds of the bifhopi fifteen acres in Efmetoney and there belongs to it one prebend. But thefe in the time of king Edward the Con* fejjor were worth thirty (hillings j and afterwards twenty lately

fhillingSy

Edward.

The

now

thirty fhillings.

Sired held

it

of king

-

Baieux was difgraced four years after this, and his eftates were all confifeated to the crown. The eminent family of Malmains appear afterwards to have held this manor, of whom it was again held in king Edward the lid ’s reign, by Guido de Shillingheld, and after him by Peter Condic, or Cundie, of Sandwich, defeended from thofe of that name, feated at Condies-hall, in Whitftaple, and he was poflcfTcd of it at the beginning of king Edward the Illdds reign. After which it defeended to William, fon of John de Condie, who died in the 4?.d year of that reign, without lawful ilfue, upon which Margaret his filler and coheir, marrying Robert Grubbe, entitled him to it, but he likewife dying without male iffue, Agnes, one of his coheirs, carried it in marriage to John Ifaac, efq. of Blackmanbury, in Bridge, whole .defeendant James Ifaac, about the latter end of king Henry VII. ’s reign, conveyed it to George Guldeford, efq. in whom the polTelTion of it was but of fhort continuance, for from this family, about the latter end of king Henry VIII. bifliop of

F 3



reign.

68

EASTRY HUNDRED.

was pafTcd away to Sir Chriftopher Hales, who not long after alienated^ it to Williarii Boys, elq. of Nonington, whofe fecond I'on Thomas Boys refided here, as he did, afterwards, at Barfon, where he died in 1 599 j notwithftanding his refidence here, he feems never to have pofTelTed the fee of it, which continued in the delcendants of his eldeft brother Edward, of Fredville, till Major John Boys, of that place, at the beginning of king Charles II.’s reign, fold it to William Turner, whofe fon of the lame name, of Grays-Inn, and afterwards of the White Friars, in Canterbury, efq. died polTeired of it in 1729. His fon, William Turner, efq. of the White Friars, inherited this manor on his father’s death, and was fucceeded in it by his only furviving daughter and heir Bridget, who reign,

it

carried

among

other eftates, in i75J> in marriage to David Papillon, efq. of Acrife, w'hofe fon of the fame name is the prefent poflefTor of it. it,

This parish is within the ecclesiastic a l jurisdiction oi th
The

church, which

dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, is fmall, confifting of a body and north ifle, and two chancels, having a fquare tow'er, with battlements at the weft end. rails,

is

is

In the high chancel, near the altar

a memorial for

Thomas Walton,

thirty-feven

years rediior of this church, obr. 1698. Anotherfor

John Thompfon, redtor, who left one daughter, married to John Farnaby, fon of the learned Farnaby, obt. 1661; arms, Two barSy a chiefs ermine, impaling a chevron, between three balls. "Within the altar rails, a memorial for Edward Monyns, fecond fon of John Monyns, gent,

and Mary his wife, obt. 1647. A marble tablet for John Minet, A. M. redtorof this church, obt. 1771 ; arms, Erminois, quartering barry of fix, argent and gules. Another tablet for Francis D’Aeth, redlor of this church, youngeft fon of Sir Thomas D’Aeth, bart. D'Aeth. A memorial for William obt. 17S4; Forftcr, A. M. of Cambridge, fon of Robert Forfter, gent.

EVTHORNE.

69

gent, of Acrlfe, paftor of this church for eleven years, In one of the fouth windows, Azure^ a obc. 1708. bend cotizedy between Jix fkields, Jable, each charged

with a

lioHy

rampant y

or.

In the

eafl:

window of the

other chancel, called the Elmton chancel, belonging to that eftate, is a Iliield, Azure, a faltier engrailedy be-

tween four bears head^, erafed, fabley muzzled of the field. The arms of Guldeford were formerly like wife in the windows of this church. In the laft-mentioned chancel are feveral memorials for the Botelers, of this pariih, A mural monument for John Harvey, cfq. of Dane-court, obt. 1759, and Margaret his wife; arms,

Harvey, impaling argent, three bars gemelles, fable, over all a lion rampant, gules, for Maud ; and another

He

for Richard Harvey, of Dane court, obt. 1732. had five fons and four daughters, by four wives. Near the weft door is a memorial for John Ruffin, gent, of

Rainham,

obt. i66i.

This church was efteemed

as a vicarage, in archbi-

fhop Langton’s time, who came to the fee in the 8th year of king John, as appears by an ordination of that archbifhop, concerning a penfion of three marcs to be paid yearly to the vicar of it by the nuns of Harwood, in Bedfordfhire,’’

Archbifliop

Edward

III.’s

Meopham, in the beginning of king reign, made a decree, concerning the

vicarage of this church, and as fuch it was efteemed in the 8th year of king Richard II. when it was valued only at four pounds, and as fuch with other fmall beneBut notwithftanding fices, was not taxed to the tenth. the above, this church has been for a great length ot time accounted a reftory, moft probably fo at firft on a

vacancy of the vicarage, on a petition of the vicar of it to the archbilhop, and it appears to have been fo acChartular. Archiep. Cant. MSS. in Bibl. Bodl. Oxon inter Libros MSS. Tlio. Tanner Afaph. Epifc, p. 105. Ducarel’s Repert. p. 47.

Vide

in

F

3

counted

EASTRY HUNDRED.

JO

26th year of king Henry VIII. ’s reign, when it was valued in the king’s books as a rectory, of the yearly value of 15I. 12s. 6d. and the yearly tenths at il. IIS. 6d. There are feven acres of glebe land. In 1588 here were feventy-fix communicants. In 1640 here were eighty communicants, and it was valued at one hundred pounds. The patronage of this church has been for many years the property of the owners of Elmington manor, and tlic owners of Walderfhare manor adjoining alternately, and as luch is now the joint property of David Papillon, efq. of Acrife, and the right hon. the earl of

countqd

in the

Guildford,

who

prefent alternately to

it.

CHURCH OF EYTHORNE. Or

PATRONS, whom Jtre/enteJ,

RECTORS.

bj

John Thompfon, obt. Sir

Edward Moninsy

06i.

21,

Thomas Walton, clerk, Novemr ber 6, 1661, pbt. July 14,

hart.

1698. J)a7tiel Kelley^

Eajiry

Elizabeth Fojlery

widow

William Turner ^

efq

.

...

M. Oft. 13, 1698, obt. 1708.’* Plenry Cafon, A. B. March 26, 1 709, obt. 1 722. John Minet, A. M. January 4, William Forfer, A.

1722, obt. November 13, 1771.= Francis D'Aeth, A. M. December 20, 1771, obt. Jan. 29,

Earl of Guildford.

1784.^

David

e e

Philip Papillon, A. M. the prelent reftor.®

Papillon, efq.

He lies buried in the chancel. He lies buried in this church, He was in 1744 prefented to the

reftory of Lower Hardres, held with this of Eyihotne,

which he

f

He

1784,

religned the vicarage of

God-

merlham, on being prefented to this reftory, w'hich he held with that of Knolton. S He is a younger fon of David Papillon,

ef(j.

the prefent patron.

BARSON,'

BARSON.

7

*

BARSON. THE

next parifh fouth-weftward is Barfofiy alias antient name ; Barfrifioriy which latter is its proper and being written in the furvey of Domefday, Barfrefioncy but Sr the fake of contraftion it has been of late both only. called and written by the former name of Barfon There is but one borough in this pariOi, viz. the bo-

rough of Barfon, which contains the whole parifh the held borftiolder for which is chofen at the petty feffions, j

for this divifion of the lath of St. Auguftine.

_

on the open hilly downs, with which abounds ; they are in like this neighbourhood much manner^for the moft part arable, the foil upon the hills in the valleys it is infertile is chalky and not over ftill of clined today, and of courfe better land, though acoarfe nature. The court-lodge and church are nearly has in it, including in the middle of the parilh, which the ftreet, only twelve houfes, and contains about 470 is exacres of land. This parilh as well as its vicinity ceedingly healthy, and has been already noticed under

B ARSON

lies

j

Coldred. Inftances of longevity here are very frequent and as remarkable, for in 1700 the minifter refident The miniin this parifh was buried at the age of 96. was 82. The fter who preached the funeral fermon

was the reader of the fervice was 87. The parifh clerk fame age, but then abfent. The fexton 86, and his parifh wife about 80, and feveral of the neighbouring above of Coldred, who attended at the funeral, were ICO years old; and in the year 1722 there were in of fifty-eight fouls, this fmall parifh, which confifled only nine perfons, whofe ages made 636 years. At the fouthern boundary of the parifh area great number of Roman twfitiliy or barrows, which adjoin Eythorne palines of entrenchments at the end of the

F 4

:

EASTRY HUNDRED.

72

of which have already been noticed under Shebbertfwell before, in which parlfh molt of them lie.

rifli, all

There is no fair. There was in king Hen:-y IIT.’s reign a family refident here, who took their name from it one of whom, Amicia de Barfrefton, was a benefadlor to the priory of Davington, as appears by the ledger book of it. At the time ol taking the furvey of Domefday, j

5th year of the Conqueror’s reign, this place was part of the poflefTions of Odo, the great bifhop of in the

1

Baieux, the king’s half-brother, under the general of whofe lands it is thus entered in it

title

In EJIrea lath. In EJire hundred^ Ralph de Ctirbefpine holds of the bijhop, one yoke in Barfrefone. There one very poor woman pays three pence and one farthing. This yoke isj and zvaszvorth feparately ten (hillings.

Rannulf de Colubels holds there one yoke^ vohich has been fcot ted in Hardes and to this time is not fcotted to the king's tax.

On

the confifcatlon 'of the billiop’s eflates,

happened on

which

about four years afterwards, this at Barfrifton appears to be among the lands which were granted for the defence of Dover caflle, to Hugh de Port, and with other lands, made up together the barony of Port, being held by barony of that caftle, by the fervice of performing ward there, for the defence of it. After which it was held of his defeendant, Johnde St. John, in king Henry III.’s reign,by a family named Wyborne j one of whom, John de Wyborne, held it in king Edward II.’s reign ; but before the 20th of king Edward HI. this name was extindl here j for it appears then to have been alienated from them, and in the tenure of different perfons ; one of whom, John deMonynham, feems to have held that part of "Wyhis difgrace,

borne’s eftate, which comprehended the

manor of Bat-

which after the heirs of Moningham had deferted their patrimony here, was alienated about the friflon,

latter

BARSON.

73

end of king Henry Vl.’s reign, to Sir Thomas Browne, of Beechworth caftle, comptroller of the houfliold, and in his defcendants the property of it continued down to Sir Thomas Browne, of the lame place, whofe lands were difgavelled by the a6ls of the ift and 8th of Elizabeth ; not long after the latter year of which he alienated it to Mr. Thomas Boys, of Eythorne, who afterwards lemovcd hither, and dying pofwas buried in this church. His fefied of it in i cldeft fon Thomas, was of Hoad, and inherited this manor, which hiselddl fon John Boys, gent, of Hoad, fold at the latter end of king Charles the Ift.’s reign, to Anthony Percival, of Dover, comptroller of the cuftoms there, who died in 1646, and lies buried at Denton, in whofe heirs this manor continued, till it was at length fold to Major Richard Harvey, who was of Edmington, in Eythorne firfl:, and afterwards of Danehisgrandlbn, Mr. Richard Harvey, gent was court of Barlon, and having pulled down the ancient manfion of this manor, handfomely rebuilt it, and afterwards refided here. He married Elizabeth Nicholls, of Barham, by whom he has had feven fons and fix daughters ; of the former, Richard the eldeft, now of Ramfgate, was vicar of St. Laurence, and is now of Eaftry, and married Judith Matfon, by whom he has a fon Richard, now vicar of St. Laurence, who married Mils Wade, by whom he has one only fon Richard. Henry the fecondfon, is an admiral of the royal navy, and of Walmer, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Win. Boys, efq. lieutenant-governor of Greenwich hofpital, by whom he has had four fons and one daughter. John, the third fon, was likewife a captain in the royal navy, and of Heronden, who died in July 1794, at

latter

;

Portfmouth, of the wounds he received in the glorious naval fight againft the French, on June the ft preceding, which prevented the king’s intention of making him an admiral, as a reward for his gallant behaviour in it. He left four fons and four daughters j of the former. 1

:

EASTRY HUNDRED.

<74

former, Henry Wife, cfq. the eldeft, is now of den, and John is a captain in the navy. Ot the daughters, ^4 ary married Wm. Boteler, efq. now of Eaftry, and Fanny married Robert Curling, furgeon, of Sandwich,

Heron-

Elizabeth died young, and Sarah. Of the younger fons of Mr. Richard Harvey, of Barfon, by Elizabeth />. Nicholls, Thomas the fourth fon is .living, but /. and Samuel, the fixth fon, is of Sandwich, brewer. Of the daughters, Frances, Margaret married to Tho-

redor of St. Martin’s, and vicar of St. Paul’s, in Canterbury; Elizabeth to William Wyborn Bradley, brewer, of Sandwich; and Sarah to John Tucker, clerk, late of Shinglewell, and reftor of Gravefend and Luddenham, in this county.** But to

mas Freeman,

clerk,

^

return to Mr. Richard Harvey, who after refiding here fome time, at length in 1792 alienated this eftate to John Plumptre, efq. of Fredville, tlie prefent owner

EIartanger, written in Domefday, Hertange, 1? a time of taking fmall manor in this parilli, which, at the was part of the poflefiions of the bifhop of whofe lands it is of Baieux, under the general title of that furvey,

thus entered in it Hertange, Radulf, fon of Robert, holds of the bifhop In ^he avable land is Jt wns taxed at one jiiling. villeins, zvithtwo demefne there is one carucate, atid five king Edborderers, having two carucates. In the time of

was worth forty Jhillings,^ and afterwards ten jhillings, now fixty fhillings, Eddid held it

ward the

Confeffor,

of king Edzvard,

it



,

,

-n

.

furvey, the bilhop s Four years confifeated ; upon which cflates, on his difgrace, were came into the hands of the this manor of Hartangre crown ; whence it was afterwards granted to Simon after taking this



See the arms of Harvey under Tilmanftone. in vol. ix. of ' See more of the Plumptres, under Fredville, this hiftory, p. 258. h

BARSON.

Fitz-Adam, by whom it was held by knight’s fervice, by barony, of Dover caltle, by the fervice of ward for the fpace of fifteen days, for the defence of

Of Simon Fitz-Adam liam, this

and

it.

Adam

his heir

manor was afterwards held by

Fitzwil-

the Pirots.

Alan Pirot died polfelTed of it at the latter end of king Henry I.’s reign, and was fucceeded in it by Robert Pirot, whofe heir was Ingelramde Fontibus^ how long he and his heirs held it, I do not find ; but at the latter end of king Henry III. or the beginningof kinoEdward I.’s reign, William de Hartanger held it. After him it became the eftateof Robert de Hardres, as may be feen by the book of knight’s fees, and he held it by knight’s fervice of the honor of Clare. In the’ 8th year of the next reign of king Edward II. his next fuccelfor in it was Reginald de Tondrcfieyi how

name does not appear ; but at the latter end of king Henry VI. ’s reign it was come into the poIfelTion of Sir Thomas Browne, of Beechlong

it

continued

in that

worth-caftle, whofe defcendant of the fame name, in the beginning of queen Elizabeth’s reign, paffed it away to Francis Santon, efq. whofe fon and heir P'rancis

Santon alienated

foon afterwards to Edward Merriweather, fecond fon of Edward, of Shebbertfwell, who it

here, and dying polfelfed of

refided

1621, anno 20 James church, and in his defcendants it continued, till at length about the middle of the laft century, it was fold to Pot, and Mr. William Pot, citizen and apothecary, of London, gave it by his will in 1691, with other lands in this county, to truffees and their furvivors, in truft, for them to pay two hundred pounds per annum, out of the rents and profits of them, to Chrill’s hofpital, and the remaining produce of them to the hofpital of Bethlem, in London ; in I.

which

was buried

truft this



it

in

in this

manor continues

veiled at this time.“

See Strype’s Stovv's Survey, book

i.

p. 194.

It

EASTRY HUNDRED.

^6

appears by the regifter of Ledes abbey, that Sibillade Watemle gave to the priory of Ledes, in free and perpetual alms, inter alia^ the tithe of Hartangre, It

was confirmed by archbifliop Theobald, in the reign of king Stephen. There are no parochial charities. The poor conIlantly or cafually relieved are not more than one or

which

two

gift

at rnoCt.

This parish diction of

is

ecclesiastical jurisof Canterbury, and deanry of

within the

the dioceje

Sandwich.

The

church, which

is

dedicated to St. Mary,

fmall building of great antiquity

;

the outfide

is

is

a

curi-

oufly adorned with carve-work in ftone, with circular

arches and windows, cfpecially at the eafi; end the weft end has a fine circular arch with Saxon ornaments and •,

and in the infide is another like arch between the body and chancel. This church, fo well known to every lover of antiquity, of which fo many engravings have been made, is a moft curious fpecimen of Anglo Saxon architedlurc. It confifts of a body and chancel, feparated by a circular arch, fupported by two a row of lingular uncouth elegant wreathed pillars heads are round the cornice ; a beautiful circular window is at the eaft end ; at the foot of the wall are two circular arches, forming recelTes, probably for places of fepulture, and not improbably for the founders of the church. The grand Ibpth entrance, now partly hid by a modern porch, is moft curioufly fculptured with rows of figures of various kinds, Nitches for ftatues are all round the building. There is nofteeple, a fmall wooden turret having been taken down a few years In the chancel is a mufince. There is only one bell. ral monument for Thomas Boys, gent, of Barfrefton, of the family of Fredville, obt. 1599; arms. Or, a zig-zag border

;

;

griffin fegreantffiabJe^ zvithin a bordure., gules.

Another

mural monument for Robert Ewell, reftor and patron, one of the fix preachers of Canterbury cathedral, obt. 1638.

BARSO?f.

A

77

1638. for George Smith, forty-one years re£lor of this parifh, obt. 1752. Several of the Boys’s were buried in this church. In the windows of gravcflone

were formerly thcfe arms, viz. Azure, two bendlsts, argent, wilhtn a bordurc, and the fame arms without the b or dure. I'he advowfon of this church, which is a rcdory, was antiently appendant to the manor ; but in the reiati of king Henry VIII. it was become an advowfon in grots, and was in the poffeffion of John Boys, of Denton, attorney-general to the duchy of Lancafler, who held it by knight’s fervice of the king, as of his caflle of Dover. His fon William Boys, efq, of Denton, Ibid this advowfon to his kinfman Thomas Boys, of Avthorne, and in his defcendants it continued down till the reign of king Charles 1. when it was alienated to Ewell, from one of which name it was fold to Sir Bafil Dixv;ell, who was poireffed of it in 1640; fince which it has become part of the pofTeflions of theprefident and fellows of St. John’s college, in Oxford, who it

are the prefent patrons of

This iris

re(5lory is

valued

now adifcharged

it.

in the

king’s books at 7]. 14s. Jiving of the clear yearly value of In 158S it was valued at fixty

about thirty pounds. fliillings, and here were communicants forty. In 1640 was it valued at fifty fliillings, and here were the like number of communicants. 'Fhis reftory has been augmented by the governors of queen Anne’s bounty with 200I. and a like fum added to it by the prefident and fellows of St. John’s college, with which the houfe, barn, and appurtenances were new built, and a barn, (fable and lands were purchafed in the parifh of Alkham, now of the annual rent of thirty pounds. There is a glebe belonging to it of feven acres, of which one is in Nqnington, but in the king s books there is faid to be ten acres of glebe land.

CHURCH

EASTRV HUNDRED*

73

CHURCH OF BJRSON. patrons. Or

RECTORS#

by tvho?n jirefented.

FrefiJent,

^

c.

of St.John' i college.

George Smith, A. M. i732,obf# May i6, 1752-' John Spier, S. T. P« 061 . 20,

752, refigned

7§8. July I5, 758, refigned 1780. John Luntley, J.L. D. June 17, the prefent redor. 1 780, 1

John 'Chalmers, A.

i

M.

I

I

He heU

this

Shtbbcrtfwcll and Coldred reaory, with the vicarages of annexed.

T

'

I

L

MAN

NORTH-eaftward from

S

T O N

E.

Barfon, the parilB of

Ey-

of Tilmanftone, in thorne only intervening, lies that but is thefurvey of Domefday written Ttlemamfione

pronounced filmejlon. viz. TilmanThere are two boroughs in this parifh, borlholdtr for Tilmanftone and Craythorne. The North Court, it compreflone borough is chofen at and all the northern hends within its bounds the church ftreet and the three part of the parifh, viz. the upper North-court, and SouthTTianor-houfes of Dane-courr, Craythorne borough is court. The borlholder for comprehends within itsi chofen at Eaftry-court, and

now

ufually

.

viz.

Lower-

bounds the fouthern part of this parilh, in all nine houfes, over all! ftreet and Barfield farm, paramount. which the manor of Eaftry claims This parish is pleafantly fituated in a vale, adcountry, with which the joining to an open uninclofed The foil, like that of thee contiguous parifhes abound. reigldDOurhood, is variable ; the vallics more generally thin and than the higher grounds, which are The northern part of the parilh is more fertikt liaht.

fertilcc

^

that.

TILMANSTONE. than the fouthern part of

it

79

the whole contains

;

more

than 1 00 acres ot land, 44 houfes, and about 240 inhabitants ; it is efteemed exceedingly healthy. This 1

appears from the parifli regifter, in which the ages of numbers of perlbns buried are from 80 to 100 years,

on an average, throughout the burials

There

Lower

full

are

a third part in

two

ftreets,

and the births exceed number.

it,

or villages, called

Upper and

former of which is the church. The parifh is long and narrow, being about a mile from eaft to well, anti near two miles the other way. It is rather an untrequented place, and has nothing further remarkable in it. There is no fair in it. William Boys, efq. third fonof William Boys, efq. of Nonington, by Mary Ringeley, refided in this parifh in queen Elizabeth’s time, in the 31ft year of which reign, he lerved in parliament for Queenborough, and died f. p. This place was part of the antient poflefijons of the fee of Canterbury, and at the time of taking the furvey ofDomdday, in the 15th }ear of the Conqueror’s reign, was held ofthe archbilbop by knight’s fervice, by William Folct, and it is thus accordingly entered in that record, under the general title of T^r7a Street, in the

MiHlum Archie pi. William (Folet) holds of the archbif/oop Tilemane/tone. In demejne there are It ixsas taxed at one juUng.

and jive borderers, formerly it was worth twenty jhillhigs, now it is worth thirty /hillings.

two

carucates.,

After the name of Folet wasextindt here, this manor appears to have been held in feparate moieties, and in king Henry III.’s reign was in the polTefllon of Sir

John de Tiddenden, and Sir Roger de Tilmanflonc, who held it of the archbifliop by knight’s fervice. That part of it, which was held by the former, afterwards defeended down to W’illiam de Tiddenden, who died pofTelledof it in the beginning of king Edward III.’s reign. After which it appears to have come into



EASTRY HUNDRED,

So into the

name of Warden,

hereafter.

The other

as will

part,

be further mentioned on the death of Sir

king Edward l.’s reign,* was carried by Matilda, his fifter and coheir, in f. p. marriage to John de Sandhurft,"’ who made a claim of liberties for this manor in king Edward l.’s reign, the 6th year of it ; whofe Ton, John de Sandhurd, of Knolton, fucceeded him in it, and died poffelTed of it in the

Roger de Tilmanftone,

in

beginning of king Edward

At TER WHICH

lll.’s reign.

theje moieties,

fituations, acquired the

South Court

names

from

their refpedHve

of the manors 0/

North

the former

of Wj;V/j was carried by Chriftian, daughter and heir of John de Sandhurfl, in marriage to William Langley, defeendedout

and

j

of Warwickfliire, whofe fon William de Langley was afterwards, in her right, of Knolton j and in the 37th year of king Edward lll.’s reign had the former liberties granted to this manor confirmed by injpeximus ; after which it paflfed in like manner as Knolton, to the Peytons, in which it continued till Sir Thomas Peyton, bart. alienated it to Sir John Narborough, admiral of the Britifh navy, whofe daughter and at length foie furviving heir Elizabeth, married to Sir I'homas D’Aeth, bart. fucceeded to this manor among the reft of her inheritance, and their grandfon Sir Narborough D’Aeth, bart. now of Knolton, is the prefent owner of it. court leet and court baron is held for this manor. The manor of South Court, being the other moiety of the manor of Tilmanftone, which as abovementioned was held by the Tiddendens, and afterw'ards came into the name of Warden, was at length afterwards alienated to White, and John White, merchant of the ftaple, at Canterbury, afterwards knighted, held it in king Henry VI. ’s reign ; one of whofe defeendants fold it to Cox, whofe arms were Sable^ on a chev

,

A

'

'

I i

1

'

;l '

|

|

l

rouy argent y a mullet y fable, for difference, betzveen three |

i

“ Chartularie of Knolton manor, in the Surrenden library.

;

attires j

8l

TILMANSTONE.

of a flag^ pinned to the JcalpSy argent ; and Michael Cox, in the 8th year of king Henry VII did hoattires

mage by

to archbifliop

Moreton

inquifition that he held

it

for

it,

when

it

vvas

found

of the archbifhop, ut de

whole fucceflbr, Thomas Cox, efq. was cuflomer of Sandwich, at the latter end of king Henry VIII. ’s reign j and he pafled it away by fale to Richard Fogge, efq. afterwards of Dane-court,

palatto Juo de Cantuary

who

defcendant not long afterwards alienated it to Peyton, of Knolton, lince which this manor has continued down in the fame title of dwnerlliip, that the manor of South in this parifli,

died poflelTed of

it

in

1598

;

his

Court laft defcribed has, to Sir Narborough D’Aeth, bart. of Knolton, the prefent poOelTor of both thefe court baron is held for this manor. manors. North and South Court are ftrongly connedled as to their manerial rights and jurifdiftion, as appears by the

A

warrants delivered to the

bailiff to

fummon

the tenants,

of whom are fummoned to both courts, two in each only excepted. Their claim is over the greater part of Tilmanftone borough and fome lands contiguous in Eaftry. The manor houfe of the latter is at prefent a neat cottage, fituated clofe to the church* yard i fome ftone walls of the antient manfion and the ruins of the all

the demefne lands are laid to the remain farm of North Court, which is a good farm-houfe. Dane-court is a manor and feat in this parifli, which had antiently the fame owners as North court above-mentioned, and as fuch paffeci from the TilmanItones to the Sandhurfls, and thence in like manner,

barn

ftill

;

by marriage to Langley, from which name it pafled, by fale, to Fennel, who fold it to Cox, and his defeendant Thomas Cox, the cuflomer, died poffefTed of it His in 1559, being the 2d year of queen Elizabeth. heirs in the fame reign alienated it to Richard Fogge, the eldeft fon of George Fogge, efq. of Braborne,'and grandfon of Sir John Fogge, of Repton. He was afterwards of Dane-court, efq. and G VOL. X.

in his

defendants it continued

EASTRV HUNDRED.

$2

continued down to his great -great grandfbn Richard Fogge, mariner ; who fold it about the year 17^4? Major Richard Harvey, then of Elmington, who reHis built this feat and afterwards removed hither. grandfon, the Rev. Richard Harvey, vicar of Eaftry, alienated

wich,

it

in

1763

who bore

to

Gervas Hayward, gent, of Sand-

for hit

arms, Argent y on a pale, JablCy

in 1765 palTed it away three crefeents of the field. by lale to Michael Hatton, efq. a commilTary of the army, who afterwards refided here, and greatly im-

He

proved

polTelfed of

viving,

feat

this

it

who

in

with additional buildings. EJe died 1776, f. p. leaving Alice his wife fur-

refided here

till

her death in 1791

;

upon

came, by the diredtions of Mr. Hatton’s will, to her niece Mrs. Hannah Lilly, who in 1795 carried the it in marriage to Rawfon Aiflabye, efq. and he is court baron is held for this prefent owner of it. which

it

A

manor. appears that Dane-court was once held of the manor of Knolton, but this has not been acknowledged for fome time part. It

The manors are

two

original

of

Great and Little Barville

eftates in the fouthern part

name of which was

of

Barfield.

the 1 hey feem an-

this parifli,

have been one and the fame eflate, which was as early as king Edward IV .’s reign, in the pofiTcfllon of the family of Harvey, and is the firlt place that I find mentioned of their refidence or pofiefiions in this county, from whence the feveral branches of them

tiently to

diftributed themfelves throughout

it,

efpecially in thefc

coat of arms affumed by the feveral branches of this family, are thofe of their female anceftor Awftyn, or as the name is Ibmetimes fpelt Aftyn, viz. Argenty on a chevroriy gnlesy three crefeentSy or, be-

eaftern parts.

The

tween three lions ganibsy erafedy fabUy armed of the fe~ cond. Richard Harvey died pofie fifed of Barfield in 1472, anno 13 Edward IV'. as did his fon*John, who was ftiled of Barfield, in 1479.

TILMAJJSTOME. bert ahd Nicholas,

who

poflefled

after their father’s

it

death, in moieties; the former died in 1518, and by his will direfted his moiety to be fold ; after which

no further mention of them here, and the pedigree of the family deferibes Robert Harvey, Ion of Robert above-mentioned as of Norborne. Moll probably this manor was at the time above-mentioned divided, but in what proportions does not appear, between tliefe two brothers, Robert and Nicholas Harvey, and afterwards took the names of Great and Little Barville i by which, however, it fliould feem, that the former of them was the largeft portion of the two. Great Barville foon after the above period became the property of the family of Crayford, of Mongeham, one of whom, in the reign of queen Elizabeth, purchafed Little Barvile of the heirs of Fix, or Picks, as they were fometimes fpelt, feveral of whom are mentioned there

is

in the regiller of this parilh, but without any dillinc-

and thus thefe cllates became again united in the pofleflion of one and the fame owner. In the defeendants of Crayford this eftate, now known by the name of Barfield only, and in one occupation^ continued till king Charles IL*s reign, when William Crayford, efq. of Mongeham, dying without ifrue," deviled it to his wife Urfula, who remarrying with Nordalh Rand, efq. entitled him to the poficlTion of it, and he in the year 1720 fold it to Sir Robert Furnefe, bart. of Walderlhare, in whofe defeendants it continued down to Catherine, filler and coheir of his Ton Sir Henry, who carried it in marriage, firll to Lewis, earl of Rockingham, and fecondly to Francis, earl of Guildford, to whom, on her death in 1766, flic deviled this He died pofiefTed of it in 1 790, and his grandeftate. fon the right hon. George Auguilus, earl of Guildford, tion as gentlemen

is

;

the prefent pofTefibr of

Barville are pulled “

down

;

it.

The

the feite of

See more of the Crayfords, under

c

buildings of Little

z

them

Mongeham,

is

ftill

to

before.

be

EASTRY HUNDRED.

^4

be traced, in a rough pafture ground on the north fide of the highway, (formerly called Sr. Margaret’s ftreet) leading from Dover to Knolton. Part of the lands of this

eRate are faid

in antient records, to

difirid of StormeJioHj in this parilb is

known, or has been ever heard

of the

parifli

There

or

its

within the

but no fuch

;

of,

be

name

by the inhabitants

neighbourhood.

The poor

are no parochial charities.

con-

about ten, cafually thirteen. This parish is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the of Canterbury, and deanry of

ftantly relieved are

Sandwich.

The finall .

dedicated to St. Andrew, is a building, confiding of a body and chancel,

church, which

mean

is

with a fquare tower at the weft end, very low, but formerly higher, having been taken down a few years ago; there is one bell in it. In the chancel, againft the eaft: wall, is a brafs plate, on it are the figures of a man and woman, on his fide one fon, on her’s three daughters, all kneeling, with the arms of Fogg^ with a-label of three points^ impaling Sackvillcy zvith a crefeent, for Richard Fogg, efq. and Anne his wife he died in 1598. graveftone for Richard Fogg, efq. father of fourteen children, famous for his poetry, and flcill in heraldry, obt. 1680. graveftone for Jane, daughter of the Rev. Strangford Viol, late re6tor of Upminfter, in Effex, and Jane his wife, daughter of Richard Fogg, efq. obt. 1719; fhe married Edward Jacob, furgeon, of Canterbury, who died in 1756. In the eaft window are three fhields of painted glafs ; the firft, the field gone. On a chief, azure, three lions rampant, or ; on the Tides in black letter. Sir John Life, hit. The field was probably or ; fecond. Gules, a crofs, argent ; third, azure, a bend cotized, argent, between fix martlets of the ;

A

A

fecond, under which was formerly this legend. Orate p aia Wi, fonge, now obliterated. In tHe north window are remaining four figures ; firft, a man in

armour with a

fhicld,

having a plain

crofs

on

it,

on his

TILMANSTONE.

85

bread, in the attitude of thrufting a lance through the jaws of a bead lying at his feet ; probably, by the crofs defigncd for Sc. George ; fccond, a young man crowned ; tliird, an older man crowned, with a globe and fccptre in his hands, and fccmingly weeping; fourth, an ancient man kneeling, full bearded, on his his

fhoulder a child holding a globe and fceprrc, to which he is looking up. In the fouth window is the figure of

a man bearded, with a palmer’s bonnet on, and daff, holding in his right hand a book. In the body of the church, a marble monument againd the north wall, near the chancel, and infcription, diewing that in the vault underneath are dcpofited the remains of Michael

Hatton, efq. of Dane-court, obt. 1776 ; alfo Mrs. Alice Hatton, his widow, obt. 1791 ; arms, Azure^ a chevron^ between three wheat Jheaves^ or^ impaling A monuthree lilies^ argent^ Jialked and leaved, vert. ment againd the fame wall for Thomas Michael Tierney, late dudent of Brazen Noze college, Oxford, and fon of Thomas Tierney, of London, by Savine his wife, obt. 1770, at Arras, in France, on his return to England, ast. 1 9. On feven diderent gravedones are memorials for the Smiths, refident at Thornton, from the the windows of this church year 1632 to 1664. were formerly much more painted glafs, both of figures and coats of arms. This church was anciently part of the podefiions of the knights hofpitallers of St. John of Jerufalem, to whom it was appropriated by archbifhop Langton, about the end of king John’s reign ; the archbilhop referving to himfelf and fuccefifors, the nomination and inditution of a vicar, and at the fame time he endow'ed the vicarage, decreeing that the vicar diould receive the whole altarage, and the moiety of all the tithes be-

longing to longing to 1

this it i°

church, and a certain mefiTuage, &c. bein which date the appropriation and vi-

Liber niger Archidiac. Cantuar, 8vo. ,

G

3

f.

42.

caragc

EASTRy HUNDRED.

S6

carage of this church remained until the difiblution of the above order, in the 3 2d year of king Henry VIII. ’s reign, when they both came into the king’s hands, and

remained there till the year 1558, being the lalt of Philip and Mary, w'hen the advowfon of the vicarage was granted among others to the archbifliop and the appropriation likewife in the third year of queen Elizabeth, this redtory being then valued at iix pounds per rinnum fince which both the appropriation and advowfon have remained part of the poirefTions of the fee of Canterbury, the archbifhop being now pofi'eficd of them. The vicarage of Tilmanflone is valued in the ;

;

king’s

book

ing, and

at 7I

12s. 6d.

It is

now

a difeharged liv-

of the yearly value of forty-five pounds. In 1588 here were one hundred and nine communicants, in 1640 there were the like number of communicants, and it was valued at fifty pounds. In 1740 it was of the value of fixty pounds. is

Archbifhop Wake,

1719, on the petition of Nicholas Carter, vicar of this church, gave licence for him to take down the old vicarage-houfe and to eredt

new

in

This vicarage is at prefent endowed with one half of the great tithes, with a vicarage-houfe, and garden only, for the vicar’s ufe. The remaining half of the great tithes belongs to the parfonage, with twenty-four acres of glebe land, held on a beneficial leafe from the archbifhop, by the two fons of the late Mr. John Curling, of Ham. There are fifteen acres of land in this pariih allotted as a glebe to Eaffry

a

one.^

parfonage. In the parifh regifter (the antient part of

it)

are the

names of Cocks, hogg, very numerous, Arden, Willford, Billingfley, Bargrave, Pattinfon, Burville, Capell, Boys, Picks, and Ower. :

,

'

P

Regifter

Wake,

pt.

i,

f.

378 a b

et feq.

CHURCH

,

87

TILMANSTONE.

CHURCH OF TILMANSTONE, PATRONS, Or The

by

VICARS.

whom ^irejented. James

ArchblJJiop

Burville.

A. B. Nov. 9,

1675, obt. 1697.

Thomas Maunder^ A. M. July 1697, obt.

I

1

1

730.

T. P.

Nicholas Carter, S.

I

73 *^»

refigned 1755.'*

John Jacob,

A.

M. 0 £l.

30,

1735. obt. 1763.^ Egerton Leigh, LL. B. Jan. 26, 1788.® 1 764, obt. April 13,

Nehtmiah Nijbett, A. M. May 15, 1788, the prefent vicar.*^ ^ LIkewIfe reAor of Ham, and ligned this vicarage for that

of

re-

Wood-

church, which he held with that of by difpenfation.

Ham r

And

vicar of St. John’s, in

Tha-

net, by difpenfation.

Mary’s, in » And reflor of St. Sandwich, and of Murflon, which two rcAories, together with this vicarage, he held at the fame time, by a tacit permiffion, till his death, t And perpetual curate of A(h.

K N O L T O N

LIES It

is

from Tilmanftone. of Domefday, Chenoltone, in

the next parlfli weftward

written in the fiirvey

other antient records Cnoltone, and afterwards hothKnol^ don and Knolton, taking its name from its fituation on the knoll of a hill. There is no bordiolder appointed for this parifli.

The

parish of Knolton is very fmall ; it contains only 432 acres. Almoft the whole of it, except a very few acres, is the property of the D’Aeth family, whofc manfion in it is beautifully fituatcd on the knoll of a having an extenfive profpedf over the neighbouring country and adjacent channel. I'he houfe, which is large, was built by Sir Thomas Peyton, the fouth part of which is ftill remaining; the centre of the front and the north wing have been modernized. The offices, which are exceedingly commodious, were built hill,

04

by

;

88 by sir

EASTRY HUNDRED. Thomas D’Aeth in 1715, In

the old part of the hoLife are the arms of Peyton on a chimney-piece;

and the arms of Peyton, impaling Cakhorpe, in every window, &c. which fufficiently point out the builder, but the arms of Langley are no where in the houfe. The park in which it ftands contains about two hundred acres. It is finely wooded, and the foil of it, as well as the reft of the parifli, is exceedingly healthy and dry, though being rather inclined to chalk, it is not very fertile. 1 he lands are moftly arable and uninclofed ; the hill and dale is frequent and continual throughout it ; the whole arrangement of them forming a moft pleafing and chearful view to the eye. Adjoining to the gardens, at the back of the manfion, is the church and parfonage-houfe, and beyond this, on the declivity of the hill northward, clofe to the bridle-way to Eaftry and Deal, a fmall parcel of coppice wood. Befides the above two houfes, there is only one more, a farm-houfe, in the parifli. There is no fair.

At

the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, in the 15th year of the Conqueror’s reign, this manor

was part of the

of Odo, bifliop of Baieux, of whofe lands it is entered in it

poftefTions

under the general

title

as follows ^urjiin holds of the bi/hop, Chenoltone. It was taxed at one Jtilin^, Hhe avable land ts ..... In deniefne there are two carucates, with tzvo borderers. In the time

of king Edward the Confejjor, and afterwards^ worth four pounds, now [even pounds, and yet eight pounds, Eduuard held it of king Edward.

Four years

it

was

it

pays

was diigraced, and all his crown, whence the fei^nory of this manor feems to have been granted to William de Albineto, or Albini, furnamed Pincerna, who had followed the Conqueror from Normandy, in his expedition hi^ther. Of his heirs it was afterwards held by knight s fcrvice, by the family of Perot, or Pyrot, as the name was frequently Ipelt ; one of whom, Alanus after the bifiiop

eftates confifeated to the

Pyrot,

;

KNOLTON. king Henry Ill.’s

89

Pyrot, held it in reign, by knight’s fervice, of the coimteis of Ewe, to whom the [eignory paramount of it had dcfcendcd from William de Albi-

neto before-mentioned Sir Ralph Pyrot, his fucceffor, was poHelfcd of this manor in the next of Edward 1. in the 13th year of which he had a grant, dated at Ac;

ton Burnel, Odlober 4th, of free zvarren in all his demefne lands of Cnoltone, among others in other different counties.

In his defcendants,

who bore

for their arms. Argent^

a fefs^ fable i in chief three ejcallops ; as appears by the coat, quartered with thofe of Langley on the font, and in the windows of this church, it continued down to Henry Perot, who was of Knolton, and ferved the office of fheriff at the latter end of the 6th year of that reign, though before the end of it John de Sandhurfl: appears to have been lord of it. He left an only daughter and heir Chriftian, who married William de LanjjO ley, by which means William Langley their fori afterwards became entitled to the inheritance of it. He re.fided at Knolton, and was fl^ieriffof this county feveral times, as were his defcendants afterwards, refidents of Knolton, in whom it continued down to Edward LangThe arms of ley, efq. of Knolton," who died f. p. ^

Langley, Per pale and fefSt indented^ azurcy and C}\ are carved on the ftone roof of the cloyfters at Canterbury and they are painted on the glafs of the windows of the church of Knolton, as will be further mentioned hereafter ; and they were formerly in the windows of the churches of Sheldwich, Tilmanftone and Nonington, thofe in the latter having on them, A bendy c^mpon)\ argent y and gules. Their arms were formerly over the door- way of the houfe of Knolton, which was re-edified by one of them, but there are none fuch remaining now. Edward Langley married Elizabeth, daughter of Tho. “

See an account of the Langleys, and their pedigree, in

dale’s

Warwick,

Dug-

p. 135, 136,

Peyton,

}

EASTRY HUNDRED.

90

Peyton, efq. of Peyton-hall and Jfelham, piire, it

whom

he

left

furvjving and in

fhe afterwards remarried Sir

i

who became

entitled to

Cambridgethe pofleffion of In

Edward Ringeley,

her right, and afterwards refided at Knolton, where he died in Upon />• her death this manor, with other eftates in this county, became the property of her brother Sir Robert Peyton, of Ifelham, as heir- general at law of her firft hufband it

in

above-mentioned, by the marriage in king Henry VI. ’s reign, of his great-grandfather John Peyton, of Peyton-hall, with Grace, daughter of Langley. Idiis family derived their defeent from William de Mallet, a noble Norman, who came into England with the Conqueror, vvhofe eldefl: fon and heir John, was lord of the manor of Peyton-hall, in Suffolk, who left Robert de Ufford, his eldefl fon, lo lurnamed from his manor of Ufford, in that county, anccflorto the earls of Suffolk of that name, and other eminent perfons in the feveral ages in which they lived. Peter de Peyton, his fecond fon, lo

furnamedfrom

his manor of Peyton-hall j and John de Peyton, his third fon, fo furnamed from the fame manor likewile, vvhofe fon and heir was Sir John

de Peyton, of Stoke Neyland, from whom, by direfl defeent, in the fifth degree, was John Peyton, efq. of Peyton hall and Wyken, who died in Henry VI. ’s reign, having married Grace, daughter and heir of Langley, as above-mentioned. The Peytons,

ofKnoL

ton, boie for their arms, Sable^ a erqf^y engrailed^ or Jir^ quarter, a mullet, pierced, aigent,

being a

difference, to this ffmily.'"

two

fons

of the

John

fhew their defeent from the third houfe of Sir Robert Peyton died in leaving 1 5 1 8,

Sir Robert,

;

who was of

Ifelham, anceftor

eytons, baronets, of Cambridgefhire Peyton, to whom he gave Knolton I

and

cltates in this county.

There

is

a pedigree

and Sir his other

of this family in the Vifitation of the

county of Kent, anno 16 19.

The

knolton.

The

91

Knolton, as did his was created a baronet

latter afterwards refided at

grandibn Sir Samuel Peyton, who His eldeft fon Sir in the loth year of king James I. Thomas Peyton, bart. of Knolton, dying in 1684, was buried in Weftminfter abbey, having had three wives i by the fecond of which, Cecilia, widow of Sir William

Swan, he ;

ion

Thomas, who died

in his life-time

and four daughters, who became his coDorothy, married to Sir Bafil Dixwell, bart.

in 1667, heirs

left a f.

p.

Catherine to Sir Thomas Longueville, bart. Elizabeth to William Longueville, efq. of the Inner Temple, and Efther to Thomas Sandys, efq. After Sir Thomas

Peyton’s death, his widow remarrying, the poITeflion of this feat came into the hands of his executor, who

demifed it for a term of years to Edward, lord Wotton, and he refided at it ; and at his death in 1628, devifed his intereft in it to his wife, lady Margaret

Wootton. Sir T. Peyton’s four daughters and coheirs joined with their truftees, not longafterwards, in the fale of this manor to Sir John Narborough, admiral of the Englifli fleet, who was by king J ames il. created a baronet, and bore for his arms. Gules ^ a chiefs ermine. He had two fons, Sir John Narborough, bart. and James Narbo;rough, elq. who were both lofl with their father in law Sir Cloudefley Shovel, admiral of the royal navy, being fhipwrecked on the rocks of Scilly, with feveral other fhips of the fquadron, in his voyage from Toulon, on On their death unmarried, Elizabeth 5f. 22, 1707. their only After and heir entitled her huftoand Thomas

0

(

of North Cray, to the poffelTion of this manor and leat, among the reft of their eftates in this illiam D’Aeth, who county. He was defeended from was of Dartford, and principal of Staple s Inn, in king

D’Aeth,

efq.

W

Edward VI. queen Mary, and queen Elizabeth’s reign, who bore for his arms, Sahle^ a griffin, volenl, or, tween three

crefeents, argent.

He died in

1

59 '^>

buried with his two wives in Dartford church i in which parifli

EASTRY HUNDRED

92 parifli his

defccndants afterwards rcfided,

D’Aeth before-mentioned removed

to

till

Thomas

North Cray.*

He

was afterwards, by patent, dated July 1 6, 1716, created a baronet, and refided at Knolton, the manfion of which he rebuilt, and died pofieffed of it in 1744, leaving ifliie by his firft wife before-mentioned, who died in 1721, one fonNarborough, and five daughters, Elizabeth, married to the hon. Henry Dawney, third fon of Henry, vifcoiint Dowme ; Elhanna to Capt. Fitzgerald, an officer in the French fervice

;

Sophia to

William Champneis, efq. of Boxley ; Bethia, firfi: to Herbert Palmer, efq. and fecondly to John Cofnan, efq. whom fiie furvived and Harrier, who married Jofiah Hardy, efq. By his fecond wife Jane, daughter of Walter VVilliams, of Monmouthffiirc, he left one fon Francis, afterwards reftor of this parifh. He was fucceeded by his eldefi: fon Sir Narborough D’Aeth, bart. of Knolton, who married in 1738, Anne, daughter and heir of John Clarke, efq, of Blake-hall, in Effex, and died in 1773 fiie furvived him, and left an only fon and heir, the prcfent Sir Narborough D’Aeth, ;

;

now

of Knolton, the poflefibr

of this efiate. court baron is held for this manor, which is very cxtenfive, for it not only claims over this parifh, but great part of Chillenden and Woodnefborough, part of Eythorne and of Denton. bart.

A

There

are no parochial charities.

The poor

con-

maintained are not more than one, cafually fix. Knolton is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Sandwich. The church, which is dedicated to St. Clement, is flantly

a fmall building, confifting of one

and a chancel, having a fmall wooden tower at the weft end, in which is a clock and one bell. The church is very neat, and ifle

There is a pedigree of this family in the Heraldic Vifitation of the county of Kent, anno 1619. is

y

KNOLTOM.

93 of

paved with black and white done ; the font is Itone^ elegantly carved, on it on two Ihields are the pale, and fefs, indented, counter^ a-ms of Langley, on two other llfields, both changed, or, and argent is

Argent, a feji, fable I'econd, Argent, a fefs, fable,

quartering,

alike, in chief,

three ogrejfes

;

firfl:,

in chief, three efcallop fhells of the lafi crofs-crofiet,

On

argent.

the

ftone

third, Gules,

work

a

different

in

parts of the church, are feveral fliields of the arms of Langley and Peyton, with their quarterings ; their mo-

numents

againft the

walls are

many, and well pre-

fpeaking of an antient tomb in this church, for one of the Ringeley family, certainly-

ferved.

Weever,

in

meant Langley fuch a tomb might exift in his time, and was removed or cafed over, w'hen the large altar ;

monuments were erc6bed, which remain atprefent. Sir Edward Ringeley had only an intereft in this eifate for life,

and

'Phis

w'as buried at Sandvvich, as

tomb of Langley had on

it

appears by his

will.

his portraiture kneel-

ing on a cufluon, his hands joined and uplifted, his hair cut round, his fword and fpurs on, and his furcoat covered with the arms of Langley ; all long fince deproyed. An altar marble monument, richly fculptured, on which is a fhip in a ilorm, driving on the rocks, in memory of Sir John Narboroiigh, bart. and fames Narborough, efq. only furviving Tons of Sir

John Narborough, admiral of

the fleet,

who

wdth their

father-in-law, Sir Cloudefley Shovel, were Ihipwrecked

upon the rocks of Scilly, 22d Od:. 1707, the elder in his 23d year, the younger in his 2 adarms, Gules, a chief, ermine, with the hand of Ulfier, in the night

for Narborough.

An

altar

monument

to the

memory

A

monument, of Sir John Narborough, obt. 1688. altar fafliion, on which is a medallion, elegantly fculptured, with the head of a lady, to the memory of lady Elizabeth D’Aeth, only daughter of Sir John Narborough, married to Sir Thomas D’Acth, bart. by whom fhe had twelve children, of whom feven furvived her, obt.

,

EASTRY HUNDRED.

94

Several Other

obt. 1721. family.

monuments

the chancel the

In

fhields ot arms,

and

among

for the

windows are

D^Aeth with

filled

others, are thofc

of Of-

borne, Peyton, Calthorp, and l.angley, with difFerenc impalements and quarterings.

The church

Knolton, which is a rcdlory, was ever accounted an appendage to the manor, and continues fo at this time, Sir Narborough D’Aeth, bart. of Knolton, being the prefent patron of it. ot

valued in the king’s books at 61 5s. 2id. and the yearly tenths at 1 2S. 6+d. but it is now of the yearly certified value of 56I. 15s. 1 ud. In 1388 here were communicants twent)'-two, and it was valued at fixty pounds. In 1640, here were It

is

.

twenty- nine communicants, and it was valued at forty pounds. There are ten acres of glebe land belonging to this redory, of which one is in Chillenden.

CHURCH OF KNOLTON, PATRONS, Or

RECTORS.

hy uihom [irefetited.

Sir Ihomas Peyton

Peter Puiy^

The Archbijhop, hac

163S, obt. 1684. Peter Purey^ Feb, 17, obt. I 708.

Thomas D'Aethi^

Sir Narborough

vice.

...

A. M. January 13, 1684,

M. April 5, obt. 1708, I 71 1. Robert Skyring, A. M. July 2 1, I 713, obt. March 26, 1753. Francis D'Aeth, A. M. John Andrews, A.

efq^

D' Aeth^

bart

1753,

obt. Jan. 29, 1784.'' Anthony Egerton Hammond, B.

1784, refigneti 1792.“ IVilliam L ade , A J u ne the prefent re6lor.

M

*

He was fon of the former. He was half-brother to the

late

Narborough D’Acth, bart. In 1767 be was collated to the vicarage of Godnicriham, which he held with Sir

this reftury, but refigneU

it

.

1

A.

7 92

on being prefented to the reAory of Eythorne, which he iikewife held with this reAory. a Now rcAor of Ivychurch, and vicar of

Lympne.

in 1771,

CHILLENDEN,



CHILLENDEN.

C H

WRITTEN

I

I.

L E

N D

95

E N,

of Domefda)", Cilledenet lies the next parifli weftwarci Irom Knolton, taking its name from its cold and low fitiiation. 'I'he manors of Knolton and Woodnelborough claim over part of this parilb, as does the manor of Adilham over another part of it. borfliolder is appointed for this parifh in the iiirvey

A

by the

juftices, at their petty fdfions for this divifion

of

the lath of St. Augufline.

The

and liealthy, but it is not very pleafantly fituated, though 'furrounded by other pariflies which are remarkably fo ; it is very I'mall, containing only one hundred and fixty acres, and the whole rents in it amount to little more than 250I. per annum. There are three farms in it, one belonging to Mr. Hammond, and the other two to Sir Brook Bridges, bart. It lies low in a bottom, the high road from Canterbury to Deal leads through the village called Chillenden-ftreet, which confills of twenty two houfes; on the fouth fide fbinds the church. The foil is chalky and poor, and the lands, which are arable, are fair is held here on Whitopen anti uninciofed.

parish of

Chillenden lies dry

A

Monday, for pedlary, &c. This place, at the time of taking Domefday, was

the furvey of

part of the pofTeffions of

of Baieux, under the general

title

Odo, bifhop

of whole lands

it is

entered in it as follows; Ofhern (fon of Letard) holds of the bijljop Cilledene, It zvas taxed at one fuling and one yoke and ten acres. I he arable land is .... In demejne there is nothing

noWy

blit

nine villeins

have there two carucates and an

In the time of king Edivard the Confefj'or it zvas worth fixty /hillings y and afterzvards thirty /hillings y nozv

half.

forty /hillings.

Godzvin held

it

of king Edwardy and

gS

EASTRY HUNDRED. Thomas Ojbern put three of

thanes.

five other

their

lauds into one manor.

Four years on the

afccr the taking

of

this fiirvey, this eflate,

and the confifcation of his cllates, came into the hands of the crown. After which it came into the poflcnion of a family, who took their furname from it, and there is mention bifliop’s difgtace

made in deeds, which are as antient as the reign ofking Henry III. of John de Chillenden, Edward and William de Chillenden, who had an interefl in this place ; after this name was become extind here, the Bakers, of Caldham,

whom

in

Capel, near Folkeftonc, pofTelfed

manor

it,

king Henry VI. ’s reign, Hunt, whofe defcenremained dants entitled to it for two or three defeents, when one of them alienated it to Galon, of Apulton, in Ickham.’' They bore for their arms. Azure a fejs coin

this

when

it

contijiued

till

pafied by fale to

^

tizedy ermine, between three goats heads, couped, argent',

which coat was granted anno 39 king Henry Vlll.^’ in which name it continued for ibme time, and till it was at length fold to Flammond, of St. Alban’s, in Noningron, in whofe defeendants it has continued down to William Hammond, efq. of St. Alban’s, who is th« prefent owner of this manor. This eftate pays a quit rent to Adifnam manor, of which it is held. It has no manerial rights, and it is much doubted, if it had ever any claim, beyond the reputation of a manor.

There

are

no

parochial charities.

The poor

con-

Fantly relieved are about fixteen, cafually fix. This parish is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of Bridge.

The

church, which

antient,

it

is

a

mean

dedicated to All Saints, feems building, very fmall, having a

is

fquare tow'er at the weft end, in which there ^

See the Harleian

MSS. No.

1069, 6



is

only

ii.

one

chillenden.

97

of a body, and one chancel. In the windows are remains of very handfome painted glafs. There is a handfome zig-zag moulding, and circular arch over the north door. There is likevvife a circular arch, but plainer than the other, over the fouth door. It has nothing further worth mention

one

in

It confifts

bell.

it.

This church was part of the poflefTions of the priory of Ledes, being given to it by William de Northwic, about the latter end of king Henry ll.’s reign j' but the prior and convent never obtained the appropriation of it, but contented themfelves with a penfion of eight

from it j in which ftate it continued till the dilTolution of the priory in the 31/1 year of king Henry VIII ’s reign, when the advowfon, together with the above penfion, came with the reft of the poffeflions of the priory, into the hands of the crown, in which the patronage of this church continues at this time. But the annual penfion of eight fhillings was foon afterwards fettled by the king in his 33d year, among other premifes, on his new-founded dean and /hillings yearly

chapter of Rochefter, part of whofe

pofiTeflions

it ftill

continues.

valued in the king’s books at five pounds. It is now a ditcharged living, and is of about the clear yearly value of twenty fix pounds. In 1588 feventyit was valued at forty pounds, communicants

This reftory

feven.

In

1640

is

it

vvas

valued at the fame,

communi-

cants feventy.

There cumbent

are three’ acres of glebe.

The

prefent in-

good parfonage-houfe on the feite of the antient one. There is no land within this parifh exempt from the payment of tithe. has built a tolerable

Regift. of Ledes abbey; Reg. RofF. p. 410, confirmed loliu, prior, and the convent of Chrift church, in 127^" =

vot. X.

H

by

CHURCH

EASTRY HUNDRED*

CHURCH OF CHILLENDEH. PATRONS, Or

RECTORS.

by ’vohom p.refented.

The Q^ueen

John Culling^ obt. 1 710, Thomas Bagnell, clerk, May 5, 1710, refigned Robert Skyring, A JoJiah Pomfret, I 725, obt. Oft.

1

72

5.**

M. M. I

1721.'

Dec. 23,

773.*

Robert Pitman, Jaiu 8, 1776, the prefent reftor.* «* He refigned this reftory on being prefented to that of Frittenden. c Likewife reflorof Knolton.

f Afterwards

LL. B. He had

E

A

penfatlon to hold the reftory of Snare with this of Chillcnden. g And vicar of Weft Cliffe,

adif-

S

T R

Y,

THE next parlfh north-eaftward Eaftry.

At

from Knolton

the time of taking the furvey of

is

Domef-

was of fuch confiderable account, that it not only gave name, as it does at prefent, to the hundred, but to the greatcft part of the lath in which it hands, now called the lath of St. Auguftine. There are two boroughs in this parifh, viz. the borough of Hardenden, which is within the upper half hundred of Downhamford, and comprehends the diftri6ls of Hardenden, Selfon and Skrinkling, and the borough of Eaftry, the borfholder of which is chofen at &ftry- court, and comprehends all the reft of the parifh, excepting fo much of it as lies within that part of the borough of Felderland, which is within this parifti. The parish of Eastry, a healthy and not unpleafant fituation, is about two miles and an half from north to fouth, but it is much narrower the other way, at the broadeft extent of which it is not more than a mile and an half. The village of Eaftry is fituated on a pleafing eminence, almoft in the centre of the parifh, day,

it

exhibiting

EASTRY.

99

exhibiting a plvflurefque appearance from

The

of view.

from

principal llrect in

it

is

many

points

called Eaftry-

branch off” Mill ftreet, Church-lfrect and Brook-Hreet. In Mill ftreet is a fpacious handfome edifice lately eredled there, as a houfe of induftry, for the poor of the feveral united parifhes of Eaftiy, Norborne, Betlhanger, Tilmanftone, Walderfliare, Coldred, Lydden, Shebbertfwell, Svvynfield, Wootton, Denton, Chillendeh and Knolton. In Churchftreet, on the eaft fide, flands the church, with the court-lodge and parfonage adjoining the church-yard ; ftreet

;

in this ftreet is

a neat

it

likewife the vicarage.

is

modern

In Brook-ftreer,'

houfe, the refidence of

efq.

and another belonging to Mr.

who

refides

Mention

Wm.

Boteler,

Thomas Rammell,

be found hereafter, under the deferiplion of the borough of Hernden, in this parilli, of the defeent and arms of the Botelersrein

it.

fident there for

many

will

generations.

Thomas

Boteler,

who

died pofleired of that eftate in 1651, left three fonsi the youngeft of whom, Richard, was of Brook-ftreet, and died in 1682 j whofe great-grandfon, W. Boteler, efq.

is

editor

now of Brook-ftreet a gentleman to whom the for his communications and is much indebted j

towards the defetiption of this hundred, and He has been twice marits adjoining neighbourhood. ried ; firft to Sarah, daughter and coheir of Thomas Fuller, elq. of Statenborough, by whom he has one

airiflance,

j'on,

V\ illiam Fuller,

captain of the

a fellow of St.

Peter’s col-;

Mary, eldeft daughter efq. of Sandwich and Hernden, late royal navy, by whom he has five Tons and

Cambridge of John Harvey, lege,

now

:

fecondly, to

He

bears for his arms. Argent^ on three ejcntcheons^ Jable^ three covered cups, or ; which coat was granted to hisancefior, Richard Boteler, efq. three daughters.

1389. Mr. Boteler, of liirviving male of the family, both of

of Hernden, by Cooke, Eafiry,

is

the

Hernden and

lafi;

clar. in

Brook-fireet.

comprizing the ncighbouihood of the above mentioned branches, may be faid to contain about fixty-four houfes. H 2 At Eafiry-fireet,

PASTRY HUNDRED.

100

the fbuth-eaft boundary of this parlfh lies the and Bctlhanger, hamlet of I Jpdown, adjoining to

At

Ham

'

in the

former of which

pariflies

fome account of

it

has

been already given. At the fouthern bounds, adjoining to Tilmanftone, lies the hamlet of Wenftone, formerly called Wendeftone. On the weftern fide lies the borough of Hernden, which although in this parifii, is yet within the hundred of Downhamford and manor of Adifliam j in the fouthern part of it is Shrinkling. or Shingleton, as it is now called, and the hamlet of Hernden. At the northern part of this borough lie the hamlets and eflates of Selfon, Wells, and Gore. Towards the northern boundary of the parifh, in the road to Sandwich, is the hamlet of Statenborough, and at a fmall diftance from it is that part of the borough of Felderland, or Fenderland, as it is ufually called, within this parifh, in which, adjoining the road which branches off to Word, is a fmall fear, now the property and refidence of Mrs. Dare, widow of Wm. Dare, efq. who refides in it.^

Round

the village the lands are for a

little

difiancc,

and on towards Statenborough, incloled with hedges and trees, but the reft of the parifii is in general an open uninclofcd country of arable land, like the neighbouring ones before defcribed j the foil of it tow'ards the north is moft fertile, in the other parts it is rather thin, being much inclined to chalk, except in the bottoms, where it is much of a ftiff clay, for this parifh is a continued inequality of hill and dale ; notw'ithftanding the above, there is a great deal of good fertile land in the parifii, which meets on an average rent at fifteen firillingsan acre. There is no wood in it. The parifii contains about two thoufand fix hundred the yearly rents of it are afiefted to the and fitty acres poor at 2679I. I

*

See more of this borough and feat under

the principal

[;art

of this borough

is

Word,

in

which

fituated.

At

EASTRY.

lOI

At

the foiith end of the village is a large pond, called Butfole ; and adjoining to it on the eaft fide, a field,

belonging to Brook-ftreet

from whence erected in

eftate,

called

the

Butts;

conjectured that Butts were formerly for the pratice of archery among the

it is

it,

inhabitants.

A fair

is held here for cattle, pedlary, and toys, on October the 2d, (formerly on St. Matthew’s day, September the 21ft) yearly. In 1792, Mr. Boteler, of Brook-fireet, difcovered, on digging a cellar in the garden of a cottage, fituated eaftward of the highway leading from Eiaftry-

crofs to Butfole, an antient burying ground, ufed as fiich in the latter time of the Roman empire in Britain, mofi probably by the inhabitants of this parifh, and tJie

places contiguous to

it.

He caufed

feveral graves

be opened, and found with the flceletons, fibuU^ beads, knives, v.mbones of fhields, &c. and in one a to

From

glafs vefiel.

dug tliat

other fkeletons, which have been up in the gardens nearer the crofs, it is imagined, they extended on the fame fide the road up'to the

ground of which is now pretty much covered with houfes the heaps of earth, or barrows, which formerly remained over them, have long fince been levelled, by the great length of time and the labour of the hufoandman ; the graves were very thick, in rows parallel to each other, in a direcSiion from eaft to weft. St. Ivo’s well, mentioned by Nierembergius, in Hijioria de MiracuJis Nature, lib. ii. cap, 33 which crofs, the

;

j

I

noticed in

my

folio edition as

any tradition of in

not being able to find

have fince found was at a place that formerly went by the name of Eftrc, and afterwards by that of Flafiiz, near St. Ives, in Huntingdonfiiire.

this parilh, I

See

Gales Saiptores, xv.

vol.

i.

p.

This place gave birth to Henry de Eaftry, who was firft a monk, and then prior of Ghrift-church, in Canterbury ; who, for his learning as well as his worthy H 3 ads.

y

EASTRY HUNDRED.

102 a6ls,

became an ornament, not only

to the fociety he

country in general. He continued prior thirty-lcven years, and died, far advanced in life, in 1222. This place, in the time of the Saxons, appears to have been part of the royal domains, accordingly Simon of Durham, monk and precentor of that church,

prefidecl over, but to his

qua vnlgari dicitur Eajierige pronuncioney (the royal ville, or manor, which Eajierige) in the vulgar pronunciation was which fliews the antient pre-eminence and rank ol this place, for thefe villa regales^ or regia^ as Bede calls them, of the Saxons, were ulually placed upon or near the fpot, where in former ages the Roman Rations had been before ; and its giving name both to the lath and hundred in which it is fituated corroborates the fuperior confequence it was then held in. Egbert, king of Kent, was in pofleffion of it about the year 670, at which time his two coufins, Ethelredand Ethelbright, fons of his father’s elder brother Ermenfrid, who had been entruRed to his care by their uncle, the father of Egbert, were, as writers fay, murdered in his palace here by his order, at the perfuafion of one Thunnor, a flattering courtier, leR they^ould diRurb him in the poHcflion of the crown, ^er which Thunnor buried them in the king’s hall here, under the cloth of eRate, from whence, as antient tradition reports, their bodies were afterwards removed to a fmall chapel belonging to the palace, and buried there under the altar at the eaR end of it, and afterwards again with much pomp to the church of Ramfcy abbey. To expiate the king’s guilt, according to the cuRom of thofe times, he gave to Domnevn, called alfo Ermenburga, their Hfler, a liifficienc quantity of land in the ifle of Thanet, on which file might found a monaRery. in his hiftory, ftiles

it

villa regain^

How

I

long it continued among the royal domains, have not found ; but before the termination of the

Saxon

EASTRY, Saxon heptarchy, the

103

manor of Eastry

was be-

part of the pofleffions of the fee of Canterbury, and it remained fo till the year 81 1, when archbilhop Wilfred exchanged it with his convent of Chrift-

come

Bourne, fince from the archbifhop’s polfeflion of it called Bifhoptbournc. After which, in the year 979 king ^gelred, ufually called

church

for their

manor

ot

Ethelred, increafed the church’s eftates here, by giving to it the lands of his inheritance in Eftrea,*' free from all fecular fervice and fifeal tribute, except the repel-

and the repairing of bridges and catand in the tles, ufually ftiled the trinoda necefftlas pofleffion of the prior and convent bove-mentioned, ling of invalions

manor continued at the taking of the furvey of Domefday, being entered in it under the general title of Terra Monachorum Archiepi that is, the land of the

this

;

monks of the archbilhop, as follows : lu the lath of EJirei in Eftrei hundred, the archbijljop himfelfhoIM EJirei, It was taxed at /even fulings. The In demejne there are three earncates and feventy two villeins, with twenty-two bar•derers, having twenty-four carucates. There is one mill and a half of thirty Jhillings, and three fait -pits of four IVood for the fhillings, and eighteen acres of meadow, arable land

is

,

pannage of ten hogs. After w'hich, this

manor continued

in the polTellion

of the priory, and in the loth year of king Edward II. the prior obtained a grant of free-%varren in all his demefne lands in it, among others ; about which time king Henry VI. it was valued at 65I. 3s. after which

28th year, confirmed the above liberty, and granted to it a market, to be held at Eaftry weekly on a Tuefday, and a fair yearly, on the day of St. Matthew the Apoftie and Evangelift i in which Hate it

in his

See Decem. Scriptores, col. 2221. This charter was engraved by Dr. Rawlinion in I 754 » trom of the a copy of it in Saxon and Latin, in a very antient MSS. Gofpels, in the library of St. John’s college, in Oxford. **

*

^

H

.

continued

EASTRY HUNDRED.

104

continued till the difiblutlonof the priory in the 31ft year of king Henry VIII. when it came into the king’s hands, where it did not remain long, for he fettled it,

among his

other premifes, in the

new

33d year

ot his reign,

on

created dean and chapter of Canterbury, part

of whofe polfeflions it continues leet and court baron is held for

at this time. this

A

court

manor.

The

maneilal rights, profits of courts, royalties, he. the dean and chapter retain in their own hands ; but the demelhe lands of the manor, with the court-^ lodge, which

is

a large antient manfion, fituated ad-

joining to the church-yard, have been from time to time demifed on a beneficial leafe. The houfe is

and partly modern, having at In the different times undergone great alterations. fouth wall are the letters T. A. N. in flint, in large capitals, being the initials of Thomas and Anne Nepartly

large,

antient

Mr. Ifaac Bargrave, father of the prefent new fronted the houfe, and the latter in 1786

vinfon. ieffee,

put the whole

in

complete

repair, In

doing which, he

down

a confiderable part of the antient building, confifling of flone walls of great ftrength and thicknefs, bringing to view fome gothic arched doorways of flone, which proved the houfe to have been of

pulled

fuch conflrudlion formerly, and to have been a very antient building. The chape), luentloned before, is

eaflendof the houl'e. Theeafl window, conflfling of three compartments, is flill vifible, though the fpaces are filled up, it having for many years been converted into a kitchen, and before the lafl alteration by Mr. Bargrave the whole of it was entire. At this manfion, then in the hands of the prior and convent of Chrifl-church,archbilhop Thomas Bucket, after his flight from Northampton in the year 1164, concealed himfelf for eight days, and then, on Nov, 10, embarked at Sandwich for France.*' at the



See Lord Littleton’s Hiftory of king

Henry II.

The

EASTRY.

The

prefent lefiee

is

llaac Bargrave, efq.

fides at the court-lodge,

lelleesot this eftate for

1 HE Nevinsons,

105

who

re-

whole anceflors have been

many

years paft,

as leliees, relided

at the court-

lodge of Eaftry for many years. They were originally of Brigend, in Wetherell, in Cumberland. They bore for their arms, Argent^ a chevron, between three eagles dijplayed, azure. iV'lany of them lie buried in Ealtry church.'

The family

of Bargrave, alias Bargar, was originally of Bridge, and afterw'ards of the adjoining parilh

of Fatrixbourne ; where John Bargrave, eldelt I'on of Robert, built the feat of Bifrons, and refided at it, of whom notice has already been taken in vol. ix. of this hiflory, p. 2S0. Ifaac Bargrave, the fixth fon of Robert above-mentioned, and younger brother of John, who built Bifrons, was anceftor of the Bargraves, of Eaftry ; he was S. T. P. and dean of Canterbury, a man of ftritft honour and high principles of loyalty, for which he fuftered the moft cruel treatment. Pie died in 1642, having married in 1618 Elizabeth,^ daughter of John Dering, efq. of Egerton, by Elizabeth, fifter of Edward lord Wotton, the Ion of John Dering, efq. of Surrenden, by Margaret Brent. Their defendant , Ifaac Bargrave, efq. now living, w'as an eminent folicitor in London, from which he has retired for

fome

years,

and now

refides at Eaftry-court,

of which he is the prefent leftee. He married Sarah, eldeft daughter of George Lynch, M. D. of Canterbury, w'ho died at Herne in 1787,7". />. They bear for their arms. Or, on a pale gules, a fword, the blade argent, pomdled,or, on a chief vert three bezants.

Shrinkling, W'hich

a fmall

is its

original

manor

Shingleton, the former name, though now quite loft,

alias

at the louth-weft

There is a pedigree of Kent, anno 1619. *

boundary

this family in the

of is

of this pa-

Heraldic Vitin. of rifti

;

EASTRY HUNDRED.

I06

adjoining to Nonington. It is within the borough of Heronden, or Hardonden, as It is now

ridi,

called,

and

as fuch, is

within the upper half hundred

Downhamford. This manor had antiently owners of the fame name ; one of whom. Sir William de Scrinkling, held it In king Edward I. ’s reign, and was of

fucceeded by Sir Walter de Scrinkling his fon, who held it by knight’s fervice of Hamo de Crevequer,® and in this name It continued in the 20 th year of king

Edward

111.

Soon after which It appears to have been alienated to William Langley, of Knoltou, from which name it palled in like manner as Knolton to the Peytons and the Narboroughs, and thence by marriage to Sir Thomas D’Aeth, whole grandlonSirNarborough D’Aetb, bait,

now of Knolton,

is

at prefent entitled to it.

There was a chapel belonging to ruins of which are

ftill

vifible in

this

the

manor, the

wood near

it,

which W'as efteemed as a chapel of eafe to the mother church of Eaftry, and was appropriated with it by archbifliop Richard, Becket’s immediate fuccellbr, to the almory of the priory of Chrift* church ; but the chapel itfelf Teems to have become defolate many years before the diffolution of the priory, moft probably foon after the family of Shrinkling became extinct the Langleys, who refided at the adjoining manor of Knolton, having no occafion for the ufe of it. The chapel flood in Shingleton wood, near the fouth eaft corner; the foundations of it have been traced, though level with the furface, and not eafily difcovered. There is now on this eflate only one houfe, built

within memory, before which there was only a folitary barn, and no remains of the antient manlion of it.

Heron DEN, alias Hard enden, now Hernden,

is

a

dlflridl in this parilb,

Chartiilarie of

ufually called

fuuated about a

Knolton manor, and book of knight’s

fees

in

the Exchequer.

mile

*07

EASTRY.

within the borough mile northward from Shingleton, of which .s within the upof its own name, the whole Downhamford. It was oiue per half hundred of has not had even the as a manor, though it

efteemcd the manor of Ad|name of one for many years part, The manfion of it was anlliam claiming over it. family of the fame name, who tiently the relklence of a a heron with one talon erca, bore for their arms. Argent, Thefearms are on a fliicld, oapintt for breath, jable. Maidllone church, being which is far from modern, in with fable, three ejcallop quarterly. Heronden as above, and in a window of Lin(hells, tivo and one, argent-, of arms of a modern d,ate, coln’s Inn chapel is a coat efq. Argent, a hei on, being that of Anthony Heronden,

Jable. One of his family azure, betiveea three efcallops, church, and in t.ie time of Heronden lies buried in this portrait and Glover, Somerfet herald, his !

of Robert coat of arms,

were remaining on Ins tombrobs is ftill extant in very old ftone. The coat of arms office, where the family is and reoifters in the Heralds filled

in brafs,

Heronden, of Heronden,

in

Eallry; nor

is

tne

by deeds which commence which relate to this eftate from the reign of Henry lU. had remamed pohefTed and name ; but after this family years it at laft defcended down of this eftate for fo many reign, to Sir William Heronden, in king Richard ll.’s gift or paffed raoft probably either by

name lefs

from

antient, as appears

whom

it

of Boteler, or Butler, t.ien to one of the family defcended roni t.ioic refident in this neighbourhood, feated at Butler s fieet, 1:1 of this name, formerly Pincerna, or le Lotclei, Afh, whole anceftor Thomas reign, whence his fucheld that manor in king John’s i^oteki, or of Butler, ceflbrs afiumed the name written Botilieryand bore for as they were frequently

fale,

their arms.

One

or

more covered cups, di^rcnlty placed

the eftate delcencied to and blazoned. In this family the time of king henry \ k John Boeder, who lived in

-

EASTRY HUNDRED.

I08

Sandwich, of which town he was feveral times mayor, and one of the burgefles in two parliaments ot that reign ; he lies buried in St. Peter’s church there. His I'on Richard, who was alfo of Sandwich, had a grant of arms in 1470, anno nth Edward IV. by Thomas Plolme, norroy, viz. Gyronny

and

rcficled at

offix argent and fable^ a covered cup^ o)\ between three talbots heads, erafed and counterchanged of the field, coU t

lared, gules, garnifised of the third. His great-grandfoa Henry Boteler rebuilt the manfion of Heronden, to

which he removed in 1 572, being the lad of his family who refided at Sandwich. He had the above grant of arms confirmed to him, and died in 1580, being buried in Eadry church. Richard Boteler, of Heronden, his elded fon by his fird wife, refided at this feat, and in 1589 obtained a grant from Robert Cook, clarencieux, of a new coat of arms, viz. Argent, on three ejcutcheons,

1 cn years after which, intending as it Ihould feem, to fhew himfclf a defeendanc of the family of this name, feated at Graveney, but

fable, three covered cups, or.

then extinct, he obtained in 1599 a grant of their arms from William Dethic, garter^ and William Camden, clarencieux, to

him and

brother William, viz. ^farterly, fird and fourth, fable, three covered cups, or, within a bordure, argent ; fecond and thij d, Arvent, a fefs, chequy, argent

of the

lafi,

done

in

his

and gules,

in chief three crofs^crofiets

as appears (continues the grant)

Graveney church.

on

a

grave

He

died in if)oo, and was buried in Eafiry church, leaving ifiue among other children Jonathan and Thomas." Jonathan' Border, the elded'fon, of Hernden, died unmarried pofi'dTed

of

it

in

brother

1626, upon which

Thomas

removed

to

it

came

to his next llirvivinrr

Boteler, of Rowling,

who upon that Hernden, and foon afterwards alienated

There is a pedigree of Butler, alias Boteler, of the Heraldic Viiitation of Kent, anno 1619. "

Heronden,*

i?i

that

EASTRY. that part of

Henry I

it,

fince called

Pannell, from

know

not,

it

came

109

the middle farm,

whom

to

foon afterwards, but

into the family

Mr. how

of Reynolds; from

which name it was about fifty years fince alienated to John Dekewer, efq. of Hackney, who dying in 1762, devifed it to his nephew John Dekewer, efq. of Hackney, the prefent poflefibr of

Another part known by

the

it.

of this ejiate of Hernden, fince

name of the lower farm, was

after-

by Thomas Boteler above-mentioned to Capcll, from whom it pafled into the family of Johnfon, in which it continued till Mr, Edward Johnfon alienated it to Daniel Kelly, gent, of the Upper Farm, in Heronden, who by his will in 1724 devifed it to his fecond fon Richard Kelly, fince whole death it has come to his two Ions Richard and William Kellv,* who wards

fold

»

are the prefent polTefiTors of

The Remaining part

it.

of the Hernden

on which the manfon of it was fituated, fince known by the name of Hernden, alias the upper farm, remained in the poirdfion of Thomas Boteler aboveefiate,

mentioned, at the time of his death in the year 1 650, and was direded by his will to be fold for the benefit of his furviving v/ife and children, and accordingly in 1657 it was conveyed by them to John Kelly, yeoman, of Alh, whofc grandfon William Kelly, of Hernden, who bore for his arms, Argent, two lions rampant, combatant, gules, holding in their pazvs a cafle in chief, vert,

1766 pulled down the antient manfion of Hernden, and built the prelent handfome houfe on the feite of it, and in 1784 alienated it to John Harvey,efq. of Sand-

in

wich, then a captain of the royal navy, who occafionally refided at it; he died at Portfinouth on June 30, 1794,

wounds he received in the gloengagement with the French fleet, on tlie of that month preceding by his w'ill lie devifed

in conlequence of the 'rious naval firll

this eflate to his wife

;

Judith for

life,

remainder to his eldeft

EASTRY hundred, eldePt Ton Henry Wife Harvey, efq. which latter now leHcies here. Capt. Harvey above-mentioned, (whofe itO

meritorious fervices to his country ought not lo be paffed by unnoticed) was born at Elmington, in the

neighbouring parifh of Eythorne, in 1740 ; his fingular courage and attention to his duty marked his condudt throughout life, and never fhone more confpicuous than in the memorable engagement of June i, above-mentioned, in which being commander of the Brunfwick, of 74 guns, he as fecond to the commander in chief, gallantly fupported him in the arduous enterprize of breaking the French line, and notwithftanding the enemy by the clofenefs of their pofition endeavoured to defeat the attempt, he intrepidly perfevered, grappling with Le Vengeur, a flnp evidently of fuperior force to his own, and bore her away from the line, never quitting her till fheftruck, which was but a fliort time During this terrible before Ihe went to the bottom. conflict, which lafted upwards of two hours and an half, in a fituation almofl: unprecedented betwixt tw'o fkips of fuch force, he reduced to a wreck L’Achille, a fevenly-four gun fliip, which was come down to the afliflante of Le Vengeur, by totally difmafling her 1 which individual condud may truly be admitted to have contributed very materially to that vidory, upon which tlie fate of his country in a great meafure depended, and w'ill ever render his memory dear to it. His remains were interred in a vault in Eaftry church, on July 5, having been attended to the gates of Portfmouih by earl Howe and the principal officers of the meft of the principal Infket with much folemnity habitants of the neighbouring town of Sandwich, iri which lie hud for foine time reflded, and had ferved See an account of the defeentof Capt. Harvey, his marriage and lliue, beloie, under Barfon, and of his preferments in the navy, in Gen. Mag. p. 673, and p. 954, for 1794. "

the

:

EASTRY,

III

the office of mayor of it In 1774, appeared In mourning on the day of his interment, as a mark of their relpeft for his

A

memory.

gold ring, weighing nineteen pennyweights, motto, Do for to repent, and the ancient coat of arms granted, as before defcribed, in king Henry IV. ’s time to Richard Boeder, engraved on it, feal

tvlth this

was found

in

years fince,

Hernden bottom, a few the polfeffion of William

the grounds in

and

is

now

in

*

Border, efq. of Eaftry.

Sta TENBOROUGH, written

the furvey of Domefday, EJienbnrge, and in other antient records, Stepenberga,

in

fince Sratenborough,

is

a feat

on the

northern confines of this parilh, which was at the time of taking the above furvey in the Conqueror’s reign, part of thepofleffions of the lee of Canterbury, being held ofthearchbilhop by knight’s fervice, under which title it is thus entered in it it

IVilliam Fclet holds EJienberge of the archbijhop, and zvas taxed at half a filling , and there he has tzvelve

and an half After which the record continues, that it was, with Bucklandand Finglefham, valued in the time of king Edward the Confelfor at forty Oiillings ; when the archbiffiop received them, ten iBillings, now thirty villeins zvith one cariirate

Ihillings.

How this

edaie pafTed afterwards T have not found,’ till about the beginning of king Henry lIL’s reign, when it was become the eflate of a family w'hich took its furname from it, as appears by a datelels deed among the archives of St. Bartholomew’s hofpital, in

which lands are given to it, abutting to thofe of the heirs of Simon de Statenberg, at StatenbergjP when it paffed from this name does not appear, but at the latter end of king Richard Il.’s reign, I find a deed, which mentions William Cooke, of Sandwich,

^

in

Boys’s Coll, for Sandwich, pt. 1, appendix, p. 2^.

Stapyn-

(

'

tl2

EASTRY HUNDRED.

Stapynbcrgc, and pare of this efiafe is at this day middle of king called Cookfborough ; but in the Henry V.’s reign, it was in the pofleflion of a family by Wm. called Atte Hall, who were fucceeded in it Bryan, gent, of Canterbury. How long it continued but in the fecond in this name 1 have not found ;

was become the property of John Kenneit, gent, of Canterbury, whole fon Thomas Kennet, clerk, of that place, in Chiiftopher Hales, 1534, conveyed his intereft in it to

year of king Richard

III.

anno 1484,

it

efq. the king’s attorney-general, afterwards

knighted,

whole daughter and coheir Margaret carried it in marriage to Ralph Dodmore, gent, of Lincoln’s Inn, and they jointly in 1757 alienated it to Saphire Paramor, yeoman, of Ealfry, being defeended of a family of good eftimation in this part of Kent, having fpread themfel'ves into the ditferent pariOres of AOi, St. Nicholas, Monkton.and Minfler, in the Ifle o‘ Thanet, Fordwich, and here at Eaftry, all now extinff of all of which there are pedigrees in the Heraldic Vifitation I'hey bore for their of this county, anno 1619. arms, Azure, a fejs embattled, betzveen three ejioils of fx points, or. He died in 1591. After which it continued in the fame name and family down to John Paramor, efq. of Statenborough, who died /. p. in 17505 after which it defeended by his will, on the death of Mrs Paramor, his widow, to his three nieces and coheirs ; that is, one moiety to Jane, wife of John Hawker, gent, of Sandwich, only daughter pf John Hayward, gent, of Sandwich, by Jane, his fifter then decealed 5 the other undivided moiety to Jane, wife of VV. Boys, efq. then of Sandwich, and Sarah, afterwards the wife of William Boteler, efq of Eaftry, the two furviving daughters and coheirs of his other fifter Mary, wife of Thomas Fuller, efq. of Sandwich, be,

fore-mentioned.

On

adivifion of their eftates in 1761, this eftate was allotted to thefe two furviving daughters and coheirs

teASTRY*

IIJ and on a future fubdivifion bej tween them in 1774, this of Statenborough, with Gore, in this parifli likewife, formed a part of that fliare, which was allotted to Jane, fince deceafed, whofe hufband William Boys, el'q. late of Sandwich, is the prefent pofleflbr of it. Mr. Boys is defcended from the eminent family of this name, fpread over the feveral parts of Eaft Kent, but whofe principal feat was at Fredville, in Nonington. William Boys, efq. was of Fredville, in king Henry VIII. ’s reign, whole fourth fon, by Mary, fifter and heir of Sir Edward Ringeley, was of Bekefborne, and left among other children, Edward, anceftor of the Boys’s, of Betlhau' ger ; and John, who was the fecond fon, of Challock, from whom defcended in the fifth defcent, William Boys, efq. of Deal, who was a commodore in the royal navy, and afterwards lieutenant-governor of Greenwich hofpital, whofe eldeft fon was William Boys, efq. above-mentioned, the prefent poflefibr of Statenborough, author of the Colledtions for Sandwich as above-mentioned, and F. S. A. a gentleman well known in the Republic of Letters, to whom the Editor of this Hiftory acknowledges his obligations for his continued aflifiance in it. He was an eminent furgeon of that town, from whence he removed to Walmer, where he now refides. He married firft Elizabeth, daughter of Henry VVife, merchant, of Sandwich, by whom he had one fon VVilliam-Henry Boys, gent, lieutenant and adjutant of the Portfmouth diviheirs laft-mentioned

fion of marines,

John Harvey,

who married

Elizabeth, daughter of

of Sandwnch and Hernden, late captain of the royal navy ; and one daughter Elizabeth, married to John Rolfe, gent, of New Romney, lately deceafed ; he married lecondly Jane, daughter of Thomas Fuller, efq., of Statenborough, and coheir of her uncle John Paramor, eiq. of that place, by whom he had nine children, of whom eight are furviving, viz.

VOL. X.

efq.

Thomas,

of Sandwich, a lieutenant in the I

royal

'

EASTRY HUNDRED.

II4

married Catherine Impctt, of Adiford j John-Paramor, gent, ‘of Sandwich j Jane ; Mary Fuller; Edward, furgeon,ofSandwich ; Henry; Robert-Pearfon, and George. P3e bears for his arms,

royal navy,

who

a bordurCy gules being the coat armour of the principal branch of this family, of Fredville. The manors of North and South Court, and of Dane-court, in Tilmanftone, claim over this hamlet Or, a

griffin fegreanty fable ^

zvithin

of Statenborough.

CHARITIES

Thomas Elware, to Roo-er Frynne,

of

this parifh,

his executor, his

by

his will in

tenement

in

1499, gave

Selveflon,^ in

lands and appurtenances, upon condition that he and his heirs fliould pay yearly to ^he churchwardens, to the reparation of the church yearly, iijs. iiijd. Christian Goddard, of this parifli, widow, gave by will in 1574, a tenement and garden in Eaftry, over againft the vicarage-houfe, for the ufe of the poor for ever, now of the annual value of 2I. los. and a tenement and garden in Eaftry to the clerk, to inftruft in learning, one of the pooreft man’s children, this parifh,

with

its

beino-aboy, of this parifti, from time to time, both which are veiled in the churchwardens. Thomas Apple^ton, yeoman, of Eaftry, by his will in 1593, gave to the relief of the poor 5I. to be paid to the churchwardens yearly, and to be diftributed by them fourteen days before Chriftmas day, to be paid out of lands called Hardiles,in Woodnefborough. Katherine Boteler, widow, of Eaftry, by her will in remain in a flock for 1617, gave to the churchwardens 30s. to there the like fum. people poor the and to parifti the the ufe of ordered that twentywill in by Thompson, 1673, Richard Eafter, and WhitChriftmas, at receive four poor people ftiould funtide, a twopenny loaf ; lecured on a houfe and garden in Eaftry, the annual produce of which is 12s. Anne Fbeind, fpinfter, of Eaftry, by will in 1713, gaveto) the poor 5I. and to the overfeers of the poor and their fucceftbrs, three acres and one rood of arable land, at or rear a place called Dedmans gapp, in Eaftry, holden of the dean and chapter of Canterbury ; the overfeers to renew the Icafe from time to time ; in truft, that the yearly rents and profits ftiould be equally diftributed on Chriftmas day yearly, in the chancel of the church, among fuch induftrious poor as fhould not receive alms; fuch. ;

i

J

letting:



EASTRY. -etting of the land

and diftribution to be

115 at the difcretion

of the

want of

Eadry ; and and their fuccelfors. The poor conftantly relieved are about thirty, cafually for

heirs of Charles Bargrave, if living in that, to the difcretion o^ the overleers

fe-

venty-five.

This parish

within

is

JURISDICTION of the

diccefe

the

ecclesiastical

of Canterbury, and deanry

of Sandwich. church, which is exempted from the archdeacon, is dedicated to St. Mary ; it is a large hamifome building, confiding of a nave and two fide ifles, a chancel at the eaft end, remarkably long, and a fquare tower, which is very large, at the weft end, in which are five very unmufical bells. The church is well kept and neatly paved, and exhibits a noble appearance, to

The

which the many handfome monuments in it contri* bute much. The arch over the w'eft door is circular, but no other parts of the church has any Ihew of great antiquity. In the chancel are monuments for the Paramors and the Fullers, of Statenborough, arms of the latter. Argent^ three barsy and a cantoHy gules. A moof the Bargrave family. An elegant pyramidial one, on which is a buft and emblematical fculpture for John Broadley, gent, many years

nument

for feveral

lurgeon at Dover, obt. 1784. Several graveftones, with brafles, for the Nevinfons. A graveftone for Jofhua Paramour, gent, buried 1650. Underneath this chancel are two vaults, for the families of Paramour

and Bargrave. In the nave, a monument daughter of Solomon Flarvey, gent, of this

for

Anne,

parilh, ob,

1751 j arms, Argent on a chevron, between three lions another gambsy fable, arrfied gideSy three crejcents, or for William Dare, efq. lateof Fenderland, in thisparifh, obt. 1770 i arms. Gules, a chevron vaire, between three ere[cents, argent, impaling argent, on a crofs,fable^ y

\

four

lions

pajj'ant,

of the field, for

qiiardant



Read the Drue .

7\gainft the wall an infeription in Latin, for Aftley Creffemcr, A. M. forty-eight years vicar of this I

2

parilh,

Il6 parifli,

EASTRY HUNDRED.' obt. 1746; heprefented the communion plate church and Worth, and left a fum of money

to this to be laid out in ornamenting this church, at which time theantient Halls, which were in the chancel, were taken away, and the chancel was ceiled, and the church other wife beautified ; arms. Argent y on a bend en-

A

grailedy fabhy three crofs-crofletSy fitcheey or. ment for feveral of the Botelers, of this parifli

monu-

arms, Botelery argent, on three efcutcheons, Jable, three covered cups, or, impaling NIorrice. Againfl a pillar, a tablet andinfcription, (hewing that in a vault lieth Catherine, wife of John Springett, citizen and apothecary of London. He died in 1770; arms, Springett, per

fefSy argent

and gules, a fefs wavy, between

;

three crej‘

impaling Harvey. On the oppofite pillar another, for the Rev. Richard Harvey, mofourteen years vicar of this parifli, obt. 1772. nument for Richard Kelly, of Eaflry, obt. 1768; arms, Tzvo lions rampant, fupporting a cajile, Againft

cents, counterchanged,

A

the wall, an elegant fculptured monument, in alto relievo, for Sarah, wife of William Boieler, a daughter of Thomas Fuller, efq. late of Statenborough, obt. at. 29 ; fliedied in childbed, leaving one fon,

1777,

William Fuller Boteler

;

arms

at

bottom,

Boteler, as

above, an efcut cheon of pretence. Fuller, quartering ramor. An elegant pyramidal marble and tablet for Robert Bargrave, of this parifli, obt. 1779, for Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Sir Francis Leigh, of Hawley ; and for Robert Bargrave, their only fon, prodor' in

Dodors Commons,

obt. 1774, whofe foie furviving

'daughter Rebecca married James Wyborne, of Sholdon ; arms, Bargrave, with a mullet. Impaling Leigh. In the crofs ille, near the chancel called the Boteler's Adjoining ille, are feveral memorials for the Botelers. to thefe, are three other graveftones, all of which have been inlaid, but the bratfes are gone ; they were for the fame family, and on one of them was lately remaining the antienc arms of Boteler, Girony of fix "

pieces^

EASTRY. pieces y i^c.

II7

impaling ermine of three Jpots,

Under

the

church are vaults, for the families of Springett, Harvey, Dare, and Bargrave. In the church-yard, on the north fide of the church, are feveral altar tombs for the Paramors j and on the fouth fide are feveral others for the Harveys, of this panfh, and for Fawlkner, Rammell, and Fuller. There are alfo vaults for the families of Fuller, Rammell, and Petman. There were formerly painted in the windows of this church, thefe arms, Girony of fix^ fable and argent^ a covered cup^ or^ betzveen three talbots heads, erafed and for Border, counter changed of the field, collared, gules of Heronden, impaling Boteler, of Graveny, Sable, three covered cups, or, within a bordure, argent ; Boteof Heronden, as above, quartering three [pots, ermine ; the coat of Theobald, with quarterings. Several of the Frynnes, or as they were afterwards called. Friends, who lived at Waltham in this parifh in king Henry VII. ’s reign, lie buried in this church. In the will of William Andrewe, of this parifli,anno 1507, mention is made of our Ladie chapel, in the church-yard of the church of Eftrie. The eighteen ftalls which were till lately in the chancel of the church, were for the ufe of the monks of the priory of Chrift church, owners both of the manor and appropriation, when they came to pafs any time at this place, as they frequently did, as well for a country retirement as to manage their concerns here ; and for any other ecclefiaftics, who might be ler,

prefent at divine fervice here, fitting O in the chancels

all

fuch, in thole times,

of churches diftindt from the

laity.

The church of Eaflry, with lingand Worth annexed, was the

the chapels ofSkrinkantiently appendant to

manor of Eaftry, and was appropriated by arch-

bilhop Richard (fucceflTor to archbifliop Becket) in the reign of king Henry 11 to the almonry of the priory of Chrift-church, but it did not continue long .

13

EASTRY HUNDRED,

Il8

archbilhop Baldwin, (archbilhop Richard’s immediate fucceffor)', having quarrelled with the monks, on account of his intended college at Hackington, took this appropriation from them, and thus

fo, for

remained as a reftory, at the archbilhop’s difpofal, till the 39th year of king Edward III.’s reign,'^ when archbilhop Simon Iflip, with the king’s licence, reftored, united and annexed it again to the priory j but it appears, that in return for this grant, the archbifhop had made over to him, by w-ay of exchange, the advowfons of the churches of St. Dunftan, St. Pancrafe, and All Saints in Bread-ftreet, in London, After which, that all three belonging to the priory. is anno 8 Richard II. 1384, this church w^as valued among the revenues of the almonry of Chrih-church, at the yearly value of 53I. 6s. 8d. and it continued afterwards in the fame date in the pofTefTion of the monks, who managed it for the ule of the almonry, during which time prior William Sellyng, wdio came to that office in Edward IV. ’s reign, among other' improvements on feveral eftates belonging to his church, it

built a

new dormitory

at this

parfonage for the

monks

reforting hither.

On

the diffolution of the priory of Chrift-church, in the 31ft year of king Henry Vlll.’s reign, this appropriation, with the advowfon of the vicarage of the church of Eaftry, was furrendered into the king’s hands, where it (laid but a fmall time, for he granted it

in his

33d

year, by his dotation charter, to his

new

this reftory continuing in the archbifeveral compofitions for tithes, enwere there fliop’s difpofal, viz. anno 1229. Ledger book of Dover tered into by the rectors, priory, f. 164.*' MSS. Lambeth, anno 1291, Chartul, Ecclae

During the time of

Chrifti. Cant. cart. 174, anno 1346, Reg. Berthona, p. 3, i, f. 42, to f. 79. MSS. Cantuar. anno 1302. Chartula Eccla Chrifti

Cant. cart. 183, anno 1356. Carta Antiq. E. 129, Archiv. Henry VI. Cartae Antig, E. 133. ArCantuar. anno 1439, chiev. Cantuar. See Ducarel’s Repert. p. 39.

founded

EASTRY.

119

founded dean and chapter of Canterbury, who are the prefent owners of this appropriation ; but the advowion of the vicarage, notwithfianding it was granted with the appropriation, to the dean and chapter as above-mentioned, appears not long afterwards to have

become

parcel of the poflefTions of the fee of Canter-

bury, where it continues at this time, his grace the archbifhop being the prefent patron of it. This parfonage is entitled to the great tithes of this parilh and of Worth ; there belong to it of glebe land inEallry, Tilmanftone, and Worth, in all fixty-

nine acres.

a small manor belonging to it, called THE MANOR OF THE AMBRY, Or ALMONRY OF Christ-church, the quit-rents of which are

There

is

very inconfiderable. The parfonage-houfe is large and antient ; in the old parlour window is a fliield of arms, being thofe of Partheriche, impaling quarterly Line and Hamerton. The parfonage is of the annual rent of about yool*

The

countefs dowager of Guildford became entitled to the leafe of this parfonage, by the will of her hufband the earl of Guildford, and fince her death the intereft of it is become vefted in her younger children. As to the origin of avicarage in this church, though

by archbifliop Peckham, in the 2Cth year of king Edward I. anno 1291, whilft this church continued in the archbifliop’s hands, yet I do not find that there was a vicar inflituted in it, but that it remained as aredlory, till near three years after it had been reftored to the priory of Chriftchurch, when, in the 4zd year of king Edward III. a vicar was inflituted in it, between whom and the prior and chapter of Canterbury, there was a compofition concerning his portion, which he fliould have as

there was one

^

f.

in

it

129. MSS. Lambeth. Regift. Berthona, 39.* and Chartae Antiquee E. 56. MSS. Cantuar.

Regift.

p», I.

endowed

Langham,

f.

I

4

an

EASTRY HUNDRED.

120

an endowment of this vicarage ; which eompofition was confirmed by archbifhop Simon Langham that year j and next year there was an agreement entered into between the eleemofinary of Chrift-church and the vicar, concerning the manfe of this vicarage. The vicarage of Eaftry, with the chapel of Worth

annexed,

valued in the king’s books at 19I, 12s. id.

is

and the yearly tenths at il. 19s. 2^d. In 1588 it was valued at fixty pounds. Communicants three hundred and thirty-five. In 1640 here were the like number of communicants, and it was valued at one hundred pounds.

The

antient penfion of 5I. 6s. 8d. formerly paid by the priory, is flill paid to the vicar by the dean and chapter, and alfo an augmentation of 141. 13s. 4d. yearly,

by the

leflee

of the parfonage, by a covenant

in his leafe.

The

vicarage-houfe is built clofe to the farm-yard of the parfonage ; the land allotted to it is very trU fling, not even fufficient for a tolerable garden ; the foundations of the houfe are antient, and probably part of the original building when the vicarage was

endowed in 1367. There were two awards made in 1349 and 1550, on a controverfy between the vicar of Eaffry and the mayor, &c. of Sandwich, whether the fcite of St. Bartholomew’s hofpital, near Sandwich, within that port and liberty, was fubje6l to the payment of tithes to the vicar, as being within his parifh. Both awards adjudged the legality of a payment, as due to the vicar ; but the former award adjudged that the fcite of the hofpital was not, and the latter, that it was withiu the bounds of this parhh.® *

See Boys’s Sandwich, p. 59 et feq.

ChURCH

'

EASTRY.

121

CHURCH OF EASTRY. PATRO NS, Or

VICARS.

by ivliom prefented.

yohn Whi/ion^ 1671, obt. 1694,. Thomas Sherlock^ A. M. induced Feb. >695, obt. June 1698,

The Archbi/hop The Khtg, fide vac The Archbi/hop

Drue

i

Afiley

A

Crejfenery

M,

.

1698, obt. Sept. 27, 1746.^ Culpeper Savage, A, M. Jan, I

747, obt. 1753.“

Sa 7iiuel Herring, 1753, refigned J757-"'

Richard Harvey, A. B.

July,

1757, obt. March 6, 1 772.*= Richard Harvey, A. M. March

27*

vicar.’'

with

his fucceflbr, for other preferments.

He lies buried in this church, y He was likewife vicar of St. Laurence in Thanet, which he religned ia 1793. He is alfo one of the lix preachers of Canterbury cathedral. X

held by difpenfation, with the vicarage of Stone, in Oxnry.

Ir

772, the prefent

w He exchanged this vicarage

t He was a good benefactor to this church, in which he lies buried. “ He was before vicar of Sutton Valence, which he religned on being collated to this vicarage, which he

i.i

1



'

r

'

'



WOODNESBOROUGH, OR

Winjboroughy as

it

is

ufually called,

lies

the

next pariOi northward from Eaftry, being written in the furvey of Domefday, Wanejherge. It took its name according to Verftegan, from the Saxon idol Woden, (and it is fpelt by fome JVodenJborough) whofe place of worlhip was in it ; however that may be, the termination of the word berge^ or borough, ihews it to be of high antiquity. Part of this parilb, over which the manor of Boxley claims, is within the jurifdidion of the juftices of the town and port of Sandwich, and liberty of the cinque

and the refidue is in the hundred of Eaftry, jurifdiiftion of the county of Kent.

ports ftnd

;

'

There

EASTRY HUNDRED.

122

boroughs in this parifh, viz. Cold Friday, Hamwold, and Marfliborough the borfholders of which are chofen at the petty feffions of the juftices, ading at Wingham, for the eaft divifion of

There

are three

;

the lath of St

Auguftine.

This parish

being two miles and an half one way, and upwards of a mile and an half the other. The church ftands nearly in the centre of it, on high ground. At a fmall diftance from the church is VVoodnefborough hill, both of which are Tea marks. This hill is a very high mount, feemingly thrown up by art, and confiding of a Tandy earth, it has been thought by Tome to have been the place on which the idol Woden ^from whom this place is fuppofed to have taken its name) was wordiipped in the time of the Saxons by others to be the burial place of Voris

large,

;

timer, the Saxon king,

whodiedin

4.57, whilft’others

fuppofe this mount was railed over thole who fell in the battle fought between Ceoldred, king of Mercia, and Ina, king of the Well Saxons, in the year 715, at Woodnejbeorhy according to the Saxon chronicle, which name Dr. Plot Tuppofes to be Woodnefborough. Vortimer, as our hiftorians tell us, at his death, defired to be buried near the place where the Saxons uled to land, being perfuaded that his bones would deterthem from any attempt in future. Though authors differ much on the place of his burial, yet this mount at Woodnefborough is as probable, or more fo, perhaps, than any other, for it was near to, and was caff; up fo high as to be plainly feen from the Port us Rutupinusj which at that time was the general landing place of the Saxon fleets. Some years ago there were found upon the top of it fundry fepulchral remains, viz. a glafs veflel (engraved by the Rev. Mr.

Douglas, in his Nania;) a fibula^ (engraved by Mr. Eoys, in his colledions for Sandwnch ;) the head of a fpear, and fome fragments of Roman velfcls. Much

of

WOODNESBOROUGH.

I23

of the earth or fand has been lately removed round the Tides of it, but nothing further has been found. At a Imall diltance northward from hence, at the bottom of a Ibort fteep hill, lies the village called Woodnefborough-ftreet, and fometimes Cold Fridayftreet, containing thirty four houfes. The vicaragehoufe is ficuated in the middle of it, being a new handfome building ; almoft contiguous to it is a handfome (alhed houfe, belonging to the Jull family, now made ufe of as a poor-hou'e ; through this llreet the road leads to Sandwich. Wetfward of the ilreet ftands the parfonage-houfe, late the feat of Oliver Stephens, efq. deceafed, and now of his widow, as wmH

be further noticed

Befides the manors and eftates in this paridi, particularly defcribed, in the weftern parts of it there are feveral hamlets, as Somerfield, Barnfole,

hereafter.

Coombe, with New-ftreet, Great and

Little Flemings, Ringlemere,

and the farm of Chrif-

tians Court.

In the north- eaft part of the parhh, the road from Eaftry, by the parfonage of Woodnelborough north-

one road, which in antienr deeds is called Lovekys-flreet, going towards AOi-ftreet ; the other through the hamlet of Marih borough, formerly called MarOiboroughj^/wiStipins, to Each End and Sandwich, the two windmills clofe to the entrance of which are within the bounds of this parilh. Each, Upper Each, called antiently Upriche, and Each End, antiently called Netherichey were both formerly accounted manors, and are mentioned as fuch in the marriage fettlementof Henry Whyte, efq. in the beginning of queen Elizabeth’s reign. After the Whytes, thefe manors pafled in like manner as Grove, in this parilh, to the James’s. Upper Each, or Upriche, has for many years belonged to the family of Abbot, of Ramfgate, and is now the property of John Abbot, efq. of Canterbury. Each End, or Netheriche, belongs, one moiety to the heirs or devifees of the late

weftward, divides

;

earl

;

124

BASTRY HUNDRED.

of Stnifford, and the other moiety to John Matfon, efq. of Sandwich. It cannot but occur to the reader how much this pariOi abounds with Saxon names, befides the name of Wodcns borough, the ftreet of Cold Friday, mentioned before, is certainly derived from the Saxon words, Coldy and Friga, which latter was the name of a goddel's, worlliipped by the Saxons, and her day Frige-deag^ from whence our day of Friday is derived other places in this parilh, mentioned before likewife, earl

claim, furely, their original from the fame language. This parifh contains about 3000 acres, the whole rents of it being. about 3373I. yearly value. It is very bare of coppice wood ; the Old Wood, fo called, in

Ringleton, being the only one in it. The foil of this parilh is very rich and fertile, equal to thofe the moft fo in this neighbourhood, particularly as to the plantations of hops, which have much increafed within thefe few years paft. The middle of the parilh is high ground, and is in general a fiat open country of arable common fields. Well and fouth-wefiward the lands are more inclofed with hedges. North and north-w-eflward of the parfonage, towards Sandwich, they are low and wet, confiflingof a large level of marlh land, the nearnefs of which makes the other parts of this parilh rather unhealthy, which is not otherwife very pleafant in any part of it. There was a fair held here yearly, on Floly Thurfday, but it has been for fome time difufed. In Ringleton field, in this parifli, there was found

about the year 1514, a fine gold coin, weighing about twelve lliillings, with a loop of the fame metal to hang it by ; on one fide was the figure of a young man in armour, a helmet on his head, and a fpear over his right Ihoulder ; on the reverfe, the figure of Vidlory, with a fword in her hand, the point downwards.

The

I25

WOODNESBOROUGH.

The manor

Shelof Domef-

Woodnes borough,

of

alias

ving, was at the time of taking the lurvey day, two ehates, both which were part of the poffeffions of Odo, bithop of Baieux, under the general title of whofe lands they are entered in it as follows : Turjiin holds of the bifhop, one yoke in fVanefberge^ and there are two borderers. Tochi held it of king

Edward.

And

again in another place, but both within the

hundred of Eaftry, Ofhern, (fon of Letard) holds of the bifhop one fuling in Selinge. There he has one villein paying two fhillings.

In the time of king fixty JhillingSy

lings.

Edward the

ConfeJJoiy

it

and afterwards, and now

Aluuin held

it in

the time of king

was worth thirty fJnl-

Edward

the

Confefbr.

years after the taking of this furvey, the bifhop was difgraced, and all his eftates were confifcated to the crown ; after which the feignory of thefe eflates

Four

was granted, among others, to the family of Crevequer, and made a part of their barony, which confided of lands afiigned by the Conqueror, for his affidance in the defence of Dover cadle, and were held of the king by barony. Of the Crevequers, as chief lords of the fee, thefe edates were again held by the family of Malmaines, who were fucceeded in one part of them, afterwards called the manor of Woodnefoorough, by one of the name of St. Ledger ; and in the other, then called Selinge,' by owners of the fame name ; and at the latter end of king Henry III ’s reign, Nicholas de Selinge, and the heirs of John St. Ledger, as appears by the book of knight’s fees in the Exchequer, held them by knight’s fervice ; the arms of St. l.eger, beirig Azure, a fret, argent, a chief, or, were formerly in the windows of this church, of Hamo de Crevequer ; the part of the former defeended to John de Shelving, for fo the name as well as the edate was then called, and he eredled a manfion

EASTRY HUNDRED.

126 manfion on the

name of

it

for his refidence,

which afterwards

Shelving, and died poflefled of

it

bore?

in the

4th year of king Edward III. leaving the pofleffion of it to his wife Benedifta, daughter and coheir of RoThe bert de Hougham, of Hougham, near Dover. of the latter defcended to Edward de St. Ledger, whofe death, Ins fon Thomas cle St. Ledger luc*

-part

on

ceeded to

it,

wlio w'ith Benedidta de Shelving' pofTefled

this eflate in the

20th year of that reign.

From

St.

Ledger the manor of IVoodnefljorough afterwards pafTed by file into the name of White, one of whom, Robert White, died poflefied of it in the 12th year of king' Henry Vlll. and from Shelving, the eflate of Shelving'^^i^ afterwards alienated to Dynely, or Dingley, as the name was varioufly called and fpelt ; and in king Henry VIII ’s reign Henry Dynely was in poffeffion of it ; at which time it paid w-ard to Dover After which their refpeftive heirs joined in caflle. the fale of both to Knight ; from which time I find no further mention of the manor of Woodnefborough, but of the manor of Shelving only, which in the beginning of king Charles l.’s reign was the property of Edward Knight, gent, who died in 1632, leaving two daughters his coheirs, eflate

between them

;

who feem

to have divided this

that part, with the

manor and

name of Shelving ; the other, from its fituation, taking the name of Churchgate farm. This latter eflateafterwards came at length court-lodge,

flill

retaining the

into the polfefTion of Chriflopher Erneft Kien, efq. lieut. colonel of the horfe guards, who died poffelfed of

1744; upon which it defcended to George Coufemaker, efq. w’hole widow Mary marrying Sir Thomas Eym Hales, bart. he became pofTefled of it, and died in 1773 ; upon which his w’idow, dame Mary Hales, above-mentioned, is now again pofielTed of it for her life ; after which it will defeend to her fon by her firft hufband, lieut. colonel George Coufemaker. it

in

The

'

WOODNESBOROUGH.

I27

The manor

of Shelving was very foon afterwards fold to Solomon Hougham, gent, of Sandwich, who died podeifed of it in 658. He was a younger fon of 1

Richard Hougham, of Weddington, in AIli, by Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Sanders, gent, of Norborne, from whofe youngeft Ion Henry, defcended the Houghams, of St. Martin’s, in Canterbury, which branch of the Houghams bear for their arms, Or^five Solomon Hougham above-menchevronelsy fabU. tioned, was fucceeded in it by his eldeft Ion Richard Elougham, gent, of the lame place, who died poffefled of it in 1662; not long after which, it appears to have paired into the polfefiion of John Grove, gent, of Tunftall, in right of Mildred his wile, who died in 1677.'' After which it defcended to his grandlon Richard Grove, efq. formerly of Cambridge, but afterwards of the Temple, London, who dying unmarried a few years ago, and having no near relations, dewith the greateft part of his eflates, to Mr. William Jemmett, gent, of Alhford, and William Marlhall, the latter of whom, on a divifion of thefe court eflates, is now become the foie poireflbr of it.

vifed

it,

A

baron is held for this manor. Shelving houfe is ftuated very near the church ; the prefent building is very mean, and exhibits no fome anappearance of ever having been a manfion tient Hint foundations have however, i find upon enquiry, been found round it. Grove is another manor, fituated at no great dlftance north ealUvard from Shelving, which in antient time u'us held by the family of Malmains, by ward to Dover caftle, being held of the family of Crevequer, and they continued in the polfeflion of it till the latter end of king Edward II. ’s reign, or the beginning of king Edw'ard III. when it was become the property of Goldfborough, and Peter de Goldfborough died pof;

f

See more of the Groves, vol.

ii.

of this hiitory, p. 581. lelfed

EASTRy HUNDRED.

128

of it in the 32c! year of that reign ; his fucceflbr was William atte Welle, of Sandwich, who died

fefled

in

it

afterwards, as appears by the inquifition taken after his death, holding it of the king in capitCy as of his cadle of Ledes, by knight’s fervice, and by

two

X

years

the fervice of ward to Dover caftle, upon which^ t wo parts of it cfcheated to the crown,* and the remaining part came into the poffefTion of Agnes his widow, who died in the 36th year of that reign, holding it by the

above-mentioned, when the king became entitled to the whole of this manor, which afterwards was granted to a family of its own name ; one of whom Sir John Grove, died pofTefled of it in Henry VI. ’s reign, and lies buried in St. Peter’s church, in Sandwich, to which he was a good benefadlor, under a monument, on which are his effigies lying at full length, and on his flrield, as well as underneath, his fervice

arms, viz. T^hree leaves^ in JiniJler bend, their /talks up^ wards, on a canton, three crefcents, which arms were likewife formerly painted on the windows of this church ; not long after his death it became the property of Sir John Whyte, merchant of the ftaple of Canterbury, who died in the 9th year of Edward IV, His defendant Henry Whyte, fon of Sir Thomas Whyte, one of the mafters of the court of requefts, died polfeffed of it in the 14th year of queen Elizabeth’s reign, leaving three daughters, Agnes, after-

wards married to

Thomas Scudamore

;

Philippa, to

Walter Gifford ; and Jane to Henry Ferrers, who became his coheirs.'’ After which, Thomas Scudamore and Agnes his wife, in 1581, conveyed their third part of it to William Fleet, as did the two other lifters and their hufbands their remaining two thirds afterwards, to Roger James, merchant, of the city See Boys’s Sandwich, p. 155, 156. Rot. Ekh. an. 2i Elix. The remainder of the account of this manor is taken from the Title Deeds, *

of

WOODNESBOROUGH.

129

of London. He was ot Dutch parentage, and coming into England, at the latter end of king Henry Vlll.’s reign, was made denizen ; of whom, and his defeendants, an account has been already given, under Tghtham, in vol. v. of this hiffory, p. 36. Tho. James, hereafter mentioned, was his fourth fon, who died /. p. and John, who fettled at Grove, was his fixth fbn ; from William, the third fon, defeended the James’s,

now

refident at

Ightham.

In 1594, Sarah, widow of Roger James, with her two fons Thomas and John, purchafed of William Fleet, mentioned before, the remaining third part of it, and thus became entitled to the whole of this manor, which afterwards, on the death of Tho. James, became the property of his brother John, who f. p. afterwards relided at Grove. His fon Henry, left four daughters his coheirs, Joice married to Edward Sayer, efq. Catherine j Elizabeth to William Bix ; afterwards joined in the conveyance of the whole of this manor to Peter de la Pierre, or Peters, as the name was afterwards called and Ipelt,

and Afra,

They

of the Black Friars, in Canterbury, and it afterwards continued in his defeendants, till threefourths of it were, about the year 1757^ alienated to Mr. Thomas Alkin, of Canterbury, who in 1773 clevifed his intereft in it, after his wife’s death, to his fon Thomas Verrier Alkin, clerk, and his daughters Margaret Alkin, and Sufan, then the wife of John

who was

Fowell, D. D. 7he other fourth part of this manor remained in the defeendants of Peter de la Pierre, or Peters, till partly by marriage, and partly by fale, it became the pro*' petty of Mr. Ifaac Warner, merchant, of Bermondfey, whofefon Simeon Warner, conveyed it to Dr. John Fowell above-mentioned, and he, together with the defeendants of Mr. Alkin, conveyed- the whole of it to Mr. Henry Jelfard, of Statenborough, who alienated it to Mr. Stephen Southerden, and he in 1793 '

VOL,

X.

^

palled

EASTRY HUNDRED. pafled it away by fale, to Peter Fedor, efq. of Dover, the prefent owner of it. A court baron is held for 1^0

manor. The manor-houfe

this

and ruinous, but not beyond a common farm-houfe. The antient manfion is

old

northward of the prefent houfe, as it fhould feem, where there is a fmali fquare plat of ground, moated round, which could hardly be for any other purpofe. The manor of Knolton claims over this manor, which pays a cahle-guard rent to Dover

hood

a

little

cafUe.

ville and farm of Buckland, written in Domefday, Bocolandy lies at a fmall diftance foiuheaftward from Grove manor. About the year 1074, Odo, bifliop of Baieux, had fome intereft in this place,

The

he then gave to St. Auguhine’s monahery, certain tithe in the fmall ville of Bocklande, which Roger de Malmaines, who became lord of the fee after the biIhop’sdifgrace not long afterwards, and the confifcaand it appears by tion of his eftates, took from it the furvey of Domefday, that the archbilhop had likewife (ome ehate here, which was held of him by knight’s fervice, under which title it is thus entered for

in

it

:

In EJlrei hundredy OJherny fon of Letardy holds one yoke of the archbijhop in Bocolandy and there he has in

demefne one carucatey and it is worth ten fhilhngs. Of the family of Malmaines thiseftate was held

thole

who aflumed

their

name from

by

and in anBartholomew’s

it ;

of lands to St. hofpital, mention is made of lands in this parilh abutting to thofe of this name of Bockland. How long tient deeds of the gift

they continued here, or who poflefled it afterwards, I have not found for a great length of time, but in the year 1553 it was in the pofleflion of the name of Wollet, for William Wollet, of Eaftry, then died poflefled «

See Dccem. Scriptores, Thorn, col.

1

789.

of

;

WOODNESBOROUGH,

I3I

and devifed It to Daniel Wollet his Ton, by the name of Bnckland Barns, with the lands, &c. fo that then, moll; probably, there was no lioufe here. He fold it to Thomas Appleton, ot Eaftry, who left two daughters his coheirs, Joane married to Thomas Boteler, gent, of Hernden, and Elizabeth to Thomas Berry, gent, of Canterbury, which latter became, in right of his wife, polfefled of it, and he fold it to Sir Samuel Peyton, bart. of Knolton, who owned it In 1622, in whole defcendants it continued for fome time afterwards. The next owner that I have found of it, is of the name of Barnes, and in 1750, FJiz. Barnes, of London, appears to have been owner of it ; fhe devifed it by will to Mr. Rich, of London, vvhofe widow Elizabeth is in the poireffion of it for her life, but the reverlion of it was purchafed by Samuel Whitbread, efq. late of London, who (old it to Mr. John Bulhell, of AOi, fince deceafed, and his heirs now poflefs his of

it,

intereft in

it.

The great and small

tithes of the

of acres, together with ville

Buckland, containing eighty fix thofe of the manor of Ringleton, being an ellate in fee, have been in the hands of the leflTees of the parfonage of this parifh for many years paft, the prefent proprietor being the widow of Oliver Stephens, efq. of WoodnefboroLigh parfonage, lately deceafed.

PoLDRES, or

PoulJerSf

Great and Little,

are

two

former of which was antiently accounted a manor. It was once the eftate of the Clitherows, but how long it continued in that name I know not however, in the beginning of the laft century, it was in the hands of feveral different owners, whofe properties in it at length pafled wholly into the name of Hatchet, who conveyed it to Barton, and he, eftates in this parifh, the

no long interval afterwards, pafled it away to Elgar, and George Elgar alienated it to John Dowden, but in the year 1703, Scorier and others conveyed it to Smith, in which name it defeended to Mr. Richard Smith, K 2

at

,

lASTRY HUNDRED.

IJ2

Smith, who becoming a bankrupt, his afllgnces foid it to Richard Solly, cfq. of Sandwich, upon whofe death it came to his only Ton Richard Heaton Solly, of St. Margaret’s, who lately fold it to Thomas Godfrey, (before Jull) efq. of Brook-ftreet, in Alh, and he is the prefent poflelTor of it. Little Poulders was formerly the property of the Terrys, of Ofpringe, in which it continued till it was carried in marriage by Olive Terry, in 1749, to Nathaniel Marfli, efq. whofe Ton Terry Marfh, elq. of Canterbury, died pofTefled of it in i789, and was buried in a vault, with the family of Terry, in Staple church. His fon afterwards fold it to Mr. Baldock,of Canterbury, as he did again to Mr. David Taylor, of Sandwich, the prefent polfelfor of it. Den N-couRT is a manor in the fouthern part of this parilh, adjoining to the borough of Hammill, which in king Richard II. ’s reign belonged to Sir Nicholas de Daubridgecourt, who in the 13th year of that reign conveyed it by fale to Thomas Elys, of Sandwich, and he having procured a licence of mortmain, conveyed it to feoffees for the endowment of the hofpital of St. 'Thomas, of Sandwich, ufually called Ellis’s hofpital, part of the polfeflions of which it remains at this time. It pays a quit- rent to the manor of Queen-court, in Ofpringe, and another to the manor of Hamwold. In 1 535, this eftate containing one hundred and fixty acres of land, was of the annual rent of ten pounds. In 1703

was

In 1757, at iiol. afterwards at 140I. By Jeafe in 1792, at 220I. per ann.*^ which is an inftance of the great increafe of the value of lands in this part of the county. it

let at 95I.

H AMwoLD, or as

now

Hammilly is a bo-rough and dijlri£i in the weftern part of this parilh, which in the furvey of Domefday is written both Hamoldcy and Aimoldcy at the time of taking which it was f

it is

called,

See Boys’s Sandwich, p. 149

et feq.

part

:

.

WOODNESBOROUGH. part of the pofletTions of

Odo, bifhop of Baienx, the

Conqueror’s half-brother, under the it is

thus dcfcribed in

Adam

133

title

of

whofe lands

it

bolds of the fee of the bifljop in

Hamolde half a

Ricnlf held it of Adam^ and another half yoke of Aimolde. Herbert holds it of Hugh^ the grandfon of Herbert ; both thefe are worth twenty /hillings

yoke.

This defcription certainly comprehends, at leaft, the two manors of Hamivoldt one of which, now called

South,

alias

Upper Hamwold,

or

Hammilf

as

it

pronounced, was antiently written in deeds and old evidences, Hammonds., alias Teukers, and fometime after the conqueft was become the eflate ofOfbern Hacket, who gave the tithes of it to the priory of Rochcfter, and in his defcendants it continued down to Ralph Hacket, who held it by knight’s fervice at the latter end of king Henry III. or beginning of king Edward I.’s reign, as appears by the book of knight’s fees of that time ; how long it continued in this name,

is

ulually

does not appear. After which, the family of Greenlliield, whofe principal feat was at Whitflaple, became pofTefTors of it, probably long before there is any mention made of them as fuch, for there is no evidence of their property here, till the beginning of king Henry VI.’s reign, when John Greenihield was pofirdfed of it, whofe fon Henry Greenfhield, of Sandwich, died in the laft year of king Edward IV. f. p. pofiTefTed of this manor, which Canterbury, ordered, as well as his other eftates, to be fold j and he appears by it to have been poirelTcd by delcent, of lands belides at Whitftaple, Herne, and Sandwich.. His feoffees alienated this manor to the Elys’s, of Sandwich, whence it paffed by (ale to Wilfon, from w'hich name it was alienated to Mr. Edmund Parbo, of Sandwich, defeended of afamily in Chefhire, who bore for their arms, Fert, Eie femee of flenrs de lis, fretty, or, a chief, ermine

he by

his will,

proved

died poffeffed of

it

in

at

1640, and K.

3

this

manor came by his

,

i

EASTRY HUNDRED,

134 to the

will

of

daughter and heir EH-zabeth, (who died before her mother in 1657,) by her hufband Capt. John Boys, of Sandwich, by whom fhe had a numerous iflhe ; one of whom, William, being his fecond fon, was anccftor of William Boys, elq. now ofWalmer, and in their defcendants it continued, till it w'as at length, by one of them in 1 7 1 1, conveyed by

l^is

fale

to

which

ifllie

Mr. Ralph

"1

his foie

crry,

who

built theprefent houfe,

handlbme one, on it. After which it became veiled, as it is prefumed, l>y way of mortgage in John Lynch, efq. of Groves, in Staple, by virtue of which he came into polfelTion of it, and his heirs afterwards in 1762, together with the fons of Mr. Ralph Terry, above-mentioned, joined in the conveyance of the fee fimple of this manor to Sir

Brook fefled

is

a

Bridges, bart. of Goodnellone,

of

it

in

79 ^> Brook William Bridges, to

it.

A

court baron

is

Hamwold-court,

who

died polhis eldefl furviving fon. Sir

I

bart.

at this

is

time entitled

held for this manor. ufually

called

and formerly Lower Hammill, to

Hammill- court,

from no great diftance was always accounted a manor,

that above-mentioned,

is

diflinguilh

it

fituated at

from it. This eflate though for fome time fince it has and privileges belonging to one. In the 2oth year of king

loft all the ufual rights

Edward

III. Tho. Brockwas pofleftcd of this manor, held of the caftle of Rochefter, by the fervice of w'ard to it when this name became extind here, a family of the name of Stokes, or Stokys, became pofTefTed of it, from whom it paired by fale to Michael Francis, whofe heirs fold it about the latter end of king Henry VIII. to Mr. Nicholas Moyes, gent, and he conveyed it to Rogers, of London, brewer, whofe heir pafTed it away to Everard, as he did to Roger James, merchant, of London, who by vvill in the 31ft year of queen Elizabeth devifed it to his two fons, Thomas and John, in feparate moietics j Thomas died f. p, on which the whole of this

hull

1

manor

,

1

:

WOODNESBOROUGH. the property of

manor became

^35 his brother,

John James

whofc death I find it in the polferfion of his deher fcendant’s widow, Afra James, who lettled it on befon Henry James, efq. of London ; after which it came veiled in his four daughters and coheirs, whofe Thomas heirs Joice Sawyer, Henry Marlh, efq. and after

Halles, efq. in 1710, conveyed it to Thomas Sladden, unmargent, whofe fon William Sladden, gent, dying and inteftate, this eftate came to his only fifter ried

Mary, who married

the

Rev. William Howdell, whofe conveyance of it to of Canterbury, who^ died

five Ions, in 1758, joined in the

Elias Sawbridge, efq.

John

it to his ne789, and by his will devifed phew Col. Jacob Sawbridge, fon of his eldei brother unmarJacob, deceafed, for his life, who died in 1776 of the fame ried, on which it came, by the limitations

unmarried

in

i

Samuel- Elias Sawbridge, efq. of Ollantigh, and the prefent pofTefibr of it. There is no court

will, to

he

is

held for

it. .





r tt

The portion of tithes in this diftrid of HamRochefter, as mill, which belonged to the priory of mentioned before, as given to it by Ofbcrn Hacker, manor of Upper Hamwold,' on the difof the priory, in the 31 ft year of Henry VIII.

owner of folution



the

into the hands of the crown, and was granted by dean and the king, in his 33d year, to his new-founded chapter of Rochefter, part of whofe pofleflions it re-

came

mains

at this time.

.

^

The manor of Ringleton,

or Ringjlony as

_

it is

fometimes written, is fituated at fome diftance weftward oodnefborough church, and at the time of from taking the furvey of Domefday, was likewife part of the the poffefiions of Odo, bifhop of Baieux, under title

of whofe lands

it is

thus entered in

it

Confirmed to the priory by the p. 39 Hubert. and Baldwin archbifliops Richard, <=

Stev.

Mon.

vol.

i.

K X

4

In

5

EASTRY HUNDRED. In EJlrei hundred, Herbert holds to ferm of the kht^, Ringetune, of the fee of the bijhop. ’The arable land is ... In detnefnc there are two carucates and four villeins, xvith fe'ven borderers,

There

half.

is

having tzvo carucates and an one mill of forty Jhillings. In the time

Edward the Cotfejfor it was zvorth eight pounds, zvhen he received it one hundred Jhillings, nozv eight pounds, and yet it pays thirteen pounds, Edward held it of king Edward. of king

Four

years after the taking of this furvey, the bifhop was difgraced, and all his eflates were confifcated to

the crown,

whence this manor Icems to have been granted to William de Albini, furnamed Pincerna, who had followed the Conqueror from Normandy in his expedition hither

he was fucceeded by his Ton of the lame name, who was made earl of Arundel anno 1 king Stephen, of whofe fuccelfors, earls of Arundel, it was afterwards held by the countefs of Ewe, and of her again by knight’s fervice, by the family of Perot, one of whom, Sir Ralph Perot, or Pyrot, as the name was ;

frequently fpelt, held

above-mentioned in king and Mr. Boteler, of Eaftry, has in his poireffiqn fome deeds of the Perots, of Ringleton, inking Richard II. ’s time, having their feals appendant, on which are thefe arms, A fjjield with a crefcent for difference, in chief, three efcallop Jhells, the legend

Edward

I.’s

it

as

reign,'

Si Johis Perot.

From

his heirs

defcended in Knolton to John de SandhurF, who left an only daughter and heir Chriftian, who married William de Langley, by which marriage he became

like

manner

entitled to

it

it

as

his heirs pafied

away

Robt. White,^ 20th year of Edward III. Sir John White, of Canterbury, a defcendant of Robert White above-mentioned, died poflefied of it in the 9th year of king Edward IV. His defcendant

whofe

;

heirs held

1 homas

it

it

to

in the

vV hite, in purfiiance of his father’s will, for

Book of

knight’s fees, in the Exchequer,

'

the

WOODNESBOROUGH. the purpofe of raifing a

lum of money

IJ7 for charitable

Border, or Butler, of Heronden, in Eaifry, from which name it was pilfed away by iale to Neame, whofe fon Daniel Neame fold it to Spencer, and his fuccdfor Nicholas Spencer, gent, ciiflomer of Sandwich, in queen Elizabeth’s reign, dying p. was buried in St. Clement’s church, in Sandwich. His arms were, A chevron engrailed^ in chief., three lions rampanty on the chevron a crefcenty for difference. His filter Anne entitled her hufband Mr. Andrew Hughes to the polTeffion of it. He was defccnded, lays Philipott, from the Plughes’s, of Middleton Stoney, in Oxfordfhire, who were branched out from thofe of North Wales, and bore for his arms, GnleSy on a bend, argent, a demi lion, between three fieurs de Us, fable. In his defendants it continued, till it was at length carried by a female heir of this name, in marriage to Jullinian Champneis, efq. of Weftenhanger, who died poflelTed of it, far advanced in years, in 1748, leaving three fons, Juflinian, William and Henry, on whom this manor devolved, in fuch proportions as was limited by his marriage fettlement, according to which it has, with Weftenhanger, and his other eftates, ever ftnee continued. Since which it has defended in like manner as Weftenhanger, and is accordingly now vefted in the fame proportions as that is, being one fixth part vefted in Mifs Frances Champneis, and the two fons of John Burt, efq. by Harriet her fifter, and the remaining part in the Rev. William Henry Burt Champneis, the eldeft fon of John Burt, efq. before-mentioned.® A court baron is held for this manor. In the year 1074, Odo, bifhop of Baieux, gave to St. Auguftine’s monaftery, thofe tithes which his ufes, alienated

it

to

Adelold, the chamberlain, in the three villes of Cnolton, Tickenhurrt, and Ringleton, among others, and thefe he gave with the king’s con-

tenants had, that

®

is,

See Weftenhanger, vol.

viii.

p. 74, 75.

fent,

EASTRY HUNDRED.

I3S

who by

but thefe tithes were afterwards taken away from the monatlery by William de Albeni, the lord of the fee of thofe lands. lent,

The

his charter

confirmed

it;

great and fmall tithes of the

manor of Ringle-

ton, and the ville of Biickland, were granted by king

James

I.

in fee,

to

Thomas Blychenden,

This

efq.

cftate has confiantly belonged to the leflcesof the rec-

tory appropriate of

Woodncfborough, and

as fuch

was

of Oliver Stephens, efq. of the parfonage of Woodnefborough/ and is now of his widow lately the eftate

Mrs. Anne Stephens. Tae manor of Polton,

as

it is

iifually called,

is

Afh ; its oricalled from a fa-

fituated in the part of this parifh next to

name was Poltmans, being fo mily who refided at it, their manfion here being

ginal

caf-

and furrounded with a moat, and they continued lords of it dowm to Peter Poltman, who was poffefledofit in the reign of king Richard II. in the 15th year of which he pafied it away, by fine, to Langley, of Knolton, in whom the poflefiion of it remained till king Henry VI.’s reign, when it was alienated to Sir John Whyte, of Canterbury, whofedefcendant Thomas W'^hyte, in purfuance of his father’s will, which diredled it to be fold for charitable ufes, conveyed it to Richard Boteler, of Heronden, In Eaftry, and in his defcendants itlfaid till the beginning of king James I.’s reign, when William Boteler fold it to Benfkin, from whom it defcended down to Vincent Benfkin, who poflefied it in the 2 2d year of king Charles II. the heirs of whofe grandfon, John Benfidn, fold it to Mr. Wil•liam Barne, of London, whofe nephew of the fame name fucceeded him in it, and was owner of it in the beginning of king George I.’s reign; after which it became the property of lieutenant-colonel Chriftopher tellated

See hereafter, under the dtfeription of the parfonage, for a particular account of the owners of this portion of tithes, as well as of the reft of the late Mr. Stephens’s eftates in this neighbourhood.

more

Kien,

;

WOODNESBOROUGH.

1

39

who died in 1744, leaving his wife Jane furvivwho polTeffed it at her death in 1 762,/. p. flie de-

Kicn, ing,

Evert'George Coulemaker, efq. who died next year, upon which his w'ife Mary, daughter of Gervas Hayward, gent, of Sandwich, became vifedit by her will to

entitled to

it,

and carried her

intereft in

it

to her fccond

Thomas Pym

Hales, bart. of Howlets. He died in 1773, and then it again reverted to her, and ihe is at this time the poirdTor of it ; but the reverfion of it at her death, by Mrs. Kien’s will, devolves on her only Ton by her firfl: hulband, lieutenant colonel George Kien Hayward Coufemaker. He married the

hufband Sir

He

hon. Mifs Southwell.

Coufemaker,

bears for his arms thofe of

originally of the province

of Brabant

and fourth. Azure, on a chevron, between three mullets, or, as many trefoils flipped, vert ; fecond and third, Azure, tivo chevrons interlaced, one ijjuing from the chief, and the other from the bafe, betiveen eight mullets offix points, all, or ; as the fame were cerviz. quarterly,

firlt

tified at the college

of arms, in London, in 1779, to

colonel Coufemaker.

This manor

is

held of the

There has not been any court

manor of Patrixborne.

time out of mind. The houfe of Polton is a large fquare building, feemingly of the reign of king James I. probabljr

eredted by the Benficins in part, and although in

round,

it

held for

it

colonel Kien modernized

alow

it

being moated exhibits a refpedable appearance. fituation,

CHARITIES,

Thomas Appleton,

yeoman, of Eaflry,by his will 101593, gave to the relief of the poor 5I. to be paid to the churchwardens yearly, to bediftributed by them to the poor people, inhabitants here, fourteen days before Chriftmas day, to be paid out of lands belonging to him, called Hardiles, in this parifli.

The poor conllantly relieved are about hundred.

T HIS

PARISH

diction of

is

fixty, cafually

one

within the ecclesiastical juris-

the diocefe of Canterbury,

and deanry of

Sandwich.

The

;

EASTRY HUNDRED.

140

The

church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, con*’ fills of a nave, and twoifles, having a fquare tower fteeple at the weft end, with a modern wooden turret and vane

which are five bells, made in 1676. It had a high fpire on the tower, which was taken down fome years ago. At the eaft end of the chancel is a marble tablet for John Cafon, elq. of this place, juftice of the peace, obt. 1718; John Cafon, efq. his fon, obt. 1755; arms, Argent y a chevr on y fable between at the top of

it,

in

^

three wolves heads y erafedy gules y on an efcutcheon ofpre-

fabUy a chevrotiy between three flenrs de lisy of the field y another for Thomas Blechenden, of the antient family of that name, of Aldington, in Kent, obt. 1661 arms, Azurey a fiefs nebuleey argenty between three lions tencOy

impaling Boys. On the fouih fide, an antient altar monument with gothic pillars and arches, having had ftiiclds and arms, now ob* Againft the wall, under the canopy, two literated. brafs plates, which have been removed to this place, from two grave-ftones in the chancel the firft for Sir John Parcar, late vicar of this church, who died the V. day of May, a" dni m° v° xiij° ; on the fecond are Latin verfes to the memory of Nichs Spencer, efq, In the middle of the chancel, a graveobt. 1593. ftone for William Dockfey, efq. of Snellfton, in Derbyfiiire, a juftice of the peace, obt. 1760; Sarah his wife, youngeft daughter of John Cafon, e'q. obt. 1 774; arms. Or, a lion rampant aziirOy fiurmounted of a bend, argent. On a graveftone on the north fide of the chancel, on a brafs plate, On a chevrofty three quaterfoilSy between three annuletSy quartering other coats, now obliterated, for Mafter Myghell Heyre, fumtyme vicar of this churche, who dyed the xxii day of July, m“ v“ xxviii. In the north ifie are fcveral memorials for the family of Gillow, arms, A lion rampanty in chiefy three heads

erafiedy or, attiredy guleSy

;

y

fieurs de Us.

At

the entrance into the chancel,

grave-ftone, on a brafs plate,

John

on a

Hill, gent, of the pa-

rifh of Naftall, in Staftbrdftiire, obt.

1605.

A

mural

monument

WOODNESBOROUGH.

monument

William Gibbs, of

for

1777; arms, Argent

y

14! this

three battle axeSy

In the church-yard are altar

tombs

John Benchkin, of Ponton, There were formerly painted

for

obr.

in fefsy fable.

to the

the Julls,andfor Sladden ; one for fometimc mayor of Sandwich, obt.

parifli,

memory

of

John Verall, gent, 1610 j and another

obt. 1639. in the windows of this

church, Or, a chief indentedy azurey for John de Sandwich. Several coats of arms, among which were thofc of Valence and Sc. Leger, Argent y three leaves in finJler bendy their foints dovonwardy proper.

azurCy three crefcents,

ory for

Grove

.

— On a

— Argent

y

cantoHy

three ef-

callops in chiefy ory in bafe a crejcenty gtdesy for

Hclpeftone, ulually called Hilpui ton, bailiff of Sandwich, in 1299. A fliield, being Helpefton’s badge, another On a fefs engrailedy three cinquefoilSy between three garbs, for John Hill, of Nafall, in Staffordflaire, who lies buried in A fefs engrailedy three lions rampant, in this church. chiefy on the fefs, a crefcent for differencey for Spencer, Quarterly, four coats cuftomer, of Sandwich. firlf. On a chevron, three quaterjoils ; fecond. Per pale, ermine and argent ; third, A crojs, between four pomegranates, flipped \ fourth, Three bars, zvavy, for Michael





Heyrc, vicar here

in

;

1520.

The

church of Woodnefborough was given, in the reign of king Henry I. by a religious woman, one Alcclina de VVodenfberg, to the priory of Ledes, foon after the foundation of it; to which deed was witnefs Robert de Crevequer, founder of the priory, Elias his which gift was confirmed by the faid foil, and others Robert, who by his charter, releafed to the priory ail It was likewifc confirmed by his right and title to it. archbifhop Theobald, and feveral of his fticcefibrs, and by king Henry III. by his charter of infpeximus in ;

his 41ft year.

Archbifliop William Corboil, who came to the fee of Canterbury, three years after the foundation of Ledes priory, at the infiance and petition of Afcelina abovementioned.

EASTRY HUNDRED.

142

who

refigned this church into his hands for this purpofe, appropriated it to the prior and convent,

mentioned,

for the finding of neccffary cloaths for the canons there;

and a vicarage was accordingly endowed in it. There was a controverfy between the prior and convent, and Adam, vicar of this church, in 1627, anno 14 Henry II. concerning the great tithes arlfing from the crofts and curtilages within this parifii, which was referred to the prior of Rochefter, who was the pope’s delegate for this purpofe, who determined that the prior and convent of Ledes, as redors of this church, fhould receive, without any exception, all the great tithes of wheat, barley, oats, beans, peas, and of every fort of corn arifing, or to arife from all lands, crofts, curtilages, or

other places whatever, fituated within the bounds of this parifh ; and that the prior and convent fhould yearly pay to the faid vicar, and his fuccefibrs, half a feam of barley, and half afeam of beans,

of our Lord.* After which, this parfonage appropriate, (which appears to have been efieemed as a manor) together with theadvowfon of the vicarage, remained wfith the prior and convent of Ledes, till its diflblution in the ift year 3 of king Henry VIII. when it was, with all its lands and at the nativity

poffeflions, furrendered into the king’s hands,

his dotation charter, in his

33d

who by

year, fettled both par-

fonage and advowfon on his new-founded dean and chapter of Rochefter, with whom they remain at this time. On the diffolution of deans and chapters, after the death of king Charles L this parfonage was furveyed in 1649, when it appeared that the manor or parfonage of Woodneft^orough, with the feite thereof, and all manner of tithes belonging to it, with a garden and orchard of one acre, was valued all together at 300I. CliErtulsne of Ledes priory, fol, lo. In the year 1302 there was an agreement concerning the parochial bounds of the churches of Eltn and Wodnelberge.

that

^;

WOODNESBOROUGH.

I43

was to repair the premifes, and the chancel of the church ; that the vicarage was worth fifty pounds per annum. The then incumbent vvas under lequcftration, and there was none to ferve the cure and that the church was then quite ruinated, and in that the lefTee

great decay.'"

'Fhe rectory or parsonage, together with the Manor of the rectory of VVoodnesborough, which run continues part of the poficiTions of the dean and chapter of Rocheller, has been from time to time d^mifed by them, on a beneficial leafe. It was for* merly held by the family of Appleton, and afterwards by that of Blechynden, both of whom refided at the parfonage

away

;

at

who pafTed John Cafon, efq. who re-

length the heirs of the

their intereft

in

it

to

latter,

whofe fon of the fame name dying /. p. in 1755, Sarah his youngeft fifter, married to William Dockfey, efq. of Shellflon, in Derby (hire, became, as his heir, entitled to it ; flie furvived him, and by her will in 1774, devifed the leafe of it to Anne, the daughter of Matthew Bookey, clerk, vicar of St. Laurence, in Thanet, by Anne, daughter of Thomas Peke, efq. fided here,

then the wife of Oliver Stephens, efq.

who

in

her right

became entitled to it, and refided at the parfonage. His arms were, Per chevron, azure and ermine, in chief two eagles difplayed, or the Bookeys bore, Gules, on ;

a bend, argent, three rooks, fable, within a bordure, engrailed. He died in 1795, leaving her furviving, and file

is

now

in pofTeffion

of

his intereft in

it,

as well as

the reft of his eftates in this parifh and neighbourhood.

A

court baron

is

held for this manor.

There

are thirty-

five acres of glebe

belonging to the parfonage. The vicarase is valued in the king’s books at lol. os. 7id. and the yearly tenths at il. os. id. It is ROW of the yearly certified value of 56I. 12s. 5id. ^

Parliameutai-y Surveys, vol. xiv. Augtu. office.

In

EASTRY HUNDRED.

144

640 It was valued at eighty pounds per annum* In 1713 but at fixty pounds per annum. There are In

1

three acres and an half of glebe land belonging to the vicarage. In the king’s books in Henry Vlllth.’s time, they are faid to have been five acres.

CHURCH OF irOODNESBO ROUGH, PATRONS, Or

VI CARS.

by ivhom ^refented.

Dean and

Cha/iter

g/‘

Rochejier

1628 ,

obt.

yajper Greeny 1661

iu

Jofcjih yaci/on,

clerk, April 4^

.

iC6i.‘ ,

.

.

Becker, obt. 1672.

.

Jfaac

Lovelly.

A. B. March

14,

<672, obr. 1729."' John Head, A. M. February 1730, refigned

i

i,

736."

July 7, i 736, refigned 1737. John Upton, A. M. Nov. ii, 1737, refigned 1747.° Jonathan Soan, A. M. Sept. 1768.P 1747, obt. Jan. 14, John Clarke, S. T. P. July 23, 1768, refigned Dec. 1775.''

y.

Billingjley,

James .

IVillianiJon,

A. M. June

28, 1776, refigned 1785. . • . Loddlngton, A. M. 1785* refigned 1785.

John

Sj7}ith,

A. M. Nov.

I

785}

''

the prefent vicar.

1 He left by will acs. to tbc poor of Bromley, of which parilh he had bcca

curate.

m And

P

Head mafter

in Rochertcr, v/iih that

of

of the king’s fchool

and held this vicarage

Thurnham, by

dlfpcn-

^

Curate of Gufton. n Likewife vicar of Sellingc, and refigned this vicarage for the reflory

fation,

of Burmarth.

refigned this vicarage tor that of

o Prebendary of Rochefler, and the

learned editor of Spenfer’s FairyQueen,

and other works.

q Prebendary ofBoebefter, and provoll of Oriel college, in Oxfoirl, and

Lam-

her hu rtf. r

And

vicar of Chart Sutton, by

difpcnfaiion.

WORD,

WORD*

*45

WORD, WRITTEN

formerly Worthe^

is

the

next parifli

from Woodnelborough, which latter is the original Saxon name, the letter d in that language being ftrickcn through, making it the fame found as /i?.* There are three boroughs in this parifh, viz. Felderland, Word-ftreet, and Hackling; the borfliolders for the two former of which are appointed at Eaftryeaft ward

court, being within the jurifdi<5bion of that manor ; for the latter at Adifham, which manor claims over a part

of

this

The

borough.

PARISH OF

Word

very

and low, and is very unhealthy ; 'it is in fhape very long and narrow, being near three miles from call to weft, and not more than one mile acrofs the other way. The village called Word-ftreet, containing twenty-nine houfes, having the church clofe to it, is fituated nearly in the middle of the parifh ; at the fouthern boundary of which, is the hamlet of Hackling, containing five houfes, the principal eftate in which, called Hackling farm, belongs to Mrs. Eleanor Dare, of Felderland. At the weftern extremity of the parifh is the borough and hamlet of Felderland, or Fenderland, partly in Word, and partly in Eaftry, formerly efteemed a manor, the property of the Manwoods, afterwards of the Harveys, of Combe, and now belonging to the right hon. Peterlies

flat

Lewis-Francis, earl Cowper; adjoining to which, in the fame borough, is the farm of Upton, fituated about a quarter of a mile weftward of the church, the eftate of which likewife belongs to earl Cowper.

At

a fmall

diftance

further

the

marfhes

begin,

where there is a parcel of land called Worth, or Worde Minnis, and belongs to the archbifliop, the prefent I

VOL. X.

See Verflegan, p, 297,

L

leficc

14^ leflee

EASTRY HUNDRED. being Mr. Thomas Rammel, of

Eaftry.

Here

are two dreams, called the fouth and north dreams, which diredt their courfe through thefe marflies northwedward towards Sandwich 3 the latter of thefe was

formerly the famous water of Gedling, through which the fea once flowed, and was noted much for being the water in which felons were punifhed by drowning, their bodies being carried by the current of it into the fea. The marfhes here are called Lydden valley, (from the

manor of Lydde-court, in this parifh, below defcribed, called formerly Hlyden) which is under the diredfion of the commlflTioners of fewers for the eadern parts of Kent ; and to which the north dream is the common

dream about half a mile northward, where the fand downs begin. Thefe fand downs are a long bank of fand, covered fewer.

The

marflies continue

beyond

this

with green fwerd of very unequal furface, and edge the fea fliore for five miles and upwards from Peppernede, which is the fouth- ead point of Sandwich bay, as far as Deal. They are about a quarter of a mile broad, except

about the cadle, which

is,

from

its

fituation, called

Sandowne cadle, where they end with the beach, but a is a little way within the fliore, about the middle cf them cut, called the Old Haven, which runs flanting from the fea along thefe downs, near but not quite into the river Stour, about three quarters of a mile eadward below Sandwich. The cadle of Sandowne is fituated about half a mile from the north end of the town of

Deal ; it was built with Deal cadle, and feveral others, by king Henry VIII. in the year 1539, for the defence of this coad, each being built with four round lunets of very thick done arched work, with many large portholes i in the middle is a great round tow^er, with a large cidern for water on the top of it j underneath is an arched cavern, bomb proof ; the whole is cncompafled with a foflee, over which is a draw-bridge. It warden, who apis under the government of the lord points the captain and other officers of it, by the ad of

WORD. 52d of king Henry VIII. This caftle has lately had fome little repair made to it, which, however, has made it but bareJy habitable. This paiilh contains about fifty houfes. The lands It are of about the annual value of 3000I. The foil Js very rich and fertile, and may properly be called the garden of this part of Kent, and is the moft produdive for wheat, of any perhaps within the county. There are no woodlands in it. There is no fair. ^

m

The principal manor

in

this

parifh

is

that

Lydde-court,

of

written in Saxon, Elyden, which was given by Offh, king of Mercia, in the year 774, to the church of Chrifi, in Canterbury, L. S. A. as the charter exprefies it, meaning, with the fame franchifes and liberties that the manor of Adilham had before

cen given to it. After which, this manor continued with the priory of Chrift-church, and king Edward L his 7th year, granted to it the liberty and

m

franchife

or

wreck

ol the fea,

apud le Lyde, which I fuppolc to c this manor and king Edward II. in his loth year, granted to the pnovy free-warren within their demefne lands witl^n it d and in this ftate this manor continued ;

,

the dilTolution of the priory in the 3 1 ft year of king enry VIII. when it came into the king’s hands, who iettled it, among other premifes, in his 33d year, on his new erefted dean and chapter of

^1

was afterwards,

It

Canterbury, by whom in the 36th year of that reign, re-

granted to the king, who fold it that year to Stephen Motte, and John Wylde, gent, and they alienated

to Richard Southwell,

who

in the ift

year of kino

it

Ed-

ward VI. paired it away by fale to Thomas Rolfe, and he afterwards conveyed it to William Lovelace, fer-

who died poftefted of it in 1576, and his Ion Sir William Lovelace, of Betherfden, alienated it to Thomas Smith, efq. of

jeant-at-law,

Weftenhangcr, from

*

Regift. EcclicP ChrlHi. Cant.

hy king Henry Vf,

See

MSS

cart. 131.

whom

Again confirmed

Bibl. Cott,

L 3

It

EASTRY HUNDRED.'

148 defcended

it

fold

it

to

part of

down

to Philip, vifcount Strangford,

Herbert Randolph,

it,

called afterwards

efq.

who

and he pafled away a

Lydde Court

Ingrounds,

with the manor or royalty of Lyddc-court, in Word and Eaftry, and lands belonging to it, in 1706, to Sir Henry Furnefe, bart. of Walderfliare, and his grandfon of the fame name, dying in 1735, under age and unmarried, his eftates became veiled in his three fillers, as the three daughters and coheirs of his father Sir RoAfter bert Furnefe, in equal lhares, in coparcenary. which a partition of them having been agreed to, which was confirmed by an a6l next year, tliis manor, with the lands and appurtenances belonging to it, was allotted to Selina, the third daughter,” who afterwards married E. Dcring, efq. and entitled him to this ellate. He furvived her and afterwards fucceedcd his father in the title of baronet, and continued in the pofielfion of this ellate till 1779, when he palTed it away by fale to Mr. William Walker and Mr. James Cannon, of Deal, who are the prefent owners of it. The houfe, called the Downes houfe, is the courtlodge, but no court has been held for many years. The remaining, and by far the greateji part .

ellate, called, for dillindlion,

Lydde-court outgrounds, was

likewife in the

of the Smiths, of Wellenhanger, and was demifed by Thomas Smith, efq. of that place, to Roger Manwood, jurat of Sandwich, for a long term of years, at which time the outer downs were enwarrened for hares and rabbits. From Thomas Smythe, efq. this ellate defcended polfefiion

down

to

Philip, vilcount

Strangford, w'ho fold the

whole of it, with the manor, royalties, &c. as has been mentioned before, to Herbert Randolph, efq. who pafled away the manor and part of the lands belonging See more of the defcent of the eftates of Sir under Walderfliare, before. “

Henry Furnefe, to

t

WORD. CO

it,

by

to Sir

Henry Furnefc,

far the greatetl part

of

149

bart.

it,

and the other, being

fince called

Lychk Court

OutgroundSy to Richard Harvey, efq. of Eythorne, who in 1 720 alienated it to Sir Robert Fnrnefe, bai t, before mentioned, in whofe defcendants it continued down to Catherine, his daughter and coheir, who carried it in

marriage,

firft

Rockingham, and feof Guildford, to whom on her

to Lewis, earl of

condly to Francis, earl death in 1766, fhe devifed this eflate. He died poffelfed of it in 1790, and his grandfon, the right hon. George Auguftus, earl of Guildford, is the' prefen This eftate comprehends all that tra<5t pofTeffor of it. of land, partly Tandy, partly marfhy, and the whole nearly palturage, lying on the fouth fide of Sandwich haven, bounded on the eaft by the fca fhore, and on the weft by the ditch, along which the footway to Deal leads, and which is the eaftern boundary of Lydde-court InngroLinds.

In the year 1565, there was a fuit in the ftar chamber, refpeding a road from Sandowne gate and Sandwich, to the caftle in the Downes, which was referred

archbifhop and Sir Richard Sackville ; who awarded, that there fhould be a highway lixteen feet broad over Lyd-court grounds. to the

Sandowne, which

To called

from the

fiind

downs over

manor, which lies partly in this parilh, and partly in that of St. Clement’s, in Sandwich, within the jurifdidion of which corporation the latter part of it is. This manor was anciently the eftate of the Perots, who held the fame, as the private deeds of this name and family flievv, as high as the reign of king Henry III. Thomas de Perot died poffefted of it in the 4th year of that reign, at which time he had thofe privileges and franchifes, the fame as other manors of that time j Henry Perot, the laft of this name, at the beginning of king Edward III.’s reign, was fucceeded by John de Sandhurft, who left an only L 3 daughter it

principally

extends,

is

a

EASTRY HUNDRED. daughter and heir Chriftian, who married William de 1^0

Langley.'^ After which till It

pafifed

continued in his ddcendants to the Peytons, and thence in like manner it

asKnolton above defcribed, by fale to the Narboroughs, and afterwards by marriage to Sir Thomas D’Aeth, bart whofe grandfon Sir Narborough D’Aeth, bart. now of Knolton, is the prefent owner of it. A court baron is held for this manor. —— There are no parochial charities. The poor conflantly relieved are about twenty- five, cafually as many. This parish is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the dioceje ot Canterbury, and deanry of Sandwich. The church, which is dedicated to St. Peter and St, Paul, is a fmall mean building, having a low pointed wooden turret at the w'eft end, in which are two bells. The church confilts of a nave, tw o ifles, and a chancel, the north ifle extending only about halfway towards the weft end. In the fouth wall of the chancel is an arched tomb, on which probably was once the figure of fome perfon, who was the founder, or at leaft a *

good benefadlor towards ifle

the

building.

are feveral graveftones for

parifh

;

and an

altar

In the fouth

the Philpotts, of this

monument

for

Mr. Ralph Phil-

pott, obt. 1704.

In the church-yard are altar tombs to the memories of the fame family of Philpott.

church of Word, or Worth, has ever been cfteemed as a chapel to the mother church of Eaftry, and continues fo at this time, being accounted as a part of the fame appropriation, a further account of which may be feen in the defcription of that church before. The vicar of Eaftry is inducted to the vicarage of the church of Eaftry, with the chapels of Shrinlding and Word annexed to it.

The

” Pliilipott, p. 360. See a more particular account of the de-manor, and the feveral pofleflbrs of it under Knolton.

fcent of this

It

15*

WORD.

included with the church of Eaftry in the vahere were luation of it in the king s books. In 157^ It is

communicants one hundred and only one hundred and fourteen.

forty -four, in

1644

of this parifh, as part beneficial of the reftory of Ealfry, were demifed on a of Guildford, whofe leafe, to the late countefs dowager

The

reftorial or great tithes

younger children are now

entitled to the prefcnt in-

tereft in this leafe.

The

leflee

of the parfonage

chancel of this church.

is

bound to

repair the

p.

JJ2S \

THE TOWN AND PORT OF SANDWICH.

Xhe town of Sandwich

on the north-eaft confines of this county, about two miles from the Tea, and adjoining to the harbour of its own name, through which the river Stour flows northward into the fca at It is one of the principal cinque ports, Peppernefs the liberty of which extends over it, and it is within is

fituated

the jurifdiflion of the juftices of its own corporation. Sandwich had in antient time feveral members appertaining to it,’‘ called the antient members of the port of Sandwtch ; thefe were Fordwich, Reculver, Sarre,

but in the later charters, the memincorporated, and the bers mentioned arc Fordwich non-corporated members of Deal, Walmer, Ramfgate, and Brightlingfea, in Stonar, Sarre, all in this county, Walmer, and Stonar, Suflex but of late years, Deal, Stonar, and Deal

j

j

cinque ports, their origin and ufe, has alof the former parts of this hiftory, to ready been given in feveral ^

An account of the

which the reader

will refer.

have

|

j

|

TOWN AND PORT

OF SANDWICH.

have been taken from it; Deal, by having been in i6q 9 incorporated with the charter of a feparate jtirifdidlion, in the bounds of which Walmer is included ; and Stonar having been, by a late decifion of the court of king’s bench in 1773, adjudged to be within the jurifdidtion of the county at large. I'he firft origin of this port was owing to the decay of that ofRichborough, as will be further noticed hereafter. It was at firft called Lundenwic, from its beinc^ the entrance to the port of London, for fo fca coart, and

it

name Danes, when

retained this

of the Saxons by the

it

was, on the

until the fupplantinoit

acquired from

its

fandy fituation a new name, being from thenceforward called Sandwic, in old Latin, Sabulovicum^ that is, the fandy town, and in procefs of time, by the change of language. Sandwich.

Where

town now ftands, is fuppofed, in the Romans, and before the decay of the haven,

this

time of the or Portus RuiupimiSy to have been covered with that water, which formed the bay of it, which was fo larse that it is faid to have extended far beyond this place, on the one fide almoft to Ramfgate cliffs, and on the other near five miles in width, over the w'hole of that flat of land, on which Stonar and Sandwich too, were afterwards Built, and extending from thence up to the jefluary, which then flowed up between the Ifle of Thanet and the main land of this county. During the time of the Saxons, the haven and port of Richborough, the moft frequented of any in this part of Britain, began to decay, and fwarve up, the fe.i by degrees entirely deferting it at this place, but ftill leaving fufficient to form a large and commodious one at Sandwich, which in procefs of time, became in like manner, the ufual refort for (hipping, and arofe a flourifhing harbour in itsftead; from wMch time the Saxon fleets, as well as thofe of the Danes, are faid by the hiflorians of thofe times, to fail for the port of Sandwich; and there to lie at different times, and no further

mention

town and port mention

made of chat of

is

Richboroiigii, which being

became

thus deftroyed, Sandwich

of the port of general

the building of this town, refort; which, as well as however, lome while after feems to have taken place, and the hiit ellablilhment of the Saxons in Britain,

the

Sandwich being mentime that is found of the name of in the life or St. Wiltioned and occurring as a port, is written by Eddiiis Stephafred, archbilhop of York, company, profpere in which it is faid, he and his mis ;

fuaviter pervenerunt, happily in portum Sandwich, at que of Sandwich, and plcafantly arrived in the harbour fomewhat which happened about the year 665, or 666, the Saxons ip than 200 years after the arrival of

more

During the time of the Danes

Britain.

infefling this

tranfadions hapkinfydom, feveral of their principal lo much pened at this place,’^ and the port of it became

Emma’s life ftiles frequented, that the author of queen of all the Englim ports ; Sandwub it the mott noted famoftjmus. Old eji omnium Anglorum porimm From the time of the origin of the town ofSandin the feveral kings wich, the property of it was verted lo till who reigned over this country, and continued gave it, as the lands kincr Ethelred, in the year 979, Chrift-church, in Canterbury, his inheritance, to of

free

from

all

fecular fervice

and

fifeal

tribute, except

the repairing of bridges and the repelling invafions, and

obtained After which king Canute, having building of this pwn, and the kingdom, finifhed the the realm at his difpofal. all parts and places in

caftles.''

having

H. Sax. an. 851,993. Ethelwerd, 1 . 3, c. 3. 612,. 6. Aflerii anii Flor. Worcefter, 9, 582, Walfingham. p. 42?- Alfred, an. 1002 ct leq. 1007.. .

SeeChron c and Hunt y

1

6 .^ S Dunelm. 614..

tioveden, 166, 170, 17 1. Brompton, 887, 891 . Kilb. Surv. p. 239. 4,io. Malmfbur. cap. 55. and Saxon, occurs at the beginning Latin = This charter, in of the Gofpels in the library of St. of a very old MSS. book col.

,

lohii’s collecre, in is


Oxford

;

it

,

.

.

was engraved by Dr. Rawlmfon

m

printed in Boys’s Collections, with a tranflation, p.

Dugd. Mon.

vol.

i.

p. 21.

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J

SANDWICH. coming

as

to

tlic

poficfrion of

it

>55 by conc^ncnr, by

his

the charter in the year 1023, gave, or rather reftored it, port of Sandwich, with the profits of the water of on both Tides of the Ifream, for the Tupport of that

church, and the fiiffenance of the monks there. Soon after this, the town of Sandwich increafed the greatly in fize and inhabitants, and on account of

haven, and the fervice done by the fliipping belonging to it, was of fuch eftimation, ports ; and that it was made one of the principal cinque king Edward the Confelfor’s days, it contained three

commodity and

uie of

its

in

hundred and feven houfes, and was an hundred within as appears by the itfelf; and it continued increafing, taken in defeription of it, in the furvey of Domefday, anno 1080, in the 1 5th year of the Conqueror’s reign, which it is thus entered, under the title of the lands of the archbilhop

j

:

j

cri,-

f

i

own proper hundred. Uhis borough clothing of the monks, the archbi/hop holds, and it is of the and yields the like fervice to the king as Dover ; and that befoie king Edthis the men of that borough tejiify, Sandwice

ward gave

lies in its

the

fame

to the

Holy Erinity,

paid^ to the

it

Edward' s death king fifteen pounds. At the time of king IVhen the archbijhop received it was not put to ferme. and forty thoufand herit, it paid forty pounds of ferme, in the year in zvhich this the monks, the food of paid fifty pounds offei me, defeription was made, Sanuuic Edivard the Herrings as above. In the time of king manthere were there three hundred and feven

rings to

&

Confejfor

fions tenanted,

now

there are Jeventy fix more, that

gether three hundred

to-

eighty three. ^

,

,

j

of the bifhop of Baieux s lands, And of the manor of Golfollows, under the defeription

under the

as

and

is

Icfbcrgc

title

i

In Efirei hundred, thirty

two .

^

Sanduuic, the archbijhop has

with plats of land belonging to this Golkfberge) and they pay forty-two (hiU hngs

houfes,

manor, (viz.

in

TOWN and port of

156 lin^s

and

eight

pence,

and Adelnuold has one yokcy

which is worth ten /hillings. Thefe houfes, with all the liberties which the bifhop of Baieux had in Sandwich, had been given by him to Chrift-church, in Canterbury, and confirmed to it in the year 1075, by his brother the Conqueror.* Afterwards king Henry II. granted to the monks the full enjoyment of all thole liberties and cuftoms in Sandwich, which they had in the time of king Henry his grandfather, that is, the port and toll, and all maritime cufloms in this port, on both fides of the water, that is, from Eadburgate unto Merksflete, and the Ifnall boat to ferry acrofs it, and that no one fhould have any right there except them and their fervants. The town, by thefe continued privileges, and the advantages it derived from the great refort to the port, increafed much in wealth and number of inhabitants j and notwithftanding, in the year 1217, anno 2 king Hejiry III. great part of the town was burnt by the French, yet the damage feems foon to have been recompenced by the favors bellowed on it by the feveral kings, in confideration of the fervices

it

had continually

fhipping of this port, to the nation. The firll example of royal favor, being fliewn by the lad-mentioned king, was in his iith year, who not afforded, in

the

only confirmed the

cudoms

the further grant of a

before granted, but added

market

town and port,** and in his 13th year granted thecudom of taking twopence for each cafk of wine received into it. After which, the prior and convent of Chrid-church, in the 18th year of king Edward I. gave up in exchange for other lands elfewhere, to his queen Eleanor, all their rights, podelTions, and privileges here, excepting their houfes and keys, and a free palfage in the "

cart. ^

Dugd. Mon. vol

i.

p. 22.

to this

Regift. Eccliae Chrifti, Cant,

62, 830. Claus II king Henry III. m. 13 and 20.

haven.

SANDWICH.

157 haven, in the fmall boat, called the vcre boat,*^ and free liberty for themfelves and their tenants to buy and fell toll free, which the king confirmed that year ; and as a favor to the town, he placed the ftaple for wool in it for fome time. The exception above-mentioned, was afterwards found to be fo very prejudicial, as well as inconvenient, that king Edward III. in his 38th year, gave them other lands in Elfex, in exchange for all their rights, priviAfter leges, and pofleflions, in this town and port. which king Richard II. in his firfi; year, removed the ftaple for wool from Queenborough, where it had been for fome time, hither. During the whole of this period from the time of the conqueft, this port continued the general rendezvous of the royal fleets, and was as conftantly vifited by the fcveral monarchs, who frequently embarked and returned again hither from France ; the confequence of which was, that the town became fo flourifhing, that it had increafed to between eight and nine hundred houfes inhabited, divided into three pariflies ; and there were of good and able mariners, belonging to the navy of it, above the number of 1300; fo that when there was occafion at any time, the mayors of it, on the receipt of the king’s

letters, furniflied, at

the town’s charges,

of armed fnips of war, which were of fuch continued annoyance to the French, that they in return made it a conftant objeifl of their revenge. Accordingly, in the i6th year of king Henry VI. they landed here and plundered the greatelt part of the inhabitants, as they did again in the 35th year of it ; but but this not anfwering the whole of their purpofe, to the Teas, fifteen

fail

Charles Vlll. king of France, to deftroy

it

entirely,

This ferry and the profits of it were afterwards granted by kings to fevcral different perfons, till at laft king fucceeding the Edward 111. tn his 24 th year granted it to the brethren of St. Bartholomew’s hofpital, wicii wliom it afterwards remained. '

fent

TOWN AND PORT OF

158

men, who landing in the night, long and bloody conflidt gained podefllon of the

lent hither four thoufand after a

town, and having wafted it with fire and fword, flew the greateft part of the inhabitants ; and to add to thefe misfortunes it was again ranfacked by the earl of Warwick, in the lame reign. 'I'o

preferve the town from fuch

difiifters in

future,

king Edward IV. new walled, ditched, and fortified it with bulwarks, and gave befides, for the fupport of them, one hundred pounds yearly out of the cuftomhoufe here ; which, together with the induftry and efforts of the merchants, who frequented this haven, the goodnefs of which, in any ftorm or contrary wind, when they were in danger from the breakers, or the Goodwin Sands, afforded tliem a fafe retreat; in a very time reftored it again to a flourifhing ftate, infomuch, that before the end of that reign, the clear yearly receipt of the cuftoms here to that king, amounted to above the fum of 16 or i 7,000!.'' and the town had ninety five flups belonging to it, and above fifteen lliort

hundred failors. But this fiinfhine of profperity lafted no long time afterwards, 'for in king Henry Vll.’s time, the river Stour, or as it was at this place antiently called, the Wantfume, continued to decay fo faft, as to leave on each fide at low water, a confiderable quantity of falts, which induced cardinal archbiftiop Moreton, who had moft part of the adjoining lands belonging to his biffiopric, for his

them

own

private advantage, to inclofe and

Sane ; which example was followed from time to time, by feveral owmers of the lands adjoining, by which means the water was deprived of its ufual courfe, and the haven felt the lofs of wall

in,

near and about

by a hafty decay. Notwnthftanding which, fo late as the firft year of king Richard III. fliips failed up this haven as high as Richborough, for that year, as ap-

it

^

See Cotton’s Records, p. 650, 659.

pears

SANDWICH.

159

pears by the corporation books of Sandwich, the mayor ordered a Spanilb (hip, lying on the out fide of Kich-

borough, to be removed.' Leland, who wrote in the reign of Henry VIII. gives the following defcription of Sandwich, as it was “ Sandwich, on the farther fide of the in his time. ryver of Sture, is neatly welle walled, where the town ftonddeth moft in jeopardy of enemies. The refidew ot the town is diched and miidde waulled. Ther be yn the town iiii principal gates, iii paroche chyrches, of the which fum fuppofe that St. Maries was furntyme a nunnery. Ther is a place of White Freres, and an hofpital withowt the town, fyrft ordened for maryners delefid and hurt. There is a place where monkes of Chrill-church did refort, when they were lords of the towne. The caryke that was fonke in the haven, in pope Paulus tyme, did much hurt to the haven and gether a great bank. I he grounde felf from Sandwich to the haven, and inward to the land, is caullid

Sanded bay.”

The

finking of this great fldp of pope Paul IV. in the very mouth of the haven, by which the waters had not their free courfe as before, from the fand and mud

gathering round about it, together with the innings of the lands on each fide the 11 ream, had fuch a fatal effc(5t towards the decay of the haven, that in the time ot king Edward VI. it was in a manner deflroyed and loll, and the navy and mariners dwindled to almoll nothing, and die houfes then inhabited in this town did not exceed two hundred, the inhabitants of which were greatly impoverifhed j the yearly cuftoms of the town, by reafon of the infufficiency of the haven, were fo de-

was fcarcely enough arifing from it the cullomer his fee. I'his occafioned two

ficient, that there

to fatisfy

feveral commifiions to be granted, one in the 2 d year of that reign, and another in the 2 d year ofc}ueen Edi*

See Boys’s Samlwich, p. 67S.

zabeih,

l60

TOWN AND PORT

OF

zabeth, to exaniine the ftate of the haven, and make d return of it; in conltquence of the firft of which, a cut was begun by one John Rogers, which, however, was foon left in an unfinifhed flate, tliough there

new

X

what was done towards making this canal dill remaining, on the grounds between the town and Sandowne calile ; and in confequence of the fccond, other reprefentations and reports were made, one of which w'as, that the intended cut would be ufelefs, and of no good tfFe£l. Whether thefe dilferent reports were the occafion that no further progrefs was made towards this work, and the reftoration of this haven, or the very great expence it was edimated' at, and the great difficulty of raifing fo large a fum, being io,oocl. which the queen at that time could no ways fpare, but fo it was, that nothing further was done in it. The haven being thus abandoned by the queen, and becoming almod ufelefs, excepting to velfels of the fmall burthen before mentioned, the town itfclf would before long have become impoveriffied and fallen are evident traces of

wholly to decay, had it not been mod fingularly preferved, and raifed again, in fome mealure, to great wealth and pioiperity, occafioned by the perfccution for religion in Brabant and Flanders, which communicated to all the Proiedant parts of Europe, the paper, filk, w oollen, and other valuable manufadures of Flanders and France, almod peculiar at that time to thofe countries, and till then, in vain attempted elfewhere j bodies up to Lontheir fituations with great judgment, didributing themfelves, with the queen’s licence, through England, fo as not to interfere too much the manufadurers of them don, and afterwards chofe

came

in

with one another. The workers in fayes, baize, and fbnncl in particular, fixed themfelves here, at Sandwich, at the mouth of a haven, by which they might have an cafy communication with the metropolis, and other parts of this kingdom, and afforded them like-

l6t

SANDV/rCH. wife an eafy export to the continent.

Thefe manufac-

turers applied accordingly to the queen, for her protec-

tion

and licence

her reign,

flie

which purpofe, in the third year^of caufed letters patent to be pafled, diredl;

for

ed to the mayor, &c. to give liberty to fuch of them, as Ihould be approved of by the archbifhop, and bifhop of London, to inhabit here for the purpofe of exercifing thofe manufaftures, which had not been ufed before in England, or for fiihing in the Teas, not exceeding the number of twenty-five houfciaolders, accounting to every houfhold not above twelve perfons, and there to exercite their trade, and have as many fervants as were necelTary for carrying them on, not exceeding the number above mentioned j thefe immediately repaired to Sandwich, to the number, men, women, and children, of four hundred and fix perfons of which, eight only were mafiers in the trade. A body of gardeners likewife difeovered the nature of the foil about Sandwich to be exceedingly favourable to the growth of ail efculent plants, and fixed themfelves here, to the great advantage of this town, by the increafe of inhabitants, the employment of the poor, and the money which circulated ; the landholders likewife had the great advantage of their rents being confiderably increafed, and the money paid by the town and neighbourhood for vegetables, inftead of being lent from hence for the purchafe of them, remained within the bounds of it. The vegetables grew here in great perfedlion, but much of them was conveyed at an eafy expence, by water carriage, to London, and from thence difperled over different parts of the kingdom. Thefe ftrangers, by their indufiry and prudent con;

notwithfianding the obffrudlions they met with, from the jealoufy of the native tradefmen, and the avarice of the corporation, very foon role to a flourifiiing cUidt,

condition. In the 8th year of this reign, anno 156

;;,

it

appears

by the return, made by the queen’s command, that there VOL. X. .

TOWN AND PORT

162

there were then in this

town 420

OF

houfliolds,

of which

291 were Englifh, and 129 Walloons, and feven perfons were in want of habitations, namely, three merchants, one ferivener, two lurgeons, and one mafter of fence. That there were at that time employed at Sandand in the fillierles, nine crayers, from fourteen to twenty-four cons; five boats, from fix to ten tons ; three hoys, from twenty to forty wich,

in the coafting trade,

tons

Tailors fixty-two.

;

few years, became much more numerous, infomuch, that in the year 1582, there were three hundred and fifty-one Dutch fettlers in

The

firangers here,

Sandwich,

in a

exercifed fifty-nine different trades or and though the haven ftill further de-

who

occupations

;

cayed, yet the trade, populoufnels, and wealth of the town increafed by their means. In this (fate Sandwich continued till the next reign of king James I. when the

cuftoms here amounted to 2,926!. per annum ; but by that prince’s fetting up the company of merchant adventurers, and appropriating to them the trade to *

Germany, the Low Countries, &c.

this place

foon

fell

and though the defeendants of the Dutch and Walloon maniifadurers fiill remained here,

to decay again,

they not long afterwards entirely difeontinued thofe manufadlures, they had originally carried forward, and mixed among the reft of the inhabitants, in the exercife

of the various occupations ufed in the town ; and thus Sandwich, though it has fince increafed in the number of its houfes and inhabitants, yet having loft its manufadlures, the principal part of its trade, it was deprived likewife of that wealth and repute it had derived from them, and in procefs of time has dwindled down to the

fame obfeurity as other country towns. The town of Sandwich was firft incorporated by king Edward III. by the name of mayor, jurats and commonaltie of the town and port of Sandwich, before which they were privileged by the name of barons, as they were at that time, with all fuch liberties as they

had

SANDWrCH.

163

had had granted to them by king Edward the Confeffor, or at any time afterwards; and by this incorporation this town continued to be governed, till Charles If. in his 36th year, granted to it a new charter, which not having been enrolled in chancery, an information, in the nature of a quo warranto^ was exhibited againfl: the corporation upon which it was agreed to furrender the charter into the king’s hands, and a new one was immediately afterwards granted ; but this lad:, as well as another charter, by king James If. and forced on the corporation, being made fubfervient to his own purpofes, were afterwards annulled by that king, by a proclamation in his 4th and laft year, which was made ;

corporations to their antient charters* rights, and privileges ; fince which, this corporation has afted under its former charter, granted in the 36th to reftore

all

year of king Charles II by which it is made to confift of a mayor and twelve jurats, who are ex officio, juftices of peace. The mayor, or in his abfence, his deputy, is

coroner, within

and he

is

all

the liberties of the town and port,

the returning officer at the eleftion of barons

municipal elections, decrees, and ordinances, are made by the whole corporate body, afiemblcd in the Guildhall, at a Common AfiTcmbly, convened by the found of the common horn; to ferve in parliament.

All

the

there are two regular and fixed Common Afi'emblies every year, one on the firft Monday after the feaft of St. Andrew, for the choice of mayor, and the other,

on the following Thurfday, for the eledtion of officers ; occafional meetings of the corporation are held at the pleafure of the mayor. The court of general feffions and gaol delivery, at which all freemen are called to attend, was formerly held quarterly, but now only lialf

A

always held at the petty feffions, which is a monthly adjournment of the general Courts of confcience and of piepowder were feffions. formerly held in this town, but they have been long yearly.

court of record

is

difufed.

M

2

The

^

TOWN AND PORT

164

The mayor

OF

chofen annually, by the mayor, jurats, and commonalty, at a common atfembly, in the Guildhall ; he carries a black wand in his hand, as a badge is

mayor of Fordwich, a member of this port, probably for fome delinquency committed by the mayor of this place ; for all the other ports, and their members corporate, bear white ones. There are at prefcnt twelve jurats, exclufive of the mayor, who are chofen out of the common-councilmen, by the whole body corporate. There is a

ot his

office,

the lame as the

fteward and a recorder, ufually a barrifter at law, who is appointed at a court of record, and a town clerk appointed for life, a deputy recorder to hold his office,

during the pleafure of the recorders the mayor, deputymayor, jurats, recorder, and deputy recorder, arejuftices of the peace. There is a land and water treafurer, two ferjeants at mace, with other inferior officers, neceh’ary for carrying forward the bufinefs of the corporation, which laft-mcntioned officers are eledted annually.

There

is

a fair, for drapery, habcrdafficry,

hardware, &c. held on December the 4th, being Old St. Clement’s day, and continues two market days; and a market, which is weekly held on Wednefdays and Saturdays. It has the grant of pleading, and of being impleaded, and of having a common feal,a power

ffioes,

of pui-chafing and holding lands and tenements, not exceeding 200I. per. annum, with a non obfiante to the ftatute of mortmain. It has the privilege of one large and one fmaller filver maces, and other immunities and liberties, the fame as the other corporations, within the jurifdidlion of the cinque ports. The arms of the tov/n and port of Sandwich, are thofe of the cinque ports, viz. Per pale gules and azure ^ three deml lions^ pajjant guardant, or, conjoined in p.ale^

many hulks of [hips, argent. A court of requefts, for the recovery of final) debts Sandwich, and the neighbouring pariffies, was efta-

to as

in

bliffied

;

SANDWICH.

165

here by an a6l in 1786 ; all fines and forfeitures, not appropriated by the a6t, belong to the corbliflied

poration.

The

liberties of the corporation were perambulated by Sir Stephen de Penchefter, warden of the cinque ports, at the latter end of king Henry III.’s reign, who came hither, and was attended for this purpofe, by the mayor and commonalty, colleded together by the found of the common iiorn/ Th E TOWN OF Sandwich is five miles from Deal, over the Sandowns, by the horfe road, and about feven miles by the coach road, through Ham and F inglefham twelve miles from Dover and Canterbury ; fix miles from Ramfgate, and nine miles from Margate. It was firfi; built, as it fhoLild feem, on a point of land, left by the retiring waters of the Portiis Rutupinmy and now extends along the fouthern fhore of the river Stour, which from hence to the fea is called Sandwich haven the town communicates with Stonar and the Ifle of Thanet, by means of a bridge, which draws up for the benefit of mafted fhips palfing through it, having been firfi: built by an a6t in 1755, and again lately rebuilt with great improvements, being vefied in the mayor and corporation, who receive the toll colledled for the pafiage over it. From its exceeding low fituation, on what was once the bed of the fea, bounded by the prefent haven, or creek, on one fide, and a vafi quantity of wet and damp marfhes on the other fides of it, this town cannot poffibly be healthy, or even a defirable place of habitation. It is in fiiape an oblong fquare ; the houfes are old fafhioned and ill built, and the fireets, which are in general but narrow and ill* convenient lanes, little adapted either for carriages or even horfes ; an exception to this, however, is High-ftreet, which k of good breadth, and much better built. It was formerly divided into ;

‘‘

See Boys’s Colle6li on for Sandwich, p. 535.

M

3

eight

l66

TOWN AND PORT

OF

purpofe of defence, In each of which were two conflables ; but from the year 1437, there have been twelve wards or diftrifts, over each of which a jurat prcfides, and nominates his conftable and deputy conffable. There are three paridies in Sandwich, and it is fdd there were formerly four churches

eight wards, for the

though now but three ; St. James s church, which flood in the weflern part of the town having been defecrated in king Edward VI. ’s reign. The prefent three churches are, St. Mary’s, St. Peter’s, and St. Clement’s chirch, all which will be more particularly mentioned hereafter ; and there are befides, three licenfed places of worlbip for the DifTenters. The Didenters were formerly very numerous in Sandwich, but their number is now much diminifhed. I'he Prefbytenans have a meeting houfe in the corn-market; the Baptifls have a licenfed place of worfhip in the fame market, and the Methodifts have one in Luckfboat-ftreet. At the entrance of the town from Canterbury, is the grammar fchool. In the centre of the town, near St. Peter’s church, is the market or butchery, and near the fouth part of it, the cattle and fifli markets, and clofe to them the guild, or town-hall, which was built in the year 1579, in the mayoralty of Edward Wood, the^initials of w'hofe name, with the date, remain over the door. There is an eftablifhment of the cuftoms here, (the cuftom-houfe being near the keys, at the end of the bridge) under the management of a collector, deputy comptroller, fupervifor, and other officers. in

it,

Much

of the fortified walls

ftill

remain, feemingly built

king Edward IV. ’s reign, efpccially on the north and well Tides, on the other fides it is defended only by a rampart and ditch. There were, till of late years, five gates, Canterbury gate, taken down in 1784,

in

Woodnefborough

gate,

Sandowne

gate, Fifher’s gate,

and New'gate. Two of thefe were formerly called St. Mary’s gate, and Ive’s gate. Sandowne gate was built, and the bridge repaired, at the charge of Sir Henry Furnefe,

SANDWICH.

167

parliament in 1 706 J and mention is made in antient writings of David’s gate, over againft which was a place, called the Bar*

Furnefe, bart. one of the barons

in

and Fryer’s gate, which was at one end of the corn market, leading down to the fricry of the Carmebut thefe feem to be interior gates, in the inner lites parts of the town. In 1787 an a£t pafled for new paving, cleanfing, lighting, watching, and otherwife improving and ornamenting this town, which has fince been carried into execution, and will no doubt, as far as is poflible, rebican

;

medy many of thofe difigreeable before fubfifted

in

inconveniences, which

it.

not well fupplied with good water ; the fprings lie high, and fill the wells with very indifferent water 3 but there is every where, at the depth of from forty to fifty-eight feet, a firatum of flint, which when once penetrated by the borer, yields a plentiful fupply of fine water but as the land drains are not kept out

The town is

;

of the wells by (teeming, the inhabitants have not that advantage they would otherwife have from them. The other fupplies are from the haven and the delf, which flream or canal, railed in fome parts above the level of the grounds, through which it runs, and was made in king Ediward l.’s reign, for the purpofe of furniOiing the inhabitants of Sandwich with water. It begins at a place called the Roaring Gutter, is

an

artificial

and running through the town, difeharges itfelf into the haven, near Canterbury gate, being cleanfed throughout its whole length, at the expence of the corporation. In the year 1621, a licence was granted to john Gafon, elq. ot London, to ered water works, and to con-

He pipes lor the benefit of the town. ‘ereded accordingly a water mill, but died before the works were compleated, and the defign fell to tne vey water

in

ground.^ «

See Boys’s Sandwich, p. 705, 790*

M

4

By

^

TOWN AND PORT

l68

OF

By what has been laid before, it appears that in king Edward the ConfdTor’s time, there were in Sandwich three hundred and feven inhabited hoiifes

;

at the time

of the taking of the furvey of Domefday, in the Conqueror’s reign, three hundred and eighty-three about the time of king Richard II. it had increafed to more than eight hundred houfes ; after which, from the misfortunes it met with, it became fo much diminiflicd of inhabitants and impoverilbed, that in Edward VI. ’s time, the houles did not exceed two hundred , in queen Elizabeth’s reign it feems to have fomewhat increafed, for in the 8th year of it, the town contained four hundred and twenty houfliolds, and there were Ibme perfons wanting habitations. ;

In the year 1689, the perfons aficfild to the poll tax,

were

in

number 1447.

*77^5

town

contained within the walls five hundred and fixty-two houfes, and 2213 inhabitants j that is not quite four to a houfe, and at prefent they are much the fame number. The soil about Sandwich^ to the eafiward, is a deep fandy loam, and the land there was, by the Dutch fet-

wholly appropriated to the growth of cfculent plants, legumes, feeds, and other produce of the kitchen garden ; thefe were the earlidt gardens, for the fupply of public markets, of any in the kingdom, and Canterbury and Dover markets, are ftill in a good meafure tlers,

fupplied from them, where the garden fluff and feeds, carried from hence, bear the preference of any others, efpecially

the

and are diftinguiflied by the carrots, &c. notwithftanding which, only fome part of the grounds, formerly applied to the ufe of gardening remain, fo at prelent, the greater portion of them being in tillage lor corn. /I'he lands carrots,

name of Sandwich

to the foi/ihward, com'ift of a deep, rich mould, are highly fertilized by manure from the town.

and

Thl haven

of Sandzvich, fome account of which has been given before, in the early hiflory of this place,

begins

SANDWICH. begins at the town, and gives

169

name

to the river Stour

from hence to the mouth of it at Peperncfs. 1 he efforts of the corporation and inhabitants of this town, as well as their applications to the crown, for the pnfervation of the haven, have been from time to time both ftrenuous and very frequent, from king Richard 111 ’s reign to the prefent time. So late as queen Anne’s reign, anno 1705, commiflloners were fent

for

down by the queen’s command to make a furvey a new haven, who reported that fuch a harbour

might be of general advantage to the public but nothing further was then done towards it. This occa;

fioned petitions to be prefented to the houfe of

mons

in

Downs

comnew harbour near the till the year 1744 when

1736, praying for a

and there it refted an addrefs was ordered by the houfe to be prefented to the king, that he would fend proper and fkilful perfons to view the baven, and examine whether a better and more commodious harbour might not be made from the town of Sandwich into he Downs, near Sandown cafile, fit for the reception and fecurity of large merchant Ihips and men of war ; in confequence of which it was rcfolved by the houfe, that fuch a harbour might be made, and be of great ufe and advanj

,

t

tage to the naval power-of Great Britain, by preferving fliips in dilfrefs,

ipeedily refitting

them

for fca,

and by

faving the lives of many of the king’s fubjects j and in the time of war, more particularly be a ready means of bridling Dunkirk, of guarding the mouth of the

and prote 6ling the country from invafion and infults ; and an ellimate was made of the whole expence of it, which amounted to 389,168!. exclufive of the grounds to be purchafed and there can be no lofs to judge why this great work, fuppofed to be undertaken by government, was fufpended, when it is confidered, that it was at a time when the kingdom was engaged in an expeniive war both with France and Spain. river,

;

After

lyo

TOWN AND PORT

OF

After this there were petitions prefented to the houfe, in oppofition to the above plan, that a tnore convenient harbour might be made, at ornearRamtgate, capable of containing a greater number of merchantmen, and fhips of war, on account of the ad-

vantageous fit nation of the place, from which there would be a laving to the public of fevcral hundred thoufand pounds, &c. And there was a petition likewife from Sandwich, fetting forth, that if piers were extended into the fea at Ramfgate, it would in a fliorc time fwerve up the mouth of Sandwich haven, ruin the trade of the town, and by flopping the couiie of the river Stour into the fea, would drown the lands between Sandwich and Canterbury. But the houfe, after due confideration, gave the preference to the

making of a harbour

at

Ramfgate, and an aSt palled

accordingly for that purpofe, as well as for cleanfing, amending, and preferving the haven of Sandwich, in 1749, anno -22 George 11 .“ By this ad, to quiet the oppofition made by Sandwich, a yearly lum of 200I.

was granted out

and dues of Ramfgate purpofe, which fum is now

ot the proBts

harbour, towards the latter blended among the reft of the revenues of the corporation. This ad, as well as another in 1765, were

both repealed by a fubfequent ad in 1792, palled for the further maintenance and improvement of Ramfgate harbour, in which ad is continued the like provifion, for the cleanfing, amending, and preferving of this haven of Sandwich, and a further power veiled in the juflices of Sandwich, with refped to the punilliment of perfons, who may remove the buoys, mooring pods, beacons, &c. or take ballall from the channel fides or fiiores of the haven, without the licence of

the

mayor and

jurats,

or the major part of them,

See an account of the Journals of the houfe of commons. leveral methods taken, the petitions and reports from time to **

time, relating to the

making

a harbour at Sandwich, in Smeaton’s

Report on Ramfgate harbour,

fedl.

i.

p. 1.

under

SANDWICH. under

171

but notwithftanding tills provilion, and every other fupport given for the prefervation of this haven, it is at prelent but of fmaii account, and by its flill further apparent decay every year, feems haftening to its total ruin. The exports at this haven are now confined to the produce of the neighbouring country for a few miles round, and the imports moftly to fhop goods, and their hands, 8cc.

other necefiary articles for the town and the adjoining country ; for which purpofe there are feveral hoys,

which fliips

far as

from London, though there are a few of larger fize, which at times make voyages as Wales, Scotland, Sweden, Norway, and the Balfail

to and

From

tic.

the frequent refort to this port, as the ufual

place of embarkation, efpecially for our kings, (whole royal

fleets

conflantly rendezvoufed in

tliis

haven)

from thefe parts to the continent and back again, there mull of courle have happened at it a feries of remarkable tranfaftions and occurrences, from the decay in the reign of queen Elizabeth, the principal ones of which are fo interwoven with public hiflory, that it is needlefs to re-

earlieft period to the

capitulate

them

became the

here.

time of

its

During

town the French, and

that interval this

objed: of vengeance to

was frequently fpoiled and burnt by them, in their feveral attackson it.* In 1597 the plague raged at Sandwich, as it did again in the year 1635, which continued w'ith great violence for the greatcfl part of the two next years.

On March

12, 1637, there were feventy-eight houfes vifiled, and one hundred and eighty-eight perfons inOn June 30, twenty-four houfes and tenefected.

Lord

Littleton’s Life of king Ville de Calais, par Lede la Henry II. T. Sprott Chron. Hift. febre. Rym. Feed. vol. iii. p. 427. vol. v. p. 594. voK ix. p. ’

See Sim. Dunelm, col. 185.

385. Hollinfliead and Stow Chron. Harris’s Hill, of Kent, p. 273. Boys’s Sandwich, p. 676. Nichols’s Frogrefles of queen Elizabeth.

ments

172 ments were

TOWN AND PORT

OF

up, in which were one hundred and from July 6th to 06lober 3th, there three perfons were buried in St. Clement’s pariih, about ten every week, who died of the plague ; and it again raged here in 1643, when there were one hundred and nine houfes infeded, and one hundred and fixty-four perfliut ;

fons that needed

A

relief.

dreadful ftorm happened

on Nov. 27, 1703, in the morning; the damage done by which, in the town of Sandwich, was eftimated at 30C0I. The cinqjje ports, as well as their two antlent towns of Rye and VVinchei.'ea, have each of them the privilege of returning members^ ufually ffiled barons, to 'parliament.

The

of them,

in the

is

return that

firft

42d

is

year of king

found

for

Edward

any

IIl.’s

reign.

The following

is

are to be found of the

a list of fuch returns

as

barons returned to ferve in

parliament for the town and port of Sandwich, from the beginning of queen Elizabeth’s reign.

IN

THE TIME OF QUEEN ELIZABETH.

Years of the Feign, ifl.

5 th.

(id’e.

Wejiminfier,

Names

of the Barons in Parliament.

Roger Manwood, John I'yfar. Roger Manwood,

efq.

Richard Perot, gent. 13th.

Roger Manwood,

fergeant at

law,

John Manwood, 14th.

gent.

Roger Manwood, fergeant

at

law,’'

John Boys. On his being made juftice of the Peake, gent, was chol^n in his room. ^

common

pleas,

Edward

SANDWICH. Ygars of the Reign,

.

Names

173

of the Barons in Parliament.

27th. At PVeJiminJler

Edward Peake, Edward Wood.

28th,

The

31ft.

(lime.

Peter

Man wood,

Edward Peake,

gent.

The fame. The fame.

35 ^ 1^39th.

Sir

43 ^^-

George Fane,*

Edward Peake, IN

gent.

THE TIME OF KING JAMES Sir

ifl.

1

efq.

I.

George Fane,

Edward Peake, efq.™ Sir Thomas Smith,

2th.

Sir

Samuel Peyton,

18th.

Sir

Edwyn

21ft.

Sir

bart.

Sandys, Sir Robert Hatton."

Robert Hatton, Francis Drake, efq.

IN THE TIME OF KING CHARLES ift. .

ift.

Sir

Henry Wootton,

Sir

Robert Sutton.

I.

Sir John*Siickling,®

Peter Peake, gent. * Boys’s ColledHons; according to the preceding parliament.

Brown

Willis, the fame as

“ In the room of whom lohn Griffith was chofen in 1608. " Sir Robert Hatton’s eleftion was declared void, and John

Borough was

cliolen in his room. Being returned iikewife for Norwich, he made his eledlion for that place, and Sir Edward Boys, jun or, was elected in his °

place.

3 ^-

TOWN AND PORT OP

174

Yeais of the Reign,

Names

^c.

John

3d. At PVepninfter.

of the Barons in Parliament.

Philipott,

Peter Peake, efqrs. Sir

15th.

John Manwood,

Natli. Finch, fergeant at law. Sir

16th.

Thomas Peyton,

Edward

Partheriche, gent.

THE TIME OF KING CHARLES

IN

bart.^

-

II.'’

2th.

1660,

Colonel Henry Oxenden, James Thiirbarne, efq.

13th.

1661.

Hon. Edward Montague,^

1678.

James Thurbarne, efq. Sir James Oxenden, James Thurbarne, efq.

1679.

The

fame.

The

fame.

1

31ft.

31ft.



32d. At Oxford 168 G

IN 1 ft.

.

THE TIME OF KING JAMES

Wejiminjler,

At

1685.

John Strode, efq. Samuel Pepys, efq.*

THE TIME OF KING WILLIAM AND

IN

jP,

.

II.

1688.

Q.

MARY.

James Oxenden, bart. John Thurbarne, elq.

Sir

during this parliament, and in the room fecond fon of the earl of Warwick, of him, Charles Rich, was chofen in 164.5. Journals of the houfe of commons, vol.iv. During iUt inter regmm were chofen, in 1654, Tho. Kelfey, gent. 1659, Richard Meredith, i 65(T, James Thurbarne, efq. p

He wascliGbled

to

fit

efq.





efq. James Thurbarne, gent. On his death, John Strode, efq. ‘

®

He made

was chofen.

his

elee^ion

for

was chofen in 1665. Harwich, and Sir Philip Parker

.

2d.



SANDWICH.

'

Years of the Reign, idc.

Names

IV‘tjlminjier.

2d. At

1

2th.

13th.



1 -—

1695.

1698.

John Taylor, Edward Brent, J.

00



r;oi.

III

efqrs.*

Thurbarne, fergeantat law,

John Michell,

-

at law,

Brent, elq.

THE TIME OF KING WILLIAM

7th. -

loth.

Thurbarne, fergeant

Edward

1690.

IN

J.

of the Batons in Parliament.

efq.

Henry Furnefe, John Taylor, efq. Sir Henry Furnefe, Sir

Sir Janies

Oxenden,

bare.

IN THE TIME OF QUEEN ANNE.

ift.

4th.

7th. o^

1

2th.

——

—1 —1 1—



1702.

John Michell,

efq.

Sir Elenry Furnefe, bait.

0



Sir

Henry Furnefe,

bart.

Jofiah Burchett, efq.* •

The

fame.*

1710.

The

fame.

1713-

Henry Oxenden, John Michell, efq.

'-J

0 CO

Sir

bart.

IN THE TIME OF KING GEORGE Sir

I.

Henry Oxenden,

Thomas D’Aeth,

bart.’'

efq.

f He

died in 1698, and John Thurbarne, elq. was chofen in room. “ He was expelled the houfe in 1701, and John Michell, efq. was chofen in his room. his

He vacated his feat by accepting the- place of fecretary of marines, and fecretary to the lord warden, and was re-ele<5led in 1708. "

“ ^

On Furnefe’s deceafe On his death in 1720,

in 1715, J. Michell, efq. Sir Geo. Oxenden, bart.

was chofen. was choien.

TOWN AND PORT Names

Yiars of the Reign,

Sir

71b. NtH^eftminfer,

of the Barons in Farliament.

George Oxenden,

THE TIME OF KING GEORGE

ift.

1727-

7th.

1734-

The The

14th.

1741*

Sir

21ft.

1747-

fame.

George Oxenden, bart. John Pratt, efq. Sir George Oxenden, bart.

1754-

IN ift.

7th.

THE TIME OF KING GEORGE

.i—i

24th.

1761.

——

Henry, vifeount Conyngham. George Hay, LL. D.*"

1768.

Henry, vifeount Conyngham

——

1774.

11 ——

M

CO

0



1784.

=>

efq.'=

Philip Stephens, efq.

Richard Sutton,

bart.

Philip Stephens, efq.

Charles Brett, efq.

In 172.5 he was

clci^ccl

efq.'^

Philip Stephens, efq.

Sir

0

*

III.



William Hey, 0

elq.'^

John Cleveland, efq. Claudius Amyand, erq.**

Philip Stephens,

14th.

H.

fame.

John Cleveland, a8th.

bart.^

jofiah Burchett, efq.

j- 22.

IN

-OF



He

made

a lord of the admiralty, and was re-

fuccceded Jofiah Burchett, efq. the former member, as

fecretary of the admiralty.

^

and In 1756 he was made a commiflioner of the cuitoms, his room. in lord Conyngham was cholen ' He was a lord of the admiralty. Secretary of the admiralty. ® In 177b he was appointed a commiflioner of the cuftoms, and Charles Brett, efq. was chofen in his room. ^

**

'

SAiJDWiCH.

'

\ears of the Reign,

30th. At

W

Names

Cfj’c.

Sir

Horace Mann,

bart.

Sir Philip Stephens,

1796.

Sir

The

of the Barcns In ParHahient,

Philip Stephens, efq.

ejiminjler,

36th.

177

Horace Mann,

barts.

eleftion of the barons of parliament

was formerly made in Sandwich, by the mayor, jurats, and refident freemen ; four of the jurats, or principal inhabitants were put in eledion, and the two, who had the greateft number of votes, were returned by the mayor ; but by the laft determination of the houfe of commons, the ele(S:ion now is in the mayor, jurats, arid freemen, as well non-refident, as thole inhabiting within the port, who do not receive alms. The refident freemen, as appeared by the poll at the latter end of the year 1790, were 492, non-refident 320, in all

812

the

number

that voted at the general eledion, was 586. The lord warden formerly claimed to nominate a baron to parliament in each cinque port, but the right was never acknowledged in Sandwich, and it was exprefsly put an end to by the ad of the fecond of William and Mary. Each baron to parliament was allowed iw'o fiiillings a day for his wages, with a few variations, namely, in 1544 the allowance was only eighteen pence a day, and from 1576 to the latter part of queen Elizabeth’s reign, it was four (hillings, about which time it feems to have ceafcd entirely in Sandwich. Edward, fon of Sir Sydney Montagu, yoiingefi; fon of Sir Edward Montagu, of Boughton, in Nortliamptonfhire, an account of whole anceftors has already been given in the former part of this work,^ was by king Charles II. in his 12th year, for his fignal ;

in that year,

fervicein delivering

which he had the ^

VOL, X.

up

to

him the Englilh

command

See vol.

i.

in the

fleet,

of

time of the ufur-

p. 438. vol. Hi, p, 370.

N

pation

3

TOWN AND PORT OF

1^8

(having by hisfingular prudence, fo wrought on the feamen, that they concurred peaceably in it) ; by patent, dated July 12, 1660, created baron Montagu, ot St, Neots, vhcount Hinchinbroke, and earl In oj Sandwich. He died at fea, on May 28, 1672. his delcendants theie titles have continued down to the right hon. John yiovXd.'^t^the -prejent and fixth earl Sandzvich, vifcount Hlnchingbrooke, and baron

pat ion

;

of

Montague, who lucceeded

his father in

them

in

1792*

married lirft Elizabeth, only furviving daughter of George, earl of Halifax, who died in 1768, by whom he had a ton John George, lord Hinchinbroke., who died in i793> having marriea Mifs Beckingham.

He

married fecondly, in 1772? Mary, eldefl daughter of Harry, late duke of Bolton, who died in lord Hin1779, by whom he had John-George, now chinbroke ; Mary married to lord Fempletown, and other children, fmee deceafed. The earl bears for his

The



earl

arms, quarterly, two coats

:

firft

and fourth, Argent,

three lozenges conjoined, in fejs, gules, within a bordure, Or, an eagle fable,, for Montapu; fecond and third,

Mondifplayed, vert, beaked and member ed, gules, for thermer ; on the centre, a mullet, [able, for difference. For his creff, on a wreath, n griffin^ s head, couped, or, with wings indorfed and beaked, Jable. For his fuptriton, holding over his porters, on the dexter fide,

A

right jhoulder a

trident, all proper,

crozvned with an

and on the finifter fide, an eagle, Motto, Poji tot naufragia with wings endorfed, vert eaftern crown,

or



portum.

As EARLY

as king

Henry

II. ’s reign,

there

wasan

eminent and refpedable family named De Sandwich, who no doubt took their name from this place ; who were employed in the higheft, offices of honour and was taken by the firft earl of Sandwich, in aliufion to his office, and the fnuRer,a green eagle, to fliew his defeent from the family of Monthermer. See Edmon8

The dexter

fupporter of the

fon*s Heraldry, voi.

i.

triton,

p, 193.

truft,

SANDWICH.

179

and In this county in particular were pofl’dled of manors and lands of conliderable value many of ; them were of knightly degree, and as appears by the records and hiflories of thoie times, continued toflourifli in this county from the above reign to the end of that of king Richard II. after which, moil probably, truft,

they were become extinct. King Edward I. fummoned by his writs, in the firfl year of his reign, feveral of the gentry and their wives, to be prefent at his and his queen’s coronation, in the feveral counties of Buckinghamfhire, Bedfordlhire, Effex, Sutlex, Hertford-

and Kent

and in the laft there was one directed Radidpho de Snndwico Conjorti At the latter end of which reign Sir John de Sandwich married Agnes, one of the four daughters and coheirs of fhire,

;

&

Sir

Hamon

de Crevcquer, lord of Folkeflone, who, in right of his wife, became poifefled of the barony of Folkeflone. His fon left an only daughter and heir Julian, who married Sir John deSegrave, who in her right became pofTeffed of that barony. This family bore for their arms, Or, a chiefy indentedy azurcy and they were fo painted on the tomb of Sir Simon de Sandwich, in St. Peter’s church, in this town ; in the windows of Woodnefborough church, and on the roof of the cloyfters at Canterbury. Sir Ralph de Sandwich, cuflos of London in king Edward I.’s reign, is faid to have borne the addition of a flew de Us in the field.

In the above reigns, and almofl to the time of the diffolution of monafleries, there were many of this

name among

the clergy, both fecular and regular, too

numerous to mention

here, but as thefe in general,

on

their entering into the profelTion

of a religious, quitted their own furname, and took on them that of the place of their birth, it is probable, they had no connection with the above-mentioned family, one of them only ?xcep:ed, which was Henry de Sandwich, eledled See

Rym,

Feed. vol. Hi. p. 59.

N

2

bifliop

TOWN AND PORT OF

l 3o

in 1273, and bilhop of London anno 1262, who died had a mawas buried in his own cathedral, where he nuiTient erected to his meiuory.* There were several families of gentility dewho refided in Sandwich at different times, whofe Vifitation of Kent, scents are recorded in the Heraldic

anno 1619

;

as 1

r

t

thole ot Finch, descended of the fame flock as anceffors Eaffwell, and bore the fame arms, and were in this neighto thofe of Coldred, and other places

bourhood. alias

Hougham, who were of AOi, and^werc

anceftors of the

Houghams, now of

St.

Paul’s,

m

Canterbury. , delcents, and Several for here refided who Mennes, azure, and bore for their arms, Gules, a chevron, vairy, or, -three leopards

faces of the lajl, were anceftors of the

Fhomfon, who of Kenfield, inPetham.

Thomfons, now

whofe defendants removed to Wmgham, of them under which Several parilhes a further account may be Seen. foIn the Britifli Mufeum, MSS. No. 22309 from the Heraldic veral KentiOi pedigrees, continued among which visitation, anno 1619,10 the year 1663 Alday, Peke, Wood, are thofe of Manwood, Iden, Finch, and Mennes ; all of Sandwich. Henry Cow field, a German, in the year 1272, reign, founded being the laft year of king Henry Ill.’s Frippe,

;

A priory

in

the tozvn of Sandzvich, for the order of

Carmelites, and afterwards, from the habut his endowment of wore, white friars

friars called

bit they

Raynold, or more properly Willarger benefador liam, lord Clinton, who was a much

was

it

fo Small, that

and appen. P- 7 J* Among the patent rolls in the tower is one, anno 8 Edw. and another anno 34 Edward pro fratribus Carmilitls Satidivid, »

Dugd. Hill of

St. Paul’s, p. 48,

I. I.

to

;

SANDWICH. to

l8l

20th year of king Edward I. was afterwards reputed the foie founder of it ; and it had afterwards feveral other benefaiflors towards the Ve-edifying of it. The church and buildings of thefe Carmelites were in general large and (lately, their churches were much fo j this at Sandwich had the privilege of fanduary ; there were buried in it feveral principal inhabitants of the town, befides the members of the priory ; after which, 1 find no further mention of it, till the (uppreffion of it, which happened foon after the 27th year of king Henry VIII. The leal formerly belonging to this priory, is now kept with the fealsof it

in tl:e

this corporation;

it is

of copper, of an oval form;

the figure is a patriarchal crofs^ Jable^ zvith a key on each Jide^ on the middle of one fide a crejcent^ on the other a far of ftx points ; in the ferment of a circle, at the the infcription is in of the crofsy a crofs^ patee letters of an antient form S. JohannisPatriarche

foot

Jerusalem. The

priory thus

coming

into the king’s

hands, remained there till the 3 2d year of his reign, when he granted it, by the defcriptlon of the feite of the priory, called JVhitefryers^ near Sandwich, with the church bells, and all mefiuages in the town, to

Thomas

Arderne, gent, of Faverfham, to hold of the king incapite. After which I have met with no fubfequent poflefibrs of this efiate, till the year 1614, when it palled by fale from George, Samuel, and John Crifp, to Nicholas Richardfon, who that year fettled it on his daughter Elizabeth, upon her marriage with Edmund Parboe. At length Elizabeth Parboe, foie daughter and heir of Edmund Parboe, marrying Capt! John Boys, entitled him to this efiate; and on a partition afterwards, of theefiates of their inheritance, this friery^ as it was then called, was allotted to William Boys, theirfourth fon, whoin 1684, annojy king Charles II. conveyed it to William Verrier, gent, of Sandwich, and he in 1703 made a fettlement of it to certain u(es, under which it became the property of

N

3

Thomas

TOWN AND PORT

lS2

OF

Alkin, gent, of Canterbury, and Suiannahto tlien* ion 1 homas his wife, from whom it defcended the inheritance Verrier Alkin, clerk, on whole death heir, now an of it became veiled in his only fon and he fnery at this time entitled to it. 1

Thomas

who

infant,

is

on the louth-weil fide of the town of Sandilreet , by wich, between the rampart of it and New is

fituated

level with ihe the foundations that are remaining confiderable ground, the buildings muft have been of meadows, occuextent, and the houfe, gardens, and This acics. pied an area of iomewhat more than five Stewart. in the occupation of Ndr. Joleph

now There is no account of the John’s hospital, inthis

eflate

is

with relating to

it, is

firfl

foundation of St,

the oldcft grant

dated anno i5 Edvvard

I.

met and

de there called Doirtus Dei ff? San£ii Joheuuiis has been dcfcnbed SandvL'ico. Since the year 1 293, it likewiie of lloJpUale. in the evidences, by the name fide of the corn marIt is fituated on the north-well building, containing ket, and confiflsof one large old and feveial rooms, both above and below^ flairs,

it

is

a

hall,

Behind this piincipal brothers and lifters. the Harbuilding is a range of fingle roonis, called for the

lociged and binge, in which travellers weie formerlj-

entertained.

was very early under the government of Sandwich, as of the mayor and barons, or jurats, patronage patrons and governors ; but although the the mayor appears to have been by thefe evidences, in

This

hofpital

and jurats jointly, yet for the faiee of haimony, the mayor for the time being, fdls up all the vacancies Like moft others that happen duringhis mayoralty. for the accom^ of early foundation, it was intended modation of travellers and ftrangers, as well as for the fupport of fixed reiidents

rooms

for

;

men and women,

frelbed with

diet

in in

it

there were feparate

which they were

and provided

wfith

re-

comfortable

lodging. It

SANDWICH.

183

appears by the antient regifler of the hofpital, that the number of brothers and fillers in it were forIt

merly fifteen, afterwards twelve, which latter niinii'ier continued till the year 1737, when the hofpital being in debt, and the revenue much reduced, the mayor and jurats found it expedient to reduce tiie number to fix ; and that two at the leaft of that number Ihould be men, and as many at lead women ; which rule, however, has not been ftridly obferved, the prefent fix being all women. The revenues of this hofpital were always fmall, arifing from difierent benefaftions to it; it received, however, a valuable addition in a benefadlion of 200I. given in 1763, by the will of John Dekevver, efq. of Hackney, (a native of this town, and a liberal benefa6tor to it) to the mayor and jurats, in truft, for the brothers and fillers ; which money has been fince in-

veded

The

in the public funds.

confiding of the intered of the above legacy, and feveral houfes and tenements, quit-rents, is now of the annual value of 47], 1 2S. od. the clear yearly value of which, (the charging of repairs and colledling being dedufled) is 38I. 2s, lod. on an average, which make the annual income of each brother and fider about fix guineas.' St. Thomas’s, alias Ellis’s hospital, was founded in honour of St. T homas iBecket) martyr, about the year 1392, anno 16 Richard If. by Thomas He ferved in Ellis, of this town, a wealthy draper. parliament for Sandwich in the 43d year of king Edward III. and in the fird year of king Richard II. and prel’ent

revenue of

it,

i

was mayor there was buried with

in the years

1370 and

1382'"'

He

the north ifle of St. Peter’s church, bearing for his arms. Or, on a crojs, fable ^ five He endowed it with the manor farm crefeentSy argent. his wife in

See Boys’s Colleftions, p. 119 et feq. “ See Rym, Feed. vol. vii. p. 178. ‘

N

4

of

^

;;

184

TOWN AND PORT OF

of Denne-coiirt, in Woodneiborough, which he conveyed to feoffees, with the king’s licence, for the ufe and benefit of twelve poor perfons in this hofpital after which, Henry Greenfliield, gent, of Sandwich, in the laft year of king Edward IV. made an addition to this charity by giving to it by his will, land in Woodnefborough, There were afterwards fcveral other benefacftions of rents, lands, and houfes made to

it.

The

commiflioners under the ftatute of 37 king Henry VIII. made a return of this hofpital of the clear yearly value of lol. cs. 4|d. beyond reprifes and archbifhop Parker in the year 1562, certified it to the privy council to be of the yearly value of twelve pounds, and to confifl of twelve brothers and four fifters, placed there for term of life, and relieved by alms and the revenue of the hofpital. It has from the time of its foundation been vefied in feoffees, the feoffment having been renewed from time to time. The feoffees are generally of the town, or the adjoining country, who when reduced to three, ought to create a frelh truft, and enlarge their

number

in conformity to certain rules eflablilhed

by which regulations

to nine,

in

1725;

this hofpital has ever fince

been

governed, the vacancies being fupplied by the feofiees in rotation.

The number of poor perfons

'

placed in

it is

twelve,

according to the original inftitution, that is, eight men and four women, all fingle, by the name of the brothers and fifters of St. Thomas (Elly’s) hofpital. They are to be aged about fifty, and parifhioners and inhabitants within one of the refpedtive parifiies of the town and port of Sandwich." The prefent feoffees are now reduced to two only, viz. Sir Henry Oxenden, See the rules and orders for the good government of this and difpofzng of the revenues of it, printed in Boys’s Colleftions,' p. 161. "

hofpital,

bart.

SANDWICH,

1S5

Brome, and JohnLynch, LL. D. archdeacon of Canterbury. The principal modern benefador to this hofpital has been John Michell, efq. of Richmond, in Surry, who was for almoll; twenty years

bart. of

returned in parliament for Sandwich. Upon the death of John Thurbarne, elq. fergeant at law, he took upon himfelf the care of the money be-

fucceffively

longing to

this hoCpital,

which being lubfcribed into

the South Sea company, with the confent of the other truftees, in that fatal year 1720, came out again with a deficiency of near half the principal, amounting to

about 200I. which lofs he voluntarily fuftained, and by his benevolence made good again to the brothers and fifters. He ufed his care and diligence, with the confept of the other truftees, towards the renewing and fettling the prefent truft, ere
year

1725,

and in compofing the orders and rules for the good government of the hofpital, and the well difpofing of the revenues of

It.

This hofpital is fituated in a retired fuuation, between New ftreet and the Corn Market, a paftage through the middle of it divides the houfe into two parts ; on the fouth fide is the hall open to the roof, beyond which are the womens apartments, two above and two below' ; the mens rooms are on the north The income of it fide, four above and four below. is very confiderable, confifting of the manor farm of Denne-court above-mentioned, and feveral fmall pieces of land, houfes, tenements, and quit-rents, almoft all of them in this town, amounting to the yearly fum of 162I. IIS. the reprifes out of which, being quit-rents for their eftates, are 61 . 7s. qd.

St. Bartholomew’s hospital is fituated juft without the town of Sandwich, on the fouth fide of

on the angle, where the two loads join, coming from Eaftry and Woodncfborough ; notwithftanding tra-

it

dition gives a

of

much

this hofpital, yet

foundation appears by a bull of pope Innocent

earlier period to the it

TOWN AND PORT OF

l86

nocent IV. anno 1244, that it was then begun to be founded by Sir Henry de Sandwich, in honour of St. Bartholomew, for the fupport of the weak and infirm, and endowed by him for that purpofe, fo that the brothers and filters (hould live in it under fome order of difeipline, and be maintained at table, and iliould wear a unilorm habit." In the Cullumal of Sandwich there is mention

made fillers

of three priefls, employed by the brothers and to officiate in their chapel lor the fouls of Ber-

trine de Crawthorne,

William Buchard,andSir Henry

Sandwich, who were probably all three benefactors to this hofpital, in the order of time therein mentioned. Such as were moft liberal in their donations to hofpitals, and other religious foundations, acquired the name of firft, fccond, and third founder, in order of time as they made additions to the foundation, and thus feveral of the family of Sandwich, from their refpe6tive benehidions to this hofpital, were fucceffively entitled the founders of it, and were from the firft, the undoubted patrons of it, till Sir Nicholas de Sandwich affigned the patronage of it to the mayor and barons of Sandwich, who trom that time became gobut great inconveniences ariling from vernors of it the confufion in the common afiemblies, where the bufinefs of the holpital was decided, it was agreed, to leave the appointments in it, to the mayor and jurats only ; and afterwards again, for the like reafon, to the mayor only, who continues regularly to fill up fuch vacancies in it during his mayoralty. This holpital is regularly vifited twice a year by the mayor and jurats, who are filled patrons, governors and vifitors of it, for the paffing of the accounts, and the better regulation of the government of it. The antient vifitation of this hofpital on the feafi; of St. Bartholomew, before the reformation, is related in the ;

*

See Leland, in his Itin. vol.

vii, p.

125.

Cuftu.mal

;

SANDWICH.

187

Cuflumal of Sandwich. Every year on that feaft, the mayor and commonalty vifited the holpital in lolemn proceffion, the laity ol Sandwich leading the way, fomewith inftruments of mulic, other to the number of feven fcoreand more bearing wax lights, provided by the corporation, which lights were to be left in the chapel of the hofpital, as an offering for the ufe of it throughout the year. After thefe followed the clergy of Sandwich, in their proper habits, chanting hymns and carrying tapers ; the redor of St. Peter’s, or fome other clergyman appointed by the mayor, celebrating high mats with much folemnity fome of the better fort of the ccmmonalty, as Sir Nicholas de Sandwich and others, provided their own

for the occafion

tapers and offered them there. There was ufually a great refort of people at this place at- the fair, held on the eve of St. Luke, and the

mayor commonly attended. does not appear that this hofpital wasadually incorporated by any royal patent, and made thereby capable of giftsand grants in fucceflion, till Henry VI II. in his 27th year, by his letters patent, confirmed the It

difpenfation which archbilliop Cranmer had made to of foundation before it, the only public inftrument

being the bull before-mentioned, of popelnnocent 1 V. The above-mentioned difpenl'ation of archbilhop Cranmer, was obtained by the hofpital, in pnrfuance of the ad of the 25th year of king Henry Vlll. it authorifed the mafter and brethren, and their fucceflors, to hold the hofpital, with all their then poflef-

&c. and future acquifitions, in as free and ample a manner as their predeceflbrs had enjoyed their eftates and privileges, referving to the mayor of Sandwich, all his right'and interefl in the premifes. After which, though there were feveral attempts made fions, rights,

to fupprels this hofpital as a religious foundation tor the king’s ufe, under pretence of the ftatutes of 37 Henry VIII. and the ift of king Edward VI. and a: grant

TOWN and port

l85

of

made of it to certain lay perfons, In fee farm, by king James the Iff. yet the corporation being well advifed, difputed the matter, and upon a hearing, the

grant was

was found to be a lay foundation, and not within the meaning of the ftatutes above-mentioned, upon which the patentees gave up their fuit ; in 1636, a venire facias was iffued for the mayor and jurats to appear before the commiflioners, on a commiflion on hofpital

the ftatute for charitable ufes, to fhew by what right they took on them the government of the hofpitals in

The

Sandwich.

records of the corporation do not furnifh the refult of this enquiry, but the hofpital of Sr. Thomas has not been fince then under the government

of the mayor and jurats, whilft this hofpital and that of St. John, has continued under their fuperintcndance to this day.

The

total

number of brothers and

fitters

in

feems to have been always fixteen. Formerly there was a limited number of each fex, namely, twelve men and four women ; but at this time the men and women are prefented indifferently, as the vacancies happen. The fcite of the hofpital is furrounded by a fence, this hofpital

which

inclofes the farm-houfe, barns, (tables,

and other

outhoufes, a chapel, and fifteen fmall, but commodious houfes, with gardens for the brothers andYifters. The other, or fixteenth tenement, was converted into a farm

houfe for the refidence of the occupier of the lands belonging to the hofpital, when they were firft hired our, and the perfon who is prefented to that vacancy, to which this houfe would otherwife belong, is permitted to refide in Sandwich, with an allowance from the hof-

pital in

money,

in lieu

of

it.

The whole

of the

fcite is

held to be extraparochial.

The houfe

j

chapel It is

fituated at a fmall diftance a large and handfome edifice, in is

from the which and

cemetery belonging to it, there were buried not only many of the brothers and fifters, but others of the in the

town

;

there

is

in it

an altar

monument, covered with a (lab

^

SANDWICH.

1

S9

nab of Suflex marble, on which lies the effigies of a man, completely cafed in his coatot mail, wichafmooth there is a triangular breall piece over his hawberk nVield over the body, and a broad fword lying along his It is undoubtedly meant for Sir Henry de left thigh. Sandwich, but the whole feems to be a cenotaph, defigned to commemorate him as the founder of this hofAn infcription on a rail over the figure points pital. out this fpot, as the burial place of Sir Henry de Sand;

but upon a firia exawich, and Sir Nicholas his fon mination of the j'uppofed tomb, a few years ago, when under repair, and of the ground beneath, fo tar as was fearched, there was neither coffin, nor any other mark ;

of fepulture found. the reformation took place, and rnaffes and commemorations for the dead were aboliflied, the chaplains officiating in this chapel were of courfe dif-

When

milfed, as being of no further ufe in it ; and it does not appear, that any regular provifion has been made fince, divine for the maintenance of a minifier to perform iervice in

it,

for the ufe

of the hofpital.

However,

and there were afterwards feveral different regulations a orders made from time to time for the providing of minifier to perform divine fervice in the hofpital ; but a brother, in 1636, a clergyman in orders was admitted

and it was agreed that he fhould perform all minifierial continuance duty belonging to the hofpital, during his many years ago there was Iervice performed as fuch on St. Bartholomew’s in this chapel only once a year, preached there by day, but now a monthly fermon is the moft lione of the minifters of Sandwich, upon ;

beral terms.

_

The benefadlions to this hofpital have been numeterrier and rental of k rous and ample, as the prefent prefent revenue confifis of one large farm, fliews let at

i

its

220I. per »

annum,

feveral pieces of land

and tene-

See Boys’s Collefiions, p. 33*

raents

.

TOWN AND PORT OF

igO

mentsin Sandwich, andfome quit-rents; and likcwifc a clear annual rent charge of fixty*tvvo pounds, paid out of the tolls arifing for the paffage over the new bridge,

between Sandwich andStonar; this altogether amounts to the annual fum of 357I. i JS. 6d. The clear income, which is 33 5I. 8s. would allow to each member nearly twenty-one pounds yearly, but the repairs being very heavy at prefenr, they do not receive more than about feventecn pounds each, to which muft be added the value of the houfe and garden, the carriage of coals and fand, wood and ftubble from the farm, and the exemption from all afieffments and taxes j which makes the whole benefit from the hofpital, at a faireftimation, about four, or perhaps five and twenty pounds a year. The feal of this hofpital is a fmall oval, reprefenting St. Bartholomew fitting under a canopy j infeription, S. S'anSfi

Bartholemei

King Edward of privy

feal, to

III

in his

23d

year, granted

the brethren of this hofpital,

by writ all

the

from the ferry over the haven, between Sandwich and Stonar, in fupportof the alms of the hofan exemplification of which grant was obtained pital in the 16th year of king Henry VIII. ’s reign. The profits arifing

;

profits of this ferry continued part this hofpital,

till

of the revenues of

on pretence of thepaffiige

in the ferry

boat being fubje6t to many inconveniences, an ad was obtained in 1755, for building a bridge acrofs the haven, in lieu of the ferry boar, between Sandwich and Stonar, in which

ad

there

is

a claufe,

which fecures to

from the revenue of the bridge, the annual fum of fixty- two pounds, being the laft and greateft rent which had been made of the ferry. this hofpital,

Roger Manwood,

efq. barrifter at law,

and recorder of Sandwich, afterwards knighted, and chief baron of the exchequer, having promoted a fubfeription in

1563, among the principal inhabitants of this towm, for the purpofe of eicding a building for a free SCHOOL, upon a promife to endow it with lands of fufficient

SANDWICH.

191

value to lupporc the building and maintain a mafter, Iblicited archbifhop Parker for his approb.ition of his defign, who afterwards became highly in-

ficient

bringing forward this foundation, by givcountenance to it, and procuring, through Se-

ftrumental

ing

his

in

cretary Cecil’s

intereh:,

the queen’s licence for this

purpofe ; by which flie granted, that the mayor and jurats of Sandwich Ihould be governors of the fchool, and be one body incorporate, by the title of governors that of the free fchool of Roger Manwood in Sandwich tliey might fue and implead by that name in all courts; might purchafe eifates in fee to the value of forty pounds a year, and have a common leal, with other ;

liberties ufuai in grants

The

of that

fort.’

fubferiptions at that time, towards the building

of the fchool houfe, amounted to 286I. and upwards; and Mr. Manwood obtained from the dean and chapter of Canterbury, a grant in fee farm of a piece of ground, inclofed with a ftone wall, fometime called St. Thomas’s houfe, in Sandwich, near Canterbury gate, to'‘7ether with a piece of kilts over againft it, at a fmall yearly rent, which land in 1366, together with ninety acres in St. Stephen’s, alias Hackington, and Northoate, near Canterbury, Mr. Manwood enfeoffed to the

governors of his free grammar fchool, for the perpetual fupport and maintenance of it. On the above piece of ground,

mayor and

called St.

jurats, by the

Thomas’s

name

of the

houfe, the building for this fchool

was afterwards ereded, and the fchool eRablifhed, and it

continues as fuch at this time. Joane Trapps, widow of Robert Trapps, of

Lon-

don, goldfmith, by her will in 1 568, gave to the recOxford, fiftytors and fcholars of Lincoln college, in two acres of land at Whitllaple, towards the finding of iroin four fcholars in that college, two to be nominated and two by the goverthis fchool, by the redor, &c. ^

Seethe licence in Boys’s Collcdioiis, p. 20S.

nors

TOWN AND PORT OF

192

and fo by like turns for ever ; in confer quence of which the redor, &c. agreed to pay yearly nors of

it,

to the four fcholars lol. 13s. 4d. towards the exhibit tions, and charges of finding the fcholars ; and the

governors of the fchool agreed, upon every avoidance of the fchool mailer’s place, they would within twenty days give notice to the redor, &c. who (houkl deliver in writing, under their common feal, to the mayor, or to the uflier at the fchool-houfe, the names of two perfons, fellows of the college, duly qualified, in order that they the governors Ihould make choice of one of

them within twenty

days, or

in

default thereof, the

nomination of fuch mailer fliould be in the archbi* fliop, the fee being full, otherwife in the dean of Canterbury for the tinie being.

Thomas Manwood,

gent, by will in 1570, gave to

the governors of his brother Roger’s free grammar fchool lands and tenements to the clear yearly rent of ten pounds, for an ulher, or for other neceflary mat^ ters of maintenance of the fchool, in fuch form as

Ihould be thought meet to the governors. Sir Roger Manwood above-nrentioned, then lord chief baron, as furviving executor of the will of Joane Trapps, widow, above-mentioned, in 1581, conveyed to themafterand fellows of Gonvyle and Caius college, in Cambridge, a farm called Bodkins, in Swaleclilfe, of the clear yearly value of ill. 6s. 8d. in confideration of which, the mailer agreed to pay annually to four fcholars of their college lol. 13s- 4d. four marcs to each ; to be nominated by the governors of this fchool, ancl by the mailer alternately. After which the heirs of Sir Roger Manwood refufing to pay the mafter’s falary, there were feveral

luits at

law and

1635 the matter was argued before the lord keeper, who direded that the niafter’s falary Ihould be paid in future by Sir Roger Manwood’s heirs, cut of the rents enfeoffed by him for that purpole, to the mayor and jurats 3 in confequence awards concerning

it,

but

in

SANDWICH.'

193

quence of which the falary of twenty pounJs per anniiin has been ever fince paid with tolerable regularity by the proprietors of the eliate, the prefent one being Sir Edward Hales, bart. of St. Stephen’s. Edmund Parboe, efq. by will in 1640, befides many other legacies to the parifhes, conduits, St. John’s hof-

and the mayor and jurats, in Sandwich, gave to the latter, as governors of the grammar fchool, an annuity of ten pounds out of premifes in Sandwich, of which four pounds was to be to the mafter of the fchool* and five pounds to the redor, fellows, and fcholars of Lincoln college, Oxford, in augmentation, &c. of the and if none were fent, fcholars fcnt from Sandwich the money to remain in the governors hands, to accumulate for fuch fcholars as Ihould be afterwards appointed j the remaining twenty fhillings to the mayor and jurats, for their charges in it ; but it does not appear that the fchool was ever benefited by this bequeif, or how it happened that it was not fo. In 1685 the mayor and jurats purchafed a piece of land, on which were two (tables, a kitchen and a cove, fituate in St. Mary’s parifli, in Sandwich, in truft, for the foie life and benefit of the mafter of the fchool for pital,

;

the time being.

Roger Manwood drew up in 1 580, rules and ordinances, for the better government of this fchool, Sir

which are ferved in

by him, and are ftill obthe regulation and government of itf in

ftill

exifting, figned

other rules for the internal government of the fchool, it is ordered, that the mafter fiiould be clefted by the governors, viz. the mayor and jurats of

which,

among

Sandwich, out of Lincoln college, Oxford, and ’to be A. M. if it might conveniently be, and allowed of by the ordinary, and that he and the uflier, who (hould be appointed by the mafter, and admitted by the governors, fhould teach the

They

VOL. X.

grammar

in the fchool.

The

are printed at large in Boys’s Coll. p. 222,

o

.

,

overplus

TOWN AND PORT

Ip4

OF

overplus of all the lands and tenements, after the mafter’s and ulher’s lalaries were paid, and all other charges, reparations, and cxpences, to be equally divided between the mafter and ufher. Ot the Icholars to be taught in the fchool, the children of the inhabitants of Sandwich to be freely taught, without any thing

taken, but of benevolence at the end of every quarter, towards buying of books for the common life of the fcholars the reft of the foreign fcholars to be taught ;

for fuch price,

And

and

be limited by the gonot be lb many grammar

rate, as fhoiild

there ftaould fcholars as fliould furnifli the fchool houfe, there fhould be a perfon, who could write well, wlio Ihould teach the fcholars reading and writing in the fciiool, in the

vernors.

if

time of there being no ufher therein, to be placed in it by the mayor and jurats, and to be paid out of the revenues of the fchool four pounds yearly, and fuch gains as by his diligent teaching he could honeftly get. T he mafter not to take to board, diet or lodge in his houfe, or rooms, more than twelve Icholars, and the uflier not above fix, without leave given by the governors. There is a common feal, of filver, belonging to the

governors of

this fchool,

which

is

kept

among

the cor-

poration feals of Sandwich.*

John Conant, A. M. was appointed the prefent. mafter of this fchool.^

The CHARITY SCHOOL

in this

17585 and

in

town has been

Is

flip-

ported a great number of years by cafual contributions, and regular lubferiptions begun about the year 1711, at which time the fchool feems to have commenced ; the prefent eftablifhmcnt is thirty boys and thirty girls, under a mafter and miftrefs ; the former are taught to read and write, and the latter employed in knitting and plain work j nine truftees are appointed every year, ®

See a plate of the fchool-houfe and of the

Colleftions. ‘ He is reftor of St. Peter’s, in Sandwich, with the vicarage of Sellindge, in this county.

feal

in Boys’s

which he holds three

*95 who, with the mayor, examine

SANDWICH. three from each parifh, the children, and direft

the affairs of the f^chool. The attention paid to this Ichool, and the vilible fmall degree effeas of it, have brought it to no all

good

which has lately been inof renutation and profperity, by Mr. Sprat, of Fort creafed by a bequeft of Tool, This legacy has been St George, in the Eaft-Indies.

Bank

annuities, in truft

invefted in 3 per cent, conlbl. fcholars, and yields a dividend of for the benefit of the of 146I. 15s. 8d. The fub8s. upon a principal

A

fixty of late years have amounted to about fermons to about feven pounds, and the colleaions at dividend, have been futpounds, which, added to the

fcriptions

'

well as inftrud the children. ficient to cloath, as fix other The mailer of this fchool teaches likewile

in Sandwich, now hnvq fertile rents of certain houles given by the will of David of ^he yearly rent of 3I. 1 6s. to the mayor and juTurner of Sandwich, in 1665, be by them difpofed of to a perfon who rats in mill, to and read Englilh poor children Ihould teach to write 'gratis.

CHARITIES. Tames Mastee, dei-eii

cfq. of Eaft l.angdon,

acre of ground, that the rent of an

Ihe vicarage of St.

>

to ti« to'vn yearly be laid

Clcmenfs church, and abntt.ng

to 53s. 4tifuinmer, nut in Drovicliii^^lea coal in

dhrh amountine

by will in 63 t. orwhicn he had behind

was clieapeft, to be among the poor of the three panl ies as the [akl up^aivl oiv?n overfeers of the poor ftiould think to mavor toaedier with the week to he given among them, fome have molf need ; the coals over. for continue K f .rV’hT-Ktmas vearlv, and this to now piece of ground called Mill garden, This feems to be the or and the the reparation of the church, fupVofed to be given to pounds annual value of three lyin„ Ices, Ivincr George s lees

when

it

aemeut's fmtjh. Called St. acres, now of the containing ill the whole three in two idcces paruh, for the w’as given originally to that vearTv rentof 7I. los.

Lano

IN

St.

wlio died in to be laid out and jurats eave bv will to the mayor to d.fcoie them, for trull eilate, in lurchafe of a freehold o a

s"rHENE°v FSrE,''b1r?!’“oTwaldcr{liare, 500I, . -V, I' 1';





TOWN AND PORT OF

igS

of the rents and profits, with the advice of the town clerk and the churchwardens, upon the 30th of May yearly, being his birth-day, two fifths to the poor of St. Peter’s, where he was born, and a moiety of the remaining three fifths to each of the other two pariflies in Sandwich. Accordingly, in 1727, the mayor and jurats purchafed a barn and lands, containing about nineteen acres, at Weddington, in Afli, now of the yearly rent of 24I, The rents, ijfnes and Jirojits of a fmall farm at Marftibo. rough, in VVoodnclborough, was given by the will of Mr. Peter Jarvis, merchant, of Leghorn, and a native of Sandwich, in 1715, in truft for the poor of the three pariflies of Sandwich, to be paid yearly to them, and now of the yearly rent of 12I. John Sprat, of Fort St. George, in the Eaft-Indies, merchant, by his will in 1776, gave to each of the three parilhes in Sandwich, tool, the intereft to be dilfributed to fuch poor of thefe pariflies yearly, as the parfons and churchwardens of them might think proper, on the 25th of November in each year. Thefe legacies were placed in the public funds, in the names of truftees. The annual dividend to each parifli is 4l.10s.8d, upon the principal flock of 151I. 4s. 6d. Old South Sea Annuities. Mr. Sprat was a native of Sandwich, and died at Madras in

I

780.

Several

tenements, fliops, and pieces of ground, given to the poor of St. Peter’s parifli by different perfons, amount altogether to the yearly funi of 16I. 17s. befuies other fmall tene-

ments, let at

And two

A TENEMENT is

vaults under the church at the call end, arc

the yearly rent of 40s. ill

the angle between Love-lane and King-flreet

now made ufe of as the parifh workhoufe. There are feveral quit-rents paid to the

of

St. Peter,

ufe of the parifli

from feveral premifes in Sandwich, amounting in

the whole to 13s. 6d. per

annum.

Solomon Hougham,

efq. of London, who w'as flieriff of and Kent in i6g6, died the next year, gave by his will, in trufl, an annuity, or yearly rent charge of iil. out of Barton-field, in the parifli of .St. Paul, in Canterbury, to be paid to the churchwardens of St. Mary’s parifh, to be by them difpofed of; 4s. in penny loaves every Sunday and upon Cliriilmas day yearly, 12s. in penny loaves, to be diilributed at church after divine fervice, to fuch of the poorefl of this parifli, as the hurchwardens fliould think fit and in cafe of age and ficknefs, if any could not come, their portion of bread to be fent home to them. :

(

;

John Dekeweu, efq. of St. John’s, Hackney, who died in 1762, gave by his will to the minifler and churchwardens of St. Mary’s, in Sandwich, 500I. to be laid out in the public funds, in truft, to repair and prelerve the family vault and tomb, and the iron work round it in St. Mary’s church-yard ; and on every Sunday,

SANDWICH.

197

St. Mary’s, in every week fuccefbread to the poor of this parifti ; and to lay out the remainder of the dividends in coals, to be given to the poor at Chriftmas eve yearly, at the difcretion of the minifter and churchwardens, &c. Befides which, there are feveral fmall tenements, and pieces of ground of fmall yearly rents, and fundry quit-rents belonging

Sunday, after divine fervice in

fively, to give 4s. in

to St.

Mary’s

pariflt.

Thomas Fulnetby,

of Deal, 101625, enfeoffed to Loopes, and overgainft the Beagrims, to make four dwellings of the premifes, for four poor tradefmen of St. Mary’s parifli only, that have been born in it, and have long dwelt there ; and in default of fuch tradefmen, then for fuch poor of the parifli, as have been born, or long dwelt there, and the rents, &c. to be divided among them. gent,

truftees, four mefluages near the

Sandwich diction of its

is

ecclesiastical juris-

within the

the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of

own name. There were formerly three parochial churches

in this town, and a church or chapel likewile, fuppofed by fome to have been parochial, dedicated to St. Ja-

cob, which has been long fince demoliflied ; but the three former churches^ being ihofe of St, Mary^ St. Peter, and St. Clement, ftill remain j an account of all which will be given feparately. St. Strand

Mary’s church

ftands in a

low

fituation in

on the northern part of the town. The original church, built in the time of the Saxons, isTaid to have been demolifhed by the Danes, and to have been afterwards rebuilt by queen Emma, which building was burnt down by the French, and it was not long ftreet,

afterwards again rebuilt ; notwithftandi.ig which, it appears to have become dilapidated and in a moft ruin-

ous date in the time of king

Henry VI.

for in the

year of that reign, anno 1448, part of the fteeple

2d

fell,

confequence of which it underwent a thorough repair, and then confided of two ifles and the nave s the latter was terminated by the high chancel, and the fouth iQc by St. Laurence’s chancel. It however, fell down again on April 25, 1667, and brought down with it in

o

3

moft

;

TOWN AND PORT

198

moft of the church fouth ifleand

its

;

OF

the weftern wall, portions of the

chancel only remaining

j

and though

was foon afterwards rebuilt, as at prcfent, yet it does not appear that any fteeple was built till the year 1718, when the prelent low one was raifed upon the fouth porch, and one bell put up in it. Before this, there were five fmall bells, which about the formed out of three larger ones year 1639, the above five bells were fold, for the faculty had been obtained in 1669, to fell the ufelefs timber and the bells, towards the rebuilding of the church, and they were fold, as it is laid, to the parilli of Eleham. In an antient bead-roll of this church, there is mention made of John and William Condy, the firll beginners of the foundation of the chantry of that name in this church ; of Thomas Loueryk and his wife, who founded the chapel of our Lady, at the call head ofit j and of the three windows of the north fide of the church ; of Thomas Elys and Margaret his wife, and Sir Thomas Rolling, vicar of this church, of whofe goods was made the welt window ^of it, and who made the vicarage of the parilh more than it was before ; and befides thele, of feveral other benefa<5tors to the windows and other parts of it. And there were divers other gifts made to this church, for its reparation, and for obits, and other religious fervices performed in it, as appears by the evidences belonging to it. The inventory of the filver and jewels, belonging to the church before the reformation, fufficiently fiiew the coftlinefs of the utenfils belonging to it, and the riches of it. The filver, according to the inventory made of them, amounting to 724 ounces j and the habits of the minifters to officiate in it, the linen and books, were anfwerable to the reft belonging to it. The prefent church of St. Mary confifts of a north ifle, and the nave, at the end of which is the chancel, which has an afcent of three fteps on each fide ; between w'hich entrances are the mayor’s feat and other pews.

the church

itfelf

j;

199

SANDWICH.

rails, are of wainfcoc news. The altar piece, table, and the weft end of and very ornamental. The font is at eight faces changed the nave, it is a ftonc bafon, having rofes, in quaterfotls ; alternately with plain ftiields and

on

the

ftiaft

1662.

are the letters

cw.

ii.

RS. de. ic. pod. j

.

.

numbers of monuments and inMr. Boys’s Collecall which are printed in numerous to mention here, 9, the whole too

In this church are feriptions,

tions

p. 3

1

but among others

at the weft

end of the nave, are me-

In the fouth Ipace morials of the Smiths and Verriers. and for the Whites. In are memorials for the Petleys are the remains of a the middle fpace, on an old ftone, on a dog or lion, and the rem.uns ot crofs /lory, refting

m. ccc on a rile above the north ifte are three grave-ftones, that underneath is pavement, with inferiptions (hewing, the family of Hayward, a vault, in which lie many of arms, Urgent, on a pale, formerly mayors of this town ;

an infeription with

this date,

i.

In the chancel is a three crefeents of the field. brafles, which formerly comlarge ftone, robbed of its of Roger Manwood and his family fable,

merated the deaths formerly St. Laurence chanthe place where it lies was

of ftone much deIn the chancel is a monument a man and woman kneelfaced ; on it are the figures of cel

for Abraham R^^n, foring, in a praying pofture, whom he had lemayor, and Sufan his wife by

mily

ven ions and

fix

daughters.

for his defeendant the

He

died in 1608; and

Rev. John Rutton,

obt.

Againft the fouth wall,

is

1763,

a hand-

reaor of this parifti. with thele arms. Argent, fome monument of marble, and per pale, azure and gules, a five che'vronels, fable, and an inlcTiption for l^vera of lion rampant, argent Hougham. Againft the fame wall a tab;

the family of let, for

Mary,

arms. Argent,

obt. 17 7^, , wife of Jofeph Stewart, efq. over all, a bend raa lion rampant, gules,

monument the fouth door, a marble thrice mayor, obt. 1 7 3^1^ for Richard Solly, gent, iled

or.

Over

200

TOWN AND PORT

OF

and Anna his wife, daughter of John Crickett, gent, by whom he had ten fons and three daughters ; arms, j^zure, a chevron^ party per pale^ or, three foies, naient, argent.

At

and gules,

betzveen

the welt end of the nave

an altar tomb, with an infcription, diewing, that in a vault underneath, lie feveral of the Cricketts j another altar tomb, with an infcription, for feveral of the is

Nowells ; arms, Three covered cups. By the gallery flairs, on an altar tomb, an infcription for Tho. Danfon, preacher, of this towm, who died 1764; on a raifed

monument of brick, an infcription, name of Jordan; this (lands ciofe

of the before, and hides the altar part of a monument, under an arch in the north wall, to the memory of Sir William Loverick,of AOi, and dame Emma his wife, the daughter of Sir John Septvans, of that parifli, who are laid to have been the principal repairers, or builders of this church, after it had been burnt by the French, and were buried in king Henry IV.’s reign; on an adjoining tomb an infcription for feveral

Maundys. There are flones, pointing out the entrances into

for the

the vaults of Solly and Stewart, and there are infcriptions on a board, commemorating the benefadlions of

John Dekewer,

Henry

cfq.

Furnefe, bart.

Solomon Hougham, and Mr. Peter Jarvis.

gent. Sir

Several nam.es appear on the (lones, on the outfidc of the eaft and north walls of the chancel. Sir Edward Ringely, of Knolton, was buried in Jefus chapel, in this church,

on the

left fide

of the

In the 35th of king Henry VIII. William, lord Clinton, is faid to have been interred under a gilded arch in the fouth wall altar.

of this church, which arch was walled up in king Edward VI. ’s reign, but it was vifible fome time afterwards in the church- yard, perhaps it may be the fame projedion that now appears there, on the fouth fide of the chancel. William Condie, who founded the chantry, afterwards called by his name, in this church, was likewife interred, together with his wife, in the fouth ifle

SANDWICH, i{le

of the old church, near

201

the lord Clinton’s

tomb

;

but there is nothing now to point out precifely the fituation oft heir remains, nor thole of Thomas Manwood, gent, who died in king Henry VIII. ’s time and was buried under the belfry. Stephen Perot was buried likewife in this church in 1570. There are feverai altar tombs In the church-vard, one of which is for the family ofDekewerj arms*

V

on a crofs, engrailed, or, five fieurs de Us, fable ; inthefirfl: and fourth quarters, a caltrop, argent-, in the

fecond and third quarters, a lion rampant, of the lajl. An anchorefs had her cell at the ead; end of this church in the 2Cth year of king Henry VIII.

At a

fmall diftance fouth-weit of Sr. Mary’s church, was a church or chapel, dedicated to St. Jacob, fuppofed by many to have been a parochial church ; there is no-

thing

now

to point out the fituation of the building, the cemetery remains and is ufed occafionally as a burial place, for the ufe of St. Mary’s parilh. This left

church-yard feems to have got into lay hands at the fupprelTion, for in 1578, it was enfeoffed by Edward

Wood,

to certain perfons,

The

for the

neceffary ufes of

was renewed in 1604 and 1649. At the fouth-weft corner was an hermitage, the refidence of an hermit. The lafl: hermit in it was John Steward, in king Henry VI Ik’s reign, who was afterwards vicar of St. Mary’s church, whofe duty it was to minifter to ftrangers and the poor, to bury the dead, and pray for the people in the chapel, which was deflroyed, as well as others of the like fort, in the beginning of king Edward VI. ’s reign. Great part of this building was Handing at the latter end ofEdward VI. ’s reign there was in it a brotherhood of St. Catherine, confifting of both brothers and fiHers, which was benefitted by the will of John Wynchelle, of Sandwich. It appears that this church or chapel was under the management of the officers of St. Mary’s parilh, and the parifh.

truft

;

that

TOWN AND PORT

202 tliat

OF

the building had been repaired in the years

1445 and 1478.

Mary

a vicarage, the patronage of whicli has ever been part of the polTeflions of the archdeaconry of Canterbury, to whom the appro-

The

church of

Sr.

is

priation of the church likewife formerly belonged

;

it

anno 1384, when on the taxation of the fpiritualities and temporalities ecclefiallic, in thi? diocefe, the church of St. Mary’s, appropriated to the archdeacon, was valued at eight pounds, and the vicarage was valued at only four pounds, and on account of the fmallnels of it, was not taxed to the tenth." The vicarage is valued did fo

in the 8th

year of king Richard

in the king’s books, in king

II.

Henry

Vlll.’s reign, at fliould feem during the

which lime, and it reign of queen Elizabeth, the great tithes, or appropriate parfonage of this church, were given up by the archdeacon to the vicarage, fo that the vicar has been lince intitled to both great and fmall tithes within the bounds of this parifli, which induced (everal of the incumbents to (file themfelves redors, but certainly wrong, for it is flill a vicarage, the vicars of which are entitled to the receipt and pofleflion of the great tithes, by grant from the appropriator. In 1588 here were 385 communicants, and it was valued at forty pounds per annum. In 1640 here were the fame number of communicants, and it was valued at fixty-eight pounds. It is now a dilcharged It living, of the clear yearly value of forty pounds. has been augmented by the governors of queen Anne’s bounty, the greater part of the money from which has been laid out in the purchafe of marlh land in Wood* 81.

IS. fince

nefborough. At prefent the vicar receives the tithes of about eighty-four acres of land. There were great difputes formerly, between theappropriators of Eaflry and the vicars of St. Mary’s, refpefting the tithes of a ''

See Stev.

Mon.

vol,

i.

p. 39, 41.

fmall

\

SANDWICH.

203

fmall diftria ofland called Put lock’s downe; but the declfions were conftantly againft the vicars of St. Mary’s, and the tithes now belong to Word, a chapel

of eafe to Eaftry. Befides the ordinary fmall tithes, the vicar of this parifli, as well as the incumbents of the two other pahoufe a certain rilhes in Sandwich, colled from every

fum, under the denomination of dues ; this payment all the houfes, gardens, is faid to be a compofition for barns, and ftables, according to cuftom, fince the 1 2th year of queen Elizabeth ; and the vicar of St. Mary’s receives befides, 6s. 8d. annual^5^ under the denomination of tithe of the old Crane. In 1776 there were one hundred and fixty-eight houfes in this parilh, and fix hundred and fourteen inhabitants; and the rents of it were in 1787, according to the pound rate, at rack rents towards the poor, upwards of 3,500!. per annum.

CHURCH OF

6T.

MJRY.

PATRONS, Or

VICARS.

hy lohom lirefented.

The Archdeacon

John Lodwicky clerk, July

4,

1661."

John Piggoty A.

M. Dec.

21.

1677, obt. 1689. John Tho/naSy A. M. Jan. 22, 1689, obt. 1706. John Ruttony A. M., I 713, obt. July 28, 1763.’' Egerton Leigh, March 9, 1764, refigned i 774 *^ William Thomas, A. B. March 31, 1775, the prefent vicar.’' hlmfclf reclor, as did Leigh. his fuccefl'ors, Rutton and grammar the of X He was maftcr and lies buried in the chancel, '»

He

figiied

fchool, y

He

held this vicarage with that

of Tilmanftone, and refigned the fame on being prefented to the reftory of Murfton. a And perpetual curate of Goodneftone, in Bridge deanry.

St.

;

204 St.

TOWN AND PORT OF Peter’s church (lands nearly

of the town

in the centre

and in that ftate was next in fize to St. Clement’s, which was the largefl church in Sandwich. In 1641 it was certified to the lord keeper by the mayor, &c. that ;

it

confifled formerly of three

ifles,

the fteeple of St. Peter’s cliurch was in a very ruinous condition j that it was a principal lea mark, and that

was beyond the parilhioners abilities to rebuild it the efiimate of the expence being 1 500I. The fleeple fell down on Sunday, 061 13, 661, and demolilhed the fouth ille, which has never been rebuilt. There had been two fermons preached in it that day j it fell down about a quarter after eleven at night ; had it fallen in the day time, the greateft part of the town and parifli would probably have been killed and buried under the rubbith, but no one was hurt and few heard of it. The rubbifli was three fathom deep in the middle of the church and the bells underneath it. This church, as well as the other two, feems to have been formerly conflru6led entirehq or at leaft cafed externally, with the (lone of Normandy, well Iquared, and neatly put together. The eaft end ol the chancel is a good fpecimen of the old w'ork, and there are detached portions of the fame fort of malbnry in other it

.

j

parts of the building.

The

prefent ftru6lure, which

evidently the

work

compofed of fragments of the mixed w’ith Kentifli rag and fand ftone,

of different times, older fabric,

is

is

and flints from the Ihore. The fouth ifle is laid to have been built by Sir John Grove, about the year 1447, and Sir Simon de Sandw'ich, warden of the cinque ports in Edward II. ’s reign, both having given towards the new building of the fteeple. The prel’ent fteeple is a fquare tower, built with the old materials to the height of the roof of the church, and from thence to the battlements with bricks of the haven mud. There are eight fmall, but mufical bells, call in 1779 ; they coft 4301. 12s. 6d. which expence liberally

was

SANDWICH.

205

was in great meafure defrayed by the metal of the former hx old bells and a clock, which is the propel ty of the corporation, who keep it in repair. In this chuixh there are the following monuments and inlcriptions, among others too ;

numerous

to

men.

nowin ruins, are the remains handfome tomb under an arch in the wall in which w-as interred the body of Sir John Grove, who nourilhed in king Henry VI. ’s reign, on which were or a

his arms,

now

obliterated, viz.

Uree leaves

in bend, on

a canton, three crefeents. There has been another arched monument in this wall, but all the ornamental parts are gone. In the north ille are feveral oravefhoneSjWjth memorials for the Jenkinlbns, for jefi-reys

and

On a large Itone, coffin (haped,' a crois retting on a fmall dog or lion, and round the verge ot the Hone fome mutilated gothic fquare cha^cters cut in the fione, for Adam Stannar, pried, rart of another Hone, with limilar for the Olivers.

Js

charaders on

in the

plate

lame Ipace

m

a

black letter

little

to the weftward.

On

it, lies

a brafs

an infcription for Thomas Gilbert, gent, fearcher, of Kent, who married Katharine daughter of Robert Fylmer, of Eall; Sutton, in Kent* and had fix fons and three daughters arms, ; Gilbert] Gules, a faltier,

He

died in

firll

wife of

or,

is

on a chief, ermine, three piles, pt/es.

1597. In this chancel a graveflone for Mr. Henry Furnefe, obt. 1672 j Anne his wife, obt, 1 696. ( I'hey were the parents of Sir Henry Furnefe] bart.) Mr. John Elanch, merchant, obt. 1718 j Elizabeth his wife, daughter of the above Henry and Anne Furnefe, obt. 1737. A memorial for

Mary,

Sir

Henry

Solly, obt.

Mr. John

Solly, mercer, eldeft flfer of Furnefe, bart. obt. 16S5 ; and Mr. John

747. Within the altar rails are memorials of the family of Verrier of this town. On 1

many marble monument

for

tion for

a againft the north wall, an infcripthe Olivers. Oppofite the above, a

monument

with an infcription for

mural Henry Wife, efq.

town and port

2o6

of

Wm.

daughter, wife of Mr. obt. 1769; Elizabeth his obt. 1772 ; arms, Boys, obt. 1761 ; Mary his wife,_ An oval tablet three chevronels, ermine. JVife, fable,

Rolfe, jun.gent. of marble forElizabeth, wife of John marble mural monuof New Romney, obt. 1780. the nave, ment aoainft the fouth wall, near the door of marble tablet undertor the jckcns and Youngs. wife of the neath for Suiannah Wyborn, formerly

A

A

of Mr. above named Mr. Thomas Young, but late William Wyborn, brewer, of this town, obt. 1755* On a marble tablet againfl the north wall of the nav^ the weft an inicription for the Jekens. The gallery at and is end of the north ifle was built by fublciiption, 1 here are fecured to the fubfcribers by a faculty. licenced vaults (tones in the church pointing out the and Feriier; of Brown; the Jeken family ; Solly ; it has three the Thurbarne family, a hatchment over a griffin pajjanty coats of arms, viz. Thurbarne, fable, In the fouth eaft angle of impalements..

argent, with

the north

ifle is

a vault,

now belonging

to the heirs

of

Ferrier, but built originally foi the faWIennes, whole atchievment, helm, and creft

Mr. Solomon

mily of are fufpended over the place.

The arms

are, Gules, a

three leopards chevron, vaire, or, and azM e, betzveen of pretence, quarfaces of thefecond. In an elcutcheon arms of Scotland, deterly, firft and fourth, the royal lecond and third, a (hip bruifed zvith a batton, fable ; counter^ zvith fails furled, within a double treffitu e,fory, the wall of the north ifle are three arches,

fiory.

In

under the eafternmoft, between the lecond and third figures window's, on an altar tomb are the mutilated thedrefles of of a man and woman lying at length in pillows, a the time, their heads fupported by double lion at his feet,

tomb

a

dog

at hers

are narrow gothic arches.

;

in

the front of the

The tomb

pioje6ts

behind the* into the church-yard ; the lecond arch is a pulpit; the tomb was expoled to view in digging compartvault in 1770 ; its front is divided into fix ments,

;

SANDWICH.

207

ments, in each of the four middle ones is a (hield, the firft of which has three wheat fans^ a crefeent in the centre', the lecond a fefs fuftUy, between three grifins heads fourth

the

third

has three

lions

rampant,

and the

over this monument in ftones in the 'wall, are two coats of arms, that on the right hand being fretty, a chief ; and the other the ports arms, three demi lions, impaling three demi Jhips. Under the wefternmoft arch, which does not penetrate through the wall, is an handfome altar tomb of Caen (lone, in the front of which are fix fmall Ihields there were arms in all pf them, but the bearings and colours are is

void

;

nearly ejffaced.

Dr. Harris fays, in the north ifle were buried Tho,' Ellis, efq. of Sandwich, and Margaret his wife ; Sir Simon Sandwich, warden of the cinque ports temp. Edward II. who was a g;reat benefador to the buildinoof the fteeple of this church. The Sandwich MS. quoted by Mr. Boys, fays, that the former of thefe lies buried here, under a moflantient monument, and that John Ive, el'q. a worlhipful merchant likewife, and Maud his wife, lie buried under an arched fepul« chre in the wall ; and that here likewife were buried divers of the worlhipful men of theSandwich’s knights. Through the wall that divides the chancel from the north ille has been an arched door, now doled up and another in the oppofite wall, from an inciofed chapel at the upper end of the fouth ifle, between which and the Imall houfe appointed for the chaplains of Ellis’s chantry, was a door of communication, which, as well as the arch, is flill vifible ; but they This probably was are now Ihut up with mafonry. the chapel, where thefe chantry priefts performed divine offices.

There

are inferiptions on boards of the benefadions

Henry Furnefe and Mr. Jarvis. John Grove has lately been removed

to the parifh by Sir

The

figure of Sir

by Mr. Boys from the

fallen ifle, wlicre '

it

muft

f'oon

have

;

TOWM AND PORT

20S

OF

have been deftroyed, Into the church befide the font, at which time his remains were fearched for ; an arched grave was found under the monument containing a coffin with the date 1664, fo that probably the remains of Sir John Grove were removed from lienee at the time that the iile was brought into its prefent ruinous date. The outward parts of the figure having been much injured by the weather and the trampling of boys, its pofition has been reverted, and the other parts brought to view, where the fculpture is remarkably (harp and elegant. In 1564 it was ordered by the mayor, jurats, &c. that the church of Sr. Peter thould be appropriated to the u!'e of the Flemmings, on account of the plague that they might be all at one place. The church yard, which was much too fmall, has been confiderably enlarged in 1776, and was confecrated by archbilhop Moore, at his primary vifitation

on July

9,

1786

The church

of

St.

Peter

is

a redory, and was an-

abbot and convent of vSt. Augutline, and of the mayor, jurats, and commonalty; but this was not without continual difpute made by the former, of the latter’s right to it. At length this controverly was finally fettled in the year 1227, anno i ith Henry 111 when they mutually tiently of the alternate patronage of the

.

.acknowledged each others right in future to the alternate prefentation to it. After which, the abbot and convent continued in the pofleffion of their intereftin the patronage of this church, till the difiblution of their monallery in the 30th year of king Henry VIII. when it came into the hands of the crown, where their alternate turn of prelentation to this redory has ever fince continued, the king being at this time eir-» The other alternate right of prefentation titled to it. has continued in the mayor, jurats, and commonalty, to the prefent time. It

,

SANDWICH,

209

valued in the king’s books at eight pounds. In 1640 here were communicants 825, and it was valued at eighty pounds. It is now a dil'charged living, of about the clear yearly value of fifty pounds. It pays five fliillings to the archdeacon for procurations, and 3s. 4d. to the archbifliop at his ordinary vifitations. The revenues of this redtory arife from dues, colleded in like manner as in the other parifiies in this town, from the houfes in this parifii, and from the tithe of land belonging to St. Bartholomew’s holpital, called Cowleez, containing about ten acres. In 1776, there were in this parilh 228 houfes, and It

958

is

inhabitants.

The

oldeft regifter begins in

16155 the one

in ufe begins

CHURCH OF Or The

1538, and ends in

from that period.

ST.

PETER. RECTORS.

by loliom firefented.

O -own

Thomas Dazv/on, A. M. ejected

The Mayor, ^c. of S atidioich

...

2 he Crown The Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, fede vac

Aiiguft 1662. John de Blay, Marchs, 1671, reh'gned 1673. Gervais Hotve^ clerk, Aug. 21 1673. yohn Pigot, A. M. March ro,

1679, refigned 1690. John Jhotnas, clerk, July ii, 1690.''

The Crown

Gerard de

The Archbijhop

22, 1737-'' George Oliver^

Gols^

i7^3> obt. Feb.

Auguft,

1

737,

obf. Jan. 1745.'*

The

William Bunce,hL. B.Feb. 22, 1745, obt June 12, y, Cenant, A. M. 1766, the

Croxvii

The Mayor,

Cs’e.

prelent redtor.*^

a

Wood,

vol.

ii.

toi6.

p.

b Sede vacantt ftr c

He

Dutch

Was likewife

ininifter of the

coc.grf gation in

Sandwich, and

publilhed feveral religious trails and

fermons. d By lapfe of the corporation.

VOL. X.

e Alfo vicar of St. Clemeiu’s, in •which church he lies buried. f And maftcr of the grammar fchool, in Sandwich ; he holds this redfory with the vicarage of Sellindge,

by difpenfation.

P

The

210

TOWN AND PORT OF The church of St. Clement

ftands at the

eadern part of the town, on the higheft ground in it; it is a large handfome ftrudure, confiflingof a nave

and two

ifles

church, and is

;

the fteeple (lands in the centre ot the

by

the oldefl part of the fabric. It iquare, and ornamented on each fide with three is

far

ranges of pillars and circular arches j the lowefl range has only fix, the next feven, and the uppermoft nine

had formerly a fpire and battlements, which were taken down between the years 1670 and arc lies.

1673

;

It

it

is

built of

Norman

(tone

the other parts

;

of the church are formed principally of holders, (that is, flints worn away by fridlion on the ihore) mixed with fand-flone, and fome Caen (lone, probably from the ruins of the original building- There is a high chancel, and two fide ones at the eafl end. Here were flails, fitted

with

feats, for

fome

religious fraternity

;

and in this church were the chapels of St. James, St. Margaret the Virgin, and St. Thomas the Martyr, the chancel of St George, and Green’s chantry and there was a brotherhood in this church eflablifhcd for the proceflion of St. George, when bis figure was 'yearly borne about the town. The nave is i'eparated from the ifles by light airy pillars and pointed arches. The deling is of oak, in pannels between arched ,

;

beams centered with

angels holding (hields, with or-

naments of rofes and foliage. The font is an antient odogonal bafon, and fhaft of flone ; the eight fides are charged with fliields and roles alternately. On the fhields are, fird, the arms of France three Jleurs de fecond, a merUs quarterly, with thofe of England chant’s mark ; third, the arms of the cinque ports j fourth, the arms of Ellis. Above thefe fquares, at the eight angles of the moulding, are grotefque faces, except at the dexter fide of the firft fliield, where the ornament is a bird like a heron ; and on the finifter hde is a coronet with balls between fpires, terminated with Jleurs de Its 3 the whole of it is befides much de;

corated,

o

I

«

va^ /Yecfz^^YL-

yui^^ /cu/ %/Ae^

y

y

/zyL€rcr/c^^^^

eyAc^irT^'fPc.

ZY

^

^

^ /^rz^'Z'Ycr^ /^e^^zy/~~

^/^a

^

Af^



— SANDWICH*

21

t

Corated, and ornamented with different devices, leaves, flowers, fruits, fatyrs faces, &c. There are five bells,

not very tuneable, and confequently of little ule, but to haften the downfall of this venerable fteeple in which they hang. They were cafl: in 1672. Among

many

others, there ire the following

memorials in

this

church

:



monuments and

In the louth

file

are

graveflones for the Hawkers ; for William Smith, efq. rear-admiral, obt. 1756; for Elizabeth, wife of Nicholas Spencer, gent, cuftomer of Sandwich, obt.

On

1583.

raifed

monuments,

inferiptions for Shelvy

and Wyborne; for Boyman ; mural monuments for Devefon ; for the Haywards, and for the Sayers. In the north ifle, for Broughton, the Elgars, and

On

Kites,

a painted board, inferiptions for the

Wy-

bornes and the Bradleys. In the chancel, on the fouth fide of the altar, is a mural monument, with the efligies of a woman kneeling, for Frances Rampfton, widow, who married afterwards Sir Edward Rede, ob. 1 61 1. An oval mural tablet forWm. Bunce, LL.B. vicar of St. Clement’s and reftor of St. Peter’s, in

Sandwich, obt. 1766, and Martha

his wife

;

arms,

Bunce, azure, on a fefs, betzveen three hoars pajjant, ar^ gent, three eagles difplayed, fable, Odiarne, fable, a chevron, betzveen three covered cups, or. On graveflones, inferiptions for the Odiarnes and Half-

nod. died

A

memorial

for

John Martin, A. B.

vicar.

He

1741. Round the verge of a large flone, with afliield of arms at the four corners cut in the flone, is an infeription for George Rawe, gent, fometime mayor and cuflomer of Sandwich, and merchant adventurer of London, and Sarah his wife, obt. 1583. Two brafs plates, with arms. Ermine, on a chief, gules, in

Memorials for Bartholomew two efcalbp flsells, or. Combes, gent, a native of this town, and feven times mayor, obt. 1694. In the choir, a graveflone for Valentine Norwood, gent. obt. 1690. In the front of the gallery, in the fouth ifle, are the arms ofOxenden P and 2.

TOWN AND PORT OF

’(212

and Burchett, and an infcription, Ihewing that Sir George Oxenden, hart, and Jofiah Burchett, elq. repretentatives in parliament of this town and port, gave the altar piece and this gallery in 1723. Many antient flones, deprived of their ornaments ^

of brafs, are fcattered over the pavement. The burial ground of this parifh is unulually large, and, including the fcite of the church, contains within a very The trifle, an acre and three quarters of ground. Dutch refidents, in the laff, century, were allowed to

church, upon the payment of forty (hillings a year, and afterwards upon bearing a third part of all expences of repair. The mayor of Sandwich was formerly cholen in this church, and continued (o, till kingCharlesIl. in 1683.

perform divine fervice

by

letter

under

his fign

in this

manual, commanded the elec-

tion in future to be held elfewhere.

of St. Clement is a vicarage, the parfonageof which has ever been part of the pofTeffions of the archdeacon of Canterbury, to whom the ap-

The church

propriation of the church likewife belonged ; when tainly did loin the reign of Edward valued at eight marcs per annum.^

HE

it

it

cer-

was

of this vicarage formerly arofe from the tithe of filh brought into the haven ; and from the refort of fifhermen and failors to the town ; but this refource diminifhing in value, by the gradual

The principal income

decay of the haven, to increafe the maintenance of the vicar, archbi(hop Parker, in conjundion with archdeacon Gheaft, in 1570, augmented this vicarage with the tithes of hay and corn, before belonging to the appropriation, relervingto the archdeacon, in lieu of them, a yeaily penfion of forty fhilUngs ; but this increafe having been made without the confent of Sir

Roger Manwood, ment was entered *

the archdeacon’s leflee, a

I, <

j

new agree-

1 ,

into

between archbilhop Whitgift,

See Kilbiirne’s Survey, p. 237.

arch’

SANDWrCH. 213 archdeacon Redman, and Sir Roger Manwood, then of the parfonage, by which thefe tithes were now again granted in Jeafe to the vicar and his fucceflbrs at the yearly rent of 7I. 6s. 8d. by way of recompence for the abatement in the fines paid at the renewals of the former leafes. In the regiflry of the archdeacon’s court there is a return made of the Rate of this vicarage in 1615, that the parfonage and vicarage had.no glebe land, more than a little garden, together with the backfide and liable adjoining, belonging to the vicarage houfe, which paid three (hillings yearly to St. Barthololefl'ee

mew’s hofpital. That the tithe of wheat and

barley, with other

fmall tithe whatfoever, was as follows, viz. the vicar

by compolition had from the parfon, tithe of wheat, barley, peas, beans, &c. and of his own endowment, hay, pafturage, wool, lambs ; tithe of the Dutchmen’s gardens, of all manner of herbs, roots, cabbages, and fuch like, for which, at his pleafurcj the farmers of the grounds compounded with him ; and in the town, the vicar had compofition for all the houfes, gardens, barns, and (tables, in this parifh, according to cuftom, ever fince the 12th year of queen Elizabeth.

This vicarage is valued in the king’s books at 13I. 1 6s. lokd. and the yearly tenths at il. 7s. 8h1. In 1588 here were communicants four hundred and lixty-eight, and it was valued at feventy pounds. In 1640 it was valued at 120I. and here were the lame number of communicants. It is now of the clear yearly certified value of 77I. los. 4b. This mud be nearly

its full

value, for the parfonage of

it

is

let at

The time for feventy-five pounds per annum. vicar dill pays the annual penfion of 7I. 6s. 8d. to the archdeacon ; 2s. 6d.. procurations to the archbiIhop, and three fliillings yearly to St. Bartholomew’s

this

hofpital, for the vicarage houfe.

P

3

Befides

y

TOWN AND PORT

214

OF

Befides the ordinary tithes, the vicar of this church, as well as the incumbents of the other churches in this town, collecfl from every houfe within the parifli,

a certain fum,, under the denomination of dues, which payment is faid to be acompolition for all the houfes, gardens, barns, and llables, according to the cuftom eltablithed ever fince the 12th year or queen Elizabeth.

The

lands within this paridi

amount

to four

hun-

dred and thirty-three acres, which are rated at the annual value of 46 il. and the houfes and buildings within it, at 721I. In the year 1776, there were in it

one hundred and fixty-fix houfes, and fix hundred and thirty-four inhabitants. It appears that fome part of the land at Stonar, was formerly bounded and taken into

The

this pariOi.

book begins in the year 1563, 1666, from which time the prefent book

oldeft regifter

and ends

in

begins,

CHURCH OF

ST.

CLEMENT,

PATRONS, Or

VICARS,

hy ’tohom prefented.

yh chdeacon of

Francis

Canterhiiry

Father bye y

A. M.

in-,

du6led July 24, 1618, ejefted 1642.*'

The Crown Geo. bi/hop ofChefieVt as archdeacon

Parker f archdeacon.

S,

Benjamin Harr ifon y Nov. 24, i66o, refigned 1666.' William Colemauy clerk, Dec. I, 1666, refigned 1677. Mark Parkery A. M. July 21, 1677, obt. Sept. 1680. .Alexander Mills,

Thomas Greeny archdeacon

h Likewlfe vicar of Linfted. Suff. of Clergy, part

A,

AI.

Nov

i,

i68o, obt. Nov. 1714. John Martin A. B. April 30, 1714, obt. March 18, 1742.“

p.

Devonflrire, and returned to St. Clement’s, in 1660, where he continued

was vicar of this chinch in 1649, and was fequefIn tered in 1650, for contumacy. Taunton, in to South wcLin he 1653,

about fix years, and then removed to another preferment in the Weft of England. W^alker, ibid. p. 266. k Before vicar of Detling, and lies buried in the chancel here.

Walker’s

See ii.

266. 1

It .appears

that he

PATRONS,

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SANDWICH. PATRONS, ^C.

215 VICARS.

t

William Bunce, LL. B June 2, 12,1766.' I 742, obt. June Wilder Bunce A, M. July 8j 1766, the prelent vicar.

Thomas Green, archdeacon, John Head, archdeacon,

Rcftor likewife of St. Petej’s, in town ; he lies buried in the chancel of St. Clement’s church. 1

this

® He had a fecond induftion to this vicarage on Nov. 23, 1774-

The oldest chantry

in

this

town, of which

any notice remaining, was founded about the beginning of the 14th century, in St. Mary’s church, by John Condy and William his fon j but it is not found to what faint it was dedicated. The patronage of it was given by the founders to the mayor and commonalty. This chantry was fupprefled, among others of the like fort, by the adls of the 3 2d of king Henry VIII. and the 2d of king Edward VI. and the revenues of it given to the king. Barton’s chantry was founded in fo me chapel, in or near David’s gate ; it was fupprefled in the fecond year of king Edward VI. when a commiflion was granted for the fale of the chantry, as well as its there

is

revenues.

Jenkyn Green

founded a chantry in St. Clement’s church, and endowed it with lands. It was fupprefled by the a6l of the fecond of king Edward VI. and the revenues of it were fold to the Thomas Clerc was chantry prieft here king’s ufe. in 1483. The feoffees of this chantry were the fame as were appointed for St. Thomas’s hofpital, and both charities were dedicated to the fame martyr patron. The chantry of St. Thomas, ulually called Ellis’s chantry, (and it is remarkable that the two capital endowments of Tho. Ellis, were made in the courfe of, five months) was the principal eflablifhment of this kind in Sandwich, being dedicated to St. Thomas the Martyr, andfounded in St. Clement’s p 4

CHURCH

TOWN AND PORT

ai6

OF SANDWICH.

CHURCH by T. Ellis, a wealthy merchant of this town who enfeoffed Thomas Rollyng, vicar of St. Mary’s and others, in two meffuages, and 216 acres of land and rent to the amount of four pounds in Eaftry Woodnefborough, Worth, Hinxhill, and Wyncleh, berg, for the endowment of it ; and in 1392 the kin^ granted a licence of mortmain, to affign thefe eftate ^

to three priefts, or chaplains, to celebrate mafs daily ir this church, for the fouls of the faid Thomas Ellis, &cii Thefe chaplains were to fill up the vacancies withii three months after they fhould happen ; upon negled of which, the patronage was to be vefted in the mayo

and

jurats of

Sandwich

;

and on

their failure forano

ther month, in the archdeacon. One of the priefts of this chantry was

bound

to ini

the youth of Sandwich to read, and the placi where he taught, was called St. Peter^s jchool ; th W'ant of fuch a fchool in this town, after this fell to tb ground on the fuppreft'ion of the chantry, was fo ft verely felt, there being none other, that it induced tb ftru(ft

principal inhabitants to endeavour to let forward anc ther fchool of the like fort, which, by the care and 1

Roger Manwood, they effefte in the foundation and endowment by him of the pn berality, chiefly of Sir

fent

grammar

chaplains was

Mr.

The

of thelGreen, a learned fchoolmafte

fchool of Sandwich.

laft

whofe houfe was at the eaft end of St. Peter’s churcl This chantry was fuppreffed by the a6t of the 2 .year of Edward VI. and with the revenues of it, wj furrendered into the king’s hands. There was a houfe of lepers in Sandwich, called ti Maldry^ as appears by feveral wills in the Prerogati^ office,

Canterbury.

.

it

Tt

THE ISLAND OF THANET.

The

Ifland of

Thanet

is

fituated at the north-eafl

county of Kent, being feparated from the by the river Stour on the Ibuthern, and by

part of the reft

of

it

Nethergong, on the vveftern fide by moft writers to be the lame as was

the water called the

of

it.

It is faid

RuimI' or Ruochi?n i that is, though Richborough itthe iftand of Richborough ; an ifland, may reafonab y be felf, having antiently been

called

by the Britons,

Inis

called. Julius Sojinus Ibppofed to have been rather lo Roman writers, who mentions it by is the firft of the Thanaton. 1 he Saxons afthe name of Athanaton and lenetlondet which name terwards called it ^eneih^ and

Dec. Script, col. 120. hfula pereventureiV^/^eyw—of frequent4icitw Thenet, vocatur Inifiayn i^o.—Tcntih Butanmco Jcring of Sells. Leland Itin. vol. vit. p. vol. iii. pttiQtie Ruoichum, Ibid. Colle 6l. "

Simon Dimelm,

in

It

island of thanet.

2i8

though by change of language, and length of time, it has been foftened to that of Thanet,

it

as

bears,

ftill

it is

called at prefent.

The

water, which antlently feparated this Ifland

from

the county, was a large sdluary on the fouth and weft

which ran up the country as far as Chartham andAfliford, and had its two openings, or mouths, to the fea ; the one at the north mouth, or Genlade, (afterwards, by corruption of language, Tenlade^ or Tenlet^ betwixtReculver and this ifland, and the other by EbbsI'his seftuary, beyond the fleet in the eaftern part of it. bounds of this ifland, feems to have ftopped before the time of the Romans, and the river Stour to have been the only water left in the valleys, through which it flowed ; and even between this ifland and the county, and when Solinus wrote, it feems to have decreafed, for he fays, it was feparated from it ^ejiuario tenui^ by a narrow aeftuary. But notwithftandingthis, fo long as the fea continued flowing at the Genlade, at the north mouth on the eaft of Reculver, there was ftill a confiderable force of water, which being increafed by the river Stour, ran down towards Ebbsfieetand Sandwich, in a rapid ftream, and ferved to fcour and cleanfe the channel, particularly the mouth of it, of thofe fands which w'ere then beginning to gather in it. At that time, inftead of failing round the North Foreland, as at prefent, the ordinary palfage from the continent of France to London was through thisaeftuary, on the fouth or inner fide of this ifland, and back again through the fame, the two openings bearing the plural name of Portus Rutupluay and likewife Rutupiie, parts of

it,

i\fter which, this water continuing to decreafe

it,

ac-

quired from thence the in Latin,

name of the river Wantfume, VaKijmmSy by which name Venerable Rede

Hiflory, where he fays, it divides this ifland from the continent, being about three furlongs, or a quarter of a mile broad, and calls

if,

in

his Ecclcfiaflical

paflable over only at

two

places, both

its

heads extending

ISLAND OF THANET. ing into the Tea. 15th centuryj the

Even lo late as the latter end of Wantfume continued navigable,

2I9 the

not only for lelTer boats, but for greater barks and merchant Ihips, which failed backward and forward betwixt this ifland

and the continent.

During

period, the landholders took advantage of this failure of the waters round this ifland, and of this

which contributed ftill more to the lefTening of the flream and weakening its force, fo that about king Elenry VII.’s time, that part of the Wantfume, which ran bySarre towards the Genlade, or north mouth, and where the Stour intermixed with it, ceafed to be a continued ftream, and flood gates being erected acrofs it, difperfed itfelf among the lands for the conveniency of watering the cattle on them, and at other times of fewing the adjoining lands. ° This is now called the Nethergong, over which where the antient ferry was at Sarre, a bridge was foon afterwards built for the conveniency of palfengers ; and anno i Henry Vll. anadf palTed for the inhabitants of the Ifle ot Thanet the

falts left

by

it,

to build a bridge at the place called Sarre ferry. As to the other -part of the Wantfume^ which

ran eaftward, though the innings of the falts by the landholders leflened the force of the tide, and of the Stour’s waters mixing with it, which occafioncd the fands to increafe at the

mouth of

the harbour by Ebbsfleet,

where it was at length entirely choaked up, fo that a wall was made there, to prevent the fea at high-water overflowing the lands, on which is now the road to Sandwich yet the remains of the Wantfume, and the ftream of the river Stour mixing with it, ferved ftill, efpecially after great rains, to preferve the harbour ot Sandwich from entire ruin, and to fcour it from thofe fands which otherwife would have entirely ftopped it ;

Thanet, p. 9. See a full account of this part of the Wantfume, which flowed northward from Sarre bridge, °

J^ewis’s Hift.

in the

firft

vol. of this hiflory, p. 286,

up.

^

ISLAND OF THANET.

220

This ftrcam is flillof fufficient depth for the pafiage of lighters and barges, between Fordwich and Sandwich, laden with coals, deals, and fuch like fort of

lip.

lieavy carriage.

The

of Thanet is furroimded by the fea on the northern and eahern Tides, along which the chalk cliffs extend, from a little weftward of Gore-end on the Ibuth, round the eaftern fide to Cliff-end, about a mile and an halffouth-wefl: beyond Ramfgate. It is bounded on the fouth by the river Stour, and on the weft by the water called the Nethcrgong. It is in lhape a long oval, being about nine miles long from eaft to weft, It is and about five miles broad from north to fouth. divided into the two manors of Minfter and Monkton, which are feparated by a bank, or lynch, which goes quite acrofs the ifland, and is commonly called St. Mildred’s lynch, as will be further mentioned hereafter. It

is

and

Ifland

computed little lefs

ing Stonar. The chalk

to contain nearly forty-one fquare miles,

than about 27,000 acres of land, includ-

on the north and eaft parts, are in fome of thefe, as from Margategeneral pretty high pier to Pcgwell, are more firm and durable. Under thefe cliffs have been found large pieces of amber, after a rage of the fea, and fall of the cliffs. The other cliffs to the weft of Margate, which reach to Weftgate bay, are much lower, and of a more loofe and crumbly nature, and fall away in greater quantities after any froft, or rage of the fea. Through thefe cliffs, the inhabitantshave cut feveral hollow ways, for the conveniency but they have been of paffing to and from the fea frequently forced to fill them up again in time of war, to prevent their being made life of by the enemy, to furprize and plunder the country. The general face ofthe country, (excepting themarfh lanei towards the fouth) is high land, exceedingly beaucliffs

;

1

1



;

p

See Lewis’s Thanet, p. 10. tiful

j

I

confirUng in general of fertile corn lands, interniixed with thofe fown with faintfoin, clover, and

tlful

;

vetches,

mohly open and

iininclofed, with gentle hill

and

dale, frequently interfperled with fmall hamlets and cottages, moll of which being built, as well as the adjoining walls, with chalk, the general foil of the country,

have a very chearful appearance. The grounds rife from the northern fea Ihore, up towards the middle part of the ifland fouthward, fothat the high road acrofs it from Sarre, eallward, towards Margate, and St. Peter’s, as well as the many bridle, orhorfe paths, which arealmoft without number, acrofs the lands, are moft beautifully enriched with continued profpeefts over the

intermediate country and adjoining channel, which being the conllant paliage towards the mouths of the Medway and Thames, has conllantly on it a variety of fiupping, which diverfify and enrich the feene as far as the eye can compafs. Thefc advantages, with the dry-

of the foil, make the illand molt pleafant and grateful during the greatefl. part of the year, and very which occalions a refort to it of heahhy at all times numbers of perfons of diltincdiion, and genteel families from London and other parts of the kingdom, both nefs

and plcafure; whence there arifes a continued rcfource of wealth, as well as increafe of trade and inhabitants to th.is iOand, to the great benefit of the landholders, and every other perfon conneded with it. Yet, notwichftanding what has been already faid, the gen< ral afped of the ifland being expofed towards the north and eafl, and there being fo very few hedges and incl'dures to fiielccr it, caufes the fituation to be very bleak towards the lea, and thofe few trees, which arc growing hereabout, are for the m.oll part ferubby and unthriving, from their being fo much fubjedto the fea wind -, which often blow very flrong, and at times blall: almoll every tiling in their w'ay. This ifland too is Icfs pleafant, from there being fcarce any medium here, between a flaikcalm and an outrageous ftorih , owing to for health

;

ISLAND OF TIIANET.

022 ils

being fo

much expofed

On

to the lea, without any kind

of the ifland, next the lea, where the fhore is clean, no marfhes near, and the water in general good, the inhabitants are moflily healthy and long lived ; but in the lower part of it, to the fouth and weft, near the marfhes, it Is not near fo healthy; the inhabitants, from the lownefs of the fituation and the badnefs of the water, being much fubjed to intermittent fevers and agues. The foil here has always been remarkable for its tellus Tanet Jua fecunditate, fays the fruitrulncfs Monkifh Hiftorian ; and modern writers fpeak of it in equal terms of praile. An antlent chronicle goes ftill further in its praife, ftiling it, Injida arridem^ bona ve-

of

flielter

.

rum

the north and

eaft fides



copia, regni Jios

et

TfhalamuSy amenitate^ gratia^ in

qua ianquam quodam elyfio^ IS edit is, as to the uplands in general, a chalky light foil, though there arc a very few parts in It a ftiff clay

but by the excellent hufbandry of the landholders, who are noted for it to a proverb in thele parts, the crops of corn are abundantly large, and Thanet wheat and barley, for its cleanlinefsand weight, fetch a fuperlor price Canary-feed is likewlfe proat market of all others.

duced on the lands here

in great quantities, as well as

the feeds of radidi, fpinach, muftard, cabbage, and other efculent plants, which are fenttrom hence for the fuppiy of the London markets ; in fhort, the high ftate

of cultivation throughout the ifland gives an idea rather of the delicate work of a gardener, than the efFed of the more enlarged induftry of the hufbandman. The farms throughout the ifland are moftly large and confidcrable, and the farmers wealthy, infomuch that they arc ufually denominated gentlemen farmers on that account, as well as from their hofpitable and fubftantial Lcland Col. vol See alfo Ibid. vol.

lii.

p.

l

70, exlibro Gocilini devltaMilburg^e

iv. p. 8, ex

lihro

ejufdem auBoris de

vita Set

Augujiini.

mode

ISLAND OF TKANET.

mode

ofllving.

Mr. Boys,

'

22J

view of the agriculture of this county, drawn up for the ufe of the Board of Agriculture not long fmcc, gives the following account of this ifland Much of it, he fays, is naturally very thin light land; but the greater part of it liaving belonged to the religious, who were the wealthiefi and moH: intelligent people, and the befl: farmers of the time, no cofl: or pains were fpared to improve the foil ; the fea furnifhed an inexhauftible fupply of manure, w'hich was brought up by the tides to all the borders of the upland, quite round the ifland, and mod probably was liberally and judicioufly applied by the monks and their tenants ; and their fuccelfors to the prefent time have not neglecfled to profit by their example. Owing to thefe circumftances, Thanet always was, and mod likely always will be famous for its fertility; and the monkilB tale of Thanet’s deriving its fuperior fruitfulnefs from its having been the afylum of St. Augudine, is not fo far from the truth, at it may at fird appear. In fhort, there is not perhaps another didrift in Great Britain, or in the world, of the fame extent, in fuch a perfefb date of cultivation ; where the farmers are fo wealthy and intelligent ; where land, naturally of fo inferior a quality, is let for fo much money, and produces fuch abundant crops. The whole ifland contains about 3,500 acres of excellent marfh land, and 23,000 acres of arable ; all the lower part of the latter, bordering upon the marflics and fome parts of the hill, where there is a good depth of earth, are exceedingly produ6tive; and the principal part of the remainder, although naturally a poor thin light mould, on a chalky bottom, is made exceedingly fertile by the excellence of the fydem under which it is in his general

:

cultivated.

of the whole ifland, or what modern writers in hulbandry call the fubfoil, is a The tops of the ridges are dry, hard, rock chalk. about

As

to the foil, the

bottom

foil

;

ISLAND OF TKANET.

22^.

coabout fixty feet above the level of the fca and are to fix vered with a dry, loole chalky mould, from four Hints, and is inches deep, it has a mixture of fmall without manure a very poor foil. The vales between ridges, and the flat lands on the hills, have a depth the

of dry^loarny foil, from one to three feet, left mixed The weft with chalk, and of a much better quality. end of the illand, even on the hills, has a good mould,

from one

to

two

feet deep, a little inclining to ftiffnefs

j

but the deepeft and beft foil, is that which lies on the fouth fide of the fouthernmoft ridge, running weft ward from Ramfgate to Monkton ; it is there a deep, rich fandy loam, and moftly dry enough to be ploughed flat, without any water furrows. Indeed it is fo rich and great
commonable fand, and fmall marine fhells. There is no Thus far land, nor an acre of wafte in the ifland.



Mr. Boys. weed, which is often caft up by the made fea in great quantities under the cliffs, has been (ireat life of by the inhabitants on the north and eaft for fides of this ifland, for the making of a manure though the flench of this weed, when firft their lands

The

alga^ or fea

very naufeous indeed and there is another ufe to which this fca weed is put here ; (but it is only fuch of it as is alive, and actually growing upon the rocks) which is to burn to make pot-

laid in

a heap

on the

land,

is

afh for the potters, which they call kelp, which being put into barrels, is carried over to Holland, with which

they glaze all their earthenware; but the fmoke arifing from the procefs of it, is very offenfive to fome dittance, as the wind happens to waft it.^ ^

See Lewis, p. 19.

The

ISLAND OP THANET.

22 ^

The

lands on the fouthernmoft fide of the ifland are defended by thofe above them, from the firong north and cafb winds, which come from the fea 5 and are very

kindly for

fruit

trees,

wliich thrive and bear well,

though there are very few orchards in the ifland j and hops have been tried in it, but without fuccefs. It fhould feem by the names of places ftili in ule, that -there was antiently much more woodland in this ifland than at prefent ; but whatever there was, almoft all of it has been grubbed up and converted into tilf lage, though feveral of the little viJls in it ftill preferve the memory of thefe woods, viz. Weftwood, Northwood, Southwood, Colyfwood, and Wood, or Villawood, corruptly pronounced by the inhabitants Willow^ woodj which lafl: leems to have been once entirely a wood, excepting a few cottages; befides thefe, there were a wood called Bobdale, in Frilket w'ood, near Hoo St. Nicholas, and Manfton wood, a copfe of about five acres, which is the only woodland of all thefe, now left.* Into thefe woods, it is probable, the inhabitants ufed to retire, and fecurc themfe|ves and families, when the Danifh pirates infefted this ifland. Some fhew of this cuftom feems ftill remaining at a place called Chefmunds, (which it is likely, was a part of that large wood about the middle of the ifland, which ftill bears that name) where there is an appearance of entrenchments caft up, in which thefe diftrelTed people fi^eltered themfelves, this being too fmall for any army to encamp in. Several caves under ground have been difcovered elfewhere, in this ifland, which were perhaps made likewife by the inhabitants to hide themfelves in from the enemy. The timber growing in this ifland is in genera), elm, which in the lower part of it, about Minfter and Monkton, grows to a good height and fize, much more fo than that which hands expofed to ;



VOL. X.

See Lewis's Hiftory, p-

^v the

:

ISLAND OF THANET,

226

the Tea winds and nearer the chalk. Juft by the hoiifc of Powcies farm, there was, till lately, a fmall grove of oaks, the only one in this ifland j but the unthriving

of them, fhewed how unkind both the foil and fituation was to them. Leland, in his Itinerary, vol. vii. p. 137, defcribes this ifland in king Henry VIII. 's time as follows “ Morton pre, » Thanet is yn lengthe from Nord-

ftate

yorney vii miles and more and in brede from the ches, to make a river of Sture and goith not far from new haven in

much

to Sandwich

yn

ftrayt

Myftre Mergat, that is to lay from Thanet.” -fowth to north a iiii myles and fo is yn circuit by eftimation a xvii or xviii myles. At Northmuth where the en*

water fweliith yet up at a creek a myle and more toward a place cawled Sarre, which tery of the



fe

was, the

fait

was the commune fery when Thanet was fulle iled.” “ Ther hath bene a xi paroche chyrches in Thanet, of the which iii be decayed, the refidew remayne. ^ ‘‘ In the ifle is very little wood. There cum at certen tymes fum paroches out of Thanet to Reculver a myle of as to ther mother chyrche. Sum paroches of the

ifle

at

tymes .cummeth to theyr mother and

certain

Minftre being in the ifle as principal chyrche. ** The Ihore of the Ifle of Thanet and 'alfo the inward part is full of good quarres of chalke.” to

And

I

:

'

a

little

further,



Raterburgh otherwife Richcboro was or ever die ryver Sture dyd turn his botom or old canale withyn the Ifle of Thanet.”

The

I

I

ISLAND OF THANET.

11-f

The

houfeholds in this ifland were thus computed queen Elizabeth’s reign, anno 1563, in the return made to the council’s letter by archbilhop Parker’s iri

order. St.

Nicholas,

houfeholds,

St.

33

......

Monketon, Laurence,

98

Minder, Birchington,

40

St. Pttcr’s,

186 107

St. John’s,

.

Woode,

none.

Total . 532 After Which, the inhabitants appear to have increafed conlidcrably, infomuch that when Mr. Lewis publilhed his hidory of this idand in 1736, it was computed that there were no fewer than 2,200 families or which, reckoning four to houfes in the whole ifland a family, one with another, would make 8,800 fouls. Intheparifli of St. John and town of Margate, there were computed to be 600 families ; which reckoning four to a family, makes the number of fouls about 2,400 ; but they are very much increafed indeed fince, in the pariihes of St. John, St. Peter, and the By the fubfequent account of the villc of Ramfgate. feveral parifhes, it will appear that there were formerly many antient feats in this ifland, inhabited by good fa.

;

milies with large edates

but thele feats are all, except two, turned into farm houfes, and the edates anciently belonging to them, for the mod part, alienated ; fo that there are at tliis time but few gentlemen of edate, and, fident in

it ;

I

;

believe, only one judice of the peace re-

which lad

is

no fmall detriment and

in-

convenience to the inhabitants of it. As to the prefent condant inhabitants, excepting thofe of the towns and villes of Margate, Sc. Peter, Broaddairs, and Ramfgate, who modly depend on the refort

of company

in the

fummer <5^2

feafon to thofe places,

and

ISLAND OF THANET. and the mechanics who conftantly refide in them j they are in general thofc, who occupy farms, who as they are perfons of good fubllance and Ibme gentility, fo they live in a very generous and hofpitable manner. They who live by the feafide are generally fifhermen, or feafaring men, or fuch as depend on what they call foyingi i. e. going off to fhips with provifions, and to help them in diftrefs, &c. many of thefe, efpecially

who go to the Camden calls them, a thofe

north feas to filh, are fuch, as lortof amphibious creatures, who

get their living both by fea and land, as having to do with both elements, being both fifhermen and hufband-

men, and equally Ikilled in managing the helm and the plough. According to the feafon of the year they knit nets, catch cods, herrings, mackarel, &c. go voyages and import merchandizes. The very fame perfons dung the land, and perform every other fort of hulbandry bufincfs.* As to the north fea

much little

fifliery,

it

has formerly been

ufed by the inhabitants of this ifland j but the^ fucceis they have met with for many years paft,

has entirely difeouraged them from following that employment. The feamen here are generally reputed ex-

and Ihew themfelvcs very dextrous and bold in going off to fuccour fliips in diftrefs j but they are too apt to pilfer ftranded ftiips, and ruin thole who have already fuffered fo much. This praflice they call faultringi and nothing furc can be fo bafe and unfeeling, as under pretence of aftifting and of faving for the unfortunate their property, to plunder and convert it to their own ufe, by making what they call guile ftiarcs,

cellent failors,

'

I

i

cheating Jharei),

Time

made

has

very

fo great

an alteration

in this ifland,

not impoffible, perhaps for us now to form a perfedt judgment of the antient Itate of it. On the north and eaft the land has certainly gone

that

it is



I

difficult, if

See Lewis’s Thanet, p. 32, et feq.

much

I

|

i

ISLAND OF THANET.

much

farther into the fea, which has wafhed

229 away many

hundred acres, not to fay thoufands, as it muft have done, if it encroached in proportion for the feven hundred years before, as it has for thefe laft hundred and fifty. At this time, at low water, rocks, as the inhabitants call them, or footings of the chalky cliffs, on which anciently was land, are to be feen above half a mile from the prefent Ihore or cliffs. On the loath and weft parts of the ifland, there arc fome hundred of acres now dry land, which were antiently all under wa* ter and a navigable ftream, where the fea ebbed and flowed. Omnia Pontus erat. At Hepes-flete, or Ebbsflete, as it is now called, was a water-mill, and at Stonar another, which both belonged to the abbot of St. Auguftine, Between thefe places was a place called Henne-brigge, not far from Stonar, on the fame fide that Cliffe-end is ; no remains of which name is now left. The main road through the ifland from St. Laurence to Sarre, was antiently called Dun-ftrete, or the ftreet, or way over the downe. On the road between Minfter and Birchington, acrofs the ifland, were two croffes erefted, which in former times were held in great reverence. The larger of thefe croffes flood where the road called Dun-ftrete and this way crofted. The Britons were the antient inhabitants of this ifland j of thefe there have been found fome memorials in their coin, and amulets both of gold, or eleSfruniy and brafs j" and fome of their tools have been like wife found here, in digging wells, &c. of a white flint, fhaped and cut in the form of a broad edged chizel. To them fucceeded the Romans, fcveral of whofe coins in brafs have been taken up under the cliffs near Bradftow, after the rage of the fea and falling down of the land. One of them, fays Mr. Lewis, was of the emperor Conftantinc. Another was a filver coin of See a defeription and engraving of two of thefe in gold, in Lewis’s Hiftory of Thanet, p. 27. “

o

7

Domitian.

ISLAND OF THANET.

2JO

of a Domitlan. About i 6 o years ago, the fervants depth farmer at Minfterj ftriking their plough a greater a pot, than ordinary into the ground, ftruck ngainfl which they brought up full of Roman coins, of the lefthe country fer and larger filver ; thefe were called by

and many years after, fome of thefe were found after a fliower of rain, which w’ere fuppofcd them. to be dropped by thefe who firft difeovered

people, hcildpates

;

Another parcel of thefe coins was found, not far off* ;• from the other place, near where the mill now (lands the mill the others having been taken up near where s formerly flood, or w'hat is now called king William mount.

Of

the Saxons,

who drove

out the Britons, after they

had been abandoned by the Romans, no coins have been known to have been found here, though they frefor quently landed, and long remained in tliis ifland fome time. In this ifland the troops of the Saxons, command lent for by the harrafled Britons, under the

landed at Hepesflete, afterof Hengift and Horfa, wards called Ebbsfleet, the common landing-place in ^nd the eaflern part of this ifland, about the year 449 > foon afterwards, for their fervices againfl the Scots

^

firfl

had and

Pidls,

the antient enemies of the Britons, this

ifland allotted to

them

for their habitation,'"

j

I

|

where next

|

fevenyear a new reinforcement of Saxon troops, in Hengift ; teen large fhips, arrived on the invitation of making together with their countrymen already in this

army. Hengift, after vaconrious incidents becoming king of Kent, this ifland The tinned in the conftant poflefflon of the Saxons.

|

j

j

ifland, a very conflderable

|

|

confecjuence of this was, that the Biitons, the antient inhabitants, were every where miferably harraffed and opprefled; nay, to fhew the abfolute conqueft of the

Saxons, as their language was altogether different from that of the natives, lb they left very few places of any *

Brompton’s Chron. Dec,

|

Script, col. 728.

fort,

;

;

fort,

ISLAND OF THANET. which they did not change the names

231 of, to

fuch

were intelligible in their own language, and were given either by reafon of their fituacion, or nature of as

the place, or after fome place of the like fort to it in Germany, the country from which they came. But this was not, by any means, the greateft misfortune to

which the inhabitants of this ifland afterwards became fubjcd ; from its fituation it lay expofcd to the continual infults and ravages of thofe mercilefs pirates the Danes, as appears by the feveral hiftories of thole times. During which in 988 they burnt the abbey or nunnery clergy and at Minfter, with the nuns in it, and the people who had fled tiiere for fandtuary. And again monaftery the year lo 1 1, they entirely demolilhed that again vifited this after which, though they no doubt mention of their ifland, yet I do not find any particular But tranfadlions here, in the hiftorians of thole times. town of Sandwich bein after ages, when the port and in

French, that it became the frequently continual objed of their revenge, and was danger of attacked by them, this ifland was always in

came

fo formidable to the

as rhe great being invaded, from its vicinity, as well which induced Euftace eale there was of landing on it, admiral, .in king John’s rcign^ le Moyne, the French France, to it, when to condud Lewis, the dauphin of and this induced Edward III. invaded this realm

he

;

fecurity of to take meafures for the

who

it,

in his

43d

and otheis, to caufe year dircded John de Cobcham where fiupsand boats fuch places in the Ifle of Thanet, fortified with mounds could land, to be inclofed and at the charge of thofe and ditches, to prevent the fame, And in the it. whofc lands Ihould be bencfitted by much the fame nayear of Uiat reign, a writ of 46th

ture,

the maritime was direded to the guardians of

parts of this county.’' *

Rym.

Feed. vol. vi. p. 623


*

747*

Just

k

.

*3^

ISLAND OF THANET. Just by Cliff-end there is a fort of bkieifh

much refembling

very

fuller’s earth,

fand,

amoog which

are

{^vtYdX jirata of fhells,

fuch as cockle, culverlliellsj great numbers of which are likewife found farther up, on the fame level, in digging wells, &c.

&c.

Our

have taken notice of fcarce and curious plants, growing in differcnj^ parts of this ifland, much too numerous to mention here, the names of them may* be leen in our feveral Hcrbalifts and Botanical Wri» botanijli

ters referred to in the note

About naturally,

below/

Sarre and Margate,

and

common

fennel

grows

abundance on the road fide and and the ; foil is particularly kind for rofemary, inlbmuch that there are hedges or it of a conin great

in the ditches

fiderable length

A weed begins

to infeft this ifland, which is not a alarming to the farmers in it, as it is of the moft prolific kind, and very difficult to be eradicated. It was produced a few years ago among fome oats, which were freighted on board a vefiel that was wrecked upon the coafl: here, and being walked by the tides along the fhore, among the fea weeds, w'as carried little

^

/

/

^

away to

different lands at the

fame time* It is of the and produces its feeds in a pod, flowering and feeding at the lame time throughout the



clafs tetredynaniia,

^ r>

i-;

^ H

Xhe its fetid fmell.

rails

inhabitants call

it

leems to be either the of Hudfon, or a variety from it.

Tlhe bird,

It

from brojjica mu*

the Jlink-zveed,

called

the bargander, in Latin, chenalopex, often frequents the marfbes and waters in this ifland.

y

Johnfon’s Gerarde’s Herbal, p. 31, 42, 248, 280, 315, 318,

324,367, 411,417,420, 469,503, 523, 533, 562, 610,622, 623,

800,838,1273,1547,1570,1571, ,572, 1573, 1574. Merretts Pinax, p- 7 i> 73 Rail Synopfis, p. 32, 42, 49, 221, 222, Lewis’s Hill, of Thanet, p, 23, Jacob’s Plantee Fav, p. ^ 10, II, 17. -

In

ISLAND OF THANET

233

In the heraldic vifitatiom of Kent, are the pedigrees ot the following families, relident at different

times in this ifland. CUybrokej of Manffon and Nafh-court, in the raldic vifitations of 1574 and 1619; arms, erofs formeey gules. of Dandelion, in both vifitations ; arms, genty on a che^i^rouy three bezantSy betiveen three heads erafedy fable y cr owned y or.^ Johnfony of Nethercourt, in both vifitations

Per pale and fefsy

indentedy

or,

and

fable

;

Hea

lions

arms,

in the firji

;

quarter y a pelican vulneratedy or.

Tenches of Birchington, in the vifitation of 1619. Curling, of this ifiand, in the fame j arms, Or, on a pale, guleSy a leopard's face, jeffant, a Jleiir de Us of the '

field.

^

Northwood, of Dane-court,

mine j a

crofs engrailed, gules

j

in the

fame

in the firji

arms, Erquarter, a wolf £ •,

heady erafed of the fecond.

Harty, of Birchington, in the fame vifitation ; arms. Or, on a fefs, fable, three eagles difplayed of the field. Spracklyn, of St. Laurence, in the fame vifitation arms, Sable, a faliier, ermine, bettveen four leopards faces, or.^

of Quekes and Cllve-court, in the fame; arms, two coats ; firft, Ermine, a fefs, chequy ; fccond. Or, on a chevron, fable, five horfe-fhoes, or. Par amor, of St. Nicholas ; arms, Azure, a fefs emCrifpe,

battled, betzveen three etoils of fix points, or.

Sanders, of St. Laurence, Minfter, and

Monkton

;

on a chevron, gules, three mullets, argent, be-

arms. Or, tween three elephants heads erafed, gules. Mafon, of Monkton ; arms. Per pale, argent and fable, a chevron, between three billets counter changed. *

See this pedigree continued to 1664 in

No, 2230.

®

Ibid.

^

Ibid.

MSS.

Brit.

Miifeum,

ISLAND OF THANET.

234

In the year 1630, the

of knighthood was retaken into confide ration, and with care and diligence bujinefs

being grounded upon an old fiatute entiand a proclamation was tled, Statutum de Militibns iffued that year, fetting forth that as the king had for-

fet

on

foot,

;

of counties, for fummoning all that had forty pounds, land or rent, to appear at the day of his coronation, and prepare themfelvcs to receive the order of knighthood ; he did then award a commilfion to certain lords,' and others of his privy council, to treat and compound with all thole who made default, and feveral commifTioners were awarded into the feveral counties, giving power of compounding ; thofcof this ifland who were fummoned to appear before the commifTioners appointed for this purpofe, were Richard Terry, Edward Fuller, William Xhurcir, William Jenkin, all of Minfter ; Henry Paramor, efq. of Monkton ; Thomas Paramor, gent, of St. Nicholas; William Fagg and Henry Johnfon, of St. Laurence. The following men of note and learnings were natives of this ifland Nicholas de Thonty abbot of St, Augufline’s monaftery anno 1 283. John de Tenety a monk of the Benedifline monaftery of Chrift- church, in Canterbury, anno 1330. V/illiam de Thorny a monk of St. Auguftine’s abbey, anno 1380. Stephen de Birchingtony a monk of the monaftery of Chrift church, above-mentioned, author of a hiftory of

merly

fenc writs to the fherifFs

:

the archbifliops as far as the year 1369. Marcellus Daundelyony abbot of St. Auguftine’s

mo-

naftery in 1426.

Robert Jenkhiy born at Minfter in 1656, educated at the king’s fchool, in Canterbury, and from thence fent to St. John’s college, Cambridge ; was afterwards '

Ruflnvorth’s Hift. Col. vol,

ii,

part

i.

p. 70.

made

ISLAWD OF THANET.

235

and mafter of St. John’s college, and lady Margaret’s profefibr of divinity, which preferments he held till his death in 1727. He was the author of feveral religious and other books

made precentor of Lincoln

and

cathedral,

trafts.

In the year 1642, Henry Robinfon,.gent. by his will, gave a melTuage at Upper Gore-end, in Birc^hington, for the maintenance

of two fellows and two fcholars,

in St. John’s college, in Cambridge ; the fellows and fcholars to be born in the lile of Thanet, and brought

Canterbury fchool ; and in default offuch, other fcholars born in Kent, and of the faid. fchool. By a decree in chancery, in 1652, and upon confent of parwere then funk ties, it was ordered, that as the lands to fifty pounds per annum, and not able to lupport the

up

in

charge of two fellowfhips, &c the college flfould maintain, inftcad of two fellows and two fcholars, four fcholars according to the diredtion of the donor, each of which fhould be allowed by the college in commons, ten pounds a year.** r c This island gives the title of Earl to the family of Tufton, long refident at Hothfield, in this county, an ample account of which has already been given under

thedefeription of that parilh, in the feventh volume of this hiftory, p. 5 17.

,

n.

r

Tufton, knt. and bart. the eldeft Ton ot patent, dated Sir John Tufton, bart. was created by Nov. I, 1626, anno 2 Charles I. baron Tufton, of Tufton, in SufTex,and afterwards, on Augull 5, 1628, his pofteiity Earl of Thanet. He died in 1632, and in the right hon.Sackthefe titles have continued down to and prefent EarlofEhaville Tufton, being the ninth, baron Tufton, and baronet.® Sir Nicholas

of them in Lewis’s Thanet, p. 4^. earls of Thanet, and their = full account of the feveral of the earl of lhanet, fucceffion, and the arms, fupporters, &c. ^

See a See a

in vol.

lift

vii.

p.

518

et fe^. -

X HE

I

ISLAND OF THANET.

236

The hundred

of Ringslow, called likewile in antient records, the hundred of Thanejf claims jurilcliction over luch part

of

this ifland, as

is

not within the

jurifdi^lion of the cinque ports.

This hundred was part of the antient polTemons of the abbey of St. Auguftine, but it was given up to king Edward I. in whofe reign it appearing, by inquifition, to be of no value to the crown, that king, in his X3th year granted it, with the hundreds of Blengate and Downhamford, again to that abbey, to hold in fee farm which grant was allowed on a quo warranto^ in the 7th year of king Edward II. before Henry de Stanton and others, juftices itinerant in which ftate thele hundreds continued, till the dilTolution of the abbey in the 30th year of king Henry VIII. when they came into the hands of the crown, where they remain at ;

this time. It contains within its

bounds, part of the parifh of St. Laurence, the parilhes of Minfter, Monkton, and Stonar, and part of the parifli of St. Nicholas, and all the churches of thofe parilhes. Two conllables have jurifdidlion over this hundred. The remainder of this i/landh within the jurifdidlion of the cinque ports, containing the corporate town of

Margate, including the parifh of St. John ; Birchingtonwith Gorefend, Wood, alias Woodchurch, and St. Peter’s, all members of, and within the jurifdidtion of the port of Dover ; the ville of Ramfgate, and the ville of Sarre, now ellcemed in the parifh of St. Nicholas, both members, and within the jurifdidion of the port of Sandwich. There were formerly eleven parilhes and churches four of the churches are ruinated, bej ing thofe of Stonar, Wood, alias Woodchurch, All Saints, and Sarre, the parifhes of the three laft churches being united to thofe of Birchington, and St. in this ifland

^

Dec. Script, Thorn, col, 1935-1943-2120.

Nicholas,

•ISLAND OF THANET. Nicholas, fo that there are at rilhes remaining in it, viz.

Nicholas, ’ivith Sarrf. rtW All Saints

St.

1.

this

5.

John,

St.

the bo-

•viith

and town

^Mar-

gate. Peter.

Monkton.

6 . St. 7. St.

3.

Minster.

4.

BiRCHINGTON, "Kith Hood, alias WoodCHURCH

time only eight pa-

rough

annexed.

2.

237

ville

8.

Laurence, with the oyRAMSGATE, and

Stonar,

annexed.

the parilhes of this illand were butts, formerly call up and kept in repair, for the pradlice and cxer^ eife of archery, or (hooting with the long bow, which In

all

was formerly

a principal diverfion in this ifland

remains of thefe butts

(till

;

the

continue in fome of the

pariHies.

ST.

THE

parifli

Nicholas at

of

NICHOLAS. St. Nicholas,

Wade, from

its

formerly called St.

fituation

ad vadnm,

that

is,

near the wading place, or ford, acrols the water called the Wantlume, at, or at lead near where the bridge at Sarre now is, lies at the north weft corner of this ifland.

moft part of it fitua.ted upon high ground, excepting towards the weft, where it confifts of alevel of marlh land, bounded by the water called The the Nethergong. The fea bounds it northward.

This parish

is

church and village ftand on an hill, ncaiiv in the centre of the parilh. In Jt there are two neat ikw built houfes, the property of the Bridge.s’s, one being the rcfidence

Mrs. Mary Bridges, the widow ol Mr. Edward and the other the Bridges, late of St. Nicholas court property and late the refidence of Thomas Bridges, elder branch of this efq. now of Glaraorganfliire, the of

\

this parilh, who family, who;ha.ve been long fetded in a.legpaid s ’bear for their arms, Argent, on a crofs, fable,

head

y

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

238

another which belonged to the late Thomas Gillow, efq. About a mile northward from the church, near Shoart, is the borough of Jll Saints in which there was once a church or chapel,

head

cahofljedy or

;

and there

is

long fince ruinated, the parifli of which is now united to this of St. Nicholas. The foil and face of the country within the bounds of this parilh, have been already taken notice of in the general defcription of this ifiand. It is about four miles acrofs from eaft to weft, and ibmewhat lefs than three, excluding Sarre, from north to fouth.

By

the return

made

to the council’s letter,

by arch-

bifhop Parker’s order, in 1563, there were then computed to be in this parifli, thirty-three houfcholds ; of late there have not been near fo many, owing to the laying farms together, and pulling

down thehoufes of

the fmaller ones.

About

half a mile to the right

of the road from St.

Nicholas to Birchington, and adjoining to the fummer road from Sarre to Margate, is a large ohelijky about ten feet diameter and twenty-nine high, built with brick and capped with ftone j it ftands on the fpot, where formerly ftood a windmill, which was a peculiar fca-mark. On the north fide is an infcription, Ihewing that it was ereded by the corporation of the Trinityhoufe in 1791, for the fafety of navigation. The manor of Monkton claims paramount over this parifli, Jubordinate to which is The manor of Downe Barton, fituated about half a mile fouth-weft from the church, on the road from thence to Sarre. It feems to have been part of the antient pofleflions of the fee of Canterbury j and in the 10th year of king Edward III ’s reign, archbifliop Stratford obtained the grant of a

market weekly, on a Monday, and a fair on the nativity of the B. V. Mary, yearly, within this parilh after which this manor continued in the fee of Canterbury, till it was exchanged with the crown, in the beginning of queen ;

Eliza-

NICHOLAS. 239 Elizabeth’s reign, whence the fcite of It was granted in the loth year of it to Windebank, but itlhould feem ST.

only for a term, for king Charles I. by his letters patent, in his 7th year, granted this manor, to William They afCollins and Edward Fenn, to hold in fee.

terwards conveyed

it

by

Tale

to

Thomas Paramore,

gent, of this parifli, who bore for his arms, Azure, a Jefs embattled, betzveen three ejlolles of fix points, or. By

was fold to Daniel Flarvey,

of Combe, in Surry, who poflefied it in the middle of king Charles I’.s reign, from one of whofe defeendants it was carried by fale to Elkib Breton, of Enfield,

whofe

heirs

it

efq.

Middlefex, who died in 1785, leaving, his widow Elizabeth in the poffcirion of it, fince whole deceafe their two fons, William and Eliab Breton, efqrs. as

in

coheirs in gavelkind, are

become

entitled to

it.

an cllate about a mile north-eall from the church, in the road leading to the fea, which was held of the manor of Downe Barton in focage, by fealty and It was formerly the property of JohnWigmore, rent. from whom it came to William Bredhall, and thence again to John Cleymond, clerk, prcfident of Corpus

Shoart

is

Chrifti college, in

Oxlord,

who anno 25 Henry

VIII.

away and allured his right in it toRobt.Kempe, which releafe was again warranted to hold in fee by him as prefident, and the fcholars of that college

paired

;

jointly afterwards.

Robert Kemp, by his will in 1548, gave it to Wilwho joined liam and Thomas, his two younger fons, to John Fynch, who in the fale of it, anno 9 Elizabeth, two years afterwards palfed it away by fale to Sir Roger Manwood, chief baron of the exchequer ; one of whole defeendants alienated it to Daniel Harvey, efq. of

Combe, from whofe

defeendants, with

Downe

Bar-

and neighbourhood, to Eliab Breton, whole

ton, and other eftates in this parilh it

was

two

fold

fons,

within

memory

William and Eliab Breton,

time ^polfclled ol

efqrs. are at this

it.

Bart-

RINGSLOW HUNDRED. 240 Bartletts, alias Thoneton, is a farm about

half

a mile weftvvard from Shoart, which was likewife held of the manor of Downe Barton iu focage, by fealty and

was antiently the patrimony of the Chiches, and then of the Garlands, from which name it pafled by fale to Robert Sea, whofe fon Henry dying without It

rent.

male ilTue, his three daughters, Millicent, Elizabeth and Mary, became his coheirs. Jerom Brett and Milicent above-mentioned, his wife, anno 5 Elizabeth, fold their third part to William Norwood, of Nafli, as did Arthur Chute, and Elizabeth above-mentioned, his wife, their third parr, two years afterwards. From the Norwoods their property in it was pafled by fale to Thomas Paramor, in the 20th year of queen Elizaand from him again to Sir John Levifon and beth Tiiomas Willowes ; the former of whom, on the death of the latter, by furvivorfhip, became folely poffefihl of this eftate, and afterwards fold it to Sir Roger Manwood, chief baron of the exchequer; the refidue, which had come by Mary, the third daughter and coheir of Henry Sea above-mentioned, in marriage to Edward Crayford, of Mongcham, continued in h.is defccndants, till it was fold to Sir Peter Manwood, K. B. (fon of Sir Roger). From the Manwoods the whole of this eftate patfed to the Bridges’s, of this parifti, and John Bridges died pofleftcd of it in 1667, and by his will gave it to his youngeft fon John; after which it was alienated to Daniel Harvey, efq. of Combe, in whofe defcendants it continued, till at length it pafled, with Downe Barton and other eftates in this parifli and neighbourhood, in marriage with a daughter and heir of that name to Breton, whofe fon Eiiab Breton, efq. of E,nfield, left by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Weftcnholme, two Ions, William and Eiiab, who on his ;

death became as Ihs coheirs, in gavelkind, entitled to it, and they arc now jointly polfelfed of it. Upver and Nether Hale, formerly known by the

nameof

are

two

eftates in this parifli, the

former of

ST.

NICHOLAS.

241

of which is fituated about a mile diftant frbnv the church eaftward, near Birchington. They were in queen Elizabeth’s reign, in the pofTeflion of John, fon and heir of Henry Crifpe, who afterwards paifed them away to James Hales, who in the 2zd year of that reign conveyed them to William Rowe, citizen and ironmonger, of London. The eftate of Upper Hale now belongs to the widow of Mr. Broadley, late of Dover, furgeon.

But Nether Hale^ which St, Nicholas,

became

nearer to the church of afterwards part of the poflcffionS'

of Corpus Chridi college, at this time.

The

lies

Oxford, and remains fo prefent leflee is the Rev. Herbert in

Randolph, clerk. St. Nicholas court, fituated at the eaflern boundary of this parilh, about two miles dilfant from the church, near adjoining to Birchington, confifts of tzvo Jeparate ejiatesy one of which was formerly accounted a manor, as appears by an inquifition taken in the 12th year of king Edward IV. by which the prefident and

Queen

Cambridge, v/ere found to be at that time poflefled of the manor of St. Nicholas courts in this parifli,® part of whofe pofieirions it remains at this time. The other estate, called St. Nicholas court farm, being an eftate in fee, has for many years belonged to the Finch family, who are at this rime entitled to it, Mrs. Finch, widow of Saville Finch, of Thriburg, in Yorkfture, being the prefent pofTelfor. fellows of

s

college, in

lands of this latter eftate are fo blended with thofe of the former, having for a long fuccefilon of time been ufed by the fame occupier, that they cannot

The

time be diftinguiftied one from the other. The prclcnt occupier is Mr. John Bridges, whofe family have been refidents and occupiers of it for many geat this

nerations* «

Rot. Efch. ejus an. See Tan.

VOL. X.

R

Mon.

p. 55.

The

«

RINGSLOW hundred.

242

of St. Nicholas court are a diftin5i titheri, as to the great tithes, but they pay fmall tithes to the vicar of Monkton. This portion of tithes arifes from certain glebe belonging to the vicar, intermixed with St. Nicholas court lands, for which the occupiers of

The lands

time a yearly compofition to the vicar, of five (hillings, but what it is, or where thefe lands lie, no one knows. Frosts is a farm in this parifh, which was the early refidence of the family of Paramore, in the defeendants of which it continued, till it was. Toon after the reftora-

them pay

at this

by Mr. Henry Paramore to John Bridges, yeoman, of this parifh, the latter of whom died pofiefTed of it in 1667, and by his will directed to tion,

alienated

middle chancel of this church. He devifed this efiate to his Ton Ezekiel, with other tenements and lands in this parifh, purchafed of Tho. Para-

be buried

mor,

cfq.

leaving

in the

pofiefTed of this efiate in 1669,

and he died

John Bridges, who died J. p. in upon which it came to Edward Bridges, cldefl it

to his fon

i68i ; fon of his kinfman Thomas Bridges, dants St.

it

down

has continued

Nicholas court,

to

whole defeenMr. John Bridges, of in

in this parifli, the prefent

owner of it.

i

CHARITIES

Edward Okenfoid,

by will in 1683, gave 5I. to be put out to intereft, the money to be given to fuch poor perfons as As this charity was unpaid for 34 receive no alms or relief. heirs of the donor, upon fettling the that fuppofed it is years, luin to lol. which fum the churchthe the account, made up wardens and overfeers have now in their hands. Thomas Paramor, efq. of Monkton,*' by will in 1637, gave 61 per annum, to be paid out of certain lands and tenements in this parilh ; and a houfe with about an acre of land, .

near St. Nicholas llreet, for a fchoolmafter to relide in, who is to teach fuch poor children as come to him, of this parifli and of Monkton, to read and write the children of fuch poor as This is now vefted in the receive alms to have the preference. overfeers, who appoint the mafter, minifter, churchwardens and and is together of the annual produce of lol.*

1

j

'

,

|

j

;

h His will

is

in

Prerog,

off.

Cant.

i

]

I

Ibid,

John

i

ST.

NICHOLAS.

243

|oKN Bridges,

of this parifli, by will in 1667, gave lol. to the poor of St. Nicholas, to be put out to intereft which fum ; is now veiled in the vicar, churchwardens and overfeers, and is put out accordingly

John Finch, gent, of Lymne, by will in 1705, gave one moiety of a farm, called Chamber’s Wall, confilling of a houle, barn, &c. and 105 acres of arable and marih land, to the minifler, churchwardens and overfeers, in trull, to dillribute the profits half yearly to eight of the elded,

poored, and mod honed, indudrious and diligent labouring men of this parifli, who never have received any alms or relief ; which charity is now veded in the minider, churchwardens and overfeers, and is of theannual produce of 37I. los.' The school endowed by Mr. Paramor, as above-mentioned, dill cxids lor the teaching of reading, writing, and arithmetic,

mader teaching, befides the above ten fcholars, feveral others from the neighbouring pariflies. The poor condantly relieved are about twenty, cafuallv the

/

thirty-five.

.

This parish diction of

is

within the ecclesiastical juris-

the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of

Wcftbere.

The

church, which

tion of the archdeacon,

Is

exempted from the

jurifdic-

dedicated to St. Nicholas* and confifts of three ifles and three chancels, having a fquare tower at the weft end, in which hang five bells. The church is a handfome building of flint, with windows, doors and quoins of afhlar ftone. There are three moft beautiful Saxon arches between the nave and the fouth

ifle.

It

has a

is

good

altar-piece.

In the mid-

a handfome brafs fconce ; the rod by which it hangs, is richly ornamented with large crowns and mitres ; it was given by Mrs. Elizabeth Hannis, in 1757. The church is pretty well paved, and is kept remarkably clean ; the fouth chancel is made ufe of as a fchool room s the north chancel belongs*to the cftate of Frofts, in this parilh, by the owners of which it is held and maintained j under the greateft part of it, is a dle



Ifle is

Wills, Prerogative office, Canterbury, devifed the other moiety in like manner to the parifii of

He

Wye.

Wills, Prerog.

off.

Capt.

R

2

large

244 large vault, in

RINGSLOW HtJNDRED. which lie many of the Paramors,

for-

merly owners of that eftate, and of the Bridges s lilcetwo wife, the prefent owners of it. In this chancel are monuments for the Paramors, and two graveftones, with braflfcs for the Everards, and graveftones and monufor the Bridges’s, of this parifh likewife. In the middle chancel are memorials tor Katharine, wife of Nicholas Chewney,' vicar ; the died in 1 650 } for Mr.

ment

Stephen Huffam, late minifter, obt. 1629; and for Thomas Smelton, A. M. vicar near thirty years, obt. 1700 Several memorials for the family ot Napleton, of thisparifli, and one for Henry Blaxland, the elder, of this parifh, obt. i6gi. In the nave of the church a

Anne, wife of Edward Emptage, ot this of the parifh, obt. 1662. A monument for feveral fame family of Napleton, Elizabeth, daughter of Tho. Napleton, the laft of her name, died at her houfe in Canterbury, in 1755 ; arms, Or, per crofs and fefs, four fquirreh feiant, proper. In the north chancel a hand-

memorial

tor

fome tomb for the Bridges’s. In nument for Edward Hannis, gent

the fouth

ifle

a

mo-

fonof Charles Hannis, gent* of St. Andrew’s, Holborn,ob. unicorn, 1750; arms, Barry of feven, azure and or, a gules, a fable, impaling Terry, viz. Ermine, on a pile, leopard's face, pierced by a fleur de lis, or. Memorials for Sackett, Emptage, Knowlcr, Cowell, Neame, Pett, and White. In the nave, a memorial for Tho. Bufby, fecretary to the earl of Thanet thirty-four years, obt. for Blaxobt. 1609 1759 > for William Henneker, land, Everden, Greadier, and the Cullins, of St. Alphage, in Canterbury. Memorials of the Napletons, whofe monuments have been mentioned before. Several memorials for the Gillows arms, Gillozv, argent, ot this parifh,

;

;

a

lion

rampant, gules, on a

chief, azure, three fleur s

de

lis,

Several memorials for the Bridges’s. On the back of the pulpit, which is very richly carved, is 1615, There was a chapel of St. Thomas the I. S. E. E. or.

Martyr on the fouth

fide

of the church, in which was

ST. NICHOLAS.

245

Many

of the Bridges’s, of this parifli, lie buried in this church-yard as well as the church. The church of St. Nicholas was formerly efteemed as a chapel to that of Reculver, which was part of the antient polTelTions of the fee of Canterbury, and continued fo till the time of archbifhop Winchelfea, who principally on account of the inconveniences arifing from the diftance of this and other chapels (for thofe of Herne and Hothe were chapels likewife to Reculver) from the mother church, about the year 1296, made them all three parochial, and united to this church of St. Nicholas the adjoining parifli of Ail Saints, the church of which had been before efteemed

Iris

Image.

of eafe to this church, and foon afterwards became defecrated and fell to ruin. ^his fmall parijh of All Saints^ the church or chapel of which may be feen in an antient map of this iftand, in Trinity college library, in Cambridge, had formerly within its bounds a villor town, called All Saints, be-

as a chapel

longing to

it.

This

is

now

called the borough of All

Nicholas parilh. This church has been long fince fo entirely demolifhed, that there are no marks of it left. It appears by Leland that it was fo in his time, but how long is not known. It appears to SaintSy in St.

have ftood not

The

far

from Shoarc

archbilliop,

houle."’

when he made

thefe chapels paro-

above-mentioned, inftituted three diftinft and perpetual vicarages in them, which he afterwards by his inftrument in 13*0 feparatcly endowed; and in token of their perpetual fubjecftion to the church of Reculver, that the vicars fhould pay each of them, cerchial, as

men-

making In the Lambeth library are feveral inftniments of ^rchdecree tion of this church or chapel and parifli, viz. A or All chapel bifliop Peckham, between the parifnioners of the Regift. Peckham, Saints and St. Nicholas inThanet, anno 1284. of the above two bounds the f. 206.— An inquifitioii concerning and a decree f. 240 ; Regif Winchelfea, anno 1297. Saints. concerning a highway belonging to the chapel of All

pariflies,

R

2

tain

246

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

of it ; that to be paid by the vicar of St. Nicholas being yearly four marcs and ten fhillings j and that in reverence to the mother church, the vicars with their priefts, minifters, and parilbioners, fhould come thither in proceflion, once in every year, in manner as therein mentioned. This was continued in Leland’s time, temp. Henry VIII. who fays, Ther cum at certen tymes fum paroches out of Thanet to Reculver a myle of as to ther mother tain annual penfions to the vicar

chyrehe.” Notwithftanding this decree, the parilhioners of thefe chapelries continued as liable to the repair of the mother church of Reculver, as the peculiar inhabitants of the place j a matter much controverted between them in the time of archbifhop Stratford, who made a decree in 1335, in favor of Rcculver. After W'hich there continued much conteft and difpute ftill on this account, until by a decree of archbifhop Warham inking Henry VIII. ’s time, it was fettled by the confent of all parties, that the people of the chapels of Herne and St. Nicholas fhould redeem the burthen of repairs with a moderate annual ftipend, in money, payable on a certain fet day in the year; but with this provifo, that if they kept not their day of payment, they fhould then be open to the law and fall under as full an obligation to the repairs of the mother church, as if the decree had never been made ; in which ftate it remains at this time, the churchwardens of St. Nicholas paying annually 3s, 4d. on this account to thofe of Reculver." Although the vicarages of Reculver and its chapels

were thus feparated and made diftinA, yet the red;ories or parfonages of them, remained in the fame ftate as before ; that is, one parfonage of Reculver, extending See a more particular account of the endowment of thefe vicarages, and the controverfies above-mentioned, ia^vol. ix. of ^

"

this hiflory,

under Herne, p. 92, and Reculver, p, 123.

over

NICHOLAS.

247 over that parifb and thole of Hothe and Herne j and another of St. Nicholas, with All Saints in Thanet, ST.

both remaining parcel of the pofTeffions of the fee of Canterbury to the prefent time. Mr. Tho. Gillow, the prefent leifee of this parlonage. The archbifhop continues the patron of this vicarage, which is valued in the king s books at

jun.

is

yd, and the yearly tenths at

15I. 19s.

iis. iiid.

li.

was valued at fifty pounds, and here were tvvo hundred and fifty communicants. In 1640 it was valued at eighty pounds, communicants three hundred. Archbifhop Juxon in 1661, in conformity this vito the king’s letters mandatory, augmented carage thirty pounds per annum, to be paid by the In 1588

it

^

cerof the great tithes. It is now of the yearly income arifes from tified value of 661. 6s. 3^^^* which payment of the above augmentation, the glebe, and a

leffee

four-pence an acre for

all

the mailh lands and pafture

in the parifh.

returned, In 1630, the minifter and churchwardens acres and upwards, that there was here a glebe of ten in part of including a clofe, called Alhallows clofe, Saints, or which antiently flood the chapel of All

which

Alhallows, containing one acre and an added, bounded out, the fences being all down ; they there was othei land bethat a report then went, that concealed, Fornieily loneinff to the vicar, which was the ftreet near the there was a vicarage-houfe in the year 1620 a fire church ; but fome time before fliared in the happening in the ftreet, thefe buildings rebuilt ftnce, calamity, and have never been half,

is

common

nor

is it

now known where

Richard Marlhali,

it

ftood.

of this parilh,

by

his

will in

rents of twenty-nine acres of 1482, devifedthe yearly

arable,

and

fifteen acres of

marfh land

this parifh

reparations of the church and St. Giles’s, to the yearly or elfe the land to be woiks of St. Nicholas church, therefrom to f^ttiain to fold and the money coming R 4

RiNGSLOW HUNDRED.

24^

the reparations, at the difcretion of the churchwardens for the time being.

The ville of

of Sarre, now

united to the parifh

St. Nicholas,

was once a feparate parijlo of itfelf was antiently fpelt Serre, and was fometimes written ;

it

in antient records, St. Giles, alias Serre, and St. Giles at Serre, from the church of it being dedicated to that

a fmall village adjoining to the parilh of St. Nicholas fouth weft ward, being fituated at the entrance into this ifland from the county eaftward, faint.

It is

_

and

at the weftern

extremity of

feems antiently much larger, and more populous than at prefent, on account of its being the moft frequented palfage into this iftand, and a place where the fhipping often lay at anchor, in their paJfTage to and from the Northmouth or Yenlade, there being a moft commodious haven for them here; and Twine, in his tieatife, De Rebus j^lbionicis^ ILvat oUtn in hoc it.

It

to have been

jiuvio

ft atio

jirmijjima navihus iS gratijfim a nautis

Sana

mminatar The

diftance between the upland and the county, and this place, acrofs the marfhes over Sarre wall, is about a mile. This fpace was antiently covered with water, the fea flowing over

between Northmouth and Richborough, being the ufual paflage for the ftiippingto and from London, and here the two tides met, which flowed in at the north and eaft mouths^of it. This water was lb much decrealed (and on that account

named

the

it

Wantfum)

in

Bede’s time, that

it

then

was no more than three furlongs broad fo that there ; were kept here two ferry boats to carry men and cattle over it, to and from the ifland the tribute or toll of ; thefe, which ufed to be paid to the king, was granted by king Egbert to the abbey of Minfter, in Thanet." In the antient rude map of this ifland, formerly belonging to the abbey of St, Auguftine, a pretty large ! See Regifl.

Mon.

Sci Aguft. cart. 162.

boat

ST.

NICHOLAS.

249

placed here, a man rowing it, and another nearly up to his knees in the water, with a Itaff in his hand, carrying a monk on his back to the boat; which feems to intimate, that then the water Was lb much fallen away that the boat could not come up quite to the fliore. This water ftill decreafing, ceafed to be a continued

boat

is

ftream, and the flood gates ereded acrofs it ciilpeii'ed it among the adjoining lands, inlomuch that it be-

came too narrow, even

for the ufe of a ferry,

and the

applying to parliament for licence to build a bridge at Sarre ferry, an ad pafled in the firfl year of king Henry VII for that purpol'e; and a bridge was foon alter ereded here over this water, which is not more than ten or twelve feet wide. This bridoe O has always belonged to the commiflioners of fewers, inhabitants

.

by whole orders

it is

Theantienc a fmall diflance weflvvard from

conftantly repaired.

ferry-houfe, fituated at

the bridge, on the fouth fide of the high road, belongs

them. Leland, who wrote

like wife to

king Henry VIII. ’s time, fays, in his Itinerary, “ At Northmuth, where the eftery of the fe was, the fait water fwellith yet up at a creeke a myleand more toward a place cawled Sarre, which was the commune fery when Thane t was fulJe in

iled.”

The village

of Sarre

is

fltuated

at a fmall

diflance from the bridge above-mentioned eaftward, the road from thence acrofs the ifland leading through It confifls of only a few flraggling houl'es, one of it. which, on the fouth fide, is the manor houfe. There is a fair held here on Od. 14, for toys, &c. Whiift the fea flowed up hither and the fliips refolded to this haven, it was accounted a pleafanr, healthy fituation ; but afterward the continued fogs and damp vapours, occafioned by the vaft quantity of

from the decreallng waters, foon made place exceedingly unhealthy, and at the lame

marflies inned this

time

;;

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

‘2^0

time unplcafant, and of courfe decreafed the populoufnefsof it, fo that it has been for a Jong time but very thinly inhabited, and that by thofe only whofe occupations among thefe fickly marlhes oblige them to rehde in

it.

This ville, or pari 111 of Sarrc, has ever been accounted one of the antient members of the cinque port of Sandwich, and as fuch, within the liberty and notwithftanding which, a difpute arofe in king Henry VI. ’s time, touching the alTeffing of it, as lying within the county ; to take away all difputes of which, the king, by his letters pa-

jurirdidion of thofe ports

tent, united '

it

;

again to Sandwich.

The manor

of Sarre was

in antient time part

of the inheritance of the eminent family of Crevequer, from which it came, partly by fale and partly by marriage, to that of Criol j one of whom, Bertram de Criol, in the loth year of king Henry III. had a grant of a weekly market, to be held on a Thurfday at his manor of Serres, until the king fliould be of full age. This manor afterwards continued in the fame family their

down

name was then

garter, a

man

Thomas Keriel, for fo who was a knight of the^

to Sir

fpelt,

of great worth and eminence, and of

oreat courage, w'hofe valiant adfions in the French wars are noticed in all the hiftories of thofe times but he was at length flain in the fecond battle of St.

38th year of king Henry VI. afferting the caufe of the houle of York. About which time, and probably before his death, this manor was alienated to John White, merchant, of Canterbury, afAlbans,

in the

terwards knighted, who held it at his death in the 9th year of king Edw'ard IV. as did his defcendanc Robert White, in the 12th year of Henry VIII. then holding it of the archbifliop, by knight’s fervice

from one of his defcendants this manor pafled by fale to Roger Bere, or Byer, as the name was fometimcs Ipelt, whofe grandfon John Byer, in the reign of queen

ST.

NICHOLAS.

251

queen Elizabeth, alienated

it

Sir Francis Ruifh, of Ireland,

whofe two daughters and

coheirs in king Charles the

Ift.’s

to Ruifli, anceflor to reign,

became

enti-

one of whom marrying Sir George Wentworth, of Wentworth Woodhoufe, in Yorkihire, (third brother of Sir Thomas Wentworth, earl of tled to

it,

$trafford) he

which

became

in

her right entitled to

it;

after

defcended to Ruilh Wentworth, efq. who left an only daughter and heir Mary, and fhe carried it in marriage to Thomas, lord Howard, of Effingham; and he about the year 1723, alienated this mait

nor, with other efiates in this ifland, to

Mr. James and mercer, of London, (after-

Colebrooke, citizen wards of Chilham caflle, in this county, efq.) and Mr. James Rucke, banker, of London ; who made a partition of thefe eftates, by which this manor was allotted to the former, on whofe death it defcended to his eldeft fon Robert Colebrooke, efq. who veiled his interefl in it to his younger and only furviving brother Sir George Colebrooke, bart. he being the next in the remainder in tail by the will of their father, for the purpofe of procuring an adt for the file of it, which adt paffed accordingly in 1774, by which it was veiled in trullees for that purpofe, and they in 1775, veyed it to Thomas Heron, efq. of Newark upon Trent, afterwards of Chilham caflle, who alienated it to Henry Collard, gent, of Monkton, who is theprefent

owner of

it.

of Sarre flood upon the hill to the eaflward of the town, about thirty rods on the left hand of the great road leading from Sarre to Monkton. It was dedicated to St. Giles, and was a vicarage, which in the 8th year of king Richard II. on account.of its fmallnefs was not taxed to the tenth.

The parish church

The

alteration

made

in this place

by the

failing

of

the Wantfume, and confequently the decreafe of the inhabitants, occafioned very probably the diflblution

of

RINGSLOVV HUNDRED.

£^2

and the uniting it, together with this paridi, to that of St. Nicholas ; foon after which, the church decaying, was fuffered to fall down, and there are at this time no remains of it left. ot this little

vicarage,

I

The

vicar of St. Nicholas receives the (mail tithes,

offerings,

&c. of

this little parilh,

or viile of Sarre,

the inhabitants of which are aflefl'ed to the repairs of the church of St. Nicholas, but they ftill keep up the diftindllonof maintaining their own poor.

The church

of St. Giles’s at Sarre was part of the pofleffionsof the eminent family of Crevequer, lords

of the manor of Sarre, to which it was appurtenant, and continued fo till Robert de Crevequer, founder of Ledes priory, in king Henry I.’s reign, gave this church to that priory, and this gift was confirmed by his fon Elias de Crevequer, who procured the confent of archbifhop Theobald, to appropriate it to the canons of that church ; which was afterwards confirmed by feveral of his defeendants, archbifhop Hubert, and by king Edward III. in his 41ft year, by his charter of -infpeximus,^ In wdiich date the appropriation of this church continued till the diflblution of the priory in the 31ft year of king Henry VIII. for the vicarage was dilfolved long before, when it came w'ith the reft of the pofleflions of the priory into the king’s hands, who by his dotation charter in his 33d year, fettled it on his new-founded dean and chapter of Rochefter,

whom

now remains. But the great tithes of this viile or parilh are very inconfiderable, there being very little corn or fowing land in it. Mrs. Gill®vv is the prefent lefTee of the par fon age. witli

P

the inheritance ofjt

See Dugdale’s Monafticon, vol.

ii.

p.

no.

CHURCH

NICHOLAS.

ST.

CHURCH OF Church of

IVitli the

253

NICHOLAS, ALL SAINTS annexed, and the ST.

SARRE

Church of

united.

PATRONS, VICARS.

Ot by ’whom ^refented. Jlte Archbljhop,

Nicholas Chewney, A, 0 lilted 1653.'!

William

about

Jacob,

ejected

Nicholas

M,

1650, 1653,

1662/ Chezeney,

reftored

in

1662, refigned 1671.

Thomas obt.

Smelter,

A. M,

26, 1700.* Young, A. B.

William

M.

|une, ?727.‘ collated

12, 1727, obt

Auguft

1701, obt. Aug. Henry Pearfon, A.

Dec

1671,

Nov.

3.0,

fl, 1748. Nicholas Simons, A. B. February 1749, obt. Dec. 1776. Ball, LL. B. May 15, 777, refigned 1 785.“

David 1

John Fagg,

bart.

A. Al. 1785,

the prelent vicar.*

q Likewife Margate.

vicar

of

St.

John’s,

r EjiAedby the Bartholomew Aft, See Calamy’s Life ot Baxter. in the middle « He lies buried

chancel. t

He and

two

his

this vicarage,

w

fucceflbrs held

th that of Chiftler,

n Likewife vicar of Chiftlef, which he refigned as well as tliis vicarage, on being collated to the redfory of Aldington with Snieeih. w In June 178 <, a. difgenfatioo paffid for his holding this vicarage with that' of Chilllct; in 1790 he fucceededhis father in the title of ba-

ronet.

by diljpcn fat lull.

M O N K T LIES

O

N

the next pavilli fouth-eaftward from St. Ni-

cholas, in the lower half hundred of Ringflow likewife. It is written in the furvey of Domefday, Mo-

town, and in other record Munchetun, Munketmey and Monkynton \ all which names

fiocftune,

i.

e.

Monks

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

254

had from its being part of the pofTeffions of the monks of the priory of Chrift-church, in Canterbury. The parish of MonkVon is about three miles from eaft to weR, and as much from north to (outh. it

The

Monkton-Rreet, is fituated rather on low ground, about a mile eaftward from Sarre, having the church on the fide of it, and Monktonvillage, called

court, an antient timbered building, at a fmall dif-

tance from the weft end of it, between which and Sarr, is the hamlet of Gore-ftreet. At a fmall diftance from the village is the vicarage and parfonagehoul'e, called the Ambry farm ; the lands northward of the ftreet rife to high land, being open common land, over which the road leads acrofs the iftand eaftward, clofe to which is Monkton mill ; and at the

eaRern boundary of the pariRi, Cleve-court. Southward of the village is a large parcel of marfli land, called Monkton level, under the direction of the commififioners offewersfor the eaftern parts of Kent, which reaches

By

down

as far as the river Stour.

the return

made

to the council’s letter by arch*

bilhop Parker’s order in i 563, there were then computed to be in this parifli fifteen houfeholds.

The market mentioned

hereafter

to have been

king Henry VI. ’s reign has been long fince difufed ; but there are two fairs, one held on the day of St. Mary Magdalen, July 22d, for the fale of hogs j granted

in

the other on October nth, for toys, &c. In the Heraldic vifitation of Kent, anno 16 19, there is a pedigree of Thomas Mafbn, of Monkton, whofe

eldeR fon William was of Bury St. Edmunds, efq. and cujios brevium of the court of king’s bench ; and his youngeft Ion James was of Frindfbury, in this county. They bore for their arms, Party per pale^ argent and fable^

a chevron^ between three

billets^ coiinterchanged,

I'homas Delaway was deputy to Robert Wallelan, who was Rieriff part of the 46 and 47 years of king

MONKTON. king Henry HI. and he held

255

this office at his feat

in this pariffi.

The manor of Monkton

was in the year 961 by queen Ediva, given mother of king Edmund and king Eadred, to Chrift church, in Canterbury, among other lands, free from all fecular fervice, excepting the irinoda necejfitas^ of repelling invafion, and the repair of cailles and highways;* and it continued in the poffeffion of that church at the time of taking the general furvey of Domefday, in the 15th year of the Conqueror’s reign, in which it is thus defcribed, under the general title of T^erra Monachorum Archiepi^ lands of the monks of the archbifliop ; that is, of Chi iftchurch above-mentioned. In Borowart leji^ in Tanet hundred ^ the archbifhop In the time of king

himfelf holds Monocjlune. the Confejjor

it

was taxed

at twenty Julings^

Edward

and

nozv for thirty -one carucates. In

The arable land is demefne there are four and four times twenty and nine

eighteen.

twenty one borderer s\ having tzventy-feven carucates. There are two churches ^ and one mill of ten There is a new fifhery, and one [alt work of fhillings. fifteen pence ; zvood for the pannage of ten hogs. In the zvhole value it was zvorth in the time of king villeins^

voith

Edward the

Confejjor

and afierzvards

tzventy pounds^

and

nozo forty pounds. The great extent of this manor, comprehending near one half of the ifland, that is, all that part of it

on the weftern fide of St. Mildred’s Lynch, anfwers and the extenfive dewell the above delcrlption mefne lands of it, might well employ four fcore and ;

The two

nine villeins. parifh

work

Woodchurch

and

Monkton

churches were thofe of

Wantfume. *

the

now

this

called

remains ; but the fifhery and fait long ago by the deficiency of the river In the 21ft year of king Edward I. the

mill,

are loft

;

mill,

ftill

See Decern, Scriptores, col. 2221.

king

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

256

king brought a writ of right againfl: the prior for this manor ; but the jury gave it againfl him for the prior. In the loth year of king Edward II. the prior obtained a grant of free-warren in all h-is demefne lands in this manor, among others, which the prior or his predeceffbrs had acquired fince the time of the king’s grandfather, fo that the fame were not within the bounds of his foreft ; at which time this manor, with its appurtenances, was valued at 6 z\J The buildings of this manor were much augmented and repaired by prior Selling, about tlie year 1480, who built a new dormitory here for the ufe of the monks, when they vifited this place ; and his fucceffor prior Goldflone, about the year 1500, ereded two new barns and moil of the other edifices. Henry VI. in his 25th year, granted to theprior a market weekly, to be held bn a Saturday ; and a fair yearly, on the feafl of St. Mary Magdalen within this manor, which continued afterwards part of the pofTefiions of the priory of Chriil-church,

till its

diffolution in the 31(1

Fdenry VIII. wdien it was furrendered into the king’s hands, who fettled it, among other premifes, in his 33d year, on his new-founded dean and chapter of Canterbury, part of whole inheritance it ilill continues. There is a court leet and court baron year of king

held for this manor. The manerial rights, w’ith the court leet and court baron, are referved by the dean and chapter in their

own hands; but

the court lodge W'ith

its

appurtenan-

and the demefne lands, which are very extenfive^ are denrifed on a benehcial leafe to Sir Brook William Bridges, bart. of Goodneftone, the rack rent of thefe premifes being upwards ofyool. per annum. ces,

Cleve-court fituated about

is

a feat in this pariQi, pleafantly

two miles north-eaftvvard from Monk-

ton church, on high ground, having a fine profped: of T

Battely’s

Somner,

pt.

ii.

appendix, p. 50.

the

y

MONKTON. the fea

^57 beyond it.

the neighbouring country and This feat was formerly in the pofleflion of the family the adof Quekes, relident at the feat of that name in in joining parifh of Birchington, from whom it came, king Henry VII. ’s reign, by Agnes, the female heit afof John Quekes, in marriage to John Crifpe, efq. terwards of Quekes, whofe grandfon John Crifpe reburied fided at Cleve, where he died in 1 558 and was

arms to be placed which in the next window to where he fliould lay, ar-they were accordingly, being Vtrty on a chevron^

in this church, having ordered his

gules, gent^ jive horfe jhoeSy fable y a bordure engrailedy

being the bearing of this branch of At length the heirs of his grandfon Sir this family. Edmund Crifpe, afterwards fold it to Ruilh, poffeflor

a

t'ov

difference

which it pafl'ed before, in in manner as has already been mentioned again marriage to Sir George Wentworth, and then likewife of the

manor of

Sarre, with

in like

manner to Thomas,

ham.

He

Howard, of

lord

about the year 1723 palled away

Effing-

this leat,

Colewith other ellates in this illand, to Mr. James of Loi^“ brooke, of London, and Mr. James Ruck, partition ot don, bankers, who afterwards made a was allotted thefe eftates, in which this of Cleve-court here ; on his the latter, who built the prelent feat to

away by

defcended to his fon, who palled it Jofiah Farrer, ot^ fale, about the year 174^. to in 1762, whole Dodlors Commons, prodor, who died

death

fon

it

lof.as

Fulld

Farrer, efq.

refided

here and was

which he has refHed abroad, Edwar time owner of this feat. Mr.

highffieriffin 1773, fmce

but he

is

at this

Pett refides at

it.

CHARITIES, will in 1642.

his He-iry Rob.kson, gent, of Canterbury.by fuccelTors, his and gave to the vicar of Monkton meadow ground mChillet, Flftp riofe in St Laurence, and his

theVe ihonld be twV tw^^ exceeding the age of fixty >ears, relief of four poor widows

t^n frlt’tiat theVents VOL

X.

^

RINQSLOW HUNDRED*

2^8

of which widows fhould he dwelling in Monkton, and two in Birchingtort j which lands are now of the annual value of eight

pounds.

There was a fet of aims houfes belonging to this parifli, which were burnt down by accident in the beginning of the year 1 792,

This parish diction of the

is

within the

dioceje

Weftbere.

The totiy is

ecclesiastical Juris-

of Canterbury, and deanry of



church, which is exempted from the archdeadedicated to St. Mary Magdalen ; it confifts

at prefent of only

one

and one chancel, liaving a ftjuare tower at the weft end, in which is a very antient fpiral ftaircafe of wood* There are four bells in it. The body of it was anticntly larger than it is now, conftfting of two illes, part of the end of the north ifle being ftill to be feen, and the arches between the two ille

remaining in the wall ; at prefent it confifts of but one ille and a chancel ; in the latter are twelve iftes ftill

ufed formerly by the clergy and the monks when they vifited this place. In the windows there were fome remains of painted glafs, among which were the heads of feveral of the priors and thefe coats of arms ; king Lucius, -plain crojs. King Ethelred, fhree circlesy two and one ; in the firft, a lion paffant; in the feconcl, a griffin \ and in the third, a king

ftalls,

A

crowned and robe dy with a globe and fceptre .

Queen Ediva,

in his hands,

T:hree lions

paffant-guardanty an orle of on a chevrOHy argenty three bugle horns ftringedy fabky between three talbot hounds pajfdnty argent,^ filechenden and Godfrey, quarterly. Blechen-

Verty

hearts.

y

den impaling Blechenden. Dean Wotton, with his quartenngs, and Ciilpe j of all which there now remain entire only a priors beady 2Sidi the arms ofCrifpe, a chevrotiy fableyfive horje jhoeSy argent under ; the Ihield, 1506. At thevveft end of the church,

,Or,

*

p

on,

See an extras of the will in Lewis's Hift. Thanet, addenda. 19,

No.

13.-

Wcever,

;

:

MONKTON. Weever,

p.

266^

259

were thefe verfes

fays,

in old

Eng-

ii(h letters Jnfula rotunda Tanatos Fertilis et

munda,

quam

circuit undo.

nulli ejl in orhe

Jecunda.

but few monuments or iliemorials in this church, moft of the graveftones having loft their brafl'es, or are worn fmooth, among thole which remain are the following in the nave of it, a graveftone, with the figure in brafs of a prieft in his habit, the infcription Iok. On a brafs plate, a memorial for Chriftopher Blechenden, gent, of this parilh, with Amy and Margaret, his wives, obt. 1 554 the brafs, with the infcription, is nailed up in the veftry, as is that for Nicholas Robinfon, gent, of Gore-ftreet, ob. 1594. A monument for Frances, eldeft daughter cf Thomas Blechenden, gent, her firft hufband was

There

are

:

Thomas Epps,

gent, of

New Romney

her fecond, and her third, ;

Nicholas Robinfon, gent, of Monkton; John Blechenden, efq. of Aldington, obt. 161 1. One for Mr. Abraham Terrey, of this parilh, obt. 1661 ; alfo for Anne, wife of Abraham Terrey, obt. 1704 ; arms, T^errey^ ermine.^ on a pile^a leopard's !>eady pierced with a fieur de liSy impaling a chevron^ betiveen three of the holly leaves. On a flat ftone, at the weft end church, a memonal for Mr. John Ayling, vicar for Lybbe forty-eight years, obt. 1710. A memorial for Orchard, of Monkton-court, obt. i68o» A memorial

Mr. fohn Burkett, vicar, obt. i 77 ^‘ The church of Monkton, to which the two chapels

for

appendant, was of Birchington and Woodchurch were part of th*: appurtenant to the manor, and as fuch Canterbury. ArGhbl•antient polfelfions of the fee of Becket) fhop Richard, (fucceflbf to archbilhop this church, with king Henry 11 ’s reign, appropriated of Chilft church ; but its appendages, to the priory

m

.



See the confirmations of them in Battelj

’s

Somn

pt.

11.

p. 97.

a6o

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

did not continue long fo, for archbifliop Baldwin, his immediate fuccelTor, having quarrelled with the

it

intended college at Hackington, took this appropriation from them,, and thus it remained as a redory, till about the 39th year of king Edward lll.’s reign, when archbiOiop IHip, with the king’s licence, redored, re*united and annexed it again to the priory ; but it appears that in return for this grant the archbilhop had made over to him, by way of exchange, fcveral advowfons in London, belonging to the priory. In the 8th year of king Richard II. anno 1384, the appropriation of this church was valued among the temporalities of the almonry of the priory at 13I. 6s. 8d. and the portion of the monks in this church at 33I. 6s. 8d.^ After which this appropriation continued in the poffelTion of the monks, who managed it for the ufe of their almonry (whence it gained the name of the Almonry, or Ambry farm) till the diflblution of the priory in the 31ft year of king Henry VIII. when it came, with the advowfon of the vicarage, into the king’s hands, who granted them in his 33d year, by his dotation charter, to his new-founded dean and chapter of Canterbury, who are the prefent owners of this appropriation, or parfonage of Monkton. Mr. Finch is the prefent leflee of this parfonage. The inhabitants of this place were obliged to pay annually to the convent of Chrift-church, as appropriators of this church, a yearly fervice called Avercorn^ by uncertain meafure ; but in the year 1263, it was determined that the quantity Ihould be two bufhels and an half j thefe payments of corn were uliially made on All Saints day, and the cuftom feems to arife from what the Saxons ufed to call eyrie jeeat^ or church fcot, which was a certain quantity of corn

monks, on account of

his

See Stevens’s Monafticon, vol.

i.

p» 39.

paid

261

MONKTON,

paid to the parifh church on St. Martin’s day, Noy. II, as the firft fruits of the corn. King Ina, in his laws, ordained this annual payment under fevere penalties ; when the Norman terms came into ufe it probably took the name of Aver corn. By the furvey of this parfonage, after the death of king Charles I. in 1649, it appears that it then confifted of a parfonage-houfe, containing a large hall, a of fair parlour, a great kitchen, with feveral houfes lodging rooms, with garrets over them ; three barns, with llables, a pigeon houfe, &c. a court-yard, a great fold yard, a garden and two orchards, containing thirteen acres, together with the office,

below

'tithes

and

ftairs

j

fix

profits to the parfonage belonging, efti-

lod. per annum.' The advowfon of the vicarage, notwithftanding the grant of it to the dean and chapter, appears not

mated

at 861 .

i

is.

above

pofleflong afterwards to have become parcel of the it continues at fions of the fee of Canterbury, where being the prefent this time, his grace the archbilhop

patron of

it. ^

This church of NIonkton continued as a rectory, as year of king has been above-mentioned, till the 39 ^^ Edward III. but there was no vicarage eridowed here

4zd year of that reign, when archbilhop Lang, that the ham, by his inftrument, anno 1377, decreed, till

the

this church lliouid portion of the vicar and vicarage of viz. that the confiR in future, as undermentioned, with two chambeis, vicar fliould have in it, the hall

com-

one the kithen, one pigeon-houfe, and fufficient dole within petent for his condition, with a which the eleemormary the manfe of his portion, extant, fituated and built lately had in it and then repaired at the colt there, to be in future continually legacies and obof the vicar; and alfo all oblations, tithes ot wool, lambs, ventions whatfoever, and the curtilage,

Augtn. Parliamentary Surveys, vol. xix, c

,

offic?.

calves.

;

RINGSLOW HUNDRED. calves, butter, milk, cheefe,

hemp,

flax, geefe,

ducks,

P’gs, eggs, wax, honey, apples, pears, pigeons, hillings, fowlings, huntings, bulinefl'es, mills, hay, hercedua^ and all other things, in any lhapc arifing

to the church of

Monkton,

or any chapels

whatlbever dependant on it ; and twelve pounds and twenty pence of good and lawful money, bv the prior and chapter of Chrift-church, yearly, for ever in future, to be paid to the vicar. Which oblations, legacies, profits and tithes, with the pigeon houfe aforelaid, as by an inqnifition taken on the annual value of each, the archbifhop was informed, together with the faid twelve

pounds and twenty pence yearly to be taken, amounted one year with another to the yearly fum of twenty-three pounds ; all which, neverthelefs,

on account

of cafual events

which might happen in future, he limited and taxed at ten marcs of filveronly j at which fum the vicar accordingly fliould for his portion only pay and acknowledge the tenth and that the ; vicar fhould find one chaplain in the chapel of Birchington, dependant on the church of Monketon, daily to celebrate ; and another likewnfe in the chapel of W^ode, dependant on the church of Monketon, to celebrate daily on Sundays, and on Wedneldays and Fridays, in the faid chapels duly, in divine fcrvices and that he lliould find the proceflional tapers, and the furplices, and fiAould bind the books belonging to

the redor to find, and fliould preferve them at his peril j and alfo all other burthens within the faid

church and chapels, accuftomed to be found by the redor of the place, he fhould undergo, at his own cofts and expences, with this exception', that the religious fhould repair the chancels of the church and chapels in all their members and particulars, and if they fhould fall down, fhould rebuild them at their own

which the archbifhop by eftablillied, and declared that the cofts, all

his decree firmly

faid

portion was fufficient

263

MONKTON. fufficlent for the vicar for all future times,

and

this

he

did with the confent of the chapter in t3^7-* The vicarage of Monkton, with the chapels ofBirchington and Wood, is valued in the king’s books at 13I. 8s. 4d. and the yearly tenths at il. 6s. lod. In 1588 it was valued at forty pounds, communicants comone hundred. In 1630 it was valued at

municants three hundred. In 1630 it was certified by the curate, churchwardens, and inhabitants, that a pidthere was then a vicaragp-houfe, with a garden, geon-houfe, and three roods of land ; and that there to the church for repairing and beautifying

belonged tenement, with an or^t, one rood of marfh land, a and chard and garden, 'and appurtenances, a mefluage of land, barn, with an orchard, garden, and four acres as and three acres more of arable land.‘‘ In 1649, of the ftate, appears by the furvey taken by order pounds per annum this vicarage was valued at forty antient penfion of twelve pounds and twenty and convent, is pence, heretofore paid by the prior and chapter to the vicar. flill paid by the dean

°"xhe

CHURCH of MONKTON, whh the CHAP ELS of BIRCHINGTON and WOOD. PAXaOKS, Or

hy

VICARSi

'•Jihom jirefented.

Meru

ArMi/hoJi of Canterbury

George Staucombe^ 1647."

and See a terrier of thefc lands s Lewis in in 1630, premiles, made Thanet, appendix, p. i8» a

the

X Reglft. Langham, i. 130- Jn befame reglfter there is a compofition Caiuerof church tween the prior and his porbury and the vicar, concerning archb.lhop tion, confirmed by Simon, Canterbury, the year

his prcdecellor iike0/ Miaiber. vicarage in the wife and c Likowife rector of Stonar, Bifthingof church the lies buried in b

of

Chrilt the archives BerRcgift. church, in Canterbury. tioncd.

thona,

Among

pi. I, fi

i

Augutt i8,

Hcfucceeded

ton.

44« S

4

patrons.

RINGSLOW HUNDRED. PATRONS,

VICARS.

At Mi/hop of Cantetbury.

Nicholas

Thoroicgood^ in ejefted Augult 1662.**

John Aylingf A.

M.

1655,

1662, obt,

Dec. 4, 1710.' Thomas Wardroper, A. M. Jan. 10, 1710, obt. Oftober 29, 1727.

M. admitted 1728, obt. Sept. 7,

James Bay Uy, A.

March

5^

1729. Peter Vallavine,

LL. B.

I

729,

obt. 1767.*^

I;

John Burket, A. B. Feb. 1767, '

'

obt. April 5, 1772.*



t

J

^

_

Hardy, A. M. Auguft 1, 1772, obt. I 786.'* John Prat, 1786, the prefent Jofejth



< ^efled bv the Bartholomew aft. Calamy’s Life'of Baxter, p. 287.

He lies buried in this church. And vicar of Prefton by Wing-

« f

ham

;

he had been before vicar of

vicar.

quiver,

,

which he refigned on being

collated to this vicarage. R He lies buried in this church, h And vicar of Hedcorne.

Re-

MINSTER. THE next parifh to Monkton eaftwaid

Minfter^ antiently written both Mynjire, and Menjire, being To

named irom

is

Saxon word Minjire, fignifying a church or monaftery. It is divided into two boroughs, viz. Way Borough and Street Borough ; the former of which lies on the afeent on the northern fide of the ftreet j the latter contains the ftreet and church, the

with the fouthern part of the parilh. This parish is about three miles and an half from eaft to weft, and near as much from north to fouth. The farms in it are perhaps as large as in any other parifh in this county ; the occupiers of which are, in general, men of confiderable ability. The weft part of this parilh is bounded by a lynch or balk, which goes

265

MINSTER.

goes quite acrofs the ifland to Weflgate, called St. Mildred’s Lynch, an account of which has already been given before, and which is the bounds of this manor from that of Monkton, as well as of the pa. This lynch has formerly been much broader riQi. than It is now, many of the farmers, who occupy lands bounding on or near it, having through a coveteous humour, not only dug up the mould or top of it, to lay on their land, but in fome places have ploughed upon it. Too many inllances of this kind are pra6lifed in other places, not only of this ifland, fcarce a

but of the county

in general, fo that there

remembrance

where thofe balks or lynches have

left

is

fuch has the greedy avarice of the occupiers been, and this is one inftance of the ill confequence of the negled of the courts leet and baron. I’he village of Minller lies nearly in the centre of it, on low ground at the foot of the high lands, having the

been

;

church on the fouth

fide of

it ;

nortliward of the

vil

to high land, being a fine open champion country of unincloled corn land, on which are fituated Minfter mill, Allan Grange, and Poweies, the latter

lage

it

rifes

of the parilh, clofe to which was, of oaks, the only one in this till lately, a fmall grove Lower down, about a mile fouthward, is ifland. Thorne manor, and beyond that Sevenfeore farm. At the parilh, and partly the fouth-eaftern extremity of or Clyvefend, io called in St. Laurence, is Cliffsend, which extends from its being at the end of the cliff, part of the eftate from Ramfgate ; it was antieutly a is called by Thorne of St Auguftine’s monaftery,and are Chronicle, the manor of Clyvelend. Here

at the extremity

in his

now two confiderable farms befides cottages. Minfter About a mile and an half fouth-eaff from -

various Ebbsfleet, formerly called by the Wipped s fl^eet ; t us names of Hipwines, Ippeds, and place of landing from the to have been a ufual

church,

is

feems ocean in this ifland j here »

it is

faid

Hengift and Hor.a, t

HP

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

s66 two Saxon

landed with their forces, about the year 449. Here St. Auguftine, often called the Apoftle of the Englilh, firft landed, in the year 596 ; and here too St. Mildred, of whom mention has been made likewife before, firft landed from France, wliere Ihe had been for indrudion in the monadic life ; and not many years ago there was a fmall rock at this place, called Sr. Mildred’s rock, where, on a great (lone, her footdep was faid, by the monkidi wriiers, to have remained imprefl'ed.* Below the church of Minder, fouthward, is the large level of marfhes, called Minder level, at the fouthern extremity of which runs the river Stour, formerly the Wantfume, which, as has already been noticed before, was antiently of a much greater depth and width than It is at prefent, dowing up over the whole I'pace of this level, mod probably almod to the church-yard fence, being near a mile and an half didance ; but the inning of the faits by the landholders, which had been in fome meafure deferred by the waters of the Wantfume at diderent places, fo far lefTened the force of the tide, and of the river waters mixing with it, that it oceafioned the fands to increafe greatly near this place, where it was at length entirely choaked up, fo that a wall of earth was made by the abbot of Sr. Augudine, the

generals,

firfl

Abbot’s wall, to prevent lire fea at high water overdowing the lands, which now comprehend this great level of mardies, at prefent under the direction and management of the commidioners of fewers for the didrict of Ead Kent. A part of thefe marili lands have been much improved by means of ihortening the courfe of the river Stour to the fea, by the cut at Stonar, which lets off the fuperduous water in wet feafons with greater expedition, and a very valuable trad of near two hundred acres has been lately inclofed by a drong wall from the fea near fince called the

\

See Leland’s Coll. vol. iv. p. 8. Dec. Script, col. 1915.

Ebbs-

MINSTER.

267

Between the above-mentioned wail and the river Stour lie a great many acres of land, which the inhabitants call the falts, from their being left without the wall, and fubje
lighter or boat in taking

them out of it.*"

ought not to omit mentioning, that on the downs on the north part of this parifli, where the old and prefent windmills were placed, is a profpeft, which perhaps is hardly exceeded in this part of the kingdom. From this place may be feen, not only this ifland and the feveral churches in it, one only excepted ; but there is a view at a diflance, of the two fpires of Reculver, the ifland of Sheppy, the Nore, or mouth of the river Thames, the coafl of EHex, the Swale, and the Britifli channel ; the cliffs of Calais, and the kingdom of France ; the Downs, and the town of Deal, the bay and town of Sandwich, the fine champion country of Eaft Kent, the fpires of Woodnefborough and Afh, the ruins of Richborough caflle, the beautiful green levels of Minfler, A(h, &c. with the fine and the river Stour winding between them (lately tower of the cathedral of Cflnterbury, and a compafs of hills of more than one hundred miles in I

;

which terminate the fight. In the marfhes on the fouth of this parifli, there was found in 1723, an antique gold ring; on the place of the feal, which feemed to reprefent an open book, was engraved on one fide an angel, leemingly kneelextent,

*

See Lewis’s Hiflory of Thanet, p. 77.

ing.

268 ing,

RINGSLOW HUNDRED. and on the other fide a woman (landing

with a fide was en-

on the woman’s graved in old EnglKh charadlers, f) 0 nC > on that of the angel, letters of the fame charailer, but Illegible. A fair is kept in this village on a Good Friday for pedlary and toys. By the return made to the coiincll’s letter, by arch* glory round her head

;

bifhop Parker’s order, in the year J563, there were then computed to be in this parith fifty-three houfholds. By an exact account taken of Minfter in 1774, there were found to be in this parifli oire hundred and forty-nine houles, and fix hnndred and ninety-fix in* habitants ; of the houfes, fixteen were farm-houfes,

and one hundred and

were inhabited by

thirty three

tradefmen, labourers, and widows.

and abbey of Minster was antiently called ^hanet manor^ and continued fo till, from the foundation of the abbey or minder within Minjler, it, it acquired the name of the manor of

The manor

Domefday, taken in the year 1080, it is dill called T^anet manor Kar sxomvi but I have met with it no where elfc fo late by that name. This manor was in the year 670 in the podedion of Egbert, king of Kent, whofe two nephews Ethelred though

in the

fnrvey of

^

and Ethelbright, Tons of

his father’s elder brother

menfride, deceafed, (who

Ermenburga,

called alfo

Er-

two daughters, Domneva, married to Merleft

likewife

wald, fon of Penda, king of Mercia, and Ermengitha, were left to his care, under promile of their fucceeding to the kingdom. Thefe princes were kept under the

infpedion of one Thunnor, a Battering courtier, who perfuaded the king to have them murdered, led they diould didurb him in the pofiTedion of the throne ; which Thunnor undertook and perpetrated. To expiate this crime, the king, by the advice of archbidiop Theodore, and Adrian, abbot of St. Augiidine’s, fent to Domneva, who had taken the vow of chadity on her, to offer her any fatisfadion for this crime, when.

MINSTER.

269

requefted of the king, according to the cuftom of thofe times, to grant her a place in Tenets where llie might build a monaflery to their memory, with a fufHcient maintenance, in which (he, with her nuns, might continually pray for the king’s as an

atonement,

forgivenefs,

flie

who immediately by

his charter,

which

concludes with a fingular curfe on the infringers of it,‘ granted her for the endowment of it full one half of this ihand, being the eaflern part of it, comprehended within the bounds of this manor, and fince feparated from the weftern part of the ifland and manor of Monkton, by a broad bank or lynch, made quite acrofs the ifland, fince called St. Mildred’s Lynch,

and remaining

The

at this day.

(lory of this grant, as told

by Thorn,

a native

monk

of St. Auguftine’s monaftery, in his chronicle of that abbey, is, that Egbert granting Dornneva’s petition, demanded of her how

of

this parilh,

and a

land (he defired ; who replied, as much as her deer could run over atone courfej this being granted, the deer was let loofe at Wellgate, in Birchington, in »

much

the prefence of the king, his nobles, and a great concourfe of people. Among them w'as Thunnor, the petrator of the murder, who, ridiculing the king for

and the method of its decifion, endeavoured by every means to obftrudl the deer’s courfe, both by riding acrols and meeting it j but Heaven, continues the chronicler, being offended at his impiety, whilft he was in the midfl: of his career, the earth opened and fwallowed him up, leaving the laviflmels of his

gift

of I'unnor's-leap^ or ffjunor's-hyjlepey to the ground and place where he fell, to perpetuate the memory of his punifliment, though it was afterwards called Heghigdale, Meanwhile /the deer having made the

name

a (mall

circle eaftward, direifled

ftrait line

fouth-vveftward acrols ‘

courfe almolt in a the ifland from one

its

See Weever, p. 261. fide

i70

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

running over in length and breadth forty-eight plough-lands j and the king, immediately afterwards delivered up to Domneva the whole tra(i of land which the deer had run over. This tra(?l or courfe of the deer, which included above ten thoufand acres of fome of the beft lands in Kent, is faid to have been marked out by the broad bank, or lynch, acrofs the ifland, fince called St. Mildred’s Lynch, thrown up in remembrance of it i*" but notwithftanding this well-invented ftory of Thorn, it is more probable that this lynch was made to divide the two capital manors of Minder and Monkton, befide to the other,

fore this gift to

Domneva.

Puteus "Thunor^ (or Thunor’s leap) fays the annalift of St. Augudine’s monadcry, apparet prope Curjum Cervi juxta Aldelond ; and the place where the king dood to fee this courfe is reprefented to be by it, where formerly was a beacon, it being fome of the highed land hereabouts, where the king might fee the ‘courfe. This Puteus Thuno)\ or Thunorflep, is very plainly the old chalk pit, called Minder chalk-pit,

'

which its not unlikely was fird funk when the abbey and church here were built, and the bottom of it in procefs of time, being overgrown with grafs, gave occafion for the invention of this fable of Thunor’s being fwallowed up by the earth at this place. The name of Thunorflep has been long fince obliterated, and even the more modern one of Heghigdale has been long forgotten. Weever fays, he lierh buried under an heap of dones, which to that day was called Domneva being thus furnilhed with wealth and all things necedary, founded, in honor of the B. V. Mary, a monadery, or cloyder of nuns, afterwards called St. Mildred’s abbey, on part of this land, on the fouth fide of the ifland near the water, in the fame place where the prefent parochial church dands. Archbidiop Theodore, at the indance of Domneva, con“ See Thorn’s Chron. in Dec. Script, col. 1906

et leq.

fecrated

MINSTER. wcrated the church of

and fhe afterwards appointed ieventy, and was appointed by the archbiHiop, the fird abbels of it ; (he died here and was buried on the glebe of the new mona(* tery. Lrmengitha, her fifter, was after her death fainted, and lived with Domneva, in the abbey here was buried in a place aLut a mlle^e mile eaft ward of it, where the inhabitants have found numbers of bones, and where it is probable, (he built

k>me chapel or

it,

oratory.

In a field or marlh called a little more than a quarter of a mile talhvard of the church of Minder, are feveral founaations, as if fome chapel or oratory had been built

fucceeded asabbefs by her daughter Mildred, who was aiterwards fainted. She is fa& to have been buried in this church. On her death Edburga luccecded in the government of this tery,

wno

monaf-

finding

infulhcient for (b great a number of nuns, built another jufi by, larger and more (lately it

which was confccrated by archbilhop Cuthbert, and dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul and to this ; •Church (he, about the year removed the body of 750, 'bf.

Mildred,

whole tomb many miracles were (aid wrought afterwards. Edburga was buried at Ml lifter in her own new church, and was afterwards laimcd. She was fucceeded as abbels of this monafat

to be

'

by Sigeburga. In her time was the firft depredation of the Danes in Thanet who fell upon the ; people, laid every thing vvafte, and plundered the religious in this monaftery j from this time they continued their ravages throughout this iftand almoft: every year^ hence by ‘degrees, this monaftery fell to decay, and the nuns decrealed in number, being vexed wnth grief and worp down with poverty, by the continual inlults of thefe mercilefs pirates, who landed in this tery

.

y See Lewis's Thanet, p, 88.

iftand

ringslow HUNDREP.

2^2

by fire this moifland In 978, and entirely deftroyed clergy and many naftery of St. Mildred, in which the people were Ihut up, having fled thither for of the

nuns^ fanduaryj but they were, together with the Leofrune the abbefs^ all burnt to death, excepting who is (aid to have been carried away priConer The Danes, however, fpared the two chapels of Su Mary, and of St. Peter and St. Paul, in one of which inhadivine fervlce was afterwards performed, for the neighbourhood. bitants of this parifli and the adjoining this antient (cite of the monaftery, together with manor, and all the red of the pofleiTions of it remained

The

and they continued the year 1027, gave the body

in the king’s hands,

fo

till

king

Milthe monafdred, together with the antient fcite of this ifland and tery, this manor and all its Jand within to without, and allcuftoms belonging to this church, which gift the abbot and convent of St. Auguftine, was confirmed by king Edward the ConfeflTor." The abbot and convent of St. Auguftine becoming remains of thus pofl’efled of this manor, fitted up the

Cnute,

in

the abbey to ferve as the court-lodge of ingly

it

has ever fince borne the

of St.

it ;

accord-

name of Minfter-

taken in the court. In the furvey of Doiuelday, this 15th year of the Conqueror’s reign, anno 1080, of manor is thus delcribed, under the general title church of Terra Mccl
Jh Tanet hundred. St. Mildred' taxed The abbot himfelf holds Tanet manor., which wds is fixty-t wo ca^ at forty eight fulings. The arable land one hundred and rucates. In demefne there are tzvo, and zvith fifty borderers fifty villeins,

There

rucates. »

Dec.

is

gives a church and one priefi, zvho

Script, col. 1783. Diigd.

Mon.

was again confirmed by king Edward iufpeximus.

having jixty-three ca-

Dec. Script,

vol.

i.

p. 84,

&c. This

in his 36th

III.

7

col. 2i 27* -

-

twenty

MINSTER. twenty JhiUings per annum, JiJheries

‘There

of three pence^ and one

is

one Jolt -pit

273 and two

mill.

In the time of king Edward the ConfejJ'or it was zvorth four times twenty poundsy when the abbot received itforty

pounds y

now one hundred pounds.

manor three knights hold fo much of the land of the villeins as is worth nine pounds y when there is peact in the landy and there they have three carucates. After which king Henry I. granted to the monaftery of St. Auguftine, about the 4th of his reign, a market, to be yearly held within this their manor of Minfter* with all ciiftoms, forfeitures, and pleas j which was confirmed among other liberties by Edward III. in his 36th year, by infpeximus. King Henry III. in his 54th year, anno 1270, granted to the abbot and convent of St. Augufiine, free-'Warren in all their demefne lands of Minfter.** King Edward II. in his 6th year, confirmed to the ab-

Of this

bot free warren in this manor among others, and next year anno 1313, in the iter of H. de Stanton and his

the abbot, upon a quo was allowed fundry liberties

fociates, juftices itinerant,

warrantOy claimed and therein mentioned, in this manor,

among others, and lands of it, view demefne likewife free-warren in all his of frank pledge, and wreck of the Tea ; one market weekly on a Friday, and one fair yearly on the eve and day of St. Mildred the Virgin, and other liberties therein mentioned j as having been granted and confirmed by divers of the king’s predecelTors, and allowed in the laft iter of J. de Berewick and his fociates* juftices itinerant ; and that king Edward II. by his charter in his 6th year had fully confirmed all of them* and by the regifter of this monaftery, of about this time, p

it

appears that this manor had within

its

court

Aug. Cant. Sec this grant, cart. 54 Henry III. printed in Lewis’s Hift. Thanet, coll. No. xviii. cart. 34 III. No. ii. printed in the fame No. xix.

Regift. Sci

rn. 10,

Edw.

VOL, X.

T

the

^74

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.'

the fame liberties as thofe of Chiflletand Sturry.

Edward

III. in his

King

5th year, exempted the abbot’s ho-

magers and tenants of this, among other of their manors, from their attendance at the flieriff’s tourne, and afterwards by his charter of infpeximus in his 36th year,

confirmed tcrthis abbey all the manors and polTcfiions given to it by former kings; and by another charter, the feveral grants of liberties and confirmations made by his predeceffors, among which were thofe abovementioned ; and king Henry VI. afterwards confirmed the fame. Next year the abbot and his fcrvants taking diflreffes on their tenants of this manor, the tenants, to the number of fix hundred, met and continued together for the fpace of five weeks, having got with them a greater number of people, who coming armed with bows and arrows, fwords and ftaves, to the court of this manor and that of Salmanflone, belonging likewife to the abbot, laid fiegc to them, and after feveral attacks fet fire to the gates of them. For fear of thefe violences, the monks and their fervants at Salmanflone kept themfelves confined there for fifteen days, fo that the people enraged at not being able to encompafs their ends in fetting fire to the houfes, dcflroyed the abbot’s ploughs and hufbandry utenfils, which were in the fields; and cut down and carried away the trees on both thefe manors. At the fame time they entered into a confederacy and raifed money here by tallages and aiTeffments, by means of which they drew to them no fmall number of others of the cinque ports, who had nothing to lofe, fo that the abbot dared not fue for juflice in the king’s courts ; but a method it feems was found to punifli thefe rioters, or at lead the principal of them, who were fined to the abbot for thefe damages fix hundred pounds, a vaft fum in thofe days, and were imprifoned at Canterbury till the fine was paid. The uneafinefs of the tenants under fuch relpedtivc fuics and fervices,

feems

MINSTER,

275

have occafioned the abbot and convent to have con^pounded uith them, which they did in the year 1441, anno 20 Henry VI. By this compofition the abbot and convent agreed, that the tenants fhoiild not in future be diflrained for the rents and fervices they iifed to pay j but inftead of them fliould pay compofitions for every acre of the land called Cornegavcl and Pennygavel,^ w'hich compofition for the Cornegavel and Pennygavcl land, continues in force at this time, being fixpencc an acre now paid for the CorneTeenls to

gavel land. In the time of king Richard II. this manor, with its rents and other appurtenances, was valued among the temporalities of the abbot and convent, at 232l.4s.3d. per annum j and the quantity of land belonging to it was by admcafurement 2149 acres and one rood. In which ftate this manor continued till the final dilfolution of the abbey of St. Auguftine, which happened in the 30th year of Henry Vlll. when it was furrendered, together with the reft of the pofiefiions of the monaftery, into the king’s hands ; at which time the manor and rents were of the value of 276I. yearly.

After which, the fee of this manor, with the antient court-lodge of it, formerly the monaftery, and then called Minftef-court, with all the lands and appurtenances belonging to it, continued in the crown, till king James 1 in his 9th year, by his letters patent, granted to Sir Philip Cary, William Pitt, efq. afterwards knighted and John Williams, citizen and goldfmith of London, tiiis lordi'bip and manor of Mcnftre, with its rights, members, and appurtenances, late parcel of St. Augulline’s monaftery, except and reierved to the king’s ufe,all advowfons and patronages of churches, chapels, &c. belonging to this manor j and he granted .

;

See this compofition printed at large in Lewis’s Hiftory of Thanet, coll. No. xxiii. ^ Augmentation-office, Inrolments. '

T

2

likcwlfe

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

276

the rents of

Corncgavel land, in the paridi of St. John, parcel of this manor j and the rents of aflize of free tenement called Pennygavel land, in the parilhes of St. Peter and St. Laurence,’ to hold the manor, with its right, members and appurtenances, of the king, as of his manor of Eaft Greenwich, by fealty only, in free and common focage, and not in capite, nor by knighPs fervice ; and to hold the rents of aflize of the king in capite^ by the fervice of one knighPs fee j which grant and letters patent were conconfirmed by an a6l Ipecially pafled for the purpofe,

likcwiie

all

aflTize

called

that year.

Some

years after which, the heir? of the beforementioned Sir Philip Carey and John Williams, then Sir

John Williams,

bart. of Carmarthenfliire, divided

which

divifion, the manor itfelf with the ; court-lodge, part of the demefne lands, royalties, and appurtenances, was allotted to Sir John Williams, bart.

this eftate

in

(who

died in 1668, and was buried in the Temple church, London) ; whofe defeendant of the fame name,

of Carmarthenfliire, dying without male ilfue, his daughter and foie heir, then the widow of the carl of Shelburne, carried it in marriage, at the latter end of king Charles II. ’s reign, to Col. Henry Conyngham, afterwards a major-general in king William’s reign, who died poflTefied of it in 1705. He left two fons, William and Henry, and a daughter Mary, married to Francis Burton, efq. of Clare, in Ireland. William, the eldeft fon of the general, fucceeded him in this manor and eftate in Minfter, but died without furviving iflue, upon which this eftate defeended to Henry Conyngham, efq. his younger brothef, fecond fon of the general, who was in 1753, anno 27 George II. created baron Conyngham, of Mount Charles, in Donegall, in Ireland ; and afterwards by further letters patent, in bart.

1736, vifeount Conyngham, of the fame kingdom; *

See Lewis’s Thanet, p. 108.

and

—— — MINSTER. 277 and again in 1780, earl Conyngham, and likewlfe baron Conyngham, of the fame kingdom, with remainder

He

married Ellen, only daughter of Solomon Merret, efq. of London, by whom he had no ilTue. He died f. p, in 1781, and was fucceeded in his tide of baron Conyngham by his nephew Francis Pierpoint Burton Conyngham, eldeft fon of his fifter Mary, by her hufliand Francis Burton,

of the

latter title to his fifter’s fons.

above-ment'oned, which Francis, lord Conyngham, died in 1787, leaving by his wife Elizabeth, el* deft daughter of Nathaniel Clements, efq. and fifter of Robert, lord Leitrim, (who furvived him) two fons, Henry, who fucceeded him in title, and Nathaniel, and three daughters, Catherine married to the Rev. John Shirley Fermor, of Sevenokcj Ellen, to Stewart Weldon, efq. and Henrietta. efq.

Henry, lb fucceeding his father as lord Conyngham, was created in December 1789, vifeount Conyngham and baron Conyngham, of Mount Charles, in Donegall, to whom the inheritance of this manor and efta'te but the pofTefljon of it for life is veiled in the right hon. Ellen, countefs dowager Conyngham; widow of Henry, earl Conyngham, above-mentioned. The arms of lord vifeount Conyngham arc. Argent, a Jhake-fork, hetiveen three mullets, Jable. Supporters. The dexter An horfe charged on the breaji iviih an

now

beloJigs

j

eagle, dijplayed, or,

maned and hoofed of the

lajl.

The

buck proper, charged on the breaft with a head, erafed, or, attired and unguled of the laji.

(iniller— griffin* s

Anunicorn* s head erajed, argent armed andmaned, Motto Over fork over or. A court Icet and court baron is held for this manor, Creft

,

of the court leet, and view of frank pledge, Ringflow, for the manor of Minftcr, in the hundred of faid manor. alias Tenet, and the court baron for the The couri-lodge, formerly a part of the nunnery, farmwas, after the diflblution of it, made ufe of as a which feme of the monks of St. Auguftine

by the

ftile

houfe, in

T

,

refided

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

2-78

manage

which they kept in their own hands. On the north fide of it, which feems to have been the front or entrance, is a handfome done portal, on the top of which, in the middle, within a circle, are the arms of the abbey of St. Auguftine, viz. Sahlc^ a crofs^ argent. At a fmall diftance from it flood

refided, to

the eftate of

it,

antiently a very large barn, fiifficient to hold the corn

growing on all the demefnes, being in lcngtli352 feet, and in breadth 47 feet, and the height of the walls 12 with a roof of chefnut. When the eftate was divided, 1 54 feet in length of this building was carried to Sevenfcore firm, where it was burnt, by an accifeet,

.

dent unknown in 1700, and the remaining part here was burnt by lightning afterwards. On the iouth fide of thehoufc ftood a chapel, faid to have been built by In it the bodv of St. Eadburga, the third abbefs here. St. Mildred is faid to have been placed by her, or rather tranflated from the other monaftery. Some of the walls and foundations of this chapel were remaining

memory of fome not long fince deceafed, now fo entirely demolifhed, that there is no-

within the

but

it is

excepting a fmall part of the tower, and of the ftairs leading up into it. Juft by thefe ruins of the tower is a fmall piece of ground, in which lately in digging for mould, leveral human bones thing to be leen of

it,

were dug up. There is a view of the remains of this nunnery in Lewis’s Thanet. The other part of this eftate^ the fcite of which lies about a mile eaftward from Minfter-court, fince known by the name of Sevenscore, on which is built a fubftantial farm-houfe, with large barns and other Carey, in neceflary buildings, was allotted to whofe fuccefibrs vifcounts Falkland, this eftate coneinued down to Lucius Ferdinand, vifcount Falkland,

who

not

many

years fince alienated

it

to Jofiah

Wordf-

worth, efq. of London, whofe fon of the fame name died poficfTcd of it about the year 1784, leaving two fifters his coheirs, one of whom married Sir Charles

Kent,

MINSTER. Kent,

faart.

rdft, efq.

279 Anne, married Henry Ve-

and the other,

who

afterwards, in right of their refpediye

wives, became poflelfed of

this eftate hi

undivided tnoie^

which hate it Hill continues. Sir Charles Kent being at this time entitled to one moiety, and Mrs. Verelft, the widow of Henry Verelfl:, efq. above-menburied in this church, tioned, who died in 17^5* ties

j

in

being entitled to the other moiety of it. Waschester is an eftate lying at a fmall diHance weftward from MinHer church, part of which was formerly parcel of thedemefnesof the manor oflMin-

and was included in king James s gram to Sir Philip Caiey, William Pitt, efq. and John Williams, goldfmith, as has been mentioned before in the account of that manor; they in the year 1620, joined of Monkin the fale of them to Jeffry Sandwell,gent. fter,

purchaled other lands of different perlons the whole in this paiilh, Monkton and Birchington, Peteis, M, D. of which he fold in 1658, to John two latPhilip le Keufe, and Samuel Vincent, which afterwards to Dr. Peter alienated their fliares loon lands together, not only ters ; at w'hich time all thefe comprehended Wafchefler faim, but hkewife part, called Acol. From Dr. if not the whole of another Peters, M. D. Peters this elfate defcended to Peter upon which the of Canterbury, who died in 1697, daughter and inheritance of it defcended to his foie carried it in marriage to heir Elizabeth, who in 1722 wife llie Thomas Barrett, efq. of Lee, whole fecond upon which it was; he died poffeffed of it in 1757. and heir Elizabeth, defcended to their only daughter Dejoyas who entitled her huffand, the Rev. William saving in Byrche, to the fee c>f it. He died to Samuel Egeran only daughter Elizabeth, married Temple, barriHer-attonBrydges, efq. of the Middle poU t, who in her right law, but now of Denton-coui

ton,

who

feffed

it,

and afterwards

Maud, who now owns

fold

it

to

Mr. Ambro.e

it.

T

4

Sheriffs

ringslow hundred.

28o

Sheriffs court

aneftate lying fomewbat lefs than a mile vveftward from Wafchefter, in the hamlet of Hoo in this parifli j it was formerly called Sheriffs Hope^ from the hope, or place of anchorage for (hips, which failed in the river Wantfume, which once ran clofe by this place. It is faid by iome to have taken its name from its having been part of the pofl'effions of Reginald de Cornhill, who was fo long Iheriff of this county that he loft his own name and took that of Le Sheriff, from whence this place gained the name of Sheriffs hope^ or court. He was fheriff’ from the 4th to the 9th years of king Richard I. in the laft year of that reign and during the whole reign of l^i^g

John.

is

His arms are on the ftone roof of the

cloyfters at Canterbury,

being T^wo lions pajjant^ debruifed of a bendlet^ impaling three piles. After this name was extindt here, the family of Corbie became poffefled of this eftate ; one of whom, Robert de Corbie, died poffeflbd of it in the 39th year of king Edward III. whofe fon Robert Corbie, efq. of Boughton Malherb, leaving a foie daughter and heir Joane, Ihe carried it in marriage to Sir Nicholas Wotton, who, anno 3 Henry V. was lord mayor of London, His defcendant Sir Edward Wotton procured his lands in this county to be dlfgavelled by the adts both of 31 Henry VIII. and 2 and Edward VI. and from

him

this

manor defcended

3 to Thomas, lord

Wotton,

who

dying anno 6 Charles I. without male iffue, his four daughters became his coheirs, of whom Catherine the eldeft carried this eftate in marriage to Henry, lord Stanhope, fon and heir of Philip, earl of Chefterfield, whofe widow Catherine, lady Stanhope, Ibid it to Henry Paramor. He was the tenant and occupier of Sherift'’s court, being the eldeft fon of John Paramor, of Prefton, the grandfon of Thomas Paramor, of Paramor-ftreet, in Alh, near Sandwich. They bore for their arms. Azure, a fefs embattled, counter embattled.

;-

MINSTER. tmhaltledy letween three left it

etoils

of fix points^

281 or.^

He

Thomas Paramor, whofe grand fame name died poireiied of it in 165?,

to his brother

fon of the and was buried with his anceftors in this church from his heirs this eftate was alienated to Thatcher, in which name it continued, till at length it was fold by one of them, to Mr. Robert Wilkins, gent, of St, Margaret’s, Rochefter, who pofleli’ed it for many years. He died without ilfue, and it has fince become the property of Mrs. Terry, the prefent owner of it.

To

MANOR is appurtenant the fmall manor OF Pegwell, or Court Stairs, in the pari Ih of St.

THIS

Laurence.

Aldelond Grange,

ufually called Allen Grange^

northwardfrom Mi nfter church, on the open high land, was fo called in oppofition to Newland Grange, in St. Laurence parifli. It wasantiently part of the pofl'effions of the abbey of St. Auguftin’e, and was in the year 1197, afligned by Roger, the abbot of it, to the facrifty of the abbey, for the purpofe of upholding and maintaining the abbey church, as well in the fabric as ornaments, but on the (ituated about a mile

condition that the facrift for the time being, tbould perform all fuch fervices to the court of Minfter as were due, and had been accuftomed to be done for the land of it.® The meafurement of this land, according to Thorne, amounted to fixty-two acres ; and to this Grange belong all the tithes of corn and grain, within the limits of the borough of Wayborough, excepting thofe

which are received by the vicar. On the diliblution of the abbey of St. Auguftine, in the 30th year of Henry VIII. this eltate, then amounting to fixfcore of the pofleflions of the jnonaftery, into the king’s hands, where it did not acres,

1



came, with the

reft

'phere is a pedigree of them in Viftn. co. Kent, Decern. Scriptores, Thorn, col. 1842.

i

6i9

«

continue

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

282

continue long, for lie fettled it in his 33d j'ear, by his dotation charter, on his new founded dean and chapter of Canterbury, with whom the inheritance of it continues at this time. It has been demil'ed by the dean and chapter, on a beneficial leafe, the rack rent of it being 41 3I. per annum, for twenty one years, to Mr. Edward Pett, of Cleve-court, the prefent lefiee of it. Mellrs. Jeflard and Paramor are the under leliees and occupiers of it. Power Es, which ftands about half a mile northeaftward from Allan grange, wasformerly a gentleman’s manfion, a large handfonie building Handing on much more ground than it does at prefent, with a gate houfe at the entrance into the court before it ; all which being pulled down, a modern farm-heufe of brick has been built on the antient feite of it. This feat was once in the poffeffion of the family of Golhall, of Gofhall, in Alb, where Sir John Golhall refided in king Edward Ill.’s reign, and in his defeendants it continued till about the reign of king Henry IV. when it was carried in marriage by a female heir to one of the family of St. Nicholas, owners likewife of the adjoining manor of Thorne, in whom it continued down to Roger St. Nicholas, who died in 1484, leaving a foie daughter and heir Elizabeth, who entitled her hufband John Dynley, of Charlton, By her he in Worcefterlhire, to the pofl'efiion of it.

had two

fons,

Henry and Edward,

the eldeft of

whom

which he afterwards alienated, about the middle of queen Elizabeth’s reign, to John Roper, efq. of Linfted, afterwards knighted, and anno 14 James 1 created baron of Teynham ; whofe great grand fon Chriftopher, lord Teynham, in king Charles l.’s reign, conveyed it to Sir Edward Monins, bart. of Walderfliare, who died poflelled of fucceedeci to this eftate,

.

1663, leaving Elizabeth his widow furviving, who held it in jointure at her death in 1703 ; upon which it devolved to the heirs and truftecs of Sufan, it

in

his

MINSTER. 283 his elded daughter and coheir, late wife of Peregrine Bertie, decealed, fecond fon of Montague, earl of Lindfey ; and they, in the reign of king William and queen Mary, joined in the fale of it to Sir Henry Furnefe, bart. of Walderlhare,

who

died polTeffed of it in 1712, as did his fon Sir Robert in 1733. After which it became, with his other edates, veded in his three daughters and coheirs, and on a partition of them,

anno 9 George

edate of Poweies was wholly allotted, among others, to Anne the elded fider, wife of John, vifeount St. John, which partition was confirmed by an adl palled next year j after, which it defended down to their grandfon George, vifeount Bolingbroke, who in 1790 alienated it to Mr. Henry and John Harnett, the prefent pofieflbrs of it.

Thorne, manor

II. this

vulgarly called, ThournCy is a in this pariflii fituated about a mile fouthward or as

it is

from Poweies above-mentioned, being fo named from the quantity of thorny buflies growing on and about it. This manor was antiently the feat of a family which took their name from it, one of them, Henry de Thorne, was owner of it in the year r 300, anno 29 Edward I. and relided here ; againd whom it feems complaint was made to the abbot of St. Augudine, that he caufed mafs to be publicly faid in his private oratory, or chapel, (the remains of which are dill fo entire as to be made ufe of as a granary, &c.) at this his manor of Thorne, (apudjpinam) to the prejudice of the mother church, and the ill example of others ; and he accordingly was inhibited from fo doing in future, by the archbilliop’s letters to the vicar of Minder, dated that year. And under the crofs in this church, an antient tomb or coffin of folid done, let into the wall under an arch of antient Saxon ornaments. On the /done which covers the tomb is a crofs fiory^ on each fide of which are two blank fhields, and round the edge of the done thele in the

north wall of

words

in old

French

it,

is

letters

:

lei gift

Edile de Thorne^ que

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

284

Dna

This feems probable to hav^ been one of the family, owners of this manor. After this family of Thorne were become extind: here, that of Gofhall, of Gofliall, in Afh, appear to have been pofl'efl'ors of this manor; in whom it continued till about the reign of king Henry IV. when it went by marriage by a female heir to one of the family of St. Nicholas, in whofe defcendants it continued down to Roger St. Nicholas, who died in i474f and as appears by his will, was buried before the image of St. Nicholas, in the chancel of Thorne, at MinRoger St. Nicholas, his fon and heir, left an ller. only daughter Elizabeth, who entitled her hufband John Dynley, efq. of Charlton, in Worceflerfliire, to the poffeflion of it. After which it continued down in the fame owners as Powcies lafl above-defcribed, till it came into the poflefTion of George, vifcount que fujl

del Efpine.

Boiingbroke, who in 1790 alienated it to Mr, Henry Wopton, the prefent owner of it. See a cuftom for the demife of tenements by will within the borough of Menftre, fecundum conjuetudifiem manerii,

anno 55 Henry

in Robinfon’s

III. Itin.

Kane,

ret, 18,

Gavelkind, p. 236.

CHARITIES,

The occupier

of Salmefton Grange, in St. John’s parifli, is bound by his leafe todilbibute to fix poor inhabitants of the parifli of Minfter, to be nominated by the minifter and churchwardens, in the flift week, and on the middle Monday of Lent, to each of them, nine loaves and eighteen herrings; and to three poor people of the lame, to each of them, two yards of blanket; and every Monday and Friday in each week, from the Invention of the Holy Crofs to the feaft of the Nativity of St. John the Baptifl-, to every poor perfon coming to Salmefton Grange, one dilhfuli of peas drefled.

Thomas Appleton,

of Eaftry, yeoman, by hiswillin 1593, of the poor of this parifli, the fum of 5I. to be paid to the churchwardens yearly, for the ufe of the poor people, inhabitants there, fourteen days before Chriftmas day, the fame to be paid out of certain lands belonging to him, called Hardiles,

gave to the

relief

in the parifli of VVoodnelborough.

Richard

— MINSTER.

28^

Richard CtERK, D. D.

vicar of Minfler, partly by deed in 1625, and partly by will on Nov 6, 1634, gave 120I. to be lent unto four parifliioners, born in Minfter, whofe fathers were deceafed, and they not lufficiently ftocked, for the term of one, two, or three years, but not exceeding that ; the intereft arifing from it to be divided among the poor of the parifli. With this

money

the truftees purchafed houfes, which are at prefent divided into four tenements, befides the parifli work-houfe, called the feoffees houfes; and feven other tenements, called Cheap Row’, the rent of which is annually diftributed in clothing to the poor perfons of the parifli. They are all at prefent let to the churchwardens and overfeers for the time being, by a leafe of 99 years, from i 729, at the rent of 61. This truft is now vefled in Mr, William Fuller, of Doctors Commons, as heir of the lall truftee ; the truft not having been filled up fince the year 1696. John Carev, efq. of Stanwell, in Middlefex, by will in 1685, gave lol. per annum to be paid yearly to the churchwardens, out of his farm of Sevenfeore; to be difpofed of to the poor yearly, on St. Thomas’s day.

Tins PARISH

is

within the

risdiction of the

ecclesiastical ju-

of Canterbury, and dcanry of

Wehbere.

The

dedicated to St. Mary, is a very handfome flru<5ture, confiding of a nave and two fide ifles, a crofs fept, and eaft chancel j the nave is of Saxon, the tranfept and chancel of gothic architeclure ; the

church, wliich

curioufly vaulted with done, and provifion

laft is

was made

for the

completed.

In

fame

it

At

prefervation.

Ipire dcepic, In

When

Is

in the tranfept,

but

it

was never

are eighteen collegiate dalls, in

the

which

wed end of the church is

is

good a tall

a clock and five bells.

Danes plundered and burnt the abbey of Minder, they feem to have fpared the two chapels of St. Mary, and of St. Peter and St. Paul, or however the done work of them was preferved, and not burnt the

with the roof and other works of timber. The former of thefe was afterwards made into the prefent parifli church, and his fince been confiderably enlarged. The nave or body of the church feems to have been the old building

j

the pillars of

which are thick and

Ihort,

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

£86

and the arches all circular, and a low roof vvas probably upon them, according to the firnplicity and plainnefs of thole times ; but fince the wall has been built higher, as app'ears by the diilance there is, betwixt the top of the arches and the wall plate acrofsj and an handfomc chancel added at the eaft end, and a fauare tower on the weft, with a high fpire covered with lead placed on The chancel or choir and the middle of the crofs it. are vaulted, and by the footings which are left, it was certainly intended that the whole crofs fhould have been finiflied in the fame manner. The eighteen ftalls mentioned before, have very handfomc vvainfeot behind, according to the mode of thofe times ^ in thefe the monks, vicars, and priefts ufed to fit during the performance of divine fcrvice. Befides the high altar in this church, there were before the reformation other altars in it, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, St. James, and St. Anne. At thefe, as likewife before the Holy for the mainteCrofs, were lights conftantly burning nance of which, there were focietics or fellowfliips, who contributed towards the maintenance of them, and thofe who died left in their lalt wills conflantly fmall fums of money for that purpofe. Under the middle of the crofs was the rood-loft, the going up to which out of the chancel is yet to be feen, as are the mortice holes in v/hich the timbers were put, on which the loft was On the north wall of it is the antient tomb of built. Edile de Thorne^. On the pavement, as well as in the ;

church porch, are feveral large fiat graveftones, the inferiptions, if any on them, entirely worn away j they feem very antient, and arc not improbably, memorials of fome of the religious of this place, but they do not’ " feem always to have lain where they do now. On the front of the tower of the fieeple is a fliield, carved in the ffone work, viz. A fefsy between three lions pajjant. Among other memorials in this church, in the chancel, is one for Francis, fon and heir to Edward Saunders* gent, of Norbournc-court, which Edward married the *

^

female

'

,

j

\

j

j

,

>

)

r

^

|

:

*

-

MINSTER.

287

female heir of Francis Pendrick,

was niirJe to queen Elizabeth. arms, A chevron, betiveen three

efq.

He

by

died

his wife,

who

anno 1643

5

elephants heads, impaling a jaltier, ermine, between three leopards faces. In

the middle gent, and cfq.

of

monument

a

ifle

Mary

his

Wingham

;

Bartholomew Sanders, wife, daughter of Henry Oxenden^ arms, P^er chevron, fable and arl for

gent, three elephants heads, counter changed,

impalino-

Oxenden. On a mural monument are the effimes of a man and woman, kneding at a defk, for Thomas Paramor, efq. fometime mayor of Canterbury, and Anne his firft wife ; amis, Azure, a fejs embattled, between three liars of fix points, or, impaling or, on a chevron, three Jiars of fix points, fable, betzveen as many dragons

heads, quartered.

In the north

On

the Paramors.

ille

are feveral

memo-

wooden frame, near the altar, a memorial for Col. James Pettit, obt. 1730. On the fouth fide of the chancel, a mural monument; for Mary, youngeft daughter of Robert Knowler, gent, of Herne, wife of John Lewis, vicar of this church, obt, 1719- A memorial for John Lewis, formerly virials for

car of this church, obt.

a

i74'6, st. 72.

A

memorial Blome, daughter and coheir of John Blome, gent. ofSevenoke, obt. 1731 ; arms, in a lozenge, A croj^ jitchee, and cinquefoil, quartered zvith a greyhound, current. A mural monument for Harry for Elizabeth

Vcrelft, efq. of Alton, in Yorkfliire, formerly governor of Bengal, obt. 17H5J he married Anne, coheir

of Jofiah Wordfworth, efq, of Wadworth, in Yorkfhirc, and of Sevenfeore, in this parifli, and left by her four fons and five daughters. In the fouth ifle hiemo rials for the Harnetts, Kennetts, and Colemans. In the middle ifle are memorials for Icveral of the Jenkins’s.

5

.

Leland,

in his Itinerary, vol. vii. p.

Florentius facet

cujus

Fumba

in

Cemiterh

130. lays,

S. Flarice in

'Thaiiet,

Crejeit Jignis.'^ *

See Colleilions, voi.

iv. p. 7.

Oa

ringslow hundred.

288

the top of the fpire was formerly a globe, and upon that a great wooden crofs, covered with lead, over which was a vane, and above that, an iron crofs j but about the year iSOfT ^ the noted fanatic K\c\\zt<^Q\A-

On

having got the fequeftration of this vicarage, took of fuperIt into his fancy that thefe were monuments ftition and idolatry, and got thefe crofles demolilhed by two perfons of the parilh, whom he had hired, after he had himfelf before day, by moon light, fixed ladders for them to go up and down, from the iquare of nier,

But if all the figures of a crofs are monuments of idolatry, and to be removed, the poor caitiff* has done his work but by halves, or rather not all, when he took down thefe from thc^ fpire and left the church {landing, whicli is itfelf built in the the tower to the top of the fpire.

form ot a

crofs.

church of Minder was antiently appendant to the manor, and as fuch was granted with it, firft to

The

Domneva,and

afterwards

became part of

the pofleffions

of the abbey founded by her here ; and after the deftruflion of it came with the manor, by king Cnutc’s grant, to the abbot and convent of St. Auguftine, to which it became appropriated in the year 1128, anno afligned, with the 29 Henry I. and was at that time chapels of St. John, St. Peter, and St. Laurence, with to them, to all rents, tithes, aud other things belonging the facrifiy of that monaftery j which regulation was confirmed by archbifhop Theobald, and afterwards, in 1168, by pope Alexander, who configncd it to the reparation of the church of the monaftery, which had

been but juft before burnt down.* In the year 1176, anno 23 Henry II. the tenants of the Halimot, or manor court of Minfter, agreed, that from thenceforth they would all cop their corn j and that they and their heirs, then and for ever afterwards, ihould pay all their tithes lawfully by cops, and all *

See this bull printed in Lewis’s Hift. col.

No.

xxix.

Other

;

MINSTER.

289

Other matters of tithes, which they were accuftomed to pay, as amply as they had ever paid them from the time of the dedication of the church of St. Mary of

Mcnftre. By an agreement entered into in 1 182, between the archbifliop and the abbot of St. Auguftine’s, this church was exempted from the payments of all dues and procurations to the archdeacon ; and that year the archbilhop confirmed this church to the monaftery which agreement was renewed in 12371 by archbifhop Edmund; and further, that the abbot and convene Ihould prefent to the archbifhop, in the chapels of St. chapPeter, St. John, and St. Laurence, fit perpetual

them, provided thofe altarages were worth ten marcs, with which the chaplains fhould be content, on pain of forfeiting the fame j the vicar luf^ient:^ of the mother church of Menftre,^ having a takipg vicarage taxed from antient time in the fame, tenths of and receiving in right of his vicarage, the obventions fmall tithes, viz. of lambs and pigs, and the which were arifing from marriages and churchings, &c. at the forbid at the chapels, and were folemnized, corpfes, mother church only, and the burials of certain lands in thele being thofe of the tenants or occupiers of

lains to the altarages in

chapeiries,

who were

to be buried at

Minftcr, unlefs

At the fame time the vicar gave leave to the contrary. of the archdeacon, the archbilhop, with the confent tochurch to the abbot and convent,

confirmed this confirmations ot gether with the feveral archiepifcopal This feveral kings of England.^ ft, and thofe of the revenue of the vicarage part above-mentioned of the chapeiries, has long fince of Minftcr, arifing from thefe Salmcftone Grange, been loft, except that out of perhaps, mi^a amounting to ics. a year which, of the fmall tithes, &c be a compofition for the tenths The altarages above-mentioned in them. at the altar, foi cuftomary and voluntary offerings o aug^^^^^ the prieft. religious office or fervice of ' ^ VOL. ;

2gO

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

thefe, the regular and

fccnlar priefts invented

niany things. For it is to be obferved, that only a portion of thefe offerings, to the value of ten marcs, or 61 . 13s. 4d. was what the chaplains of thefe three chapels were prelented to, and that they

were accountable for the refidue to the abbot and convent, and that if they prefumed to detain any more of thefe offerings beyond that fum, they were to be deprived even of that. For this reafon, they were to fwear to the abbot and convent, to give a true account of the offerings made at their feveral altars, on their refpeftive offering daysa and in no fhape to detriment their parilh of Menffre, as to

legacies or obventions, perfonal or predial,

but to conferve all the parochial rights of the fame, entire and untouched*, to the utmoff of their power. Ten marcs appear now but a fmall furn for the maintenance of a parifh miniffer; but when the value of money at the time when this compofition was made is confidered, it vvill be found to be a handfome and generous allowance to a chaplain, efpecially as their flipends were then paid by authority ; ten marcs were then equal to more than fixty pounds now, and in a council held at Oxford but fifteen years before, it was decreed, that where the churches had a revenue as far as five marcs per annum, they fhoiild be conferred on none but fuch as fiiould conftantly refide in perlbn, on the place, as being a fufficient maintenance. In 1348

H. Knighton

informs

us, a chaplain’s iifual ftipend

was five marcs, or two and his board} as for the chaplains of thefe three chapels, though they were to receive no more than ten marcs of thefe altarages, they were not excluded the enjoyment of the manfes and glebes, given to thefe chapels when they were firft confecra'ted, w'hich made fome addition to their income, and perhaps enabled them to keep a deacon to aflill them.’'

no more than four or

See Kennett’s Parochial Antiquities.

On

291

MINSTER.

On

tlic

great and principal

feftivals,

the Inhabitants

and other officers, with their banners, tapers, &c. were uied togo in proceffion to Minfter, their mother church, tlrere to join at the Iblemn mafs and other divine fervice then peribrnied, to make their offerings and pay their accuftomed dues, in token of their iubjedion to their parochial or mother church. The appropriation of the church of Minder, toge-

of thefe three chapelries, preceded by their

priefts

ther with the advowfon of the vicarage, continued, in manner as has been already mentioned, with the abbot

and convent till tlie liillolution of their monaffery in was furthe 30th year of king Henry VI IL when it rendered, together with the reft of tnc poffeffions of the diffothe monaftery, into tlie king’s hands. After be faid to be lution of the monaftery, there could not for the any pa rfbnage or appropriation of this churdi, demefoe lands of the manor'of Mii.fter, which are very totne tithes of extenfive in this parifh, were fubje<5t, as to the vicar, corn, to only a fmall modus or compofition and eighteen of eighteen ihocks or cops of wheat, and the vicar Ihocks or cops of barley, or tliereabouts ; die corn tithes in right of his vicarage, to

was

intitled,

of the parifh, as the lands in the remaining part Will be furdier noticed hereafter.

of

When

the vicarage of this church was

endowed and

hrund ; but certainly it a vicar inftituted, is no where confecrawas before the year 1275; for of St. Laurence t^t tion of the churchor chapel-yard nvade parochial, mention year, w'hen that cl.apel was Menftre, See. and in the year is made of the vicar of vicarage was valued at nS4, anno 8 Richard H. this diffolution of the abbey of St. tiirtv marcs. After the vicarage continue in Augiiftine, the advowfon of this kingl'.dward VI. in the hands of the crow^^,till prcmiles, to the archbivear, granted it, among other parcel of fmee which it has continued ftKT,

V

2

'

RINGSLOW HUNDRED.

292 of that patron of it. feilions

fee,

ti.e

archbilhop being the prefcnt

This vicarage is valued in the king’s books at 33I. 3s. 4d. and the yearly tenths at 3I. 6s. 8d. In 1588 here were three hundred communicants, and it was valued at 15c!. It is endowed with a manfe and glebe of about twenty- four acres of land, upland and marfh all the corn tithes, and other tithes of that part of the parifh called Street-borough ; and of about one hundred acres in the other borough, called Wey borough, except the corn tithes of the demefnes of the manor of Minfter, for which the modus or compofition above-mentioned is paid. The land in Minfter level, which is pafture, paying but four-pence an acre for tithes. Dr. Richard Clarke, vicar here in 1597, made a compofition with his parifhioners, by which they obliged themfelves to pay

M

^J

I

J

"

j

him

at the vicarage houfe, within three

days after every

quarter, after the rate of twelve-pence an acre for their marfh land, or elfe to lofc the benefit of the compofi-

Dr. Meric Calaubon, who fucceeded Dr. Clarke, would not abide by this compofition, but af-

tion.*

f

^

<

-I .1

^ i

J j!

terwards compounded with the occupiers, at the rate r of twelve-pence an acre for the worft of the land, and | of fourteen pence and fixteen pence for that whi(5h-is->,| better; and in the year 1638 he demanded his tithes : of the marfh land in kind, or eighteen pence per acre, !' which was agreed to by the pariftfionefs, and paid by '

them

643 ; when the civil wars being begun, and this county in the power of the parliament, Dr. Cafaubon, being continually threatened to be turned out of his vicarage, was content to receive one fhilling per acre for the marfh land ; in which manner he received it till the end of the year 1644, when this vi^

till

the year

1

According to

this agieement Dr. Clarke received in the year for 1615, 1579 acres, and in the year 1633, for 1665 acres of marfli land, at the rate of lad. an acre; which was

quarterly

paid, according to this compofition.

carage

;

'

MINSTER.

293 carage was Tcqueftered, and one Richard Culmer was put into poflcffion of

this vicarage,*

who

to ingratiate

himfelf with the parifliioners, agreed, to take no more than twelve pence an acre of them, as did Dr.Cafaubon at in 1660, on his being reftored to this vicarage ; which rate the tithes were afterwards uniformly taken, feveral vicars not till the time of the prefent vicar; the

being difpofed to quarrel with their neighbours, though the land now lets for as much again as it did in Dr. Cafaubon’s time, viz. at 28s. an acre and upwards. There have been feveral litigations and ifflies at law Dodfworth, and tried between the prefent vicar, Mr.

on account of fliis modus for the which have been decided m the vicar’s

his pirifhioners, liiarfh land, all

per acre from is. 6d. bj'^the verdict in his favor, and nowlfakes its goodnefs; to 2S. 6d. for the grafs land, according to favor,

who

fetafidethe

modus of one

(hilling

the poflefyet there are ten acres of grafs land late in which never having fion of Jofias Fuller Farrer, efq. remain at that paid more than four-pence per acre, The prefent value of it is about 3 50I, compofition.

per annum.

CHURCH OF

MII^STER.. VICARS. Meric Cafaubon, S. T. P. collated June 19, 1634, refigned Oft. 4, 1662.*’ John Cajiillon, S. T. P. collated Oft. 9, 1662, obt. Oft. 21, i688."

is

« Mis w in Prer

iHIes himf of Monkto cldeft fon gent, the ti the fequef

Minder

;

iUU JilUlca foil James tharine, an

in-law Ro( J£lizabcth.

RINGSLOW hundred.

294 P.4TRONS

VIC A Its.

The Archbijhop,

A. M.

Hejiry Whea-fan^

Nov.

collated

March

12. 1688,. obt.

5. 1695.'’

Thomas Greene,

S.

T.

col-

I*,

lated April' 2, 1695, reffgned V

'

1708.“

J

Jolfn

heiuiSy

March »

A M.

747 *',

James

T.

S.

TustJhaJT),

lated Feh. 12, 1

collated

lo, 1708, obt. Jan. i6,

1

col-

P.

747, rdigned

757*'* ,

Francis DoJjheortJi^

A. M.

Dec- 12, prefent Vicar." lated

i

col-

7S 7»

^ He was liicewife reftor of Chart}iam. Sec Wood’s Aih. vol. ii. y. 874, and his life in Blog. Brit. vol. vii. p. 4197 ; his will was proved April 25, 1695, and is in Prerog. oft". Cant. e He 'ivas a native of Norfolk ; in 3702 he was made canon of Chiift-

t Likewife vicar vf St. John’s,j Margate^ in Xliaiietj in 1719 lie m as mavle-maiber ©FEafthridge ho^'ital, Canterbury; he died xt.-7Z‘, and li<»

church, in Canterbury, and in 1708, archdeacon of that diocefe, at which time he was.collaled to. the r.<£lory of Adifham, when he refigned this vicarage he was afterwards vicar of St. Martin’s in the Fields; bifliop of Norwich, and then bifhop of Ely. See

this vicarage,

;

Sliog. Brit, vol. vii. appendix, p.

1

iz.

m

buried in this church. See more of St- John’s, Mitgate. S Me held the re&ol y, of Chart.w.ith

him under

by dilpenlbtidn, tlaie'tf Feb. iz, 1747,. and refigned .hodi for tl.e vicarage of Rociidale, in Lancafliirfe.

b He is treafurer of the chdrch of Salilbury, and a prebendary of York,

and holds this vicarage with that of Doddington, in this county, by difpenfation.

BIRCH INGTON. NORTHWARD

from Minfter

Birchington, adjoining to the

lies

the parifh of

have been anciently called, fometimesBirchington inGorend, and at other times Gorend in Birchington*, from a* place called Gorend, in this parifh, where it is reported the church formerly flood, though the moft nfual name Tea.

It

is

Paid

to

was always^ as it is at prefent, Birchington only. This parish is within the liberty and jurifdiflion of the cinque ports, and is a member of the town and port

EIRCRIilGTON. 295 port of Dover j and though Gorend in It, is laid to have been united to that town and port, ever fince the reign of king Edward I. yet in king Henry VI. ’s reign it was difputcd whether this pitrifh was not in the county at large ; to take away therciore all doubt of it, the king, by letters patent, united it to Dover, the mayor

of which appoints a deputy here, to whom the inhabitants have recourfe for juftice. By the Landtax a6t of 17 1 r, it was enafted, that in future, the parilhes of St. joim, St. Peter, and Birchingtun, in the lUe of Thanet, within the liberty of Dover, Ihouldbe deemed and taken to be a diltinc^divifion within the laid liberty, and in the executing of that aifl, Ihould be changed towards making up the whole fum charged on the town of Doves and the liberty thereof, according to the proportion which was alTelTed upon the fiid pariflics by the aft of the 4th of William and Mary, for granting an aid of four Ihillings in the pound, &c. This parish joins the lea flaore northward, along the whole of which it is bminded by high cliffs of chalk, through which there are feveral apertures made for the conveniency of a paffage on to the lea fliore. The pageneral, high land, and very pleafantly fituated j in the middle ot it Hands the church and village adjoining, tolerably well ffeltered with elm trees. rifh

is,

in

village, in a pleafing fituation, on a gentle eminence, com-mands many delighctul prolpefts over lea

This

view up the delightful tower of which cavale to Canterbury, the principal though at tlie difthedral forms a confpiGuous o'ojefl) beyond which, in clear weatance of twelve miles hills and the lofty ther, are plainly feen the range of

and laudi particularly a

fine



woods

in

Chilham and Godmerlham parks, more

tlian

fix miles further fouthwaird.

About

three, quarters

of a mile north-weft of the

is Gorechurch, and near as much from the fea fiiore., particularly menend, anticntly a place of note, being 11

.

tioned

CINQTE PORTS LIBERTY.

296

tioned In the great charter of the cinque port§, as one of the members of the town and port of Dover. Leland, in his Itinerary, vol.

Reculver

vii. fays,

is

now

fcarce half a mile from the fnore, but it is to be fuppofid, thatyn tymes pafte thefe cam hard to Goreende, a two mile from Northmouth, and at Gore ende is a litle

ftraite caullid

dive

:

and about

Broode

this fh ore

Staires is

go downe the

to

good taking of mullettes.

The

great Ragufeis ly for defence at Gore ende and thens again is another firms on totheP'orelande.” Here the church flood antiently, and that

it is faid

by the

of the the prefent one was falling

cliff

on which

built in its

was loft flood, and that

it

(lead

;

it

near this

is

a

Upper Gore end, which was given by the owner of it, Henry Robinfon, gem. by his will in farm, called

1642, for the maintenance of two fellows and tvvo feholars in St. John’s college, in Cambridge, as has been

About

already related before.

a mile fbuthward,

lie

Great and Little Brookfend ; and at a like diftance caftvvard, Great and Little Quekes. At the north-eaft boundary of the parifh is Weftgate, where there is a fmall hamlet of houfes from which place Domneva’s deer is faid to have begun its courfe acrofs thisifjand, running for fome fpace eaftward, till it turned fouthward towards the boundary of it, at Sheriffs Hope, in ;

Minfter.

This

parlfii

half each

way

is ;

fomewhat more than two miles and an about the village and Quekes, it is

pleafantly ffeltered w-ith trees tile,

;

the lands in

and like the other parts adjoining to

it,

it

are fer-

are arable

and moftly uninclofed, lying high, with hill and dale intermixed. The high road from Sarre to Maroate runs along the fouthern fide of the parifh. There Ts a bay of the fea adjoining to the fhore of this parifh, called

Hemmings

bay

;

probably

fo called

from

Hem-

ming, the Danifli chieftan, who landed with his companion Anlef and their forces in this ifland, in the year 1009.

By

TJIRCHINCTON.

B7

the return

made

297

to the cotincll’s letter

by nrch-

^

bifhop Parker’s order in 1563, there were then computed to be in this parifli forty houfholds ; and by the return of the furvey made by order of the fame queen, in her 8th year, of the feveral maritime places in this 'county, it appears that there were then here lioules inhabited forty-two; that there was a landing place, but it had neither fhip nor boiit. whale was caft afhore within the bounds of this parifhinthe year 1762. Ihe manor of Monkton claims far amount over this i Jubordinate to which is.

A



The manor

of Quekes, or Quex,

as

it

.is

fre-

quently fpelt-in the antient deeds of it. It is fituated ’in the fouth-eaft part of this parifli, about three quarters of a milefrorp the church, and was antientJy the 'feat of a family who gave name. to it, many of whotn •lie buried in this church, feveral of whofe graveflones and inferiptions yet remain ; among which are thofc of John (^ick, who died poflefied of it in the year 1 449, anno 28 Henry VI. and ofhisfon Rich. Quek in 1456 f from the latter of whom this feat devolved

by paternal defeent to John Quekes, efq. who about the beginning of king Henry VII. ’s reign; left an onlv daughter and heir Agnes, who carried it in marriage to John Crifpe, efq. defeended of an antient family feated at Stanlake, in OxforOiire

he afterwards refided here, and died polfcfled of it in 1500, anno 16 Henry VII. He left by her four daughters, married to Barret, Gofborne, Thomas, and Synrons ; and one ;

John Crifpe, who was flieriffin the lotli year of king Henry VIII. and kept his Onrievalty at fon and heir

of QiJekes. He had three fons, John, the was of Cleve-court, in Monkton, of whom fur-

this feat

cldeft,

Richard Queke, of Birchington, appears by his will, proved in 1458, in the Prerog. off. Cant, to have been buried in the chancel of St. Mary of Birchington *

thcr

CINQUE PORTS LIB-ERTY.

29^8

ther mention has been made in the defcriptlon of that place i Henry, tlxe. fecond, was of Quekcs; and Wil-

liam, the third, was lieutenant of Dover callle. Henry Crilpe, efq. the fecond Ton, of Quekes, kept his Ihrievaky at tiiis feat in the 38th year of the above reign, anno 1546, being the laft of it, and was a nnm of great name and erninency, and of finguJar cftimatlon

.

for his difcretion and weight in the management of the public affairs' of the county, as well as for his hofpita-

infomuch that he was reputed to have the entire rule of all this ifland. He died at Quekcs, at a good old age, in the year 1 575, leaving by his fecond wife

lity,

of whom Nicholas Crifpe, efq. the eldeft fon, was of Grimgill, in Whitftaple. He was fher iff in the ift year of queen Elizabeth, and died here in his father’s life time, anno 1564, leaving an only

fix

children

;

daughter Dorothy. John, the fecond fon, by his fecond wife Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Roper, efq. of EUham, left a fon Henry, heir to his grandfather, who will be further mentioned hereafter j a^id Henry, the youngefl, had three fens, Henry, who was firll of Great Chart, and afterwards fucceeded to this feat of Quekes, of whom further mention will be made; Thomas, who was firft of Canterbury and afterwards of Goudhurft, where he died in 1663. He left three fans, Thomas, who at length fucceeded to Quekes, as will be mentioned hereafter j Henry, w ho was of Monkton, and died in 1678, being anceftor of Henry and Thomas Crifpe, efqrs. of the cuhom-houfe, in

London, and of Weft Ham,

in

Effex, the latter of

whom

ended in an only furviving daughter Sufen, w'ho married the late George Elliot, eiq. of Upton, in tliat county 3 and Richard, riio third fon, died / p. Now to return to Henry, the only fan and heir of John, the fecond fon of Sir Henry Crifpe, of Quekes,

by his fecond wife, who became his grandfather’s heir and poffefied of Qiiekes 3 he was knighted and refided twice married, here till his death in 1648. He

BIRGHINOTON. but

left

no

iflue

Crifpe, viz.

;

firft,

Or, on a chevron, his death in

299

he bore for his arms two coats for Ermine^ a fefs ch'equy and fee o-nd. fable, five horje fhoes, argent

^

On

came, by the entail of it, Crifpe, gent, of Great Chart] before- mentioned, (the eldeft fon of Henry, the fourth and youngeft brother of Nicholas Crifpe, of Grimgill, 1648,

to his fifft-coufin

the father of Sir

removed

to

this feat

Henry

Henry

He

Crifpe, laft-mentioned.)

Quekes, and

in the year 1650 was apbut on account of his great age and } infirmities, his fon was fuffered to execute this ofhee iii

pointed fheriff

room. He was commonly called Bonjcxir Crifpe^ from his having been kept a prifoner in France for fome time, and never learning more French than thofe words, at lead he never would life any other whild there. In Augiift 1657, he was forcibly, in bight time, taken away and carried from bis feat of Quekes, by feveral perfons, EngliflTmen and others, ro Br uges, in Flanders, and detained there as a prifoner^ till the fum of 3000I. fhould be paid for his ranlbm. A few his

days after his arrival at Bruges, he fent to his nephew Thomas, who then lived near Quekes, to come over to him, to afiift him in .his great eitigeheies and extremities, After fomeconfulration together, he difpatched his nephew to England^ to join his end’eavours, with thofc of his fon Sir Nicholas Crifpe, for his ranfom and enlargment, in which they found great difficulty, as Oliver Crom\vell, who was then prOte^for, fufpe^ted the whole to be only a collufion, to procure joooi. for the ufc of king Charles II. then beyond the fens and accordingly an order was made by the protestor in council, that Mr. Crifpe fliould not be ranfomed upon which much difficulty arofe in procuring a licence for it Sir Nicholas died before it could be effected, and then the whole care of it devolved on Mr. Tho;



;

*'

There

IS

of this family in the Heraldic Viftn. co. as above.

a pedigree

Kent, 1619, the arms

mas

200 mas

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY. Crifpe, to obtain the licence and raife the

money,

which finding himfelf notable to do without the fale of fome of his uncle’s lands, he impowered him and his ibn-in law, Robert Darell, for that purpofe, who made every difpatch in it ; but it was eight months before the ranfom could be paid, and Mr. Crifpe releafed out of prifon ; when he returned to England, and died at Quekes, in 1663.' This enterprize was contrived andexeaited by Captain Golding, of Ramfgate, who was a fanguine royalifl-, and had fometime taken refuge with Charles II. in France. The party landed at Gore-end, near Birchington.and took Mr. Crifpe out of his bed, without any refiftance ; though it appears that he had been for fome time under apprehenfions of fuch an attack, and had caufed loopholes, for the difeharge of muflcets, to be made in different parts of the houfe, and had afforded a generous hofpkality to fuch of his neighbours as would lodge in his houfe, to defend him ; but all thefe precautions were at this time of no effebl, fo that they conveyed him, without any difturbance being made, in his own coach, to the fea fide, where he was forced into an open boat, without one of his domeftics being fuffered to attend him, although that was carneftly requefled as a favour. He was conveyed fi-ft to Offend, and then to Bruges, both which places were then in the power of Spain, which had been at war with England for more than two )''ears.“' He died polfefled of this feat above-mentioned, having had one Ton and one daughter, who married Robe. Darell, efq Nicholas the Ton was knighted, but died before his father at Quekes, in 1657, leaving an only daughter and heir, who married Sir Richard Powle, of Berkfhire. The account from which the above was taken, was found among the writings of the eftate of Stonar, in this ifland, which formerly belonged to Mr. Henry Crifpe, and was mortgaged for '

part of his ranfom.

m See

Bibl.

Topog.

.

Brit,

No.

45.

On

ElRCHtNGTON.

On Mr.

Crifpc’s death in

i66j, without furvivino this fear came, bv the entail made of it, to his nephew Thomas Criipe, (the eldcft fon of his next brother Tliomas Criipe, of Goudhurft) who afterwards rcfidedat Queiics, where he died in i68o, leaving by' his wife, whom he married in Holland, four daughters his coheirs, viz. Maria- Adriana, married to Richard Breton, cfq. of the Elmes, in Hougham Frantofi,or ; Frances, to Edwin Wiat, efq. of Maiditone, feraeant at law ; tlizaberh, to Chrifiopher Clapham, efq. of akcfield, in Yorkfhire, and Anne-Gertruy Crifpe who died unmarried in 1708. On thedivifion of

male

ifl’ue,

M

their

inheritance, this feat cfq.

who

efq.

and

to the lot of Richard Breton, immediately afterwards fold it to Edwin Wiat* he alienated it, after fome little interval, to fell

John

Buller, efq. of Morvall, in Cornwall, whofe*foii William dying/, p. the reverfion of it, (after the death

of’his wife,

who was

entitled to

it

for

as part

of her jointure)" was fold to Sir Robert Furnefe, bart. of WalderHiare, but he never came into the poFefTion of it ; for Mr. Bnller’s widow, afterwards the widow of F. Wiat, eiq. fon of Edwin above-mentioned, enjoyed it till her death in 1760^ when it came into the podeirion of Catherine, countels of Guildford, one of the three daughters and coheirs of Sir Robert Furnefe, bart. who in 1 767 fold it to Henry Fox, lord Holland, and he conveyed it to his fccond fon, the hon. Charleslife,

James Fox, who paHed away {lis intercfl in it to John Powcl, efq. who dying /. p. his filler, then the wife of William Roberts, became his heir and entitled to this eflate, and he is now in her right poircfied of it. At this houle king William ufed to refide till the winds favoured his embarking for Holland. A room faid to be the beddiamber of the royal guell is Hill Ihewn. His guards encamped on an adjoining indofui-e. "

See Boxley, vol.

iv.

p.'53S. ft

^

CINQUE PQRTS LIBERTY. commodious firucture, built jxirtIt has been a large of which has of timber and partly of brick, much

^02 ly

down, and the reft been within thele few years pulled modernized and converted into a farm houfe. It is which defend pleaiantly fituatcd among a toll of trees, There was formerly a vineyard in it from the winds. round. the gardens, which are walled of the fame rank, 'Phis aniient feat, like molt others to ruin, the weather has been for fomc years going faft

had been penetrated into moft of the apartments, which windows were greatly the principal onesi the roof and indeed cademolilbed, and no part of it iniiabitcd, or the end occupable of being fo, except a fmali part at apartments at the pied by tlie farmer i a grand fuit of and much north-weft corner was demolifhed in 1781, taken down by pieceof the remaining parts of it were the materials j meal at different times, for the fale of ruinated ftate this feat remained till the year in wlfich

took down great part of 1789, when Mr. Powell and rebuilt the reft as it remains at prefent."

The manor

of

Westg ate,

alias

Garling,

it,

lies

eaftern part of this parilb, extending likewife It had antiently owners of into the parifli of St. John. by the booK of knight s ov'’n name, for it appears at the

its

exchequer, and o?her records, that Robert king Henry III. de Weftgate htdd it in the reigns of Auguftine’s, by and Edward I. of the abbot of St. He left at his death his fon Robert, knic^ht’s fcrvice. cuflody of Sir iin£r age, who afterwards was in the as fuch Hairy cfe Sandwich, and he held it accordingly family of latter of thofe reigns, ft went into the

fees in the

in the^

Ley borne very loon

after

l>orne died poffeffed of

it

this,

for

William de Ley-

3d year of Edward

in the

II.

his jicir, (daughter leaving Juliana his grand-daughter life-time) who being of his fon Thomas, who died in his

O

A

fouth view of this feat, as in

1

780,

is

given in Bibl. Top.

BIRCHIK
50^5

heir both to l^r ^a£her and grandfather, became enrito large pofleHions in this and fcvcral other coun-

tleei

for the greainefs

of which flie was ufually ftiled the lnf
by the inquifition taken after her death, in the 43d year of king Edward III. ehat there was then no one who could make claim to her eftates, either by direct or even collateral alliance. After which this manor continued in the crown, till king Richard II. in his i ith year, gave it to the priory of Canons, nliat Chiltern Lapygley, in Hertfordlhire, where it continued till the dllfoilution of that houfein the 30th year of Henry VI If. tipf-rears

when

was, with

its .poffcirions,

Surrendered into the king’s hands, and was co-ii firmed to him and his heirs, by the general words of the aft, pafled the next it

all

year for that purpolc.

King Henry VIII. becoming

thus pofiefled of

it,

granted this manor, wioh.a31 its rights, members, and appurtenances, among feveral other premifes, for divers good caufes and canfidcrations, to Richard, fuffragan bi (hop of Dover, to hold to him and aligns, durinobis life, without any account of rent whatfoeverj provitk'd, if he fhould be promoted to one or more ecclefiaukal benefices, or other dignity or annuity, of the yearly value of ioc>]. tliat then this grant ihould be void.

This

certainly

happened before the 36th year of

that Feigt), for the ‘king that year granted this

manor

Thomas Moyle,

to bold in capite by knight’s ferwice ; he alienated it in the firfl' year of Edward V^I. to Roger and Valentine Byer, alim Bere,p to tlie ufeof to Sir

the former,

who

poMHlcdof it in the 4th and i;th and Mary, and was fucceeded in it by died

year of Philip John Byer, his Ion and heir, and

5 Elizabeth,

'he

conveyed

to Thomas Adam, who P

See Rot, Efch. ejus an.

in the

it,

anno

17th year

pt. 3.

of

I^ORTS LIBERTY.

CINQUE

204

or that reign, alienated

it

to

Thomas Dane,of HernCf

Robert whofe daughter and heir Thomafine marrying poffefDenne, eiq. ot Denne-hill, entitled him to the Denne, efq. jion or this manor. His eldefl: fon 1 homas

who was

recorder of Canterbury, died in 1656, and was

by his ekleft Ton Thomas, of Grayswill to his broInn,' elq., who dying /. p. devifed it by dying likether John, of the Inner Temple, efq. who lifters i wife f. p> gave it by will to his four maiden ot the the cldeft of whom, Thomafine, on the (hare

fucceeded

in

it

entitled inheritance left them by their brother, became Crifpe,_ of to it, and afterwards marrying Sir Nicholas Quekes, he became in her right poirdFed of it, and died Anne, who carried in 1657, leaving an only daughter B. of in marriage in 1673 to Sir Richard Powle, K. it

Berldbire, whofe fon John Powle, efq. of Lincoln’samong other Inn, dying in 1740, jfp. this manor, heirs of cllates, by the enfailoi it, reverted to the right Tho. Ciifpe, his mother Anne Crifpe, in the perfon of

(defeended from Tho. Crifpe, of Goudhurft, the next brother of Henry, the father of Sir NicholasCrifpe, above mentioned) whofe Rich. Powle, foie daughter and heir Anne married Sir

efq. of

Weft-Ham,

in Eflex,

K- B. the father of John, who died /. p. in 1740, as above mentioned.) He left an only furviving daughand heir Sufan, who rnarried.in 1757, the late Geo. Elliot, efq. of Upton, in Eflex, who poflefled it in her right, and in 1764 alienated it to Mr. John Wotton, ©rthis ifland, as he did again to Mr. James Taddy, gent, of St. John’s, whofe furviving Ions anddevifees

ter

James- and Edward Taddy, became the latter

is

fince

become

entitled to

the foie pofteflor of

it,

but

it.

a manor fituated about a mile fouth-weft from the church of Birchington ; it was part of the antient poflclTions of

Brookseno,

antiently fpelt Brookejende,

is

the priory of Chrift-churchs and in the lothyear of king Edward 11 . the prior obtained a grant ot free-

.



warren

BIRCHINGTON’, warren for

liis

demefne lands

in this

3^5 manor among

continued with the priory till the final fupprcdion of it in the jift year of Henry VIII. . when this manor, among the other poflTefTions of it,, came into the king’s hands, where it did not continue others, after this

it

among

other premifes, in his 33d year, on his neW'ere6ted dean and chapter of Canterbury, part of whofe inheritance it ftill continues. long, for he fettled

it,

not any court held for this manor. The manerial rights the dean and chapter referve in their own hands ; but the fcite and demefne lands are

There

is

dcmifed on

Mr. John of

a beneficial leale, the

Friend, junior,

who

prefent lefiee being

the prefent occupier

is

it.

of Broadgate, otherwife called BrockmanSy lies within the bounds of this parifh, and it was part of the extends likewife into Monkton pofleflTons of Henry Beaufort, duke of Somerfet, and on his attainder in the 8th year of king Edward IV. came to the crown, whence it was granted to John Brockman, efq. of Withara, in Efifex, to hold by the

The manor

;

fame tenure and fervices as it was held in the ift year of his reign, and he died po fie fled of it in the i6th year of king Henry VII. anno 1300, as was found by the inquifition then taken.^

CHJRITIES

Ten acres and one half

of land, were given

for the

with the ferepairs of the church here, or perhaps purchafed acre is let one v/hich veral legacies left to the church fabric, of to keep them, churchwardens to a poor man employed by

by

the

and the rents the boys orderly at church ; the refidue is let out, applied to the ufe of the church. . r An'na-Gertruy Crispe, fourth daughter and coheir ot Thomas Crifpe, efq. of Quekes, by, her will in 170^^, devifed to ville of Acholc, the overfeers of the poor of Birchington and then Monkton, for ever, 47 acres of land in Birchington and the paper annum, in truft, to pay to the clerk of ,

.

m

icafe at 18I.

pt, q See Battely’s Somner,

VOL,

X.

X

ii.

p. 170.

rifli

cinque ports liberty*

3o6

yearly 20s. to keep clean the ifle and monuments belonging to Quex ; to three widows of Birchington 3I. to two widows of Achole 2I. for wearing apparel to appear at church ; to keep at fchool with dame or mafter, 12 boys and girls, and to give to

rifli

each, at leaving the fchool, a bible; the overfeers to take yearly to difpofe of the remaining money for binding a ten fliillings fchool-boy apprentice ; that the overfeers fix up a yearly account of receipts and payments, and pafs the fame before a juftice of ;

the peace.*'

This parish diction of

is

ecclesiastical jurisof Canterbury, and deanry of

within the

the dioceje

Weftbere.

The

exempted from the archdeacon, and dedicated to All Saints, is a handfome buildit confifts of a nave ing, fituated on a rifing ground and two ifles, reaching but half the length of it, and what is remarkable, they are all /panned by a fingle roof ; beyond thefe are three chancels. That on the north fide of it belongs to the antient feat of Quekes, in this parifh, and is repaired by the owners of it j in church, which

is

1

;

monuments and memorials of the families of Quekes and Crifpe, &c. The fouth chancel is made into a handfome veftry, and juft by

it

are

many

fine antient

ftands the fteeple, which

is

a tower, on which

is

'

i

,

|

|

|

I

placed

|

a fpire covered with fhingles, of great life to fhips at lea as a land-mark. There are five bells in it. In the windows of the church are fome few remains of painted

was much more formerly. Before the reformation, there were here befide the high altar, altars and images with lights before them, for the blefled Virgin Mary, St. Nicholas, the Holy Trinity, St. Anne, and St. Margaret; to each of which legacies of a few pence and fometimes Ihillings, were almoft conftantly deviled by the parifhioners ; as appears by their wills, remaining in the Pre-

|

glals, juft fufficient to fliew that there

<

i

;

1

i

!

j

rogatiye-office, Canterbury, See a copy of »et, col.

No.

this part

of the will in Lewis’s Hift. of Tlia-

xiv.

Among

a

BIRCHINGTON.

Among chancel,

is

-;

3O7

,

other memorials in this church, in the high a (lone with a brafs plate, having on it, the

of a prieft in his habit, and an infeription for mafter John Hey nes, clerk, late vicar of Monkton, obt. 1523. In the vellry, on a brafs plate, an infeription for Mrs. Margaret Crifpe, late wife of Mr. John Crifpe, the youngeft daughter and heir of George Rotherham, efq. obt. 1508. In the Quekes, formerly called St. Mary’s chancel, are many graveftones, with effigies

and monuments well preferved, for the family of Crifpe, of Quekes, with their bulls, feveral of brafs plates

which, as well as the ornaments, are of excellent fculpvery handfome ture, from the year 1508 to 1737.

A

mural monument and infeription fbrdame Anne Powel, only daughter and heir of Sir Nicholas Crifpe, of Quex, and relief of Sir Richard Powel, K. B. obt. 1707* leaving only one fon John Powel, efq. of Lincoln’s Inn, who died unmarried 1740, and lies here interred. mother’s eftates in Kent purfuant to her deeds of fcttlement, defeended to Henry and Thomas Crifpe, elqrs. of the cullom-houfc, London, the only furviving branch in the male line of this an-

By her

tient

death,

all his

name and

family.

A

memorial

for

Wm.

Buller,

crojs^argenty arms, 5 ^j ^/^, four eagles difplased of the fields a crefeent for difference a chevron between three pelicans ^ or. impaling John Biechenden, gent, of Birchington, appears, by and his will, anno 1^80, to he buried in the nether end

efq.

ofQuekes, ob. 1708

;

,

north fide of the chancel, where Sir Henry Crifpe was buried. There are engravings of three of the monuments of the Crifpe’s in Lewis’s Pliltory of Thanet. an antient tomb in this chancel;, lie the effigies of a

On

on the fides and end of it are the arms of Crifpe fingly, and thofe of Scotr, three Catheand Crilpe, impaling rine wheels in a bordurey engrailed^ ifie, a memorial the fame feveral times. In the middle pariffi, obt * for Capt. George Friend, of this memorial, and feveral others for the fame family. A

man and woman

;

X %

fhcwing.

cinque ports liberty. fhewing, that in a vault underneath, lie feveral of the Neames, of Gore-end, and Mockett, of Dandelion.

One

for

Samuel Brooke,

efq. obt. 1 774. Several memorials for the Kerbys, of Southend, and Brookfend ; Audens, and of Gore. memorial for Thomas Underdown, late of Fordwich, and thrice mayor of that corporation j he died 1 709. done, on which is a

A

A

brafs, with a pried in his habit, the infeription gone, but in fmall circular brades at each corner are his initials,

F. conjoined in the manner of a cypher. In the church-yard, on the north fide, there dood formerly a fmall houfe, called the Wax-houfe, where they ufed to fabricate the lights for the church procefI.

fions,

&c.

In the time of the fequedration of this vicarage, about the year 1642, or rather the refignation

of

by Dr. Cafaubon, on the ordinance againd pluralities, this church was left by the vicar, to anyone who would officiate in it, and this houfe was fitted up at the parifhioners charge, or perhaps at the expence of the family of Crifpe, who were defirous of a conformid’s officiating here, for the minider to live in. Accordingly Mr. Edmund Fellows, A. M. of Sandwich, officiated here as minider from 1 63 7 till after 1 660 ; but in a late vicar’s time, this houfe was, by his order,pulled down, and the materials carried away. This church was one of the chapels belonging to the vicarage of Monkton, and is now the only one of them in being. As this church was a chapelry of the paridi church of Monkton, and the chapel was eredled for the cafe of the inhabitants, they were antiently obliged to contribute towards the repairs of the mother church; but this ufage, as well as that of the other chapels in it

(except St. Nicholas, which dill continues to pay a certain fum towards the repairs of its mother church of Reculver) has been for a long time difcontinued. this ifland,

By 1367,

the it

endowment of

Monkton in of Monkton for

the vicarage of

was decreed, that the vicar

the

3O9

BIRCHINGTON.

the time being, fhould find one chaplain In this chapel of Birchington, dependant on that church, daily to celebrate, as far as he conveniently could, which chaplain Ihould officiate in this chapel duly in divine fervices;

which the vicar allowed him a ftipend of fix pounds per annum.

for

In the valuation of the vicarage of Monkton, in the king’s books, the vicar of it is charged for a priefl: at

the chapels of Birchington and

Wode,

iil. 13s. 4d.

In 1640 here were 240 communicants. The vicar of Monkton now finds a curate to offiarchbiffiop, ciate in this church, being collated by the the chathe patron, to the vicarage of Monkton, with of Birchington and Wode appendant to it j but pels

including that the appropriate parfonage of this parilh, Monkof Wood adjoining, as an appendage to that of of the priory ^of ton, which was part of the pofieffions

fiom it, Chrifi-church, vvas yet a diftin
Henry

of Canterbury, to his new-erc(5led dean and chapter whom the inheritance of it is at this time vefied. The parfonage of Birchington, including that of in

Wood, ficial

alias

it

were

is let

twenty-one years. but it was two hundred pounds per annum ; per on a fiirvey, at fix hundred pounds

was valued, annum, having 2000 acres tith'ery

on a beneIn 1778 the rack

adjoining,

for

leafe

rent of

Woodchnrch,

of

it.

leflees

The of

it.

of tidieable land within the

family of HugelTen, of Provender, From the coheirs of the late Wil-

liam Wefiern Hngeflen, efq. was fold, in 1791, toMr. George is the prefent whofe fon Mr. Benjamin Bulliell The parilh clerk here had formerly aiitient book of the clerk orivilcges, as appears by the by different from thole enjoyed For colfefling hlFdiies.’ -

Tl.is

is

Th.lnet, col. printcil in Leivis's

X

No. xv.

xvi.

Other 3

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

310

other parifh-clerks in

this ifland

;

befides certain Turns

of money, amounting to 5s. 6d. and a groat a year for every cottage ; and he had paid him in kind by the farmers, twelve cops and twelve fheavesof wheat, and twelve cops and two fheaves of barley j but in the year 1638, an aflefiTment was made by the parifhioners of this parifli, and of the parifh and ville of Wood, wherein they rated their lands at twelve pence the fcore acres, and the cottages at four* pence each, for the clerk’s wages.

WOOD,

ALIAS

SOUTH-eaftward

WOODCHURCH.

from, and adjoining to Birching-

of Wood, other wife Woodchurch, corruptly called by the people WilloW’Wood, for Villa- wood, taking its name from its being anton,

lies

the ville or parijlo

tiently almoft all a

wood.

as Birchington, a limb of the tozvn and port of Dover, and under the government of the fame deputy, It

is,

with Birchington, to the land-tax, though antiently it was taxed by itfelf. This town of Wood, in queen Elizabeth’s reign, paid more to the tenth and fifteenth, than was paid at that time by the town of Monkton ; and yet in the return made by archbifhop

and

affeffed,

purfuance of a letter from the privy council, it is faid there were no houlholds in this parifh ; the meaning of which probably was, that this parifh, being

Parker,

chiefly

in

woodland, there were no farm-houfes

in

it,

but

only cottages. The high road from Sarre to Margate feparates Wood from Birchington ; about a quarter of a mile or a little more from which, fouthward, are the ruins of Wood, or Woodchiirch chapel j near it there is but one houfe, the reft of the houfes being near a mile from it,

at a ville, antiently called the

Millburgh, and now Acholt,

WOOD.

311

Acholt, which is about the fame diftance from Birchington, where there is a fair held at Acholt, on May 30, yearly, for pedlary and toys. For this reafon it is likely this chapel was fo far fuffered to go to decay, as at length to

fall

down

;

however

this

may

be,

has been long fince demoliflied, only part of the walls being left ; its yard, containing about half an

it

by the original walls of it, confee. The building muft have been of a

acre, furrounded

verted to a lay confiderable

fize,

as

the foundation meafures eighty-

four feet in length, and fifty-fix in breadth ; there is a mount of eight or ten feet high in the middle of the area of the church, which evidently appears to be the There is a farm-houfc adjoining ruins of the tower. the inclofure, which is about a quarter of a mile from the great road leading from Canterbury to Margate, The inhabitants of this pari fh are alfelfed towards the repair of the church or chapel of Birchington, though it hill maintains its own poor.^

Wood

was dedicated to St. Nicholas, archdeacon, it was exempt from the jurifdifHon of the and was (landing and ufed as a place of worlhip in the year 1563. The vicar of Monkton, to which church this was a dependent chapel, was bound by the endow-

The

chapel of

vicarage, to find a chaplain, to celebrate in Frithis chapel on Sundays, and every Wednefday and day, and to officiate in it duly, in divine (erviccs, as is

ment of his

particularly defcribed initj for

more

which duty he

paid him 3I. 145. 4d. yearly. The parfonage of this parifh is united with that of Birchington, an account of which has already been given before, and is demifed with it, on a beneficial leafe

;

the prefent iefiee being

Mr. Benjamin

Bufhell,

of Minder. ‘

See Lewis’s Hift. Thanet, p

74.

St.

X 4 I.

^

CINQUE PORTS XIBERTY.

312

ST. JOHN’S, ALIAS Is

THE NEXT ADJOINING PARISH

from Woodchurch, which rough within

of

MARGATE,

late years,

company

to

it,

though only a bo~

has fo greatly increafed in buildings

and become it

latter,

north-caftward

yearly, that

fo it

noted from the rcfort of has almoft obliterated its

name of St. Johns, that of Margate only one now known to moft people.

antlent parochial

being the

within the liberty and jurifdiblion of the cinque ports^ and is an antient member of the town and port of Dover and though united to it ever fince

This

parifli is

king Edward I.’s reign, yet fo late as in that of king Henry VI, itbecamc adilpuie, whether this parifh was not in the county at large ; to take away therefore all doubt of it, that king, by his letters patent, united it to Dover, to which place it is fubjedl in all matters of civil jurifdidion. The mayor of Dover appoints one of the inhabitants to be his deputy here ; but though he bears the name of the mayor’s deputy, he has no power to adminifter an oath, or to adt as the mayor himfelf might do if he was prefent. This officer is chofen either every year, or once in two or three years, at the pleafure of the mayor of Dover, and appoints a fub-deputy. He had antiently an afieiTment allowed him every year, to bear the charge he was at, in the execution of his. office, out of which he paid feveral fums, by reafon of the dependency of this pariffion the town and port of Dover. In this pariffi, and the other two parlflaes of St. Peter and Birchington, there were two companies of foot foldlers raifed, which ufed to be muftered by the deputy conftable of Dover, which was a confiderable expence to the inhabitants, the governor and his attendants being all treated by them and their charges borne, which was done out of this deputy’s rate or affiefiment. Out of the fame rate there were built in i624two watchhoufes

^

ST. John’s,

Margate.

313

houfes and a watch-bell, hung on the cage, and another watch-Koufe built in the fort; out of this race likewife were provided two brafs guns for the fort, with appurtenances and ammunition for them ; and a barrel with pitch to fet upon the beacon ; out of it were defrayed the charges of filling up the fea-gates

made

the

to prevent rogues

from coming up the Tea, to (leal and plunder, efpecially in time of war; thus Fayernefic gate was dammed up in 1618 but fuch an anefi'ment has been difeontinued for more than one hundred in

clilf,

into the country that

way from ;

years paft.“

This parish of St. John, which

is about three miles and a half aerofseach way, has much the fame appearance, as thofe parifhes in this ifland heretofore

deferibed, confifting of open

uninclofed corn lands,

with frequent hill and dale, the loil moftly chalk. Ic accounted an exceeding healthy is fituation, and the inhabitants long lived. In the year 1 563, as appears by archbifiiop Parker’s return to the order of the privy council, here were one hundred and feven houfholds ; but fo far had they increafed between that tin>e, to when Mr. Lewis wrote his Hiftory of Idianet in 1736, that there were then computed to be in this parifh, (Including Margate) about fix hundred families, which would make the number of inhabitants about two thoufand four hundred in the whole. They are now increafed to upwards of feven hundred families. The village or town^ now called Margate fituated in the borough of that name, a furtner account of which will be given hereafter, lies on the fea flmre, on the north fide of it, extending fouthwards, on the afeent of a hill, on the knoll of which (lands the church. Befides the town of Margate, there are fcveral other fmall villeSjOr clufiers of houfes in this parifii. Wefibrookc, (from wejl of the Brooks) lies about a quarter of a “

Lewis's Hiftory of Thaiiet, p. 131.

mile

— CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

314

mile weft ward from Margate,

Garling, which

is

a

of near twenty houfes, about midway between Margate and Birchington, In this hamlet is a farm called Carling’s farm, which belongs to the hofpitals of Bridewell, and Bethlem, in London. Miitterer has about three cottages a Southward from Garling little nearer to Birchington. is Twenties and Lyden, and then Vincents, now the property of Mr. Francis Smith j all at prefent are only lingle farm houfes, yet almofl within memory, at the latter there was another dwelling houfe ; and by the great number of difufed wells found hereabout, it Ihould feem that there were antiently many more houfes at this place, which feems to account for the fituation of the oratory or chapel, called Dene chapel, built by Sir Henry de Sandwich about the year 1230, to which reforted not only the lord of that manor and his family, but the inhabitants of Twenties, Vincents, and Fleet likewife, purchafed by Henry, lord Holland, which has fince paflfed in like manner as Kingfgate, and his other eftates in this ifland, and is now owned by Wm. Roberts, efq. in the middle of, or at lead at a convenient diftance from thofe farm houfes, this little oratory was placed. Chapel- hill houfe belongs to Mifs Browne. Fleet above-mentioned, is a place at the fouthern extremity of this parifli, at a fmall diftance from Vincents, extending partly into the parillies of St. Laurence and Minder. It was antiently a place of fome account, having been the inheritance of a family, written in antient records de Fleta, who were refident here about the reign of king John, or of Henry III. at prefent there is only a fmall farm-houfe, one tenement, and the ruins of another. Philipott fays, the family of pretty

large

ville,

confifts

Fleet fealed with Chequy^ on a canton^ a lion rampant, as appeared by antient ordinaries and alphabets of arms. In

James

I.’s

time, one of this family ended in a daugh-

and coheir, married to Philipott, who became entitled to this eftate, and poflelTed it in 1656. Southward

ter

ST. John’s,

Margate.

315 Southward from the church is Draper’s hofpiral, and the fame didance further a good houfe called Updowne, belonging to Mr. Farrer; about half a mile from which is Nalh-court, and about as much farther Little Nalh.

In the eadern part of the parilli are the two hamlets of Ead North Down, and Weft

North Down, (the

latter about two miles eaftward church, the former about one only,) and from the laftly Lucas Dane, almoft adjoining to Margate, in the lame valley. The northern and eaftern fides of this parilh are bounded by the lea-fhore, along the whole of which there is a continued range of high chalk cliffs, excepting in the opening between that fpace, where the harbour and pier of Margate, with the town, (lands, and a fmall place to the weftward of it.

The borough and town

of

Margate

is

on the northern bounds of this parilh, adThis borough was antiendy joining to the fea. bounded on the land fide by a very large lynch or bank, a confiderable part of which has been fo long fince ploughed up, that no one knows the bounds of it on that fide. It feems to have had the name of Margate, or more properly Meregaie, from there being here an opening or gate, through which there was a fmall merCy or dream, running into the fea. On that fide of the town next the fea, was a pier of timber, built eaft and weft, in the form of a half circle, to defend the bay from the main fea, and make a fmall harbour for Ihips of no great burthen, fuch as By the corn and other hoys, and the fidiing craft. the prefent appearance of the chalky rocks, which were the foundations of the old cliffs, on each fide of this pier at low water, it feems as if antiemly nature itfelf had formed a creek or harbour here, the mouth of which was juft broad enough to let fmall veffels go in and out of it ; but fince the inning of the levels on fituated

the fouth fide of this iftand, the fea having borne har-

^l6

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

der on the eaft and north parts of it, the land on each fide of this creek has been, in procefs of lime, wadied quite away by thefea, and the inhabitants were obliged to build this pier to prevent the town’s being overflowed by the ocean, and to defend that part of it which lies next the water by piles of timber and jetThis pier was at lirft but final), and went but a tees. little w^ay from the land, but the cliffs ftil! continuing to be wafhed away, the lea by that means lay more heavily on the back of it than ulual, and rendered it jieceffary to enlarge it by degrees, to wdiat it is at pre-

At what time this pier was firft built is unknown, that it was fo long before the reign of king Henry VIII. is certain from Leland’s account of it, (who lived in that reign) for he fays, Iiin. vol. vii. “ Margate lyith in St. John’s paroche yn Thanet a v fent.

and there is a village and which a peere for fhyppes but now fore decayed Ihews it to have been built many years before ; and it feems to intimate, either that there were then no ‘dues paid for the maintenance and prelervation of it, or that the trade to it was fofmall, that thole dues w^ere not fufficient to keep it in repair. However this be, it is very certain that this pier was not then near fo large as it is now, and that the lands in this ifland were not in fuch a ftate of cultivation as they have been of late years, and confequently the droits paid for corn ffiipped, by which it now chiefly fublifls, were not nearfo much as they are now. In queen Elizabeth’s reign, it is ceitain this pier was maintained by certain rates, paid by corn and other merchandize fhipped and landed in it, which rates were confirmed by the feveral lord wardens of the cinque ports, who have from time to time renewed and altered the decrees, made for the ordering of this little harbour, under the management of two pier-wardens and two deputies, who were to colled; the droits or dues to it, and infped and provide for the neceflary fupport and

myles upward

fro Reculver,

'

repairs

ST. John’s, repairs of

it.

The

Margate.

oldeft of thefe decrees

317 is

dated in

1615, and confirmed by Edward, lord Zouch, lord warden, chancellor and admiral of the cinque ports. In thefe decrees
or the monies due to the pier; of which they are to give an account to the parilhioners, and their fuccei-

twenty days after the choice of new pier-wardens. It is likewife the office of the pier-w’ardens to infpeft and provide for the repairs of the pier; but they cannot make any new works above the value of five pounds, without the content of the

fors in this office, within

inhabitants, •

But

appears, notwithfianding this care for the prefervatioh of the pier, that through negledt of the perfons employed, it by degrees fell fiill further to decay, inlbmuch, that in the year 1662, complaint -

it

was made to James, duke of York, then lord warden and admiral of the cinque ports, that this pier and harbour was much ruinated and decayed, and that the monies formerly colledfcd and received for the repairs of it, had not been duly improved for that purpofe, and that for a long time patl there liad not been any due account given, or cletffions made of iucceffive pier-wardens yearly, as by antient ciifioms and orders I’his date of of former lord wardens ought to be. the pier and a fuppofition, which was generally believed, that the pier-wardens had no power to compel the payment of the droits, or harbour-dues, went forward from time to time, and feemed to threaten the entire

;

CINQJJK PORTS LIBERTY.

3lS

winch induced the pier-w3.rdens Rncl king George L inhabitants at lalt, in the i ith year of to enable them more to petition parliament for an adf accuftomary effedually to recover the antient and of the pier droits, for the lupport and maintenance

entire

rum

ot

it >

which ad palled accordingly that

year.

The

title

of

ad is, to enable the pier-ivardens of the town of Mar 0 ate, more effequally to recover the antient and ac^ the

-

cuflomary droits for the fupport

/aid pier.

The preamble

and maintenance of

to the

ad

recites,

the

that the

Margate had, time out of mind, had and of great a pier and harbour very commodious, navigation of benefit and advantage to the trade and of fliips and marithis kingdom, in the prefervation and from eneners in dorms and ftrefs of weather, convenient for mies in times of wars; and alfo very forts of commothe exporting and importing many That the fafety of the town of Margate, aud dities. depending upon the of all the neighbouring country prefervation of this pier and harbour ; there had been antient town of

towards the maintenance and prefervation of it, time immemorial, paid to the pier- wardens, or their depucertain droits, commonly called ties for the time being, poundage, or ladage ; and other rates or duties, which had bee"n confirmed by the orders and decrees of the without the due lords wardens of the cinque ports ; payment of which, this pier or harbour muft inevitaof the inhabitants bly fall to decay, to the utter ruin neighbouring country, and of this town, and of all the trade and navigation of to the great piejudice of the make the kingdom. Laftly, that it was necellary to provifion, as well for the recovery of and for the the faid droits, rates, and duties aforefaid, enforcing of due payment of them, as for the better

more effedual

It was therefore fecuring the faid pier and harbour enaded, that the antient droits fliould be continued and paid, and that to this end the pier-wardens Ibould :

*chufe colledors,

who Qiould be

allowed for their pains in

ST.

JOHN

Sj

MARGA.TE*

3^9

in the colle(5tingof

them, not exceeding one fliilling and fixpence in the pound, and fliould give fecurity for the fame, and that their accounts fliould be yearly audited by the pier-wardens, with divers other regulations, powers, and penalties, for the better carrying forward of the fame. Laftly, that all (urns of money colleiffed fhould be paid to the pier-wardens, to be laid out in repairing and improving the pier and harbour, and not applied to any other ufe ; and that the pier-wardens (hould have power to prevent all annoyances in the harbour. Under this ad the pier vyas maintained till the year 1787, when an application to parliament being intended for the improvement of the town of Margate, the rebuilding and improvement of the pier was applied for at the fame time, and an ad of parliament pafled that year, anno 27 George

III. for that

purpofe, as well as for afcertaining, eftablilhingand recovering, certain duties, in lieu of the antient and accultomary droits, for the

fupport and maintenance of this pier. Since this the old wooden pier has begun to be new cafed on both fides with ftone, and extended, and the whole is now compleatly finifhed. An ad of parliament was palled

(1799) to amend the former, by encrcafing the droits, and enabling the commiffioners to make further improvements. This will certainly add to the increafe of the trade of this place, and the general benefit of the inliabitams of Margate, and country contiguous to it.'^ The rates, according to which the droits for the maintenance of this pier are at prefent fettled, as well by the late ad, as by th.e commiffioners impowered fo to do, are by much too long to be inlerred this prefen t year

here.

the (hipping trade, which was once pretty large, before the harbour was fo much walked away

Moft of

There

is

I-ewis’s Hift.

a view of the o!d pier of Margate,

Thanec, plate xvi. p

as

in

1736, in

123. ptr

*

CINOJTE PORTS LIBERTY.

32a

and the fhips began to be built too large to lay up here, has been long lince removed to London. However, there are flill lome Ibips of burthen refort hither for the' importation of coals from Newcaftle and Sunderland and oi deals, &c. from Memel and Riga ; bcfides this, the exportation of corn and other by the

fea,

;

product of the farms in this ifland is very confiderable from this harbour, as is the quantity of goods of every iort from London, brought in daily by the hoys for the fupply of the fhops and other inhabitants of this place and neighbourhood; to which may be added the leveral palfage- boats, or yachts, as they are now called, which are neatly fitted up with cabins and

other accommodations, and fail every day to and from London, conftantly freighted with paffengers, baggage and other lading belonging to them; and the number of perfons, which the inhabitants boafl are

and from this place in the veflels yearly, is almoft beyond a moderate credibility, even to 18,000 on an average. As the paflage from England to Holland is reckoned the fhorteft from this place, many great perfonages have embarked here from time to time for the continent. In particular, in king James I.’s reign, carried to

the eledor palatine, the king’s fon-indaw, with the eledrefs Elizabeth his wife, embarked from this place for Holland. In later times king William III. often

came

way

king and from Holland twice landed here; and king George II,

hither in his

to

;

George I. anti queen Caroline his confort, with the young princeflcs, came firft on fhore and ftaid all night at this place ; and that fnccefsful and vidorious General John, the great duke of Marlborough, chofe this place for his embarking, and landing again to and from the feveral campaigns he -made abroad. The town of Margate was till of late years a poor inconfiderable fifjiing town, built for the moll part in the valley adjoining to the harbour, the houfes of

which

ST.

John’s,

Margate.

321 which were in general mean and low; one dirty narrow lane, now called King-ftreet, having been the principal ftreet of

it.

It

does not Teem ever to have been in

any great repute for its filhery or trade ; .and disappears more fully from the return made on a furvey, by. order of queen Elizabeth, in her 8th year, of the (everal maritime places in this county, in which it was returned, that there were in Margate, houfes inhabited one hundred and eight ; perfons lacking proper habi-

boats and other velfels fifteen; viz. eight of one ton, one of two, one of five, four of eighteen, one of fixteen ; perfons belonging to thefc boats, occupied in the carrying of grain and filhing, tations eight;

fixty.

There was a market kept here as long ago as 1631, of which a return to Dover was made every month; but

feems not to have continued long, nor does it appear by what authprity it was kept at all. From this date of infignificance Margate rofe unexpedledly, and that no long time fince, to wealth and confequence, owing principally to the unlverfal rethis

commendation of lea air and bathing, and the rage of the Londoners at the fame time of fpending their fummer months at thofe watering places fituated on the fea coafl ; and when it came to be known that the Ihore here was fo well adapted to bathing, being an entire level and covered with the fineft land, which

extends for feveral miles on each fide the harbour, and the eafy diliance from the metropolis, with the conveniency of fo frequent a paflage by water, it gave Margate a preference before all others, to which the beauty and healthinefs of it, and of the adjoining country, contributed ftill more. An objedion has been made to the fea-bathlng here, that the frelh waters of the rivers Thames and Medway, mixing with thofe of the fea here, lefl'e/i the faltnefs of the latter ; but this can have but little force,

when

VOL.

X.

it is

confidered, that the

Y

mouths

of thofe rivers

322

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

rivers are at the diftance

of near thirty miles, and are

both fait for nearly that diftance from their mouths j and befides, the waters of thofe rivers do not run on the ebb-tide halfway down to Margate road, before the tide at flood turns them back again. Another advantage peculiar to Margate is, its being a weather Ihore, during the greateft part of the

fummer

;

or in

other words, the foutherly winds, which generally prevail in that fealon, blow oft from the land ; by which means the fea is rendered perfectly fmooth, and the water clear to a confiderable depth j whereas moft of the places on the fea-coaft in the Englifh channel,

from the North Foreland to the Land s End, are on a lee- Ihore during the whole of that time, and are incommoded very much by thofe winds ; for thofe grateful gales, which produce fine warm weather, and render the Margate ihore fmooth and pleafant, never continual fwell and fail to occafion at the fame time a furf of the fea on the fouth coaft of England; which not only makes the water there foul and thick, but annoys, fpatters, and frightens the bathers exceedingly.

This induced numbers of genteel people, among which were many of the nobility and perfons of fabathing, as for fhion, to refort to Margate, as well for being fuffipleafure ; but the houfes were far from inhabitants, nor were cient to receive this increafe of

accommodation for them ; this numbers of adventurers in building; a

there proper places of

brought hither new town was built to the fouthward of the old one, old on the fide of the hill nearer the church, and the town too was greatly improved and increafed ; a large Cecil-fquare, fquare was erefted in the former, called afl'embly-room, with a on one fide of which is a large public hotel adjoining. The aftembly-room, which is fuppofed to be nearly as large as moft in the kingdom, much tafte and elegance. It is 87 feet is finin-ied with height and long and 43 broad, of a proportionable ^

richly

ST. John’s,

Margate.

323 ornamented j adjoining to it, are apartments for tea and cards ; under which, on the ground floor, is a billiard and coffee room, which join the hotel, and a large piazza extends the whole length of the building. The number of fubfcribers names to thefe rooms in the feafon, amounts generally, as it is hiid, to more than a thoufand. In the contiguous field there was afterwards built another fquare, called Hawley-fquare, and an entire range of genteel houfes from one end of it to the other, moft of which command a fine and extenfive profpetft over the fea. Near the harbour there are feveral commodious bathing-rooms, out of which the bathers are driven in the machines, any depth along the lands into the fea, under the condu(ft of the guides ; at the back of the machine is a door, through which the bathers dcfcend a few fteps into the water, and an umbrella of canvas dropping over, conceals them from the public view. Upwards of forty of thefe machines are frequently employed richly

until the time of high water j their Itrudure

once Ample and convenient, and the pleafureand advantage of bathing may be enjoyed in fo private a manner, as to be confiftent with the ftridiefl: delicacy. Benjamin Beale, a Quaker, and inhabitant of this place, in the earliefltime of its improvement, was the inventor of

them

is

at

but, like other ingenious perlbns, his invention proved his own ruin, though numbers have fince acquired an affluent fupport from the ufe of them. Befides the benefit of fea-bathing at this place, j

there are,

if

warm

bathing

is

thought neceflary, dole

to the harbour, four I'alt-water baths,

on a very good

conftrudion, which may be filled in a few minutes, and the water brought to any degree of hear with the greateft facility.

On

the 2 1 ft of June, 1792, the firft ftone of a general Sea-bathing'infirmary, iituated in Weft Seabath Bay, and for which a very large fublcription had

been

raifed,

was laid by John Coakley Letfom, ‘ Y a

M, D. of

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

324. of London,

by the committees both of London and Margate, with much parade and ceremony. Near the Iquares above-mentioned is a theatre, eflablilhed by adt of parliament in 1786, at the expence of upwards of 4000I. and a public library with contiguous rooms, built in an elegant and magnift' cent

affifted

Itilc.’^

Margate at firlf, from this great increafe of inhabitants, was but ill fiipplied with provifions from the neighbouring country, which had not fufficient for the purpofe, and even what they did fupply was but very precarious; to obviate this, a grant of a public market was obtained in 1777, to be held weekly on a Wednefday and Saturday. This grant was made to Francis Cobb and John Baker, gents, wardens of the pier, and their fucceflbrs j to be holden in the town of Margate, for buying and felling of corn, grain, flour, fldh, filh, poultry, butter, eggs, fruit, vegetables,

and other

provifions, fo that

now

this place

is

exceedingly well fupplied ; and to add ftill further improvements to this town, an ad of parliament pafled in the year 1787, for the paving, lighting, and otherwife improving it, which has been lince carried into execution ; thirty-four refpedable parifliioners being appointed to fuperintend this very uieful and neccifary bufinefs. The application to parliament was, as well for rebuilding the pier of Margate, and for fupporting and maintaining it, as for widening, paving, repairing, cleanfing, lighting

and watching the

ftreets,

lanes,

highways, and public paffages in the town of Margate and pariOi of St. John the Baptift, in the Ifle of Thanet ; and for fettling the rates of porters, chairmen, carters, and carmen, within the faid town and for preventing encroachments, nuifances and annoy;

There was

good engraving of the infide of the library, from a drawing of Mil's Keate's, by Mr. Malton, of Conduitftreet, London. ances ^

a

ST. John’s,

Margate,

325 ances therein. And now the inhabitants of Margate thought their town of fufficientconiequence, to throw off the yoke of dependency on the town and port of Dover, and to exempt themfelves from the jurifdiction of it i for which purpofe they petitioned the cro\vn for a charter of incorporation, which was flrongly oppofed by the town and port of Dover j and on a hearing of the merits of the petition, in 1785, before the king’s attorney. general, though he agreed that the town ftood in need of a more regular police, yet he difapproved of the matter in queftion, and oblerved to them, if they perfiffed in their prefent mode, they had ftill the power of applying to parliament, and recommended to their attention certain propofitions previous to fuch application, their confideration,

and

fulting their friends, they

to be taken into

after their return

would

at their

and con-

own

time, ac-

quaint him with their determination j but this fo far difcouraged them from the further profecution of a charter, that all further intentions of it from that time fell to the ground. In Love lane, adjoining to the market, the Baptiffs have a meetingdioufe, to which there belongs in

fummer

a

numerous congregation j and

in the

middle

of Hawley-iquare, is a neat chapel, for the followers of the late Mr. Weffey. little above the old town northward, adjoining to the fea, is a fmall piece of ground, called the Fort, being formerly put to that ufe, and maintained at the pariffi charge ; there was a large deep ditch on the land fide of it next the town ; at its entrance towards the eaft was a ftrong gate, which was kept locked to

of the north

fide

A

preferve

the ordnance, arms, and ammunition

j

for

cannon, bought and repaired by the parifh ; here was likewife a watch-houfe ; a gunner was appointed by government, with a falary of here were

two

brafs

twenty pounds per annum, and a flag hoiffed upon

Y

2

occa-

C1NQU£ PORTS LIBERTY.

^26

occafion ; and there were fent hither from the tower, ten or twelve pieces of ordnance, with carriages. This was not only a great fafegiiard to the town, but a

means of prelcrving merchant fliips going round the North Foreland and the Downs, from the enemy’s privateers, which often lurk hereabouts, and being hidden behind the land, furprize Ihips failing that way. But this appointment of a gunner has been for fome time difcominued the gate at the entrance of the port has been taken away, and the ditch has been •,

converted into a fmall fquare of houfes. battery

is

now ereded on

mounted on

its

fcite,

A

(mall

and the guns

the improved conftrudion.

north eaftward of the new town, is built another hamlet of houfes, called ufually Hooper^s hill, on which there is a curious horizontal windmill, ereded by Capt. Hooper, for the purpofe of grinding corn, upon a very large fcale, and of luch

On

the oppofite

excellent

mechanifm

hill

as to render it

worthy the

infpec-

tion of the curious. There was a branch of trade, that of malting, which was formerly (o large, that there were about forty malting houfes in this parifli ; but this trade is now

almoft wholly gone to decay here, as it has been for feveral years throughout all the neighbouring country. The hanging and drying of herrings has formerly been of great ufe to the poor of this town, a great many of whom w'ere employed in the feafon, to wafli, But this trade would have fait, fpit, and hang them.

been

much more

beneficial to the place,

had thefe her-

by the inhabitants, for then there would have been more employment for the poor, many of whom had little to do, but in fpinning and twilling of twine to make nets with, and the knitting of nets, &c. But this fiQiery here has long fince gone fo much to decay, that thofe who depended on it were forced to fell their large boats, or let them run out ; after

rings been caught

which,

ST. John’s,

Margate.

327

which, thofe in which they tiflied were fo fmall, that they dared not go out far to lea in them, nor venture of late years out of the pier in a freQi gale of wind the affluence of the Itrangers reforting hither has diffufed a fpirit of emulation among the fifliermen, w'ho are now very numerous ; and have furnilhed themfelves with fubllantial vefflels and large boats, by which they not only fupply their own town,

but in their feafons carry confiderable quantities of fifh to London. The fifli generally caught here are fkaite, wraiths, fmall cod, haddock, turbot, whitings, foies, and other flat fiOi mackrel and herrings in their feafons ; lobfters, pungers, oyfters, and other fliell-fifli ; and llkewife eels, of which, as old ;

filhermen have aflerted, fuch plenty has been caught here formerly, that they uled to be meafured by the bufliel, but for thel'e many years paft they have been very fcarce j the reafon of this, perhaps, may be the great ufe that has been made for fome years of the fea woofe hereabouts, not only in taking up fuch of it as lay on is caftup by the fea to mix with the dung or

the land, but ftripping the rocks of it, to burn and make kelp, of which notice has been already taken before, by which the (belter and food of thefe fifli and others of the like nature, which lie near the (bore, were taken away ; of which there was a complaint made to the lord warden fo long ago as the 35^^^ that by the burning and taking up the Elizabeth annoyed fea-weed, the inhabitants of this ifland were in their fiOring; in their health, and greatly hindered was granted to in confequence of which, a warrant and Sandwich, the deputies of the mayors of Dover and burning the to forbid and reftrain the taking up any one w atfea-woofe within the Ifle of T hanet, by to have been refoever; but this warrant Teems not :

s'

See Lewis’s Hift. Thanet, p.

Y

4

i

34

feq.

'garded,

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

328

gaided, perhaps from an infufficie.ncy of the power of the lord warden 'to purfue the execution of it ; and the fame cuflom of taking it away at the free will of

who have

a right lo to do, has continued (and indeed there can be no reafon why it fhould not) to thole

the prefent time.

The

firlh

lord

Conyngham,

as lord

of Minder manor, brought an adion againft the inhabitants of the part of the ifland within that manor, for taking away this fea-woofe from the thore without his licence ; which claim was tried at the county affizes, but his lordfliip failed in the edablilhm^nt of it. Here is an eftablifhment of the cuftoms, under a furveyor, fearcher, and other inferior officers. Among the other improvements at this place, the fchools ought not to be forgotten ; there are two for

young ladies, and two

for

young gentlemen,

betides a

private feminary, lately eftabliflied

.

by a clergyman ; and a charity fchool has been not long ago indituted, for the education of forty boys and an equal number of girls, fupported by the voluntary fubfcriptions of the inhabitants, and much affilted by the liberal donations of the nobility and gentry, who refort hither in the dimmer. There are no fairs kept at Margate ; but at Northdown one is held on the 25th of July, being St. James’s day, to whom the north chancel of the church was dedicated ; and the feaft is kept in purfuance of the will of Ethelred Barrow, who appointed a give all- on that day for ever. From the expofed htuation of Margate to the north and ead, it has frequently fuffered by tempeds and

dorms, fetting in to the land from thofe quarters. The town and harbour of Margate are fituated fo diredly open to the'northern ocean, that a veficl taking her departure from thence and deering her courfe north half ead, would hit no land till (lie came on the coad of Greenland, in the lat. of 75° north, after having run 1380 miles. Great damage was done by dorms '



ST.

John’s,

Margate.

329

ftonns of wind, particularly in the years 1755, 1763, and 1767, to the Ihips within the pier, and to the houfes near the harbour, which from the force of the fea and its impetuofity werealmoft demolilhed. In the fummer of the year 1788, a female beaked whale came on thore at Margate; it was twenty-feveri feet in length, and in girt feventeen feet. Mr. Hunter, furgeon, of this place, in dilfefting the head of this fifh, difeovered four teeth juft penetrating the gums in the lower jaw, which led him to conjeclurc that it had fcarcely attained half its growth, and tliat

common

its

length might

be,

when

full

grown,

at

leaft fixty feet.

Between the hamlet of Garling

and the

were found in the year 1724, in digging a fea-gate, or way through the cliff into the fea, to fetch

lea, there

manure of the land, twenty-feven several instruments, lying all towhich makes gether, about two feet under ground

up

fea-oofe, or woofe,

for

the

;

it rather ftrange, that they were not before that time difeovered by the plough. They were of mixed brafs, 'or what is ulually called pot or bell metal, of feveral

but both Tides alike; the largeft of them feven inches one quarter long, and two inches three-quarters broad at the bottom ; the leffer ones, were five inches in length, and two inches and one-half in breadth at the bottom ; two of them had ringles on one fide about the middle,

fizes

and fomewhat

different

ftiapes,

which was the thickeft or deepeft part, rhefeinftraments are ufually called celts^ and have been found in great numbers in various parts of this ifland, as well Hercuas on the continent, as in Spain, France, and lanium, in Italy ; and our learned antiquaiies have differed

much

in opinion to w'hat ufes they were^

de-

though they feem to agree that iney are either Roman or Britifii ; moft probably the former. The them learned Montfaucon has deferibed that among figned,

with

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY. ringle, among the Roman tools

330

with a of building, and is of opinion that it was a chifel, with which they ufed to cut or hew ftones. Count Caylas, in his antiequities, obferves, that thefe indruments with and without rings are common in France, and are called Gallia Hatchets ; he is for referring them to domeftic ufe, as chifels with handles fitted into them perpendicularly j but obferves, that whether employed for domeflic ufe or military purpofes, they cannot be of

much

fervice for

want

of flrength.

Montfaucon likewife obferves, that the metal of which thefe inflruments are made, feems not hard enough for fuch work ; though the antients ufed fome kind of temper by which they made brafs as hard as iron j but, fays Mr. Lewis, in his Hiflory of Thanet, it was but viewing thefe tools, if fuch they were, found here, with fome attention, to be fatisfied that the metal of which they were made, though fomevvhat harder than common brafs, was not fo hard as iron, nor yet hard enough to hew any done that was not foft and ealy to be cut. Mr. Hearne, after feveral arguments to prove that they were not military weapons, agrees in the fame opinion, as does Dr. Borlafe, which is in fome meafure corroborated by there having been one found in Herculaneum and the latter thinks they were offenfive weapons originally, indeed of Britifh invention and fabric, but afterwards impioved and ufed by the provincial Romans, as well as Britons. Mr. Thorefby fuppofes them to have been the heads of fpears of the civilized Britons,* and Mr. Whitaker that they were the heads of light battle-axes ; and Mr. Gordon, in his Itinerary Septentrional, feems to have fancied them a kind of Roman fecuris, or axe. * ®

Count de Caylas Recueil d’antiqultes, vol. ii. p. 318. Letter to Mr. Hearne in the appendix to the firft volume of

Leland’s Itinerary.

Again

ST. John’s,

Margate.

331

Again it has been conjectured with lome probability, by a learned and ingenious gentleman, that tlicic Indruments were chilels ot the Romasi loldiers, with which they ufed to lharpen the ftakes, called Judes and valliy which were a part of their travelling baggage, Jarcina^ fince they ufed them in their daily encampments J and that as every foldier muft have had one or more of them, this might be the reafon why fo

many

of

them

are found,

at various periods in dif-

ferent places.

Dr. Stukeley, ever druidical, undertakes as ufual", to (hew that thefe brafs cart indruments, called celtSy w-ere Britifli, and belonging to the Druids j that they were fixed occafionally at the end of their ftaves to cut off the boughs of oak and mifletoe ; Laftly,

but that when not made

ufe of for thefe

purpo(es,

they put them into their pouches, or hung them to their girdles by a little ring or loop. See Mr. Lords obfervations on rW/r, printed in the Archseologia, vol. v. where there are four plates of kinds of celts, found in various places, and one of thefe found here in Lewis’s Hiftory of

different

Thanet. the beginning of the year 1791, as fome la bourers were digging to lay the foundation of three new houfes behind the charity-fehool in Margate, about two feet below the furface they found the re~ inteiied in giaves tnaius of fe^jevuL bodies^ which weie hewn out of the folid chalk, and lay in the diredion were more of north and fouth. None of the graves was found a than fix feet long. In one of the graves crowned, and on the coin, having on one fide a head attitude, havreverie the figure of a man in a running infeription not legiing a lance in his right hand, the of Probus. At the ble ; but was found to be a coin fcabbaid. there were found a fwoid and a

At

fame time

See Vegetius de re militari,

lib. i. c.

24,

lib. iii. c. 8.

both

.

-

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY, both much decayed. The bones were found 332

very en-

but on being expofed to the air foon crumbled into duft and another coin was picked up at the lame time in excellent prefervation, a coin of Maxi mianus, having his head, and round it imp. maxitire,

;

mi anus, of Jupiter

On the reverfe, the figure ftanding, having in his right hand the

p.

F.

AUG.

thunder bolt, and in his left a fpear, jovi conserVAT AUG. and underneath xxi r. a compliment to the 2 1 ft legion ; and not long afterwards there was found a coin, in good prefervation, of Helena, the firftwife of Conftantius ; on one fide her head, with this infcription, fl. Helena augusta, and on the other fide, reipublic^ securitas, round a female figure.

In 1792, as fome workmen were finking a cellar, in one of the graves adjoining to the above they found

a fmall Roman urn, which was filled with allies, but no bones or other remains were difcovered befide it. The manor of Minster claims over the greateft part of this parilh j the lands holding by certain rents of afllze, called Corn-gavill and Penny-gavill. The lands were antiently diftinguifhed by a large lynch, balk, or greenfwerd, part of which is ftill remaining, though not fo broad as it was formerly, and the other part has undergone the fate of other lynches hereabouts, being io entirely ploughed up, that there are no remains of it left. Notwithftanding which, the number of acres is ftill preferved in the books of the collectors of thefe rents of aflize, according to which it is ftill gathered, though much of the land is gone over the cliff into the fea. Subordinate to this manor, are the following places of note, fituated moftly in the fouthern, or inland part of this parifh, excepting that of Dandelion, which is in the north-weft extremity of it. The firft of thefe to be deferibed is

Sal

;

ST. John’s,

Salmestone,

Margate.

333

or S aim anji on grange or -parjonage^

being a manor, fituated about one quarter of a mile fouthward from the church. It was part of the antient poflelTions of the abbot and convent of St. Auguftine, to the facriftie of which monaftery it was appropriated. King Henry III. in his 9th year, anno 1224, granted to the abbot and convent the privilege of holding a fair within this manor. In the 2ifb year of king Edward 1 the king brought his claim againft the abbot for this manor, by writs of quo warranto and de re 5io, which was tried before J. de Berewick and his fociates, juftices itinerant at Canterbury that year; but the king relinquilhed his claim, and afterwards confirmed it to the abbot and convent, and their fuccelfors. In the 7th year of king Edward II. anno 1313, in the iter ofH. de Stanton and his fociates, juftices itinerant, the ab. hot was fummoned by quo warranto, to fliew why he claimed fundrv liberties therein mentioned in this manor, among others ; and the abbot pleaded the grants and confirmations of them, by divers of the king’s predeceflbrs, and that they had been allowed in the ufually called

.

of J. de Berewick and his fociates, juftices itinerant ; and he pleaded, that king Edward II. by his charter in his 6th year, had fully confirmed all of them to the abbot and convent. After which, the rolls of the laft iter of J.de Berewnck being infpected, it was found that all the liberties which the abbot then claimed by allowance of the faid iter were allowed in upon which every part of them was allowed. Afit laft iter

;

which, king Edward III. by his charter of infpeximuSf in hts 36th year, confirmed to this abbey all the manors and pofleffions given to it by former kings

ter

and by another charter, the feveral grams of liberties and confirmations made by his predeceflbrs, among which were thofe above-mentioned ; and Henry \ I. afterwards confirmed the fame. In

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

2^4-

In the year 1318,

anno i2 Edward

II. the

abbot

of St. Auguftine and his fervants, giving offence to the tenants of the manor of Minder, efpecially for taking diftreffes on them, the latter affembled together, and affiulting the court-lodges, or manfions of that manor and of Salmanffone, fet fire to the gates

of them ; during which the monks and their fervants here kept themfelves confined within the walls for fifteen days ; fo that the people without, not being able to encompafs their defign of firing the houfe, deftroyed the abbot’s hufbandry utenfils in the fields,

and all the trees in this manor, to effe6tually, that none have grown here ever fince ; but a method was found afterwards to punifli thefe rioters, or at lead the principal of them, who were fined in a large fum, and imprifoned at Canterbury till it was paid.' At the beginning of king Richard II.’s reign, Thomas Ickham, facridof the abbey of St. Augudine, among many other improvements made on the monadery, and other edates belonging to it, built a new hall at this manor, with chambers, at the cod of one hundred marcs at which time, according to the meafurement made of the lands of Salmandone, they amounted to eighty-nine acres of arable land ; and there belonged to it likewife, the tithes, great and fmall, of the paro;

chial chapel of St.

John Baptid, the

fmall tithes of

parochial chapel of St. Laurence, and of the paridi of Minder, exclufive of thofe given to the vicar ; and a portion of great tithes in every one of the three tlje

of which tithes, this edate was ufually called the re5iory, or grange of Sah man/ione. The facrld of the monadery for the time parifhes

;

from the

poffeffion

being, was ufed yearly at Salmedon, in the drd week of Lent, to didribute to twenty-four poor perfons of the ifland, and dwelling in the undermentioned parilhes ; of Minder fix, of St. John’s fix, of St. LauDec. Script,

col.

2034. See Minder before.

rence

;

ST.

John’s,

Margate.

33^

and of St. Peter fix, to each of them nine loaves and eighteen herrings and to diftribute yearly on Midlent Sunday to the faid poor perfons, or as many of the like in thofe parilhes, to the like number, and to twelve poor perfons, three the like charity of each of thofe parilhes, to each of them two yards of blanket ; and on Monday and Tuefday in every week from the feaft of the Invention of the Holy Crofs, to the feaft of the Nativity of St. John Baptift

rence

fix,

',

;

inclufive, during the faid term, to deliver to each

poor one dilh-full Salmefton, of peas perfon coming to the vicar yearly of St. pay clrefled i and to John’s buQiels corn, and of two the fame for the time being, and of St. Laurence Peter and to the vicars of St. ; Minfter for the of church time beto the vicar of the alfo and yearly, twelve Ihiling, ten Ihillings fterling monafiery, the of to be dilings yearly to the convent All Saints, of and to vided among them at the feaft horle meat, and for the find fufficient man’s meat Salmefton, at yearly on monks and fervants and horfes day after, and the feaft the feaft of St. Mildred, the pay to the fourth of St. Bartholomew, and to yearly to

prior of the monaftery thirty Ihillings; and yearly find and provide, and fend to the monaftery on the vigil

of

Sr.

Mildred, and

St.

Bartholomew the Apoftle,

handfomely caparifoned, for the ufe of the fourth prior of the monaftery. So long as the abbot and convent continued in polfeflion of this eftate, they kept it in their own hands, colledled the tithes and

two

horfes

ploughed the lands with the affiftance of lay-brethren the manfion-houfe ferved them for retirement and The chapel and infirmary the ufe of the grange. here are ftill entire, excepting that the windows are demolifhed. On the final diftblurion of the abbey of St. Auguftine, in the 30th year of king Henry VJH. this manor came to the crown, where the pofTeffion of it ftaid Elizabeth, when it was till the fecond year of queen granted

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

33^

granted for a term of years, to E. Thwayts, then lefTee of it, who was bound to yearly pay to the vicar of the churches of St. John, St. Peter, and St. Laurence, in Thaner, two buthels of corn, and to the vicar of Minfler ten Oullings, as he was before bound to pay ; and likewife all the charities and alms in like manner as before.'' And next year the queen having taken into' her hands feveral manors, lands, &c. parcel of the fee of Canterbury, by letters patent, that year granted to the archbithop and his fucceffors, feveral redtories, parfonages, and other premifes, in lieu of them, among which was the redfory of Salmeftone, late parcel of the potleffions of the late monaftery of St. Auguftine, valued at the annual fum of 3 81. los. o^d. with the reprife out of it, of eight pounds yearly, to the vicar of St. John in Thanet ; and of four pounds yearly to the vicar of Waltham. Anno 1558, being the laft year of Philip and Mary, the queen granted to the archbilliop the right of patronage of feveral redlories

and

vicarages,

among which was

that of Salmeflon

cum

Deane.® Since which this manor and grange has continued part of the pofleffions of the fee of Canterbury, the archbifhop being the prefent owner of The lefiee is ftill bound by his leafe to pay out of it. it all the above charities, the fame as were paid by the lefl'ee of it before the diffolution of the monaftery ; but thediQi of peas, covenanted to be given to every poor man coming to Salmeftone, is almoft grown ob-

which it is laid, is owing to the leflee’s taking advantage of the word difh in the leafe, which being an uncertain meafure, is given to the poor people in fo fmall a pittance, that it is not worth their while to go for them.^

folete,

^ ' ^

Inrolments, Augmentation-office. See Wilkins’s Councils, vol. iv. p. 177. See Lewis’s Hiftory of Thanet, p. 154.

It

Margate.

ST. John’s,

337

been for many years paft demifcd by the archbifliop, on a leafe for three lives, at the beforementioned yearly rent ; the earl of Guildford has at this time the interell of this leafe.® Dandelion is an eftate htuated in the north-weft extremity of this parilh, about half a mile from the fea-fhore. This was inantient times the feat of a family of this name, and who fpelc their name at firft, both Daundeleon and Damdelyonn^ aS appears by divers antient deeds, fome of which are without date, fome as high as king Edward I.’s reign. William Daundelynn, or Daundelyon, poflefled it in the 2d year of king Richard II. as appears by the regiftersof St. Auguftine’s monaftery ; his fucceffor was John Dandelyon, who refided here in the next reign of king Henry IV. whofe fucceftbr of the fame name died poflefled of this feat in 1445, anno 24 Henry VI. It has

and was buried in the north chancel of this church. He left an only daughter and heir, who marrying with Pettit, entitled him to the poffeffion of this feat, His defcendant John Pettit, (fon of Valentine) was an alderman of London, whofe fon Valentine refided here,

and

in his

defcendants,who bore for their arms.

Argent i on a chevron^ gules^ three bezants betzveen three quartered with lions heads erafed^ Jable^ crowned^ or ; thole of Daundelyon, viz. Sable, three lions rampant, betzveen two bars, dancette, argent,^ it continued down in 1661, to Capt. Henry Pettit, who died here and was buried with his anceftors in this church,

Thomas, John, and VaHenry, by lentine, by his firft wife, and Richard and ingavelkind to this his fecond wife, who became heirs

leaving furviving five fons,

eftate,

which afterwards,

divifionof

it,

in

became vefted

confequence fiom fuch in

feveral different pro-

Salmeflon, in the 45th a finall foiith-weft view of number of the Bibl. Topog. Brit, plate xii. p. 1 71; the Herald. ** There is a pedigree of this family of 1 ettit, in *

There

is

,

Viftn. CO.

Kent, anno 1619.

VOL. X.

u .

Z

u

.

CINQJJE PORTS LIBERTY. prietors, whofe refpe6tive heirs afterwards joined in the (ale of it to Henry Fox, lord Holland, who conveyed it to his fecond fon, the hon. Charles Janies Fox, and 'he pafled away his inierell in it to John 1 owell, elq. who dying without illue, his fifter, then the wife of William Roberts, efq. became his heir, and entitled to this eftate, and is the prefent polfef-

33^

'

for

of

it.

T his antient leat has for fome length of time been made uie of as a place of public refovt^ with a bowlinggreen and other accommodations for the purpole. It feems as it it had been antiently walled round very ftrongly, according to the manner of that age, for a defence againfl bows and arrows part of this wall is ;

Fill ftanding,

and top.

flints in

with the gate-houfe, built with bricks rows, with loop-holes and battlements at

Over the main gate are the arms of Daundelyon

above-mentioned ; on the right fide of this gate is a fmaller one for common ufe, at the right corner of which is a blank elcutcheon, and at the left corner a demi ItoHy Yanipanty with a label out of his mouth, on which is written, Daundelyonn. as

Under

^

the right fide of it, as you go out of the gate, was found in the year 1 703, a room large enough to hold eight or ten men, in which were many pieces of lacrymatory urns, of earth and glals under the ; other fide of it is a well prifon. In the window of the

dining-room

the manfion-houfe, are the arms of Daundelyonn, quartered with thofe of Pettit. in

The manor

of Dene, with the

eflate called

Hengravcyis fituated about a mile fouth-eaftward from Dandelion. Ihe manor of Dene was in the beginning of king Henry III.’s reign in the

poffeffion

of the family of Sandwich, to one of whom, Sir Henry de Sandwich, Robert, abbot of St. Auguflme, granted a licence to build an oratory at this manor, being within the bounds of the abbot and convent’s capital

manor

of Nlinfter, in

which the abbots exercifed an eccle-

V

ST. John’s,

Margate.

339

which he might caufe divine fervice to be celebrated by his own chaplain, in the prefence of himfelf, his heirs, and

tcclefiaftical as well as civil jurifdi6tion, in

The

fuccelTors.

ruins of this little chapel are

flill

to

an open field, by the great road leading from Margate to Minder, without any houfe or building near it. The foLith-wed wall is quite down. It was built of flints, rough cad-over. On the north fide are the remains of two rooms, which, as they have no communication with the chapel, might probably be the apartments of the officiating pried.‘ He was fucceeded in this manor by Sir Simon de Sandwich, who, as it appears, held it of Sir Stephen Heringod, for in the 4ad year of that reign, this Sir Stephen releafed to the church of St. Augudine, all the homage which Sir Simon and his heirs owed to him, on account of this manor, and which he held of him by knight’s fcrvice. After the death of Sir Simon de Sandwich, his heirs paired away the pofieffion of the manor of Dene, with a tenement jud by it, called Auftone^ to Roger de Leyborne whofe fon William de Leyborne died pofbe feen,

in a little valley, called

Chapel Bottom,

in

,

of it in the third year of king Edward II. leaving Juliana his grand daughter his heir, who being heir both to her father and grandfather, became en-

fefled

titled

to large pofieffions

in

this,

and

feveral other

from the greatnefs of which, (he was ufually Ifiled the Infanta of Kent ; (he was thrice married, the lad of her hufbands being William -de Clinton, afterwards created earl of Huntingdon ; and he, in her right, was pofl'elfed of this manor in the 20th year of king Edward III. He died podefled of it in the 28th year of that reign, upon which Juliana his widow, countefs of Huntingdon, who had ilfue by neither ol her hufbands, became again pofielfed of it in

counties

'

No.

A

;

north-well view rf the whole

45, plate

.\ii,

is

given in Bibl. Top. Brit.

p. 171.

z 2

her

;

y

CINQUE FORTS LIBERTY,

340

own right, and in the 36th year of that reign made a donation of this manor of Dene, with the te-

her

nement

called Auflone, to the abbot

and convent of

Auguftine ; on the condition, neverthelds, that the monks and their fucceflbrs, after her death, thould out of the profits of it for ever, celebrate yearly on St. Anne’s day, onefolemn mafs in the choir, as on a double feaft, and diftribute on the fame day to one hundred poor perfons, two hundred pence, that is, to every one of them two-pence ; and to their convent one fufficient pittance ; that on the day of her anni-

St.

verfary they fhould every year celebrate the obfequies

of the dead with a folemn mafs in the choir, and other things thereto appertaining, as on a double feflival; and on the fame day fliould diftribute to two hundred poor people, two hundred pence, and a pittance to the abbot ot the monaftery, the prior, and to every monk, and that the abbot and convent Ihould find a fecular chaplain, to celebrate for ever at the altar of St. Anne, in the monaftery, one mafs every day for the king, and for the fouls of his and her anceftors and for the fouls of Laurence de Haftings, and John his fon,

&c.

And

further, that all the

monks who

fhould have as above. In default of the performance of which, her heirs fiiould retain the rents and profits till fuch time as the abbot and convent fliould make full fatisfacftion for their defaults.^ This gift was confirmed by the king to the abbot and convent, by whom this manor was afterwards appropriated to the facrifty of it. At this time the abbot and convent were pofTefifed

were to celebrate

at this altar,

of an cftate at this place, called Hengrave, conftfting of two hundred and three acres, which it feems was then accounted a manor as appears by the compofition entered into in the year 1441, between the ^

Dec. Script. Thorn,

col,

2138. Lewis’s Thanet, col, p. 68,

No. xxxiv.

abbot

ST. John’s,

Margate.

341

abbot and convent and the tenants In which fitiiation the manor of Dene with Hengrave continued, till the diliblution of the monaftery in the 30th year of king Henry VlII.’s reign, when it came into the hands of the crown, where the fee of it continued till the reign of king James I. who foon after his acceffioii to the throne granted it to William Salter, who conveyed it to Manafl'er Norwood, of Dane-court and Norwood, in this ifland, and he died in 1636 ; from whom it paffed to his grandchild Alexander Norwood, who mortgaged it, with part of the demefnes of it, to feveral perlbns, (for feveral parts of them had been before fold and parcelled out to different purchafers).^ But this manor of Dene, with Hengrove, afterwards, though after feveral intermediate owners, became the property of Sir Henry Hawley, bart. of Leyborne,

who ftill continues the owner of it. Nash-court is an eftate lying about

a mile fouth-

ward from the church, which feems- antiently to have been part of the poffeffions of the priory of Chrifl* church, if we give credit to a date cut on a Hone in the wall of the manfion-houfc of it, which is 1108 ; and as a corroboration of it, in the window of the hall is painted the mitre and paftoral ftaff, ufed by the priors of Chrift-church, with the arms of that monaftery pendant by a firing on each fide, and the initial letters G. P. which I fuppofe to mean Gilling-

ham Prior, who fame window

died in 1376. In another part of the is painted W. a bird, and underneath

Cf)pcf) 0 l 0 I by which probably is intended William Chychele, who was archdeacon of Canterbury in 420. By all which it fliould feem that this eftate once belonged to that priory ; if fo, it was held of the prior and convent, by the family of Garwinton, of Bckefborne, for they were then in the poffeffion of it ; one 1

Lewis’s Thanet, p 153. Dane-court, in St. Peter’s. ‘

See more of the

Z

3

Norwoods under

of

^42

CIN
PORTS LIBERTY.

of whom, William Garwinton, dying /. p, Joane, his kinfwoman, married to Richard Haiit, was, anno ii Henry IV. found to be his next heir, and entitled to his intereft in this eftate ; and their fon Richard Haut, leaving an only daughter and heir Margery, Ihe carried it in marriage toWilliam Ifaac,efq. of Patrixborne, in

memory of which

alliance, the

windows

of this

man-

were fome years fince, in feveral panes of glafs, adorned with the arms of Haut and Ifaac, and near them the arms of archbilhop VVarham, impaled with thofe of his fee. The Ifaacs fcem to have continued to hold this eftate at the time of the diftblutionof the priory inking Henry VIll.’s reign; after which the fee of it appears to have been vt fted in the name of Lincolne ; from one of whom it pafled in queen Elizabeth’s reign, to William Norwood, who at his death in 1 605, left nine fons, who became his heirs in gavelkind, and fhared this eftate in equal parts. They joined in the fale of the whole of ic to Paul Cleybrooke, efq. who bore for his arms. Argent^ a crojspatee, gulesJ^ He refidcd here, and died poflefied ofit in 1622, whofe fecond fon William fucceeded to it, and wasof NaOi court, efq and at his death in 1638, fion in the great hall

devifed it, after his widow Sarah’s death," to his kinlinan Alexander Norwood, of St. Stephen’s, near Canterbury,® who leaving only two daughters his coheirs, they joined in the conveyance of it to David Turner,

yeoman, leftee of Salmeftone Grange, and I'.e fettled it on his fecond fon David, on his marriage with Cathedaughter of Stephen Netherfole, of Wimlingfwould, who died in 1710, leaving one fon Nctherfole Turner, who proved infane; after which it became rine, eldeft

Pedigree of Cleybrooke, Heraldic Viftn. co. Kent, i6ig. She afterwards remarried Mr. George Somner, llainat Wye bridge in 1648, and Jaftly, to Mr. James Newman. ° This account is taken in great part from Lewis’s Hiftory of Thanet, p. 150, and from Philipott,,p. 386 their accounts are greatly different, and it is hardly poffible to reconcile them. "

;

vefted

Margate.

ST. John’s,

veiled in his next heirs of the

343

name of Turner,

in

the

and perfons of the Rev. David Turner, of Fordwich, redor of Elmllone, and of Mr. David Turner, gent, the former of whom left two fillers his coof Margate,

he devifed his moiety of this eflate, Turner, and the viz. Sarah Smith, widow, and Mary Mrs. Smith, as fiirvi* furvivor of them for their lives

heirs, to

whom

;

syhofe devor, is now in pofleflion of this moiety, on will of Mr. ceafe the fee of this eftate will pafs by the

Turner above-mentioned, to her fon James Smith, and Ambrofe Collard, jun. heir of her late daughter Sarah, wife of Ambrofe Collard, fen. The latter Mr. David Turner, of Margate, deviled

Anne, moiety by will to his only daughter and heir afterwards remarried to late the wife of James Brown,, enMr. Jacob Sawkins, gent, who is now in her right his

titled to'it.

The

houfe was long

made ufe of as

r r a farm-houle, T

T

Jt

former times, a large building, after the faflaion of the enwith a Ipacious hall and butteries over againft is

trance into In the fhield

it.

^

^

windows of

this

of arms of four coats,

manfion

viz.

firfl.



is

j

u*

painted this

Sable ^ a chevi on^

crejcent on the beizveen three mullets pierced^ argent^ a lions paff chevron for difference ; fecond, Jrgent, two

engrailed, argent-, Jant, gules-, third. Azure, a Jaltier anoejcallops, gules fourth, Or, a fefs betzveen three two and one, or-, another, Azure, three lions rampant, -,

helmets, or, ther, Azure, a fefs, betzveen three efquires martlets, impaling Or, a Jaltier engrailed, between four gules, impaling Sable, fable-, and another. Or, a crofs, a bend and canton, or. been conBut within thefe few years paft it has

the adjoining verted into a florehoufc, granary, &c, for farm-houfe.P *

See a

Tour through

Z

the Ifle of Thanet,

4

&c.

CHARITIES.

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

344

CHARITIES.

Ethelred Ba R ROWE, by

1 ordered her execu5 1 3 a yearly give-all, while the world endured, viz. every year a quarter of malt and fixbufliels of wheat and vi«flual according thereto ; to maintain this, a purchaie was made of fifteen acres and an half, h ing at Northdown

tor

VVilliam

Curlyng

ju this parifli,

which

will in

,

to maintain

is

inverted in trurtees, and called by the

name of St. James’s land. This is one inrtance of the donations made to churches, for the more folemn celebration of the wake orfeart of the church’s dedication, or at leart of fotne chancel in it ; -thus in this parifli there ufed to be kept what the inhabitants called a fair, on St. John Baptirt’s day, the faint to which the church was dedicated ; but f fnppofe there being no fuch fair on St. James’s day, to whom the north chancel of this church is dedicated, or no provifion made for the celebration of it, the tertatrix Ethelred Barrowe, ordered her executor tc prdvide for

an annual this

ever on that day, which is Itill obferved in Northdowne, and by the country people called

feart for

parifli, at

Northdowne

fair ; only inftead of a give-all, or a common feart goers and comers, the corn and meat are by the feoffees dirtributed to poor houfe-keepers. She Hkewife ordered by her will, that what money was left of hers, after her legacies were paid, fliould be bertowed on repairing the chancel of St, James, in the- church of St. John. ^ i\nd here I fliall oblerve, that as it was then ufual in populous towns, to celebrate the anniv'erfaries of their churches dedica-

for

all

tion with an accuftomed fair, fo even iji the mort private pathefe yearly folemnities were obferved with feafting, and a great concourfe of people; fome poor remains of which are rtill riflies

continued in many of thepariOies in this ifland under the name of fairs, which Sir Henry Spelman fupposes was firrt occafioned by the reforting of people to fuch a particular place for folemnizing fome feftival, and elpecially the feart of the church’s dedication, or the wake ; and that therefore the word fair is derived from the Latin word feriee, or holyday. Thus in the next parifh of St. Peter are rtill kept two fairs, one on St. Peter’s day, the faint to which the church is dedicated ; the other on Lady-

day, to

whom

Lady of

Pity.

the north chancel

is

dedicated by the

name of our

Thomas Toddy,

by will in 1566, gave 30I. to purchafe fo land as could be bought for that money, which land was to be let out for rent to the mort value; and yearly, for ever-

much

P All thefe wills relating to this and the following charities, or extracts of devifes, are printed in Lewis’s Hift. of

themfo far as relates to the charitable Thanet, col. No. xxxvii et feq.

more.

ST. John’s,

Margate.

345

more, to be dlftributed, and given to the muft poor and needy Accordingly with this money were purthaied 13 of this parifh. acres of land, lying in this parifli at C.row'e-hill, which is invelied in truftees. parifli, by will in 1594, irtfl people of this papo gave of Winchefter billets, hundred two rifli, on Shrove Tiiefday. into bread at the place baked be and two bufliels of wheat, to

John Allen,

of Drapers, in this

for ever, to be diftributed to the

aforefaid.

Johnson

gave out of

his

^

farm at Garhnge, (fince

given to Bethlem hofpital, in London) 6s. 8d. paid yearly to the churchwardens, of which 6s. to be diflributed by them in time of Lent, to the pooreft of the parifli, and 8d. to be divided betwixt themfelves. 1626, gave to the poor ot throughout the y^ai, fixthis parifli everv Sunday or fabbath-day penny worth of good bread, to be diftributed by the diicietion

Hensy Sandford,

by

will in

of the churchwardens and overfeers. Francis Buller, efq. of Kingfton upon Thames, gave to of land, lying at this parifli feveral tenements and half an acie by the feoffees, out Church-hill, the rents of which to be laid in binding poor

boys apprentices to fome fea-faring employ-

ment.

Michael Yoakley,

born in

this parifli,

by

will in

1707,

endowed an hofpital^ or alms-houje^ the building of which was ^ place called Drapers, about threeere£fed in the year 1709’ Draper

called^ quarters of a mile from Margate, whence it is one of which is approhofpital', confifting of ten dwellings, poof nii.ii and priated for an overteer, and the others for luch parillies of St. four the of inhabitants or women as are natives have w’ere to who Achol and ; John, St. Peter, Birchington, garments, outward for grey warm gowns or coats of fliepherd’s the truftees , a weekly allowance at the dilcietion of s

and

firing,

and each have now and each a flip of only an allowance of coals, a yearly ftipeiid, the rearound for a garden. Thisinftitution being intended for idlenefs, the of encouragement the fief of indigence, not for

which

injuiuftion

is

altered

by the

truftees,

of fuch as founder has^in his will Ipecified the qualifications humble and meek, a of Ihould be admitted, induftrious, and not found being The ftipend given by the founder quiet fpirit. owing adequate to his charitable intentions as formerly, fo fully

provifions at this place, the late to the increafein the price of is too well rennembei-ed benevolence Georae Keate, efq. whofe who ufually vifited this here, to ftand in need of any encomium a fublcription promoted place every fummer for feveral years, was made addition amona the company, by ivhich a confiderable of tliefe poor people. to the^^comforts and conveniency

In

^

CINQ^IE PORTS LIBERTY.

34^

In the middle of the building is a meetlng-houfe for the people called Quakers, of udiicli perfuafioii the paupers were to be, though that is not now particularly required, fo that they otherwife anfwer the donor’s delcription. Over the middle doors in each front is placed a fquare white marble, wherein, according to the directions of the founder, is cut the following infcription, to which he refers in his will, as containing the conditions and qualifications of the poor perfons to be admitted into this alms-houfe. In much iceeknefs, the

With Not

fo

God of Might did hlejs^

increaje

f fore.

tnaintain pride nor idlenefs^

But

to relieve the

poor.

Such induftrious poor as truly fear the Lord.

r Meek Qf\ Humble and > L (fuiet fpirit J

M.

according

to

his vsord,

GLORY TO COD ALONE.

Y.

At a place called Frog-hill, are two fmall cottages belonging fo the parifli, built on the wafte of the manor of Dene, which was pur chafed of Alexander Norw’ood, efq. lord of it in the year 1641, by Chriftopher Frenchbourn,- who growing neceffitons, in 1662, fora yearly penfion paid to himfelf and his wife during their lives, fold this land, containing four perches and an half, to the churchwardens, &c. of this parifli. The donation of nine loaves and eighteen herrings to fix poor perfons yearly, on Midlent Sunday ; and of two yards of blanket to three poor perfons, all of this parifli, yearly, from Salmanflone Grange, has been already fully mentioned before, and is ftill continued.

Mrs. Sarah Petit,

reliCl of Capt. John Petit, of Dandegave 146I. towards the providing fome additional ornaments for this parifli church, which flie laid out in the addi^

lion, in 1720,

tion of two filver flaggons for the Communion, double gilt; double gilding the other plate; a crimfon velvet cloth for the Communion, trimmed with gold orras ; wainfcot rails round it with new' cufliions ; the floor matting, and a branch for the middle ifle. And by her new will in 1729, fliegave 7U. for the ceiling of the north and fouth ifles, and fo much of the three chancels as wfre not ceiled at that time.

This parish

is

risdiction of the Wellbere.

within the

ecclesiastical ju-

of CsntcrburVj Rnd

dctiuvy

of

The

ST. John’s,

Margate.

347

church, which is dedicated to St. John Rapt ill, ftands about half a mile from the lower part of Margate fouthward, on the knoll of the hill; it is a large building of flints, covered with rough-call:; the quoins,

The

Hone. It confifls of three ifles and three chancels, having a low fquare tower, with a fmall powted turret on it at the welt end of the north ifle, in which is a clock and fix bells.

windows and door

cafes of afhlar

The north chancel is dedicated to St. James. whole building of the church is low and of aconfiderable length, and fee ms to have been raifed at feveral times. The roofs of the north and fouth ifles and chancels are covered with lead j on that fide which is outermofl: on the north fide of the high or middle chancel, is a fquare building of hewn Hone with battlements, and a flat roof covered with lead, and the windows guarded with a double let of iron bars. This moll probably was intended and ufed formerly for the church treafury, or fafe repofitory of the plate and valuable

The

belonging to it. At the beginning of the lall century, being then of no kind of ufe, it was employed

reli6ls

gunpowder, fliot, &c. for the ufe of the fort, and was repaired by the deputies ; but in 1701 it was fitted up and has fince been made ufe of as a veflry. The tower was fomewhac too fmall for the former ring of bells which were in it, confifling of fix very tuneable ones ; they were by much the largell

as a flore-houfe for

of any hereabouts, the other parilhes having before leffened theirs by calling their old bells anew. A partition divided the weft end of the fouth ifle from the body of the church, which was made ufe of fora fchool-houfe. the end of the fouth ifle is the font, of Hone, odagonal, on the feveral fides are the arms of the Cinque Ports and England quartered with France. In the mid-

At

was a tombftone, without any infeription, having intermixed, a crofs on it, and the Greek X. (for which lignifies its being for one of the prieftly order ; perhaps this might be themonumentofSt. Imarus, w'ho was a dle

ifle

monk

;

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

34^

monk of Reculver,

and

faid

is

by Leland,

col. vol. iv.

have been buried in this church. Among ocher memorials in this church are the following In the middle to

:

chancel a ftone, vicar, obt. prieft,

with brafs elEgies, for I'ho. Smyth,

On

1433.

a brafs plate, the effigies

and inlcription for

hfty-five

Thomas

of a

Cardiffe, vicar for

years,

obt. 1515, which is engraved in Lewis’s Hiftory of Thanet. memorial on brafs for Nicholas Chewney, S. T. P. twenty years pallor of this church, obt. 1685. Several brafs plates and

A

infcriprions

for the

chancel, cove red

Norwoods, one

now by

in

the

middle

the matting and feats, for

Tho-

1604. A memorial for John Ccppin, efq. fon of William, born 1607, commander of feveral of the king’s Ihips, who in two actions with the Dutch received feveral wounds, one of which proved mortal, and he died two days afterwards, 1666 arms, Party per pale, three Jpoarz heads, couped. In

mas Cleve,

gent.

obt.

the fouth chancel, a plain mural monument for Henry Crifp, fecond fon of John Crifp, of Cleave, the

of John Crifp, efq. of C^ekes, and elder brother of Sir Henry Crifp j arms at the top. Or, on a chevron, fable, jive horfe (hoes, or, quartering Denne, argent, two leopards heads, or, on two JlaJques, fable. On a Ihield below in a lozenge, fable, on a bend ingr ailed, cldeft fon

gules, a crejcent, argent, for difference. nument are the effigies, kneeling, of

On a

mural moPaul Cleybrooke, efq. of Nalh-court, in this parilh, and Mary his wife, daughter of Richard Knatchbull, efq. of Merfham,and an inlcription to their memories.'^ He died 1622; arms, Urgent, a

crofs patee, gules,

the fouth chancel

is

impaling Knatchbull.

In

a Hone, on which are in brafs -re-

maining the arms of Cleybrooke, with the crell, a demi of rich, argent. On the north fide of the chancel hangs Paul Cleybrooke’s helmet, with the crell,

&c. On an altar tomb underneath, a memorial for William Cleybrooke, efq. of Naffi- court, ob. 1638. ^

^

See a

Tour through

the Ifle of Thanet, &c.

An

ST. John’s,

An

Margate.

349

on a brafs plate for Nicholas Cantcys, obt. 1431, A memorial for George Somner, gent, of Canterbury, who being commander of a detachment of horfe was flain in the confli6t at Wye, obt. 1648 ; arms. Ermine^ tzvo chevrons^ voided, impaling ertnine, a crofs ; underneath are two lines cut out with infcriptlon

and

effigies

a chifel, by order, as it is faid, of the rulers then in power. In the north chancel, an infeription on a brafs plate,

and the

armour of John Daundelyon, arms torn off. Several monu-

effigies in

gent. obt. 1445, the ments and graveftones for the family of Petit, of Dandelyon, in this pariffi; arms. Petit, argent, on a chevron,

between three lions heads, erafed, fable, crowned, or, three bezants, quartered with Dandelyon,Jable, three In lions rampant, between two bars, dancette, argent.

gules,

on brafs plates, inferiptions, among others, for Richard Notfield, obt. 1416; for Luke Spraklyn, gent, and Mary his wife, he died in 1591. In this chutrh likewile are the following monuments and gravdlones a handfome m.ural monument for William Payne, efq. of this pariffi, defeended from the Paynes, of Shottenden ; he died 1717; arms, fix coats, the fii ft of which is for Payne, Per Jallier, arNear dent and fable, a lion rampant, countercharged. Brooke, merIt a neat mural monument for Robert chant, and Sarah his wife, daughter of Gilbert Knowler, efq. of Herne ; he died 1767 \ ffie died 1731 ; arms, Gules, on a chevron, argent, a lion rampant, fable. Within the altar rails is a vault for the family of Brooke. the middle

ifle

:

A memorial for the

Rev. John Jacob, vicar of this paMemorials for Anne, wife of Dudley riffi, obt. 1763. Diggs, obt. 1720; for John Forbes, M. D. ob. 1780; Parry, efq. for William Fox Parry,efq. fon of William vice-admiral of the red, obt. 1776. A memorial ffiewDame Elizaino- that under the right hand pews lies beth Rich, relitff of the late Sir Robert Rich, bart. ob. place. J788, wife of James Walker, m. c. of this ‘

Memo-

,

^

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY. Memorials for John Leapidge, efq. of Eaft Ham,

35^

j

in

^

1780; arms. Argent on a ch evrony fable three cinquefoils of the firjiy between three holly leaves, EiTex, obt.

proper’, for

J

^

George Meard,

efq.

obr. 1761.

/

It is re-

J

markable, that though this graveftone is but four feet by two, there is lool. by his will, vefted in the 3 per

^

keep

Memorials Gertrude Agar, obt. 1780. Memorials cents, to

it

in repair.

for the

Edward Diggs,

obt. 1689.

Flon.

for feveral

|

of

if

Amemo^

I

obt. 1726, and Sufanna his wife,

v

the Turners, of Nafli-court, in thisparifh. rial for

»

Memorials

for

Dudley Diggs, gent. obt. obt. 1689. Another for

1716, and Mary his wife, John Glover, gent, who died

London

t r



1685. gent. obt. 1671, and Mary his wife, obt. 1691, and for Peter Tomlin, obt. 1700; arms, On a fefs, three right hands couped at the wriji, beti^een three battle axes, impaling battle axes. In the church-yard, among many other tombs and memorials, is a plain brick tomb for Tho. Stevens, efq. he died in 1790, being the only fon of Philip Stephens, efq. fecretary of the admiralty, who was killed in a duel near this place, by one Anderfon, an attorney, of London, at the fecond difeharge of the pif-

One

for

at

in

*

Humphry Pudner,

On

'*

;

;



,

i

^

\

handfome monument encompafied with iron rails, are inferiptions for the Tomlins and Lefters, and for the Brookes, all related by intermarriages on tols.

a

,

:

;

a large tomb, arms, Lozengy, on a chief, a lion pajjant, guardant, and memorials for the Bakers and Cowells;

on a tomb fenced in with iron rails, thefe arms. Parted per pale andfefs, in the firfi quarter, a lion rampant ; and a memorial for the Bings and Sollys. Another tomb and memorial for Alexander Alexander, LL, D. (mafter of the academy at Hampited, and a perfon of confiderable literary abilities) obt. 1788. Another fuch tomb and memorial for the Trowards. An elegant tomb and memorial for Stephen Sackett, obt. 1786, and for feveral of the Cobbs. A. memorial for Mrs. Jane Wallis,

.

( ’ -





ST. John’s,

Margate.

3^1

Wallis, obt. 1745, daughter of Dudley Diggs, gent, and Anne his wife, and wife of Henry VVallis, furgeon, who died 1734. memorial on the fouth fide of the church, for Edward Diggs, mariner, obt. 1791. On

A

a tomb-ftone, at the north fide of the church, are feveral memorials for the Gurneys, of Shottenden arms. ;

Paly of JtXj parted per fefs, counter changed, impaling a Jaltier, engrailed.

On

a plain graveftone, a

memorial

John Pcrronet, of Shoreham, in Kent, obt. 1767 and for the Colemans. Before the reformation, bcfides

for

;

end of the middle chancel, there were altars in this church dedicatee! to St. George, St. John and St. Anne, and very probably otiiers lor other particular faints ; on or over them, in niches, ftood the images of the feveral faints, before which were burnt wax tapers, to the maintenance of which, people ufed to contribute when alive and leave legacies at their deaths. Adjoining to the church-yard on the fouth' fide, flood antiently two houfes, called the waxhoufes, in which were made the wax lights ufed in the church at procefiions, &c. Thefe were burnt down in 1641 ; fince which a leafe of the ground has been demifed by the churchwardens to build upon. This church was one of the three chapels belonging to the church of Minfter in this ifiand, and very probably was firft begun to be built as early as the year 1050, and was made parochial fometime after the year 1200, when the church of Minfter, with its appendages, was appropriated, in the year 1 128, to the monaftery of St. Auguftine, and was at the lame time alfigned, with the chapels of St. John, St. Peter, and St. Laurence, with all rents, tithes, and other things belonging to them, to the facrifty of that monaftcry ; and it was further granted, that the abbot and convent the high altar at the

eaft

fhould prefent to the archbifliop, in the above-mentioned chapels, fit perpetual chaplains to the altarages of them, to the amount of the value of ten marcs j befides

which, they were to retain the manfes and glebes belonging

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTy.

^^2

but that the vicar of the mother -1 belonging to them receive, in right of jl church of LMinfter fhoukl take and of fmall tithes, viz. of lambs his vicarage, the tenths from marriages and pigs, and the obventions arifing ;

chapels, the inhabiand cliurching forbidden at thefe their priefts, were accuftants of which, preceded by procefTion to tomed to go, with much ceremony, in their parochial Minfter, in token of their fubjeaion to

mother

J J J I

'I

church.*^

of Canterbury, In i375> Simon Sudbury, archbifhop augmentation of granted a cornmiflion, in a caufe of After this, the appropriation of the vicarage.

I '

this

appendant chapels, and the advowlonsof the vicarages of them, continued with diffolution of the monafthe abbot and convent till the king Henry VIII. when they tery in the 30 th year of of the poflefwere furrendered, together with the reft

church of Minfter, with

its

king’s hands. fions of the monaftery, into the After the dilTolution of the monaftery, and the

by

enjoyed in right of of thofe emoluments he had before great and fmall tithes of this his vicarage ; for all the mentioned before, appropriparifli were, as has been this parifli, formerly beated to Salmeftone Grange, in fo that the endowlonfyino- to the abbot and convent j ment of this vicarage, at that time, confifted of a payment of two bufhels of wheat, to be paid yearly at Midfummer, and a penfion ofeightpounds to be yearly befides which, he had a vicapaid out of that grange raf^e-houfe, with a dove-houfc and garden, containing ;

Dec. Script. Thorn,

col. i960,

chapels of the prelentation to thefe

j *

change

parochial chapel of St. broutjht by ihe reformation, this from the moJohn° Baptift became entirely feparated vicar of this parifh having ther church of Minfter, the whatever ; but no further fubjeftion to it in any fhape deprived of feveral this fame change he was likewife

‘i

j

See a full account 2002. and the rights and dues of

them, under Minfter before.

an

>

ST. john’sj

Margate.

353

an acre and three roods j and eight parcels of glebct containing together about fourteen acres. The advowfon of this vicarage, as well as the great and fmall tithes of this parilli, as part of Salmeftone grange, being thus verted in the crown, application wa * made to jdng Edward VI. for Tome augmentation t^ it, which feems to have been granted, though thekinS died before his intentions towards the doing of it wer^ completed j however, this was very foon afterward^ done by his fucceflbr queen Mary, who by her letters patent, in her firft year, granted to Thomas Hewett* clerk, vicar of this parirti, in augmentation of his maintenance, all manner of tithes of lambs, wool, pigs, geefe, flax, wax and honey, and other fmall tithes whatfoever, yearly, arifing, growing, and being in and throughout the whole borough of Margate within this parifh ; and all oblations arifing on the four principal days and feafts yearly within this parifh ; and all tithes, perlbnal and pafchal, from all the parifhioners within it, yearly increafing and arifing, to take and enjoy all the aforefaid tithes and oblations, and premifes to him and his fucceflbrs for ever j to hold in pure and perpetual alms, in lieu of all fervices and demands, without any account whatfoever from thenceforward.' This vicarage is valued in the king’s books at eight pounds. In 1588 here were communicants five hundred, and it was valued at fifty pounds. In 1640 here were the like number of communicants, and it was valued at eighty- five pounds. In 1709 this vicarage was returned to be of the clear yearly value of 49I. 12s. 6d. It is now a difeharged living, of the fame clear yearly value as above-mentioned.

The advowfon

of this vicarage

coming

into

the hands of the crown on the diflblution of the abbey of St. Auguftine, continued there till Edward VI. in See col.

this

inftniment printed in

Lewis’s Iliftory of Thanet,

No. XXXV.

VOL. X.

A

a

his



CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

354

ad\owfon of the vicarage of Minfter, with the three chapels appendant to it, one of which was this church of St. John Baptift, among other premifes, to the archbifhop fince which this advowfon

his

firfl:

year, granted the

;

has continued a part of the poiTefllons of that fee, the

of it.

archbifliop being the prefent patron

In 1640 and in 1709, the vicarage-houfe was enlarged by the addition of fome new rooms. In the par-

window was painted a fliield of arms, being Manwood, impaling Coppingcr lour

CHURCH OF

ST.

JOHH

BAPTIST.

PATRONS, Or by whom ^irefented.

VICARS. Thomas

Ihe Crown, fede vac

S/evens,

Sept. 18, 1662.®

S.

T. B. adm. obt. Dec.

1660,

yohn Overyng, admitted Sept. 4,

The Archbifhop.

1662, obt. 1665. Nicholas

(..hevoney,

S.

mitted April 24, 1685.

T.

P. ad-

1665, obt.

A. M. admitted December 9, 1685, refigned

albeit

Innys,

1692.“ George Stevens,

September

A M.

admitted refignpd 1692, 3,

1697." John Johnfon, A. figned

* He had been vicar of the neighbouring church of St. Peter, and was buried in this church on January 2,

1661. t He had been vicar of St. Nicholas at Wade, from whence he was «je£led or forced to icmove fome time after 1654. He was a learned man, and

wrote fcveral books.

He

lies

buried

in this church. u Hewas vicar of ChilHet,

and was encouraged to take this vicarage by the principal inhabitants of this parilb, who obliged ihemfelves to pay

1

M.

1697, re-

703.’'

him yearly an augmentation of 40b In 1692 he refigned this vicarage for thecuracy'of Maidftone.

w j^is fucctflbr has given him this charafter in the patifh regifter. Opsimu% ct doii\(fivwi Scotui. In 1697 he refigned this vicarage for that of Shriviugham,in Buckinghamlhire. After his refignation, this vicarage was for fome years held by fet^ueftration, aim ferved by curates. * Afterwards vicar of Aplcdore and of Cranbrooke. Sec Cianbrooke. His life is in

Blog. Btit. vol.

vii. p. 3.

PATRONS,

ST. John’s,

PATRONS,

MARGATE.

355

VICARS.

(jfc.

Tiie Archbijhop

John

W^arrettf

A. M,

705 ^ yohn Lenvls, A. figned

1

703»

1

M.

17^5*

)an. 16, 1747.“

yacob

Omer, Feb.

i

747 » 1749 yohn yacob A. M. 175 $, obt. Dec. 21, 763.* William Harrifon, A. B. June I

16, 1764, the prefent vicar. Hiftory of the Ihand of Thanel, and of fevcralother books. See his life in Biog Brit, vol, v. p. 2927. a And vicar of Tilmanftone. He lies buried in this church ; he died xt.

7 L!ke*ifc reSor of TrottefcHve, Jn the diocefe of Rochefter, and was afterwards a prebendary of Exeter.

* Ltkewife vicar of Minfter and reflor of Acrife, and mafler of Ea(lbridge hofpital. He was author of the

6i.

PETER’S

ST.

from St. John’s, being To called from the dedication of the church of it to St. Peter. This parifh is within liberty and jurifdiBion of the cinque ports, and is an antient member of the town and port of Dover, and though

LIES

the

next

p^rifh

fouth-eaftvvard

ever fince king Edward I.’s reign, yet fo late as in that of king Henry Vl. it became a difpute, whether this pariOi was not in the county at large ; to take away therefore all doubt of it, that king, by hiS united to

it

which place, in like manner as St. John’s above-mentioned, it is fubfe6l in all matters of civil jurifdidion. The mayor of Dover here too appoints one of the inhabitants to be his deputy, who is chofen either yearly, or once in two or three years, at the mayor’s pleafure i and to the charges of the felTions formerly held at Margate, this letters patent, united

it

to Dover,- to

parilh and Birchington ufed to contribute their pro-

portion.

A

a

1

The

;

ClNtiUE PORTS LIBERTY.

35^

The

parish of St. Peter

and healthy a fitiiation as any in this ifland, the lands open and uninclofed, the foil a dry chalk, with frequent hill and dale interfperfed throughout it. At Sowell hill, in the northern part of the parifh, the land is reckoned to be the higheft in the ifland. The village ftands on apleafing eminence, furrounded with trees, which is rather uncommon in thefe parts, having the church on the north-vvefl: fide of it; at a little diftance fouthward from which, is a fmall neat chapel, built by the fe6t of Methodifts.

is

as pleafant

Several genteel families refide in this village,

about the middle of the parifli, which is about two miles and a half acrofs each way, and is bounded by the high chalk cliffs on the fea fhore towards the north andeafl. It feems formerly to have been more populous than it is at prefent, for there were in the year 1563, as appeared by archbifhop Parker’s return to the orders of the privy council, one hundred and fituated

eighty-fix houfholds within this parifh. Befides the village above mentioned, there are feveral other fmall

hamlets and houfes interfperfed throughout if, viz. towards the fouth, Upton, Brompflon, which is now the joint property of Henry Jelfard, efq. and Mr. John Grey ; Dumpton, great part of which extends into St. Laurence, it belongs to the earl of Hardwick and Norwood. On the north-weft fide of the parifli is Sacket’s-hill, fo called from its being the eftate of an antient yeomanry family of this name, feveral of whom lie buried in this church, one of whom, John Sackett, as appears by his will, refided here and died pofleffed of his eftate in this parifh in 1444; on it there has been lately built a handfbme houfe by Mr. King, for his fummer refidence,whofe children arc now pofleffed of it. In the northern part of the parifli is the hamlet of Reading-ftreet, fouthward of which is a fmall forIn the eaftern part of the ftall, and then Sowell-ftreet.

Hackendon downe, banks, where feveral antiquities have been dug up,

parifh, clofe to the

cliffs,

is

or as

357

5T. Peter’s.

and the hamlet Pawlyns, and of Stone, formerly the refidence of the Sir Charles then of the Huggets, where a few years ago his fumbart. builta fmall pleafant feat for

will

be further mentioned hereafter

Raymond, mer refidence

;

the prelent ftood owner of it. Not far from hence there formerly the country a beacon, which iifed to be fired to alarm fome remains in cafe of an invafion ; a few years fince of the timber of it was dug up on the top of the Beathan the con-hill, about fifty- five rods nearer to Stone ;

Sir

Harry Harper,

bart.

is

prefent light-houfe. About a mile and an half north-eallvvard from the is a point church, at the extremity of the chalk cliff, (fuppofcd by of land called the North Foreland, to difmoll to be the Cantium of Ptolemy) fo called Deal and tinguifiiitfrom the other Foreland, betwixt is a proufually called the South Foreland ; it

Dover, into the montory, or cape of land, that reaches further mofl: of the land fea, and is fomewhat higher than

a houfe, hereabouts. On the top of it was formerly with a large built of timber, lath, and plaifter work, which a light was glafs lanthorn on the top of it, in courfe, that kept to direct fliips in the night in their Sands, which they might keep clear of the Goodwin

and on which fhips are apt to ftrike endeavourbefore they are aware, on account of their extends fb far into ing to keep clear of this land, which accident burnt the fea. This houfe being by fome down in 1683, there was for fome time a fort of beabut hoifted con made ufe of, on which a light was lie

off this point,

j

there was built about the latter end of the laft century odtagon, on the top here a ftrong houfe of flint, an

open to the air, in of which was an iron grate, quite which was made a blazing fire of coals. But about the covered with year 1 73 "ij the top of this light-houle was and the fire a fort of lanthorn, with large fafh lights, which the was kept burning by the help of bellows, invention was light-men kept blowing all night. This

A

a 3

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

35 ^

to fave coals, but the Tailors complained of

very

much

to

it,

as

the prejudice of the navigation,

being

many

on the Goodwin Sands for want of and indeed it was fo little feen at Tea, that

vefTels being loft

feeing

it,

fome of the Tailors aflerted, they had in hazy weather feen the Foreland before they faw the light ; whereas, before the lanthorn was placed here, when the fire was kept in the open air, as the wind kept the coals conftantly a-

was feen in the air far above the light-hoiife ; complaint being made of this, the governors of Greenwich hofpital ordered Sir JohnThomfon to view it, who ordered the lanthorn to be taken away, and the light* houfe to be made nearly the fame as it was before, the light to continue burning all night and till day-light j fince which, a few years ago, it was again repaired, and two ftories of brick were raifed on the former building. The height of it at prcfent, including the fmall room in which the lights are kept, is fome what more than one hundred feet j this room, which may be perhaps beft defcribed as a dome raifed on a decagon, is about ten feet in diameter, and twelve feet tigh ; it is coated with copper, as is the gallery round it, to prevent fires. From the gallery there is a very extenfive view, of which a conception may be formed from thefe lights being vifible in clear weather at the Note, which is ten leagues diftant j in each of the Tides of the decagon, towards the Tea, is a patent lamp,^ kept burning all night, with a refiedtor and magnifier, the latter being very large. The whole building is white-wafhed, except the light room on the top ; and all the rooms in it are ufed by the man and his family, who take care of it.'’ I'o the repair and mainte light,

the blaze of

it

A print of this light-houfe, as in 1736, is inferted in Lewis’s Thanet, p. 166 ; and as it is at prefent in Gent. Mag. for 793, In the 3d year of queen Anne a licence and authority p. 1167. was granted to Rob. Olbolafton, of holding, erecting, changing and renewing the light houfesand lights upon the North and South i

Forelands, for

1

7 years, at the rent

of 20I. Orig. 3

Anne,

rot. 29.

nance

ST.

Peter’s.

359

'

belonging to nance of this llght-houfe, every fhip is obliged Great Britain, which fails by this Foreland, and every foreigner to pay two-pence for each ton of the g^ernors four-pence. It is under the direftion ;

vefted. There is of Greenwich hofpital, in whom it is Foreland and Stonea fignal houfc between the North eftablifhment of it is a hoLifc, ereded in 1795^ ^he and two men. lieutenant and midfhipman of the navy, year, one Here were two fairs formerly kept every orli^er on on June 29, being St. Peter’s day and the fcveral March 25, being Lady-day; but they have foi of July, and the years paft been changed to the loth ;

5th of April.

paramount over the of Minjler claims landholders liolding o preateft part of this parilh ; the Subordinate rent called Pennygavel. it, by a certain ' to this manor is that of

The manor

Dane-court,

fituated

in a

valley, at a fmall

Peter. tance weftw'ard from the church of St.

It

ciil-

was

s Icat in once accounted a manor, and was a gentleman furname to a very early times, giving both Icat and their coat aimour, family of this name, who bore for \\st.cujlom of gavelGules, four fleurs de Its, or. But two branches, kind having divided this ellate between and heir Margaone of them leaving an only daughter about the end of king ret, married to John Exeter

Henry

IV.’s reign,

widow, held

this

flie

in her

manor

own

right,

at her death, in

being then a the 4th year

appears by the efeheat of king Henry VI.’s reign, as which the fee ofit Ixicame rolls of that year; after who died pofldlcdo vefted in Nicholas Underdowne, Richard II. as appears by his will it in 14S4, anno 2 his wife, two Ions, proved that year, leaving by Dionile of whomnedeNicholas and Richard; to the former one of his uelcenvifed this manor, which at length pafied away by falc dants in king Henry VIlI.’s reign, rcfided here, as to Richard Norwood, who afterwards their arms, Ermme, did his defeendants, who bore for

1

3^0 a

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY.

engrailed, gules, in the firft quarter, a wolfs head, erafed of the Jecond,^ down to Richard Norwood, crofs

gent, of Dane-court,

who

pofTefTed it about the beginning of king Charles 1 ’s reign, and he devifed it to his lecond ion Paul Norwood, who about the year .

1666

alienated

it

to

Richard Smith

but he dying unto his nephew Robert, (only fon of his only brother Robert) Smith, who pa/led It away by lale in 1686, to John Baker; and he afterwards alienated it to Robert Hammond, who fold married,

it

it

;

came by deicent

to his brother

Thomas Hammond, of Deal, and

left ieveral fons, the furvivors of

he

whom

feem afterwards to have become his heirs in gavelkind, and they joined in the conveyance of it to Peter Bridger, who left two daughters his coheirs, upon a partition of whofe inheritance, this eftate of Dane-court was allotted to Sarah the eldeft daughter, to be holden in Icveralty in lieu of her undivided moiety of her father’s whole eftate,

and m.yrying Gabriel Neve, attorney-at-law, he enjoyed it in her right, and afterwards fold it to Mr. Richard Sacket, of Eaft Northdowne, who by his

Ae

will

devifed

grand daughter Sarah, the wife of Robert Tomlin, who is the prelent pofteftbr of it. it

to his

Caleys Grange, commonly an

called Callis court,

is

eftate in this parilh,

which was part of the antient pofteflions of the abbot and convent of St. Auguftine, and was by them appropriated to the ufe of their facrifty. T, his eftate, which confifted of fifty-nine acres, and two thirds of the great tithes of this parifh, continued in the pofleftlon of the monaftery, till the final

diftoliition of

reign,

when

it

it,

in

came

the goth year of Plenry VIII.’s into the king’s hands, where it did

not remain long, for the king in his 33d year fettled this eftate by his donation charter, among other premifes, on his new-founded dean and chapter of Chrift-

There is a pedigree of CO. Kent, anno 1619. '

this family

in

the Vifitation of the

church.

ST. Peter’s.

361

church, in Canterbury, where the inheritance of it remains at this time. On the clean and chapter’s becoming poflefl'ed ot this eftate, they demifed it on a beneficial leafe for three lives, which demifc they afterwards changed into a term for twenty-one years. The mayor and commonalty of the city of Canterbury are the prefentleflees of this eftate, in truft, for certain charitable

ufes bequeathed by

mer

Mrs. Elizabeth Lovejoy,

the for-

of it. Mrs. Elizabeth Lovejoy, widow of the Rev. Geo. Lovejoy, mafter of the king’s fchool, in Canterbury, by her will proved in 1694, gave the term of years, of leftee

was pofiefled by leafe from the dean and chapter of Canterbury of certain tithes at Callis grange, in St. Peter’s parifh, to the mayor and commonalty of the city of Canterbury, in truft, after feveral fpecial reftriftions therein mentioned, to repair the chancel of the church ot St. Peter, and her hufband’s and her monument in itj to pay the clerk twenty fliillings yearly j to pay the vicar of this parifh forty pounds per annum, clear of all deduftions ; to pay a fchoolmafter twenty pounds clear yearly fum, to teach twenty poor children of this parifh to read, write, and caft accounts; and if fuch be wanting, the number to be made up from the parilE of St. John ; to pay certain yearly fums to the feveral hofpitals of Jefus, Kings-bridge, Cogan,PIarbledowne, andManwood, in and near Canterbury. The overplus of the clear remaining profits to be difpofed of by them in pious and cliaritable ufes, as is therein mentioned, according as they in their dilcretion fhould think fit.** On a return made in 1649, In the year this eftate was valued at 203I. 6s. 8d. 1777, the rack rent of this eftate was 450I. In 1790, it was 630I. per annum. It confifts of a glebe of thirty-nine acres of land, with the tithes of 1670 acres,

which

file

in this parifh.

of

Mr. John Gibbon

is

the prefent leftee

it.

^

See Lewis’s Hift. Thanet, p. 97,

No.

xlviii.

Besides

;

,

CINQilE PORTS LIBERTY.

362

Besides the hamlets before-mentionedy there are two larger villes in this parifh, viz. Kings-gate and Broador Bradjiow ; the former of which,

King’s-gate,

is

fitnated

in a little valley, clofc to

the northern Ihore of the fea, leading to which there is a breach in the cliff made for the convenicncy of the

hlhery in king Charles

and formerly called by the inhabitants Bartholomew’s-gate, from a tradition that it was finiHied upon the fdlival of that faint. It is now denominated King’s-gate, which name, the inhabitants fay, was given to it on account of that king’s landing here with the duke of York, on June 30, 1683, in his way by water from London to Dover ; on which change of name, the following Latin diflich was made on the occafion, by the proprietor of the land, and IS now affixed in brafs letters on the gate ; II. ’s reign,

Olim Poita fui Patroni Bartholomaet

Nurc, Regis JuJJu Regia Porta vccor. Hie exjeenderunt Car. II. R. Et Ja. dux Ebor. 30 Junii 7683 .

Antiently the land here reached much farther into the fca than it does at prefent, a great deal of it hav-

ing been

loff

within the

memory

continues to encroach on

it.

of man, and the lea

This pleafant

ffill

little ville

formerly confifted moffly of fifhermen’s houfes, who got their living here by that craft, going off to (hips in diffrefs, or carrying them fielh provifions, beer, &c. when they paffed this way in their return from a voyage, which they called by the name of Joying ; but it has been long fince deferted of thefc people, it continued a place of but poor account, till the late Henry, lord Holland, was induced, from the precarious date of his health, to try the air

he

of

which purpofe under the diredlion and

this place, for

built a delightful feat here,

model made by Sir Thomas Wynne, bart. (fince created lord Newborough) to reprefent Tully’s Formian on the coaft of Baiae. On the front of the houfe, towards the fea, is a noble portico of the Doric order villa,

the

ST. Peter’s. the wings are faced with fqiiared

flints

363 of curious work-

manlhip. The back front confifls of feveral buildings, exadly anfwering to each other, upon the oppolite Tides of the garden, the whole being connected with much In the houfe were a great clefireable convenience. number of antique marble columns, llatues, bufls, and vafes, purchafed initalyat a veryconfiderable expence, In the garden,ac all which have been lately removed. the upper end of the long walk, is a beautiful colunin of black Kilkenny marble, erefted to the memory of

the late countefs of Hillfborough, and called Countefs Pillar, with an infeription to the amiability of that excellent lady, who died in 1767 at Naples. 1 he houfe but the objefts has a pleafing Angularity in it round it create a difgull in the childifh tafle dilplayed in a number of fantartic gothic ruins, built thick toge-

itfelf

The moft con fide tather over the adjoining grounds. ble of thefe buildings are the Bead-houfe, having^ the appearance of a Roman chapel, with gothic windows and a crofs at the fummit, now ufed as an inn and houfe of entertainment. The temple of Neptune, Arx Ruo~ chimj a fmall caflle on king Henry VIII.’s plan of Deal, Sandown, &c. caftles. Harley tower, built in compliment to Thomas Harley, elq. lord-mayor in 17 68. Whitfield tower, in compliment to Robert Whitfield,

The

convent, reprefenting an antient monaftery, containing the remains of a chapel and five cells, which afford a comfortable afj'lum for five poor families; there is a cloyfter before

cfq. formerly

owner of

this eflate.

gateway and porter’s lodge, containing fome good apartments. Nearer the it,

and

at the eaft

end

is

a grand

a Angular building of the rude gothic kind, credfed on the larger of the two /mww//, called Hcickotdon banks, which are conjedured to particularize the

fea cliff

is

of the decorations within fide of this houfe, and of the feveral antique marble columns, ftatues, butts, vales, &c. ^ pocket is given, and was firlt printed about the year 1 777* '

An account

volume

called the Kentifli Traveller’s

Companion. fpot

CINQ.UE PORTS LIBERTY.

364

fpot where, in a fharp conteft: between the Danes and Saxons, many on both Tides wereflain, and were buried

of which a more ample account will be given hereafter. Countefs fort, quite in ruins, defigned for an ice-hoiife, but never finillied j and laftly, the caftle, by far the largeft of all the outworks, made on the here,

plan of thofe ereflcd by king

Edward

I.

It

was

in-

tended originally for (tables, coach houfes, &c. and ferved for that purpoTe till very lately, when the northweft Tide was converted into a dwelling for the proMoft of thefe are haftening faft to ruin, prietor of it. to which the materials with which they are built, being moftly chalk cut into fquares, with Tome few flints, greatly contribute i and the Tmall garden behind the houfe, in which the beautiful column above-mentioned filth and rubis erefted, was till lately overfpread with bifh. Lord Holland purchafedthis eftate of Robert Whitby his will field, efq. and at his death in 1774, it pafled to his fecond Ton, the hon. Charles-James Fox,' and he conveyed his intereft in it to John Powell, efq. who dyinc:^ without iflTue, his fifter, then the wife of William Roberts, efq. became his heir and entitled to this eftate, I'his feat the prefent pofleflbr of it. prefent occupied as a common lodging-houfe.

and he

is

About two miles from joining to the Tea,

is

at

King’s-gate fouthward, ad-

the ville of Broadstairs, and To named inhabitants

lies

ufually called by the

from the Saxon words Bradfteow, i. e. a broad place. This ville is of late become To confiderable as to form a fmall town ; many new buildings have been erefted within thefe few years here, for the refidcnce and other accommodation of families in the fummer feafon, who and yet be rewifti to have the benefit of Tea-bathing, tired from the inconveniency arifing from To public a place as Margate, one of the houfes in refidence for the '

fummer

feafon of Sir

it

is

now

the

John Hennikcr,

See Quekes, in Birchington, before. bart.

ST. PETER^S.

At

bart.

the upper

end of the

village,

next St.

365 Pe-

a fmall meeting-houfe, belonging to the Gepier, are the neral Baptifts. In the way leading to the each fide ruins of a ftone arch, or portal, walled on is

ter’s,

which were formerly fixed flrong gates and a portcullis, to prevent any incurfions being made here by privateers, &c. to plunder the inhabitants. Thrfe gates were long fince either taken away, or worn out by great length of time, and the ftone work is faft running to decay, there being no care taken to repair At a fmall diftance above the gate, there was anit.^

with

flints,

tiently

to

dedicated, as tradition goes, to the under the appellation of our Lady of

a chapel,

Virgin Mary, of Bradftow j in Pity, though more ufually our Lady was held in fuch vethis chaper was her image, which by this place, neration, that the Ihips, as they failed

At a imall diluled to lower their toplails to falute it. pier of Broadftairs, tance north-eaftward,‘ is the little when, or by whom firft made, is not known. It is of timber, to make a harbour here, to lay up the built

fifliing boats,

which go from hence

and other fmall

to

the north lea,

craft.

r

^

1





For the fupport and maintenance of this pier, the authorized by the inhabitants of this parifh had decrees by which they were lord wardens of the cinque ports, impowered to chufe every year two officers, called by to look after the repairs, and to it ; the laft of colled the droits and duties payable the title of which it is thefe decrees was in 161 6, in mentioned had been time out faid, that the rates here

the

name of pier- wardens,

of mind.

,

,



^

or

j

dated in 1564 and 1550, It appears by an indenture, w’ay leading to it, was the fee that this pier and the Culmer, of this place ; and that eftate of the family of way was granted and leave and privilege of ufing the ^

A

print of this gate

net, p, 164..

is

in

Lewis’s Hiftory of the

Ifle

of

Tha-

confirmed

366

ClNCiyE

PORTS liberty.

confirmed by them to the inhabitants and parifiiioncfs, on condition of their paying half a man’s fhare of every boat appertaining to the parifii, of all fuch profits, &c. which fhould happen to them by wrecks of the fea, or by any other cafualty, or means, faved or taken up there, or near adjoining, by any of ciiem. And in confidcration of ten pounds, they had granted to them the pier of Brad (low, with all their right in it, to hold for ever for the good of the whole commonwealth with them, on their paying to the wardens of the pier for the maintenance of it, fuch dues as had been accuftomed that the inhabitants Ibould have room on Cul-mer’s land to frame timber, &c. for the repair of the pier. That a rule of government Ihould be kept up for ever on the fcaft of Chriftmas, and St. John Evangelift in the afternoon, in the parifli church of St. Peter, and there be choicn two wardens, one at leafi: to be a fifherman, who fhould gather up the duties for the maintenance of the pier, and if any damage fhould happen, to repair it on notice given, within two years at fartheft, on pain of voiding the agreement and lafily, that the ;

;

made and placed by there the Culmers, Ihould not be fpoiled or hurt by great gates entering in at the pier,

the filhermen.

appears by

It

the return

made

to the order

of the

privy council, for an enquiry into the (late of the fe.veral maritime places in this county, anno 1565, being the 8th year of queen Elizabeth’s reign, that there

were then at Broadfiayer, under the government of the mayor and jurats cT Dover, houles inhabited ninetyboats and other vefiels eight, three of two tons, eight two of eight tons, one of ten tons, and two of twelve and perfons appertaining to thefe boats, only octons ;

;

cupied

in the trade

There

of fifhing, forty.

fident in the ville of Broadilairs,

ployed

now rewho are chiefly emand who make a con-

are at this time about ninety families

cod fifliery, iiderable trade from the oil drawn from the in the Iceland

livers

of the

ST. Peter’s.

367

brought home hither in cafks for th.it purpofe ; their rcfidence here is on account of this harbour, which has been befides, the common rendezvous of boats and vciicls employed in the mackerel and herring filberies, and it affords Ihelter to fmaller flups in gales of wind, when in diffrefs on the

the

fi(h,

which

Goodwin

.ire

when

cannot receive it from any ocher harbour on the coaff; but about thirty years ago, the harbour having been greatly decayed by length of time and frequent (forms, became .fo much damaged, in particular by one in 1763, and then again by that tremendous one which happened in Sands, or otherwife,

tliey

January 1767, tliat it was almoft entirely demoliflied and rendered ufelefs, infomuch thu the rates, together with the ufual contributions of the inhabitants for the repair of it, were far from being fufficient for that purthe charge of rebuilding it, according to a modepofe j

rate effimation,on

a

furvey then taken for this purpofe,

upwards of 2C00I. This obliged the inhabitants, though fome years afterwards, to folicit the contribution of the public towards the rebuilding of the

amounted

to*

320 year of the picfent reign, an aff of parliament was obtained for rebuilding it, under the man.igement of certain commiffioners, with proper powers for the improvement and better maintenance of it, and removing and preventing obftru£f ions and annoyances therein. Near this place, in 1574. a monjirous filh fbot himfclf on Ihore on a little fand, now called Fiffincls, where, for want of water it died the next day ; before which his roaring w'as heard above a mile; his length, fays Kilburnc, was twenty-two yards; the nether jaw opening twelve feet ; one of his eyes was more than a cart and fix horfes could draw ; a man flood upright in the hence his eye was taken; the tliickncfs place from from his back to the top of his belly (which lay upwards) was fourteen feet ; liis tail of the fame breadth; three the diffance between his eyes was twelve feet

pier,

ar.vl

at length in die

;

men

.

368

men

ftood

CINQUE PORTS LIBERTY* upright in his mouth ; fome of his

ribs

were

tongue was fifteen feet long; his liver was two cart loads, and a man might creep There were four whales, or moninto his noftril.^ ftrous large fifli, towed afliore by the fifliermen on this ifland a few years ago, one of which had been found floating on the fea dead, and was brought to Broadftairs, and meafured about fixty feet long, and thirty-eight feet round tlie middle ; its forked tail was fifteen feet wide, its lower jaw nine feet long ; it had two rows of teeth, twenty-two in each row, about two inches long; the upper jaw had no teeth, only holes for the lower It had two ones to flnic in. It had only one noftril. gills, and the lower jaw fliut in about three feet from fourteen feet long

;

the end of the nofe. twenty-two guineas.

his

It is faid this fifh fold at

Deal

for

brass coins of the Roman emperors have been found near Broadflairs, on a fall of the adjoining

Many

much

times ; but they have been fo much worn and defaced, as not to be diftinguiihed what they were. Near the cliffs, about midway between the lighthoufe and KingfgatCr are two large barrows, or banks of earth, called by the country people Hackendon, or cliff,

after

rain

and

froft at different

Hackingdozvn banks^ already noticed before. The tradition is, that thefe banks are the graves of thofe Englifh and Danes, which were killed in a fight here ; and that as one bank is greater than the other, the former the place where the Danes were buried, who are faid to have been defeated. It is not improbable that this

is

battle referred to in hiftory,

was that fought

a. d.

853, when the Danes having invaded this ifland with a confiderable force, were attacked by earl Alcher with the Kentifh men, and earl Huda with thofe of Surry, and

A bone of this fidi is ftill preferved at Kilburne, p. 215. Little Nath, in St. John’s parifli, but it is greatly impaired in fize from being expofed fo long to the air. ®

an

3^9

PETER ’s.

ST.

nn obftinate battle was fought, in whlcli the EngliOiac at lafl defeated ; firft got fome advantage, yet were the great numbers were killed, among which were two Englilh generals and the battle being fought io near the Tea, a great many on both lides were pufned

and drowned. One of thefe barrows was opened in 1743* in the prefence of many hundred people; a little below furfice of the ground feveral graves were difeovered, Hones ; cut out of the folid chalk and covered with flat oblong they were not more than three feet long, in an thruft oval form, and the bodies feem to have been was dug in into them almoft double ; a deep trench of it two the middle, and the bodies laid on each fide aflies. of the fkulls were covered with wood-coals and The ficeletons feem to have been of men, women, and and by the fmallnefs of the latter, thefe were into

it

;

children,

conje(5lured to have been unbo-n. Three urns made of very coarfe black earth, not half a bufhel, half burnt, one of them holding near on found with them, which crumbled into dufl:

were being expofed to the

bones were rather of a in found, larg^fize, and for the mofl; part perfcdly opened, the appear176 c, the fmaller barrow was no urns w^re ances were fimilar to the former, but Holland erefted found. In memory of this battle, lord an infcription, fantafUc houfe, or monument, with

The

air.

a

on the larger of the

tv,'o

banks.

CHARITIES.

Richard Culmer, bv

his

in 1444, gave to the poor.

will

m

Lynch, acres of land, lying at Brodafteyr among eaily, diftnbuted > the rent of which to be land is his 1 Friday. in the parifli, on Good

)f this pariOi fix

;wo pieces ; :he moft needy low rented at 4I. 2s. 6d. per annum. perlons The following are the gifts of charitable ^

unknown 1

:

conOne piece of land, called the Panfh Chalk Land, annum. ainine two acres, let at los. Sd. per Acre, let for 5 s. 4 d. acke of lAKO, csllcd the

Wme

o/e

per

annum.

•VOL.

X.

B b

Haxf

cinque ports liberty. SJO Half an acre, lying at Braultow, let for 5s. per annum. tnzABETu Lovejov, relift of George Lovejoy, cl. head mailer of the king’s Ichool, at Canterbury, by her will in 1694, 20I. to a fchoolmailer to teach twenty poor children of this pariili and if there were not fo many here fit to be taught, their number to be made up and fiipplied out of the nei'^^hbour° ing pariili of St. John.'*

gave

;

IIannah Ia ddy, by dows of

her will in this pariili the yearly intereil

1726, gave to the poor wiof 120I. to be laid out in

the purchafe of lands ; and 3I. in money, to be diilributed tothe poor at the time of her death.' There is paid to the ule of the church, in money, 2d. out of land lying at Swillingdown hill.

The donation on Midlent Sunday,

of nine loaves and eighteen herrings yearly, to fix poor perions, and of two yards of

blanket yearly, to three poor perfons of this

manitone grange,

in the pariili

fully taken notice of

under that

Robert Lansynby, 493 » gave

vicar

from Salbeen already

pariili,

of St. John, has pariili.

of this

pariili,

by

his

will in

to the

wardens of 'this church, or fuch other perfons as^ the pariiliioiiers of the iame fliould chufe, one tenement, with Its appurtenances in this pariili, at Chirchill, which he ^

ately

purchafed of John Sackett, for maintaining and upholdino' a t' o

the church.

This parish diction of the

is

within the

dioceje of

ecclesiastical juris-

Canterbury, and deanry of

Weflbere.

The

church, which

on a rifing ground. fomething pleafing

dedicated to St. Peter, (lands Jt is a fmall (Iruaure which has is

in the appearance of it. It is built, as the reft of the churches are hereabouts, of flints, co-

vered with roiigh-caft, and the quoins, windows and doors cafcd with aftilar ftone, only the porch has more workmanfliip uled about it ; above are ftone battlements; the roof is covered with lead, and the portal or door-way has a mitred arch of wrought ftone. It confifts of a nave with a fmall ifle on each fide of it, a large middle chancel, and a Imaller one on the north fide of

V' The Wo. \

it,

part of which

will

xlvii.

is

is

now made

into a veftry,

printed in Lewis’s Hillory of Thanet, col. p. os. *

See an extraft from the

will, ibid. p.

97,

No.

xlviii.

The

:

ST.

Peter’s.

37*

'

middle chancel, which is beautiful, is ceiled in compartments, the framing of which is enriched with carved work, as is the cornice round it. The church hand* is elegantly pewed with wainfcot, and has a very fome defk and pulpit. In the middle ifle arc two handfome brafs chandeliers, wliich were purcliafed by Tubfcription , and there is a neat gallery at the weft end,

The

well contrived for the convenience of the inhabitants, and the whole is kept in excellent order, and more than iifual

neatnefs.

At

the weft end of the middle iQe, un-

der the gallery, is a handfome font, of white marble, the gift of John Dekevver, cfq. as appears by the in-

1746; below the infcription are, the arms of Dekevver. At the weft end of the north There were ifle (lands the rower, which is a fea mark. antiently five bells in it, which fome years ago were The call into fix, the great bell being made into two. fcription, ere
high or middle chancel was beautified about the year expence of Mrs. Elizabeth Lovejoy, leffee 1 730, at the of Callis grange; who, out of the profits of that eftate, ordered this chancel as well as hers and her hufband’s

monuments

in

it,

to be repaired as often as ftould

be

and the fum of twenty (hillings to be paid yearly to the clerk, on the day of the anniverfary of her death, March 29, as an encouragement for him to needful

;

. take due care of the monuments. At the weft end of the louth ific is a room taken off for the fchool houfe. In this church were antiently^ befides the high altar in the middle c hancel, three other

altars dedicated to St.

James

Pity, and St. Margaret.

the Apofile, St.

Before thefe

altars,

Mary of on which

were wax-lights conftantly burning, for the maintenance of which there were feveral fraternities and legacies left. Several antient monuments and inferiptions are in the body and chancels of this church, the principal ones of which are

were the images of

thefe faints,

Among others, a monumiddle or high chancel ment for James Shipton, vicar, obt. 1665; another, for B b 2

in the





^

y

CINQJJE PORTS LIBERTY.

372 for

George Love-joy,

firft

ichool-niafter at Iflington,

then of the king’s ichool at Canterbury, obr. 1685. He lies buried within the altar- rails ; arms, Azure three bars^ dancette^ or^ Impaling cbequy^ azure

and or^ a mar-

on a fejs, three leopards faces of the fccond. On ble againd the north wall is an account of the chari-

given by Mrs. Elizabeth Lovejoy, as follows: By her will and teflament, to the mayor and commonalty

ties

ot the city of Canterbury, her leafe of Callis grange,

upon

pay yearly to the vicar of this parifh, forty pounds to a fchool mader, to teach twenty poor children gratis in the parifh, twenty pounds; to jefus hofpital, Canterbury, five pounds ; to St. John’s hofpital, in Canterbury, ten pounds to Kingfbridge hofpital, in Canterbury, five pounds to Cogan’s hofpi; tal, in Canterbury, four pounds to Sc. Stephens’s ; hofpital, five pounds ; to Harbledown hofpital, five pounds per annum ; and fhe gave by her will to the fchool and hofpital at Ifiington, aool. and to the fchool truft,

to

;

;

at

Wicomb,

Buckinghamfhire, lool. She wainfeotted and adorned this chancel, and gave .plate for the communion table in her life time, and two filver flagons by her will, a. d. 1694. She died of an apoplexy before fhe had fealed or finifhed her will, fo that it took no efi'e<5l as to her real edate, but after many fuits and controverfies was adjudged good as to her perfonal edate ; and twenty fliillings Ihe left yearly to be paid to this parifh clerk to keep both monuments clean. memorial for Mr. Leonard Kowntrec, minider, obt. 1624. the north chancel, on an altar tomb, an infeription for Manafles Norwoode, of Dane court, and Norwoode, efq. obt. 1636 arms. Ermine^ ; a crofSf engrailed impaling fix coats. There are feveral brafs plates and inferiptions for Culmer and Elmdone. in

A

In the north

1587.

A

ifle

an altar

brafs

plate

tomb for

for

Michael

Webb, obt.

Philip Smith, obt.

1451.

Another for John Sacket, of this parifh, obt. 1623. A memorial for Alexander, fon of Alexander Nor•woode.

ST. Peter’s.

373

woode, efq. of Dane-court. A black marble for Cornelius Wilks, A. M. nineteen years vicar of this paA like rilli, and prebendary of Wells, obt. 1776. ftone for the Rev. John Deane, A. M. forty-one years A memorial for Daniel Pamflet, vicar, obt. 1757* gent, and Mary his wife. He died 1719. Anantient tomb for Mrs Elizabeth Omer, obt. 1709. A mural monument and infeription for the Rev. Roger Huggelt, M. A. late vicar of the king’s free chapel of St. George, in Windfor, and redlor of Hartley Wafpaill, in Southampton, cldeft fon of Roger Hugget't, of Stone, in this pariik, wlio was foie heir of the Pawlyns, He an antient and refpedtable family of that place. on it died at Hartley, in 1769, where he was buried arms, are inferiptions for others of the fame name ;

;

GuleSy a chevron^ hetiveen three Jlags heads^ or^ impaling parted per pale^ fable and guleSy a griffin paffiant^ coun-

terchanged,

A

tomb

for

Mr. Henry Huggett,

gent,

of the Pawlins, of Stone he died in 1751 ; and for others of this family. A mural monument, Hiewingthat in a vault underneath, lies Mary, wife of John Dekewer, efq. of Hackney, who died without furviving iflfue, one fon and one daughter lying interred with her, obt. 1 748. In the fame vault lies the abovementioned John Dekewer, efq. an efpecial benefaftor to this parilh, obt. 1762, set 76; arms, Fert, on a caltrops, crofs, or. Jive fleiirs de Us, fable, bettveen two foie heir

and two

;

lions,

rampant, ‘wnpdXmg argent , parted per fefs,

three efcallops, tzvo

and

piles zvaved, fable,

A

one, in chief, gules, in bafe three

tomb

for

John Dekew’er, fon In the fame vault are

of the above John, obt. 1740. others of this family. A beautiful mural monument of white marble, on which is the figure of a child fitting, weeping and leaning on an urn, erefted to the memory of John* Alexander Dekewer, fon of John Dekewer, efq. of Plackney, and Elizabeth his wife, obt. E778, set. ten years. A mural monument for the Rev. Tho. Reynolds, obt. 1754-

Befides thefe there are

B b

memorials

3

'

CINQUE PORTS LIBERT\^

374

Noble, Gray, Read, Witherden, White, Si' mons, Cooke, Culoier, Wild, Jeken, Tilman, and Kerby. In the middle of the chancel, a memorial for Grace, wife of James White, gent, of Chilham, daiigh terof Gratian Lynch, gent, of Grove, in Staple, obt. 1740 , and for Grace her daughter, wife of Thomas rials

for



Hawkins, obt. 1746. lor John Sackct, of

At

A brafs this

the end of the north

plate in the north

parilL>

ifle is

obt.

1623,

fee,

ifle,

59.

much Anne his

a large white ftone,

Michael Pavkn, obt. 1662 i wife, and Anne their daughter. In the church yard are many handfome tombs and grave-ftones, of perfons of different trades and occupations, refidents of this paIn the tower is a great crack on the eaft and rifli. weft fides of it, from the top almoft to the bottom, where it opened near an inch, and more than two at the top, fo that the tower by it inclines to the northward i and it is wonderful, that when it wa