The history and topographical survey of the county of Kent

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.^OJ.

THE

HISTOR ^ND

TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEY OF THE

COUNTY OF KENT. CONTAINIKG THE

ANTIENT AND PRESENT STATE OF CIVIL AND ECCLESIASTICAL

IT,

;

COLLECTED FROM PUBLIC RECORDS, AND OTHER AUTHORITIES:

ILLUSTRATED WITH MAPS, VIEWS, ANTIQUITIES,

8cc.

THE SECOND EDITION, IMPROVED, CORRECTED, AND CONTINUED TO

THE PRESENT TIME.

By

EDWARD HASTED,

Efq

F. R. S.

and

S.

A.

LATE OF CANTERBURY.

“ Ex

his omnibus, longe funt humanij]imi qui. Cantiu?n incolunti'

“ Fortes creanturfortibus et bonis, “ Nec imbellem feroces progenerantl^

VOLUME

VIII.

CANTERBURY PRINTED BY W. BRISTOW, ON THE PARADE. M.DCC.XCIX.

TO

WILLIAM BOYS,

Esq^ F.

S.

A.

OF

' I

W

A L

ME

R,

SIR,

It

with

is

much

pleafure that I feize this oppor-

tunity of acknowledging your kind and liberal friendfliip

to

me, upon every occafion,

continued

afli

fiance

efpecially in the

you have afforded me towards

my

publication of the

the

earlieft

period of

History of Kent, from it^

Such

afliftance,

from a

gentleman

(

gentleman of

your

iv

)

eftabliflied

literary

character,

cannot but ftamp additional credit on the Hiftory,

and contribute both pleafure and Readers of grateful

it.

Pleafe,

Sir,

to

accept

edeem and

mDft

to be, with die

refpeft.

Your much and

.

me

my

marks of your

thanks for thefe conflant

favor and regard, and believe greatefl

fatisfadlion to die

obliged

faithful

humble

fervant.

LONDON, June

24, i799.

EDWARD HASTED.

INDEX. flis letter a refers to the Appendix of additions and correflioiis to the fcreiuh

and eighth volumes, added

alias

CUffe land:,

in

Burmarjh,

260.

Abdy’s, of Surry, account of 428. Ac K HANGER MANOR, itl Chcriton,

AcR

'

164,

191;.

s E, pa>i/ii of,

1

7.

Albini, William de, 97. Albrincis, William de, 143, I

76, 180

;

Simon

de,

i

70

j

MANOR, parijh

3

manor

of,

1

manor,

in Biddendeiij

A. 541. Allard’s, 376. Allen’s, 85, 86.

Allens, and oi\\tx%,poffefs Craw.* ‘home, in Hope, 418. Altar, Ro 7nan, at Stone, 479, Ambry,, alias Amery-court in Bleane, 524. Amhcrfi:, Col. William, 244; John, 41 8; Amherft’s, 237 Amherft, John, and others,

.

Crawthorne, in Hope, 418; John poffejfes Lower

poffefs

541. Angley, Little, in Cranbrooke,

4 a ,

;

Ed-

ward, 355.

Haf

ill

Allard’s

Andrews, Phineas, 242

29.

Aldington,

437,

farijhof, 133; MANOR OF, ! 79. Alkham, Peter, 193; Alkham’s,

A. 540.

1

157, 164, 202. Alderley, Thomas, 402, 403. tingliegli,

of,

AlKHAM,

Pagehurft, in Staplehurft, a.

31.

i

Albrincisfamily,<3«o«w/5/',

Al.DGI.OSE

Aldridge’s, 443. Alford, John, 488. Alien priories, account

i34»>39*

III.

ASlon, in Witterfliam,490,49i in Charing, A. 547. Adams, Thomas, a, 540. Adams’s, 104. Adelyn, Thomas, 8^. Adye’s, 395. Afterpoole. See Otterpoole. A G H N E- C o U R T M A NO R , S« Old Rom?iey, 410, 441Air, unwholefome, in Rdmney Marfir, 469. Albeni, family of, 346, 331. Albermarle, Baldwin de Betun, earl of,

481,486,494; church of, 9. Aloes BK IDG 375. Aldon, Thomas de, 48.

in Capel, 146.

Abbot’s couax,

end of this volume.

361, 401, 423,4.24, 423, 47^j

A.

j\bBOTS,

at the

.

3, 47, 550, 5 34; 282, 288,297, 338, 399, 360,

b

Andrews, Dr. James, the heirs o^,leffcct of Rucking manor, 3

<;

4

-

Anlell’s, 51, 86.

Antiquities found,

47, 199,

Antoninus’s

INDEX.

VI

Antoninus’s Anvill’s.

Itlntrary,

Averenches, barony

441.

See Handville’s,

Apoale MANOR,

Stone, in

in

Oxney, 48 1 Apledore, manor

382; town

of,

of, 376, 466; church

of,

497. Apledore, family of, 391. Apulderfield, Sir William de, 308. Archdeacon' s houfe,

at

Limne,

283, 285, 286. Acris, William de, Arden, lands fo called, in Cheriton, 195.

N

» 97 Arundel farm, in Elmfted, 34. Arundel, Sir John, 2 13. .

Arundel, Albini’s,

earls of,

97,

Fitzalans, earls

of,

213, 347, 349. Afliburnham’s, 308, 431. Aflibye, John, poffefes a houfe at Dowle-ftreet, A. 547,548. Afienden seat, in Tenterden, A. S 43 -

Ashford, pari/h of, a. 549. Athelftane, king, 154. Athol, Strabolgie’s, earls of, 1 8,

490 ; pojfejfes Bower, Flemmings manor, in Molafli, A. 544; Edward, A.

fliam, <3’/7«r

545 Aulfen, John,

BokingGoudhurfl, A. 539; Buckhurft and Great Swifts, in Cranbrooke, a. fold

pofejjes

manor,

the Place-houfe, in Woodchurch, a. 543; Midiey ma-

540.

Awkeridge. See Acrife. Ayerft, Rev. Robert Gunfley, pofe^ffes a third part of Malmaines manor and farm, in Alkham, 135, 136; and ofSotmere MANOR,in Capel, 146. Ayerft, Jane, poffejfes a third part of Malmaines manor

and farm, in Alkham, 135, 136; and of Sotmere main Capel, 146.

Bachelor’s, of Romney, 461. Badlefmere’s, 86,444, 509, 526. Bagnal, Henry, clerk, 300



Anne and

A. 555.

Auberville’s, 69, 71, 131,289,

Elizabeth, and others, pojfefs the advowfon

of Frittcnden

291. Sir

in

B.

Avant.John, and others,Jioffefs

Aucher,

397, 418, 455. 496Auften, Edward, of Godmer-

nor,

19, 509. Athulf, king, 494. At-Lefe, 530.

nor,

barts.

-

Ardern, Thomas, 502. Arjiinge hamlet , i n e w i n gto n

346;

134,

Averenches, tower of, in Dover caftle, 157. Averlinges, William de, 150. Auflen, lady Rachel, 397, 418; Auften’.s,

Apuldre, 468.

of, 122,

137, 148, 149; account of, 157, 164, 190, 191, 202.1 Averenches, family of, 143, 156; account of , l§/, 170,202.

Anthony,

124, Aucher’s,

126, 149, 186; loi, 195 ; of Biflioplborne, 84, 88 ; of Otterden, 214. Audley, James de, 213.

Audintune, Stephen de, 448.

Avennes, John de, 18.

54

RECTOR V,

a.

t.

Baieux, Odo, bifliop of, 21,28, 92, 97, 1 12, 120, 129, 154, 200, 346, 369,410,425, 488, 521. Baker, Hercules, 244, 250 ;

John, 323;

Sir

John, 279. Baker’s,

INDEX. of Baker’s, of Silfinghiirft, 31 Caldham, 1 36, 14^. 166,185; ;

of

Baker’s,

Romney, 458,

460, 461.

Mr.

Balderfton,

FARM, Baldock,

pojjejfes

Brook

Weftwell, a. 546. William, 128, 403,

in

501, A. 543. Baliol,

Hugh,

Baliol college, in

Baliol’s, 5.

;

Oxford,

5.

Ball^ David, Jirefent reflor of Aldington, 327. Barnfield’s, 429. Banke, lands, in Cheriton, 195. Banks, Sir Jofeph, and others,

Merrud, 316. Barbes, Robert dc, J29.

Bardinden manor,

in

Ruck-

ing,

356. Bargrave, Dr. Ifaac, 438. Bargrave, hamlet of in Newington, 198. Barling, Clement, clerk, 435. Barnes, Miles, clerk, 90, 188. returned

to

parliament

for Hythe, 240. Barnlley, Rev, George, 228. Barrett, Tho. 138 ; Paul, 453; Barrett’s, of Aveley, 201. Barrett, Thomas, alias Balfett, 181.

Barrow, Maurice, 340. Barton man or, in Canterbury, 36.

E’izabeth,

Maid of Kent,

the

Holy

(loiy of, 2c, 6.

Barton’s, 137. Bafant, Peter, 334. Bafing’s, 489. Baflett’s, of Romney, 461. Batchelor, Haac, 300. Bate, Thomas, 429 ; Bate’s,

436. Bathe, Henry de, ordinances

of,

47 °> 475 Bathurft, Rev. Richard, pojfefjes Brickwall houfe, in Goudb 2 -

Bayley’s, 166.

Beake's, 335.

403

Bean, Robinfon, 251. Beane's, 104, (66. Bearcroft, Philip, clerk,

10.

1

Beauchamp’s, 306. Beauvoir, Rev. Ofmund, account of, 529.

Beckingham,

Rev.

James-

nor, in Whitftaple, 514. Bedeford, Richard de, 367. Bedlejlone, hamlet of in Braborne, 15. Bedingfield, Timothy, 8, 267, 268; 'Phomas, 87; Bedingfield’s,

292.

Beechborough

Barnham’s, 348, 351, 520.

Barton,

ibid,

Charles, poffejfes a fourth part of Stelling manor, 93. Beconfield, alias Tangreton ma-

Baptilts, meetings of, 172.

Barons

A. 539; Rev. Thomas, Benjamin, 454. Battell, abbey of, 432. . Battely, Nicholas, 405 ; Dr. his Antiq. Rut up. 423. hiirft,

Beale’s,

18

vii

seat,

in

Newington, 198,202.

Bekehurst, alias ShorneCOUUT MANOR, 67. B ELGAR MANOR, ?« Lid, 427, Beihoufe, family of, 200, 201. Beling's, 30.

Belknap’s, 356, 442, 426. Bellaview, in Limne, 291.

Benenden, parifi of, a. 542. Benfon, John, clerk, 359. Bere, Nicholas de, 442. Beregrave, John de, 198. Beresford, Michael, 502 resford’s, 436. Berewick, alias

MANOR,

in

Bergavenny,

;

Be-

Berwick

Limne, 288. Nevills,

lords,

48, 49. Berkeley, Sir Charles, 453. Bernys, Richard, 291 ; John, 312.

Berry-court manor,

in

Old Romney, 442. Bertie,

Bertie, lion. Peregrine, 128.

Berth AMS M A NOR,

pojfejfes Little

New-

in

2C2. Berworth, William, 442. Bejborough houfe, in Hernhill, a. ington^

538. Bert’s, 7, 8, 41, 531.

Betiin, Baldwin de, 17. Bexhill, John, pojfejfes Capells '

9

INDEX*

VIU

court, in Ivechurch, 402.

Bickerrtaff, Sir Charles, 488.

Bid DEN DEN,

pari/fiof,it..

541.

Bigg, Egelred, 40, 47.

Bjlsington,

parijh of,

344,

A. 554.

BiLSINGTON inferior, MANOR OF, 347 Superior, alias PRIORY, manor of, ;

manor of, 361, 376,382, 424,4725 PRIORY, ,345. 349» 428. MANOR,

_

in

Hawking,

149.

Limne, 292.

Billerika, in

Birch, Stephen, ligh

55

MANOR,

fojfejj'es

South-

in tlmfted, a.

1-

Bircholt Franchise, dred

o/*,

Bircholt barony, oj , 10, A.

hun-

A. 550.

I ,

hundred

550.

Bircholt,

parijh

of

.551- , Bird, William, 402, 403 mas, 516.

10,

;

a.

Tho-

Bishops Enbrookemanor, in Cher i ton,

1

and

the parfonage, 497 Biackburne’s, of Tenterden,

488, 497. v os E, alias Canonscourt, in Newington ,205.

Black

Bladbean, alias court manor,

in

B BEANE,

524.

542*

Blackmanstone,

parijh

of,

5^.

Blackmanstone,

manor

OF, 4c6, 407, 472. i-re,

Jacobs-

Eleham^ loi, 102, A- 552. Blake, Patrick, 397. Blaxiand, Mrs. refides at Graveney-court, a. 538.1 parijh

of,

Blechenden, Mr. tenant of Bilfington priory,

345 ; Peter, Blechenden’s, of Aldington, 321, 322,324,325, ;

Blehem. See Bleane. Blen, Sir Hamo de, 526, 532, Bletching court. See Scotney, Blount’s, 411, 429. Blythe, Richard, 495.

Booking, Edward, D. D. 297. Boston, Stephen de, 128. Bodertiam See Botifliam. Bokingfold manor, in Goudhurjl, A. 539. Boliiigbrooke, George St. John, vifccunt, 127, 502, 511. Boiingbro! ke, St. John’s, vifcounts, 128, 130.

Bologne, earl of, 54. Bond, James, prefent curate of Bilfngton, 352. large quantity of,

Folkeflone

Blackburn, John, Silverden, in Hawkiunrt, a.

Bkckn

Witter-

;

fham college manor, 488 ; Ebency priory manor, 495

Bones,

93.

Bifliop’s, of Siirtex, 487.

272, A

Cheney-court

Ivechurch, 403

408

.349* 35^Bilfington,

JBilchetJl

in

Jan.es. pojjejfts the

lute of Ccbbes-place, in Istwv.huich, 342 Thomas, •

in

& Hythe churches,

169, 185. 251. Bonneville’s, 506.

Bonnington, parjh of 331, 554) manor of, 472. Bonningtai Pirm Farm, 335, Ponniiigton’s, 122, 333, 334, Ecncuii, the nrchitedl, 220. Boothe, Thomas, 207. Borough, Englifli, cufcpt of,

Borough,

Sir

97,

Edward, 383. Borowart,

INDEX. BraNdred,

498, 500. Botany, 249, 424, 4 S 7 >'5 ° 9 Boteler, Sir l-’liilip, 243? 3^3 » Boteler’s, of Teftoii, 224, Boteler’s, of 2371 39 ° Bleane, 531.

Borowart,

/<7//; o/,

-



;

Boteler’s court manor, in

Bleane, 521, 531*

and hamlet

?nanor

of, in /icrfe,

114.

Brandi ed, Robert, 136

Bran-

;

dred’s, 145, 167. Bream’s 187.

Bramfton’s, of Eflex, account of, 428. B R E D M E R , alias B R O A D *M E D

MANOR,

Bothvvelle, 519.

IX

in Folkefojte, 166.

Botolph’s, alias Butters Bridge 286.

Bredgman, John, 251.

Bottsham manor,

Brenchley, John, ^^^xBrockton, in Charing, a. 547.

Elm-

in

Jled, 40.

Amery Boucherie, Mrs. court, in Bleane, 525.

Brcgland’s, 334.

manor,

Brenley

Bleane, a

Boughton under Bleane, Bren SET, parijhof,

)

Boughton

COURT manor, a. 537. Bourchier, John, 71. Bourne’s, 355. Bouverie, Hon. William Henry, pojjejjes Orlellone, Capell, Ham, and Brenfet manors, and the advowfon of Orlef tone reffory, 361, 363, 364, 371, 390; Bouverie,

Wm.

earl

of Kadnor, 361

;

Bou-

verie’s, account of, ibid.

Bower, alias Flemming in Moladi, a. 544.

Bowicke, nor, in

manor,

hleham, 101. Bowles, Mrs. and others, pof

advowfon of Fritten-

Jefs ihe

den re£fory, a. 541.

Boynton,<3 //<7 xBonnington MANOR, inSwingfield, 122. Boys,

Sir

bert,

Edward, 113; RoWilliam 405

clerk,

poffeffes

;

Elfords,

hurft,

A.

542

Boys’s,

;

542

court, account

;

in

Hawk-

Samuel, a. of Hoadc-

of,

^28, 532.

Boxhurf, Upper and Lower, in

parijh

parijh

388

of,

MANOR

PLACE, 390;

;

OF,

363. Brent’s, 104, 357. Brett, Thomas, LL. D. 359; Nicholas, clerk, 188; a. 546. Brett’s, of

Romney, 461.

Brewer, John, 454, 455. Brice, John, 102. Brickwall houje, in Goudhurfl:, a. 539. Bridger’s, of Limne, 300. Bridges, Sir Brook, pjff'jfs!

Combe FARM,

in Braborne, Saltwood caftleand ma22 nor, and the Grange farm, 224 Thomas pojfejjes Lyghe court, in Liminge, 86. Britons, battles of, 169, 252. Broad mead manor. See Brcdmer. Broadnax, Robert, of Cheriton,

of,

;

195

;

Thomas,

of tlylhe,

223 Broadnax's, 261. Broadnax farm, in Burmarfli, 261; in St. Maries, near ;

Romney,

406.

Broadfreet, in Liminge, 80, a.

552.

Brocket manor,

Hawkhurlt, a. 542, Boxley, abbot of, 341.

Bra BORNE,

Boughton

;

Boyke ma-

alias

in

537.

.

496 14, a.

S 5 »-

;

in

Ebenc,

Brocket’s, ibid.

Brockhull, MANOR, in

alias

Thorne

Saltwood, 224.

Braborne Combe. See Combe. Brockhull

X

INDEX

Brockhull Bujhes, in Saltwood,

226. >90,

of

Salt-

u c count rf,

224,

Brockhiill’s,

;

wood, 166;

229, 307, 308.

Brockman. Henry, of Liminge, James243 Drake pojj'ejfes Cheriton maTJOR, 191; bwetton MANOR, the advowfon of Che J92 riton redlory, 196; Arpinge f ARM, 197; Bargrave FARM, 88

William,

;

;

;

198

;

manor,

Newington

and Bertrams, 202 Beechborough SEAT, 204; lejjee of Combe woods, 206; piojJeJfes the parfonage and ad;

vowfon of Newington carage, 208

Brockhull

;

nor, and Brockhull in Saltvvood,

Fee,

alias

MANOR, 267;

;

vi-

ma-

Bullies,

Southlygh M A NOR, in Elmfted, 41 lejjee of the hofpiial ellates in Hallingligh, a. 551 , Browning’s, 308. Brydges, Samuel-Egerton, pcfbellied

fejjes

farm,

12

well pojfejjes Smerfole Swingfield park

woods

;

farm, wood,

in Liddon, 127.

Buck, Robert, 135, 146. Buckhurfl, Thomas D. 74.

m anor,

Buckhur/l,

;

of

Cheriton,

197; prejent vicar of Newington ,210. Brockman’s, of Liminge, ico; of Beechborough and New-

;

John’s, 124

fee-farm

re^lor

j

; and the rectory and advowfon of Swingfield curacy, 126; Swanton MANOR, in Liddon, 130; Evering manor , in Alkham, 138; Kev. Edward Time-

St.

121

Brenfet manor, 389, and the parfonage and advowfon of Brenfet vicarage, 393 Jupy efent

167, 227, 436, 456.

Browning, Jolin,

Newing-

Newington

lius-Drake^

Browne, Jolin, 136 ; Benjamin, 412; Browne’s, of Beechworth caHle, 135, 136, 145,

and

Diinchurch a

rent from Aldington

320;

535 Broome’s, 133.

eftate

226; an

in Burmarlh, 262

ton

of,fQZ, A*

-

Brockhull, William de,

194

BROOKLAKD,/«ri/?i

in

Cranbrooke, a.

540.

Buckingham,

Staffords,

dukes

of, 92, 93.

Buckland, near Faverfliam,4i3. Bucler, Walter, 208, 392.

Budden, Sir William, 452. Bunce, Mr. olCanteiburyjjo^.

ington, 191, 192, 202; ac203, 207, 208, 262, 267. Brockton^ in Charing, a, 547.

Burcherde, Richard, 61. Burgate, Thomas, 35. Burgh, Hugh de, 200, 277, 278, 313, 416; Thomas, lord, 418. Burgh, Borough’s, lords, 383.

Brokeman’s, 442.

Burgherfli’s, 48.

Brome, James, clerk, 196, 209. Bromley -green, in Orleftone and Warehorne, 361, 366.

B URMARSH, par if of 258,

count off

Brompton's Pot, inE leham ,8 1,96. Brook farm, in Weftwell, a.

546.

Brook, John K. Shaw, clerk, leffee

109.

of Eleham

parfonage,

MANOR

I A. OF, 266, 472.

553 Burnet, James, clerk, 264; Alexander, clerk, ibid. 405. Burnt-houfe, in Chartham, A. ;

544 * Burt, John, 75, 76, 289; two fons of pofejs a part of Bere-

wick&OtterpoolM ANOR, 291.

B ui ioUf

INDEX. Burton, Ml Kennington, a. 549. Bulbritlge’s, 67.

187

gift,

Canterbury,

Rev.

Winchelfea, 343;

;

Wiilfred, 35, 216.

Butler’s. 276.

Byrche,

Xl

William-Dejo.

pojfejfes

archbishop of,

the parfonage and ad-

vovV’fonof Braborne vicarage,

vas, 138.

26

Byrthric, a Saxon, 293.

the

;

advowfon of Haf-

tingligh reftory, 32; the par-

C.

fonage and advowfon ofElmfted vicarage, 43, 44 ; the

Cade, Laud, clerk, 323. Calchyth, fynod at, 216. C A L c OT in MiiUey ,412.

advowfon of Horton re£iory, 62; Brandred manor, in Acrife, 1 1 5 Liddon manor, 128, the parfonage and advowfon of Liddon vicarage, the parfonage and I 31, 132; advowfon ofA Ikham vicarage

,

Caldham manor,

in Capell,

;

144; Caldhain’s, Caldicot. Little. See Calcot. Caldwell, John, M. D. 327. Cale, John, 12, 13.

Cambridge, mafter, &c. of

St.

with

the

chapel

John’s college in, pojjefs Trienftone manor, in Biirinarfli, 261 514; mafter, &c. , of Emanuel college in. pojfefs

alias Capel,

lands in Liddon,

Flegg’s-court,

1

30

;

Chrift

college in, 393. Canons court. See Blackwofe.

Canons,

149

priory, 340. Canitler-hall, in Selling, a. 538. Canterbury, aichbifliops of,

233.288,425,447, 497.517 ; Alphage, 367; Arundel, 343; Becker. 222 Boniface, 98, Bourchier, 108; 88, 516; Chicheley, 431 ; Courtney, 219, 222; Cranmer, 32, 60, ;

79, 88, 94,

106, 1 15, 140, 145, 148,149, 155, 193,223, 275, 279,298,318,350,370, Cuth396, 402, 413, 444 bert, 82 Janibert, 425, 465 Juxon, 26, 45, 132, 187 ; Lanfranc, 43, 82, 301, 353, ;

;

35 + 358.425 ; Morton, 3 18 Barker, 187, 313, 396, 39S, 437 Biegtnund, 465 ; Ralph, S3 ; Sancrott, 217; Sheldon, >

;

;

Stratford, 3; Te187, 517 nifon, 132, 151; Theobald, ;

83;

Tillotfon,

hain, 88,

185;

Feme,

147; the tithes of Evering ward in Alkhain and Swingfield, 141 land in Capell, 143, 146; ;

the

in Hawking, advowfon of Haw-

the par; fonage and advowfon of Folkeftone vicarage, 187 ; king'recftory, 151

Chiltern Langley

;

of

140,

V\'ar-

222,296; Whit.

Combe manor

and woods Newington, 206 ; the parfonage and advowfon of Poftling vicarage, 2:7; the advowfon of saltwood reiflory, with the chapel of Hythe, 229 the advow fon of Blackmanftone reeftory, 275 ; the advowfon of Eaftbridtje rectory, 279; the parlonage of in

;

Scllindge, 313; Boulton Stan-

manor, in Aldington, 316; the advowfon of Aldington re«ftory, 325; the adfted

vovvlon of

Newchurch

rec-

tory and vicarage, 343; Bilfingtcn priory, 350; the

advowfon of Rucking rec358; Warehorne rectory, 374; the advowfon of tory,

Snargate reftcry, 377; the advovvlon of Snave reidory, 398 the advovvion of Ive;

church

IND EX.

Xli

527, 52S,

529; St. GregcJSf. priory in, 43, 82 Sepulchre’s priory in, 341,

the adnear Maries, of St. vowfou parfonage the Romney, 408

church

rc(5torv’, 4.01.;

ries

;

and advowfoiiofLidvicarage, 437; the advovvfon ot Oid

Koinney advowfon

refi-ory,

;

;

the

man’s M an OK, in

1

;

-

Canterbury, dean and chapter of, pojfefs Orgarfwicke maNOR, and advowfon of rectory, 271 ; Fi licking manor, 354; Fairfield manor, par-

fonage and advowfon of cu-

381; Brookland parfonage and advowfon of Aghne-court vicarage, 387 380,

;

MANOR, 442

;

in

365. 370 ^

Capell,

;

Caof\ 142 Manregge, chapel

parijh

pell, aliai

525.

liurehorne, Lapel’s, 371. in

;

of, 140.

Iveclurch,

401.

404, 408, 437, 481, 492. Canterbury, archdeacon of, his houfe at Limne, 285, 286 poJfc[Jes the parfonage and advowfon of Limne, 301, 302,

racy,

Capel manor,

in

Good-

Bieaiie,

Capell’s court, /«

229.275.279.297.301.317, 325.343.558.374.39^.4^^.

50

MANOR,

Elehani, 105. Cantis, \V\n\i\Ti^ fioJJ’e/fes

rough" and fifliery, 514; the parionage and advowfoil of Whitftaple curacy, 5 7. Canterbury, fee of, 43, 44, 53, 6s, 127, 147, 206, 217, 222,

3

-

Can TER WOOD

Witierfliam fdarwich bo-

of

re£lory, 492

444

524

;

Oid Romney, and ad-

the parfonage

alias At CipelPs, of Jvechurch, 402, 404. Carden's, 310. Careclata what, 483. Carkeridge’s, 407. Carter, Rev. George, Hurft MANOR and advowfon of redfory, 329, 330 prefent

Capell’s,

;

redor of Hurft 331. Carter, George, of ton, 432, 482.

Kenning-

Cafaubon, Meric, clerk, 409, 445 -

Caseborne manor, riton,

in

Che-^

194; Cafeborne’s,

Cafon, )ohn, 322. Laiiilicn,

John Baptift, 395,

vowfon of Stone vicarage, Pollard oyfter the 484

Cajile hill, in Folkeitone, 168.

grounds in

Cawne, Sir Thomas, 368. Ceritone, family of, 190. Cefrreton, Ralph de, 128. Chadwick. James, 454. Chafy , PEilUam, prefent reHor of

;

Seafalter

Seafaiter,

500 501, and

manor,

;

the parfonage and advowfon of the vicarage, 503 ; Shou-

MANOR

art

and

rents

in

Whltfiaple, 522. Canterbury, priory of Chrift-

church

in,

35. 47, 82, 138,

154.221.232.270.288.317, 353.354.358.367.380, 425, 441 467. 487. 494 500. 503. .

.

525 Canterbury, Eaftbridge hofpital, mafter of, pojjejfes Bleane manor and lloade court. -

Cataraflonium^‘^'3X\or\ of, 81.

S'waycliff'e,

523.

Challock,

parijh of a, 545. Chalybeat fpring at Folkeftone,

152.

Champneis, MIfs Frances, and Rev. Henry-William pojjefs Weftenhanger manor, in Stanford, 76; Berewick and Ottcrpoole, in Limne, 289, 291.

Champneis,

INDEX. Champneis, Rev. Henry-William, A. 552

Clerke, Jofias, 49; John, 322}

Champneis’s,

;

of Weftenlianger, account

Clerke’s, 324. Cliffe, Allen,

of,

Clifford,

74, 289, 291.

Chapman, John, D. D.

reflor

of Aldington, 231,326, 327.

Chapman, John, JtoffeJfes Perry town, in Weft well, a. 546. Chapman’s,

Charing,

191;.

parijh of a. 547.

548.

Chartham, parith of, MANOR OF, 376.

A.

544

»

Chartons manor, near Farningham, 190.

manor,

Chene-court

in

Ivechurck,

402. Cheney’s, of Shurland, 402, 417, 4t8.

348,

_

parijh

of,

188;

reft or y of, 209.

Cherryng,

Adam

de, 458.

Chefterfield, Philip, earl of, 43. Cheftfield manor, in Swaycliffe, 521, 531. Cheftwill, James de, 522.

443, A. 540, 543.

Chilham, barony Chilton

of,

of,

A.

544;

509.

farm,

in

Alkham, 133.

Chowte’s, of Betherfden, 418 Chriftmas’s, 443. Chylton, Thomas, 207.

CiNauE ports,

Clinton and Saye, Edw.Fynes, lord, 73, 99, 181, 183, 186, 191, 193, 202, 223, 267, 389. Clinton and Saye, lords, 139, 143, 150,159, 165,171,172. Cloake’s, 36. Cloke, John, 42. Clopton’s, 201 Cofenton’s, of Cofenton, 10 1. Clowes wood. In Bleane,

5 1 8, 525, 53'Clufe MANOR, in Bleane, 521, 5257 53»Clynton, lords. Zee Clinton. Coates, Odiarne, pojfejfes Stanford MANOR, 67 ; William,

Broadnax farm,

in

Maries,near Romney, 406; Coates’s, of Romney, 458,

Clare, Walter de, 437. Clarke, John, clerk, 207 Clarke’s, of Afliford, 357.

Cl.AVERTIGH MANOR, /« ham, 106; Farm, 109,

46 Cobbe, Benjamin, /^rofGoogie-hall, and lands in New1

church, 342 ; Robert, lejfee of Scotney, alias Blechingcourt MANOR, in Lid, 431. Cobbe’s, of Cobbes-court, 85; of Aldington, 3 1 1 account of, 316; Cobbe’s, ofNewchurch,

Cobbes-place, in Newchurch, Cobbe's, alias Lodge 341 ;

5*

VOL. VIII.

Clinton, Sir John de, 177; Clinton’s, 158, 167. Clinton, tower in Dover caflle,

334,341, 461.

232, 449;

Claphill hamlet, in Aldington, ^

Clif-

;

origin of, 450. Clache’s, 411.

3

;

St.

Old Romney,

in

de, 512.

Clifton, Sir Gervas, 363 tons, harts. 333.

pojfejfes

Chene-court. Cheyn-court. Chicheley, Florence, 431. Children, George, pojjejjes Berry-court,

413.

Walter

»57-

Charles’s, of Addington, 489. a. Chart, Great, ^(27 /^

Cheriton,

Kill

land, 342. Cobham, Sir

Thomas, 383 Cobham’s, of Sterborough, ibid.

;

Cobham, John,

alias ~&to 6kt,

334-

£/(?-

c

Cock, Henry, heirs of, pojfcfs the Oaks, alias Bifliops Enbrooke

INDEX.

XIV

manor,

brooke ton,

Cheri-

in

CoCKr.ESCOMBE MANOR, Liddon,

Coppyn, George, 452.

CoFTHALL,

194.

MANOR

128;

in

and

BOROUGH, in Braborne, 22. Cockride manor, in Rucking, 348. Codd’s, of Watringbuiy, 105. Codham’s Corner, in Seafaltcr, 503.

Coc, Robert, 294. Coldham MANOR. J^eCaldham. Coldwell, John, clerk, 230. Colebrooke’s, of Chilham, 320, of God-

,

manor

merfliani

and par-

fonage, a. 545.

Colepeper, Thomas, 329, 520. Colliers hill in Merfliam, 316. Colkins,inBoughtonBlean,538. Collens, ]ohn, poffejjes Frizley,

Cranbrooke, a. 540. Collier, John, 51. Collins, James, foj^ejjes Frenin

churli, in Ha\vkhurft,A. 542. Collins’s, of Hythe, 241, 371,

1

Coronation,

Columbers,

alias

family of, 11, 212, 216. Colvyle’s, 293, 295.

Combe manor, in Braborne, 21,29; manor in Haftingligh, 29 manor in Hawking, 149 MANOR in New;

;

ington,

FARM, Combe’s,

fervices at,

206

Limne,

in

;

183, 298. 21.

Comyn, John,

Cofmus Bleane. See Bleane. Cotman, Rev. Jofeph, a. 547. Coventry, John, clerk,

Thomas,

truftees

Shottlesfield

of Bade-

nagh, 18. Cona 7it, John, Jirefent re^or of Sellindge, 314.

Con DIES HALL,

/« Whitjlaple^

512.

372;'

of, pojfefs

manor,

in £le-

ham, 100. Slaugham, 341,

of

49 S> 497 AT,

alias

STREET,

in

-

Court

CouRTUp-

Limne,

292;

chapel of, 296.

Court at Week manor,

in

Snave, 396, 472.

Court at More.

Cowper,

A-i?

Peter,

Swayclift'e

More-court.

earl,

pofejfes

MANOR, 520; and

advowfon of earls,

reftory,

523

;

320.

Cozofreetfair^SiX Folkeftone, (/?/ o/’,

1

77

A 540. .

Craniner, Robert, 224. Cranfton, James, 51.

Crautkorne, alias CrayTHORNE MANOR, in Hojie All Saints, 417, 472, a. 555. Crauthorne's, 417. Craythorne-houfe, in Tenterden, A. 343. Crevcquer, Hamo de, 143

Hugh

earl

245,

347 > 348Coienton’s, 112, 116.

C R A N B R O O K E,/ai

251. Columbels,

323.

/irefent reAor i o of Elchnm, , Jd'^itterJham, of 493.

Covert’s,

321.

Coleman Richard,

in Aldington,

IVilliam,prefent vicar

Corniisallis.

de, 146.

Crevequcr’s, 40, 137, 164, 191, 48b, 5^5’ 53^* Criol’s, 1 1, 64, 69, 71, 1 18, 122, 131, 143, 164, 191, 198,

206,289, 291,339)406,407, 487.

Confecration of churches, /om of^ 216.

Criipe’s. 223

Cooke,

Crilpini,

Sir Philip,

Covuv^ST

426.

in Aldington,

323. Copperas houfes at Whitftaple, 507. ,

; of Grimgllland Quekes, 311, 312, 316.

Roman

family of, 424.

Cromer, William, 241.

Cromp, Richard, 247. Cromwell,

XV

INDEX. Cromwell, Thomas,

lord, 1519,

325; 322; Mrs

Margaret, 24.7; Deedes’s, of llyi\\Q , account of

parijhof, a. 546. See alfo .

Culpeper, Thomas, 41 Colepeper.

alfo

Cumbe’s, 21, 149Combe’s. Cundie, William, 512. Cundies-hall, John de, 512. Ciirbefpine, Ralph de, rag, 2 12. Curfon, Francis, a. 537. Jeremiah, 370, 416;

George in

pojfejjes

Diimborne,

Richard

ibid.

Heronden, ibid. Curteis and Roberts, poffefs

Whitfield -houfe,

in

4S'o-

Cuthred, king of Kent, 354.

Thomas-BaiTett-Len-

nard, lord, 201. Ballet’s, 436.

Dane manor, in Elmfted, 36. Danes, iranfadions of in Kent, 40, 82, 154, 170, I 79, 466, 481 Daniel, Vincent, 437. Daniels, John, 502. Dannet, George, 426. Dapifer, Alured, 135. Darell, Henry, of Little Chart, account

of, 547Dafliwood, Sir Francis, 455*

Dan e-court, 36

;

in

Brcnfet

390-

Deanry,

Aldington mefnes, 320

rural, at

;

;

MANOR,

321 ; Rutfins hill, 322, and Copthall, in Aldington, 323 ; I-alconhurft, alias

Goldenhurlf farm,

in

378. Delves, John de, 21 3. Dene, chapel of, in Elmfled, 43. Dene, Ansfridde, 367. Dengemarsh, in Lid, 431,

Dengenefs, in Lid, 424. 432. Denis, Sir Peter, account of,\oj. Denne, of Lid, heir of. pofejs an eflate in Eaftbridge, 27O;

Den lie’s,

Liminge, 89.

Delbouverie’s, account of 161. Dechair, Richard Blacket, prefent vicar of of ling, 218.

19.

Denftroud common, 524. Denton, Robert de, 527. Den ward, Mrs. pojfejfes a fourth part of Stelling

manor,

93. Jacob, 107, 181, 243,244; Defbouverie's,i67,

Defbouverie,

Defpencer, Philip le, 86. Defpencer, Francis, lord le, 397.

Thomas, Court

Davis’s, 167. in Elm/led,

Hythe, 239 and deShryinpendcn

at

manor

421,422,423,424,446,469; PLACE, 432.

D.

alias

SEAT

Defray, John, clerk, 443. Delangle, Theophilus, clerk,

Tenterden, a. 543.

Deane,

a

Melli's.

Alli-

Cuftoms.eftabliflinientsof, 423,

Dacre,

;

pojfejfes

Ro

;

poJfef)'es\Jv^^\.%, alias

enden,

220

Hurft, 329; Old Chenecourt, in Ivechurch, 403 ; Belgar manor, in Lid, 429.

Tenterden, a. 543

bert

238, 250. 251, 525. Deedes, William, pojfejfes Brabornc-court lodge, j 9 a s e at Saitwood, in at Sandling, ;

See

Curteis,

19,

Julius, 242, 243, 270,

165, i8t, 186, 201. Cropley’s, 431. Crolby’s. 3 22.

Crondal,

M. D.

Deedes, William,

Suave,

at

lord

ie,

poJJejjCs

Week manor,

in

Woodrove,

in

ibid.

Ebeney, 496. of ChrifDering, Richard, chach, 297. Dering, Sir Edward, bart, 24.2 ;

account of,

a.

548.

P

c 2

Bering,

XVI

INDEX.

Dering,

Sir

Burmarfh

Edward,

/ioJ)e{fes

manor, withAb-

bots-court, 261

More ma-

;

nor s,in R licking,

357; Eaftchnrch and Honichild ma-

of Maifon Dieu in, 277,278, 313, 416 ; caflle, 31 lands ;

held of, i

128,

J22,

54, 85,

34 136, 137, 144, 149,157, »

165, 190, 192, 193, 194, 213,

nor, 278,416 Tinton manor, in Warehorne, 370;

261,273,290,295, 305,308,

Dean-court, in Brenfet, 391 land in Lid, 433 a part of Condies-hall, in Whitllaple,

Dover, Richard, fuffragan bifliop of, 340 Fulbert de, ;

Cheftfield manor, in SwayclifFe, 522; Clowes

Dour river,

;

;

513;

wood and

Boteler’s court, in

Bleane, 525, 531.

Dering, John-Thurlow,/o^_^j VVickins, in Charing, a 547. Dering’s, of Heyton, 67, 68 of Egerton, 104. Dering’s, of Surrenden, 277, .

;

^78

j

account of,

432, 456,

513-

DenngsdrofF and Marfli,in Lid, 433 Deringus de Morinis, 68. Detling, William de, 166. Dicconfon, William, 2 14, 307,

332, 341, 362, 569.

509. fourceof, 134. Dowle-freet, \n Fluckley ,a 548.

Dowles FARM, in Elmfted, 34, Drake, Rev. Ralph, 191, 202 ; account oF, 203, 208, 226, 267 ; William, heirs of, pofefs Lit-

tleOvens, in Selling, a. 539; Drake’s, of Cam^ridgefhire, 56 r. Dray, Freebody, 458. Drayton, his Folyolbion, 477. 2); elitigore H a M l E T , n A Ikham -

i

-

310.

Digby, Henry, 403 Kenelm, 445 Joaiie, 25 Diggs’s, of Chilham, 320. ;

-

;

Dimchurcii, par'tfi of, 264, Wall, /« Romney 553 5

I

Marjh, account of, 265, 473. Dimock, Henry, prefent leBor

of

Black?nan/ione, 275. Dingley’s, 118.

D’ldbnden, Ralph de, 98. Dix, Jo/hua, picjent re^orofOld Romney, 445. Dixwell, Col. 12 1

242

;

Bafil, 144, ; Dixweil’s, of Terling-

hamand Brome,93, 160, isl. Donations, Saxon, curious f/iecimenof, 288. Dover

pier, 6, 173 town and port of, lyi burgelTes of, 339; priory of St Martin’s HI) 114, 339, 497. hofpital ;

.

134.

Dryden, Jonathan, clerk, 196. Duckworth, J. Bafil, a. 549.

Dudmanswike, alias New Barne Lees, in Hope, 418.

Duke’s, 102. Dumborne, in Tenterden, a. 543,

Duncombe, Mr. oftheM^ef, 309.

MANOR, in

Dunk, John,

Elmlted, 34. Stocks

poffefes

farm, in Smeeth, 3. Dunk’s, of Smeeth, 9. Dunkirk, HAMLET OF, 173, Dunn, Rev. Mr. a. 542. Dunning, William, 418. Durant’s, 461. Eatchend <^ww/g-.4,inLiminge,78. Eadbald, king, .170, ^ ^ 179. Eadred, king, 518. Eadfy,

/r/g/?, 2S8, 487. Eanfwith St. 154, ,80, 185. Earthquakes felt in Kent, 220.

Eastbridge ,pari 9 oF,2 ,

553

4*7

J

;

manor

c’tlet of,

76,

72

of, 266,

85,

Eafl

XVI

INDEX. Eaft Lyghe, 85. court.

Sie

Eastwell, parijh MANOR, 472.

of^

Lyghe-

Thomas Cromwell,

earl

149, 159, 165, 181, 191, 201, 222, 223, 269, 389. Eftday, Henry, 251 ; Eftday’s, of Saltwood, 220. Eftotinges. See Stowting. of,

a. 546

;

Eaton, Lott, pojfeffes a part of Sweet Arden manor, in Cheriton, 195.

Ebeney,

ElTex,

pri-

parijh of

ory, manor of, 494. Ebolestone, alias Weli.-

couRT MANOR,

Bleane,

ill

530 Echingham’s, account of, 41 1, 429. Echinghill or Eachend HAMLET, in Liminge, 80. Ediva, queen, 3 1 7. Edolph, John, 22; Edolph’s, -

Eftraites.

See Street.

Ertrei, lath of, 498.

Eftretone, 339. Ethelbert, king, 169. Ethelwulf, king, 366, 494. Eve’s, 414. E V E G A T E M A NO R , in Smceth

Evelyn, Mr.

3

his difcourje onforcft

trees, 23. Evelyn, Vfilliani, Capt. of Sand-

gate

cajlle,

245

183

;

William

;

William, Glanvillc,

194.

390.

Evelyn, William

Egbert, king, 366. Eg'e.kt: on, parijh of

A. 547.

Eldred, John, 137, 298, 320; Eldred’s, 167. A. 55 ^* E'LV.iWU, parijh of MANOR OF, 118; park-

wood, 109. Elen-hill seat,

in Hawkhurft,

A. 542.

Elfords seat, in Hawkhurft, a,

•Glanville,//o/‘-

y^j-Oxenden farm,

in Salt-

wood, 227; Belleview, 292, and Wellop manor, in Limne, 298; lejfce of Limpe parfonage, 302.

Everden manor, ti’ffEvering. Evering manor, in Alkham, 137 ; ward tithes, 141 ; Everi»g’s,

i37> i57» *93*

Eversfield’s, 383.

ibid,

EvIN GTON-COURT SEAT,

Elgar’s, 10 1.

ElleNden

in

501 Ellis’s, 368.

Elmfled, 34, i 6 \yokeof, ib. family of, ibid. Evyas, Theobald, 501.

Elm ST ED, parijh

Ewe,

UAtiOV., in Seajal-

fer,

of, 33, a. 551. Elnefbroc, Walter de, 192. Elwes, of Berkfhire, 36.

earls of, 47, 97, 98. in Staplc-

Exhurst manor, hurji, a.

541.

Emmerfon, Thomas, 430. Enbrook, ftream of, in Cheriton, i8g.

Enbrook, family

of,

192.

Ensbrook manor, ton,

in Cheri-

ibid.

Engelbert, Walter,

135.

Engham’s, 356, 371. Eppes’s, 452. Erafmus, Roterodamus, 326. Eflex, Henry de, i6, 22, 369.

F.

Fagge, Rev. Sir John, a. 344 ; of Fagge’s, of Limne, 299 Sull'ex, 383; ofBrenfet, 390, ;

392. Fairbrook

farm,

Fairfield,

a. 537*

parifh

f,

;

manor

of, 382. Falconers Hurft. See Hurft. Falconer, Godfrey le, 328.

Fal-

INDEX. Gol Fitz-Derijig’s,

xviii

Falconhurst, alias DENHURST FARM, in

329; MANOR OF, 472. Fane, Hon. John, 243 George, of Badfell, 418; Thomas, 520; Fane’s, 376. Fanfcombe manor, in Hafting-

Fitzneal, William, 36. Fitzpain, Roger, 510. Fitz-Peter, Jelfry, 176. Fitz-Reginald, Peter de, 305, Fitz-Roger’s, 306.

;

Flegg3-cou R.T, king MANOR,

ligh, 29.

Farewell’s, of Boughton, 525. Farnabye, Sir Charles, 23,244, 245.

Flegh’s, Fleet,

Anthony, 512.

Farrer,

Farthing/ole

farm,

in

53



Hoptons Alkham, 137.

Fe£i:or, Peter, pojjejjes in

Fermor’s, alias Godfrey’s, of Lid, account of 426. Feme, alias Capell, chapel of, 140. Fettiplace’s, 430. Fienes, 185.

Dorothy, 307. Finch, John, truftees of, pojfefs an eftate in Eaftbridge, 276

Filoll,

;

Haw-

alias

148.

148, 150.

Thomas,

pojfejpis

Wild-court,

alias

Eleham,

109. Fauconer’s, alias Falconer’s, 328. Faverfliam, abbot and convent of, 501. Faiifiett, Rev. Bryan, 62, 63.

MANOR,

of Heyton, 68.

Fitzgerald, Maurice, 18,

Hurjl

Well,

in Bleane,

‘-

Flete, tithes of,

1 79. Fletcher, Brice, 7.

Fogge, George, of Braborne, 100. Fogge’s,

85,

204, 407; 1 8, 190,

203,

of Repton, 71

72,

,

1

191.

Folkestone, hundred of, 120; PARISH OF, 152, A. 552;

town

of, 143, 170; barony 122, 127, 134, 136, 148, of, account of, 149; 157, 164, 166, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194,

202;

MANOR

OF, 122,130,

> 35 . >79; park, 135, 192; PRIORY OF, 156, 179; parfonage, 147. Folkeffone, Sandwich de, fami_

Dering’s place, in Lid, 434; Mr. 74; hon. Heneage, 242 John, of I.imne, 277, 278, 342 Saville, 434; Finch’s, of the Moat and Eaftwell, 260 ; of

’b.Xis. JioJJ'epfes

;

;

Limne, 299. Finclicocks seat, 539

in

Goudhurft,

ly,

barons of,

158

Bonve-

;

rit's ,\\{co\n\ls , account of,\6z

Font,

curious one, at

Brookland,

384. Foord’s, Mefirs. pojfefs gill, in Whitftaple,

James

Grim512;

occupies Cheftfield, in

SwayclifFe, 522.

*.

Finchdeny iiiTenterden, a. 543. Fineux’s, 123.

Fordforfall, \v\ Folkeftone, 152.

Finnis, Robert, fojjejfes a part of Sotmere manor, in Ca-

Chart, A. 548. Fordice, John, M. P. for New Romney, 456. Fordred, William, 8, 23, 61 , 77,

pell, 146. Fitzalan, Sir John, 213 John, lord of Clun and Ofwalter, ;

347

hamlet,

;

in

Little

299, 311, 324.

Foreman, John,

*

Fitzbernard, Ralph, 341, 448 Fitzbernard’s, 86, 444.

Ford-mill

and

others,

Shiphurlf manor, in Marden, a. 539.

Foreland

INDEX. Foreland

manor

Stretch-

,

land.

ForfiMm, Kent, where, 480. Fotherbye, Charles, D. D. 327. Fowle, John, 268.436; IVilliam K^inge, prejent re^or of Burmarjh, 264 reHorof Snar~ gate, 378 governor of South-

;

;

lands hofpital, in Neiv Ro/nnty,

459 Fowle, Jofeph, pojfeffes Upper andLowerBoxhiird,inHawk*

hurft, A. 542. Foxhole FARM, in

Swingfield,

Franklyn, John, 323 ; Franklyn’s, of Wye, 407. Frauncy’s, John, 458. Freeman, Thomas, prefent JequeJirator of Li ddon vicarage, 132. Frenchurft, in Hawkhurft, a. -

Frith, or Fright, chafe of, in Al-

dington, 315.

FRITTENDEN,/iflr //5 of, A. 541, Frizley, in Cranbrooke, a 540. .

Frogwell HAMLET, in ton, 198.

Fryerne,

Newing-

FA RK M ANOR , S telling, 94. Fuller, Rofe, 455.

Furnefe, Sir Henry, 123 ; Fnrnefe’s, of Walderfliare, 128, 391, 45

5,

25.

i'lg, 357 Geohegan, Ignatius, 93. -

Gerard, Stephen, 85. Gibbins Brook, in Stanford, 66.

Gibbon, William, 223. Gignajh seat, in Weft well,

a.

546. Gibbs’s, of Capell, 145. Gilbert,

Humphry, 214

Sir

;

460, 502,

GimmingeBrookefin Stanford ,66. Gipps, George, leffee of Elmfted parlonage, 44; George, clerk,

303

;

George,

304,

274j 329-,, Glanville, William, 194, 244, 250, 292, 298. Gloucefter, Thomas, duke of, 510. Goddard, Samuel, pojjejfes Bonnington, alias Kennetts MANOR, with Bonnington Pin FARM, 335 ; Goddard’s, ibid.

Godden,

Holyrood-

Fynch, Vincent,

Gay’s, of Elmfted, 37, 41, 42. GeUibraad,Rev. Jofeph,^o^£^« Poundhui'il MA NOR, in Riick-

Gilbert’s, 316.

121

542

XlX

5

1

1.

alias Hztbcvt.,

See alfo Finch.

Robert, fojfejfes Finchden seat, in Tenter-

den, A. 543.

Godiiey, David, pojfejfes Great Hodiford, in Seliindge, 311; Sarah, ibid. William pojfejfes

Packmanftone manor, 340; Peter, of I. id, 433 Thomas, 31 1,435 Chamberlain, 401 Edward, of Apnldore, 495. ;

;

Fynes, lords, Clintonand Save,

Godfrey’s, of Hodiford, 31 1, 312, 313, 340; of Aiding, ton, 321, 322, 323, 325 ; of Lid, 383, 401, 412 account of 426, 436, 453.

73 > 93. 39 ’ 143.. 150alfo Fines, and Clinton. >

G.

;

Gadfley’s, 357.

Gale, Dr. his

comment on An-

toninus’s Itinerary, 81,

J99,

Godman, Thomas, 136; Godman’s, 167.

219. Garwinton’s, 103.

GodmekshaM,

Gafeoyne, Thomas, 403.

Godwin,

Gate, Sir John, 510, 517. Gate filver, cuftem of, 530.

276, 293, 425. Gokin, Richard, 9.

545

parifi

of,

a.

*

earl,

170,232,233,

Gol

XX Goldevhurst,

INDEX. alias

con hurst FARM,

Fal-

in Hur/i,

Green

See

fliields.

pojfejjes

Exhurft

;

Riiodes-coiirt, in

Selling, A, <39.

pojfefes

Staple,

in

Grove’s, 271,

;

481. Grove MANOR, in Haftinglelgh, 29.

Grubbe,Robert,5i

3;

Grubbe’s,

100.

Grundy, John, 495.

500. Goldiuell

manor,

hurft, A. 541

Goldftone, Thomas, prior of Chrift-church, 380,441,494,

SEAT,

in Aldington,

317.

Gomeldon, Thomas, 214, 299, 307; William, 431; GoI

manor.

Grove, Rev. 'Harry,

329.

Golde, Henry, clerk, 297. Goldfynch, Saiindir, 125. Golding, Sir Thomas, 277

Mr.

Grimglll

meldon’s, of Sellindge, 123 ; account of, 309. Goodmans MAKORi in Bleane, 525. in Newchiirch, 342. Goring, Sir Charles Mathew, 390. Goudhurff, a. 539. Gould’s, 520. Gonlfoiin, Chriftopher, ^16. GmiHfon’s, 454, 461. Grafton, in Whitftaple, 509. FARMjin SaItwood,224.

Graveney,

Giieftling, court of, 450.

Guildford Marfli, 469. Guildford, Richard, 35^. Guildford, Catherine, countefs of, 123 ; George-Auguftus, earl of, pojfejfes

Boynton,

North,

alias

and Bonnington

MANOR, in Swingfield, 123 ; Holyrood,fl//a^ Fryerne-park

MANOR, leffee

of

in

Stelling,

Fairfield

and advowfon of curacy, 380, 381.

Guines, Baldwin, earl of, 200; abbey of, 207, 392. Guldeford’s, 496.

Gurney, Hugh de, 307.

Gravier, David, 311. Gray, John, M. D. 355. Graydon’s, of Fordwich, 34,

Gujboms FARM, A. 537.

H. Haddington, Thomas,

Green, Thomas, 53

oZ/cj

Norton,

'-

Green’s, 292, 298, 531.

94;

manor,

A. 538.

of,

alias

manor,

Hall-court

earl of,

430. Hadloe’s, 294. Haffenden, Stephen,

Simnells, in Aldington, 323.

323 ; James, heirs oi,pojfefs^n eftate in St. Maries, near Romney, 408 ; Haffenden’s, of Romney, 461. Hagene. Aglme-court.

5 ‘i-

H ALDEN,y4flri//;

Greenford, John, 130. Greenhill, Stephen, pojfrjfes

Greenshields, alias GrimGILL manor, /V; M'hitfaple,

Greply,

Francis, prefent -vicar of Stone, in Oxney, 486; M-^iL Ham, prejent vicar of leave

B

536.

Gregory’s, of St. Maries, near Romney, 408.

of, A. 543. Halfden, a Saxon prince, 221,

232. Hales, Sir James,

106; Edw.

242, 243 ; Sir Edward, 320; hjfee of Stone parfonage, 484 Brocket manor, in

Ebcne,

index. Sir Thomas, Ebene, 496 Chriftopher, Sir 244; 919. ;

jixi

Hanifield, CIcmencia de, 500. Hanville green, a. 538,

Hales’s, 1035 of Tunltall, 274,

292,298, 304, 402^407,496; of the Dungeon, 86,290, 333, 336.

Richard, clerk, 90, Richard, 135; Halford’s, ofCanterhury, 105,146. Halke,John,3T Halke’s, i i,i 3. Haltord,

91;

;

Hall MANOXt, alias

Smeeth,

in

W tNGMERE

in EleJiam,

North

104;

COURT,

4;

MANOR, 122;

Sii'ingfielci ,

Hall-court, alias MalWAiNEs MANOR, inAlkham, 134

Kennington, 274.

Ha LMEDE,<2//
H ALTON

MANOR, in Alhham MANOR, inFolkeJIone, 165. Halton, William de, 138. Ham, hundred of, 360 manor, in IVarehorne, 363 3 70 Hamflreet hamlet, 361, 366. 138;

;

,

;

Hambrook, Stephen and Richard,

pojjejs

Burnt-houfe, in

Chartham, a. 544. Hanimill-grecn

hamlet,

in

Hamon’s, ofAcrife, 113.

Hamond, George, 67

Thomas,

Har INGE M A N o R

mond’s, 5:2.

in Svvingfield, 121

;

An-

thony prefcnt

vicar of Limne, tcAor of Ivechiirch, 406.

m

h.

,in

Bt abornCj

22, A. 551.

Hampton’s,

67

,

/a Sellindge,

307.

Harman, Mrs.

the dif-

pojfeffes

folved hofpital in Romney, 458. Harnett, Peter,/so^^TCocklefin Liddon,i

129. Harpsfield, Nicholas,

LL. D.

230.

Harpur, Sir George, 489. Harrifon, Mrs. p^'ejfes Aaron, in

Charing, a. Hey ton

poffeffes

547

Tho.

;

manor,

in

Stanford, a. 552.

Harvey, Dr. William, nent Jihyfdan, account 184,

298;

the emiof,

177,

Thomas, 206;

John, 242; Harvey’s, 183, 185.

Harwich,

22.

i/<2 «^(?/,/FARM,inBirchoIt,

Hanetone, land of, 22. Hangres, hills fo Called, 80. VOL. Vllt.

boroughof,\\\

12.

Whit-

505, 506.

Harte, Thomas, 434 ; Harte’s, of Sellindge, 313, 436.

Hartriuge,

Ha

;

Hammond, James, 119; Hammond pojfejjes Foxhole ma-

>

Sir

Hardres’s, 35, 41, 93, Hard wick, lord chancellor, 133. Harefield, a. 538.

ftaple,

Hamo, Viceconics, 41, 525. Hamon, Alexander, 102, 116;

303

Hardres,

Harwood, Ralph, 118.

Warehorne, 366.

Hamrton

ii, 13,

-

combe manor,

-

Hall, Peter de, 136; Hall’s, of

nor,

account of,

Harbledown, hofpital of, a, 537 Hardres, Upper, church of, 95,

in Cranbrooke,

a,

540.

HASTINGLIGH,/rt;;>i? 3^,27, A. Haftings, John de, 18. Hallings, in Siiffex ; Reward of the Rape of, 429.

Hatch, alias Smeeth heath, 2. Hatch’s, 357. Hatton, George Finch, a. 546. Plant’s, 29, 30, 4D'86,92, 103, 273, 274, 290, 368, 395. HAWKHURST,/’<2 r//7;o/’, A. 542. Hawking, 3/', 147.

Hawkins’s^

INDEX.

XXll

Hawkins’s, of Nafh,335, A.53

7.

Hay, Humphry, 67.

Hayman, Thomas, lindge ringe

365.

foJJeJiles

Sel-

manor, 307; manor, 308; Great Ha-

Wilmington and Somerfield, 310.

New

Hayman,

Peter, fiojj'ejfes Langport,«i/flj Septvans

nor,

ill

Lid, 43

ma-

I.

Hayte’s, 67.

Hayward, Mrs.

poJfeJp;s

Ellen-

den MANOR, inSeafalter, 502. Hazelden, William, lejjeeoi the parfonage-houfe in Goudhurft, A. 539. Sir Francis,

Head,

Jiojfefs

heirs of,

Weftbrooke,

in Lid,

434Healthinefs of air,inftance of,Q 5

Heaton, Henry,

clerk, 406.

'Hv.A'SZt hundred of 210. Hearn forjiall^ in Folkeflone,

152.

Herne, lands

in, 511.

Hede, burgefTes Hedelinth, lath

in, 83. of,

498.

Helchin-houfe, in Elmlled, 34.

Heminge manor, 6or7ie^

20

Herlackenden, Old, borough

:n

Bra^

FferWew

manor jinHawkhurft,

A. 542.

Hernehurft, 519.

Hern ehill, pariJJi

a. 538. Heron, Thomas, 320, 321. a, Heronden, in Tenterden, 543Herring fijhery, at Lid, 422. Heirys’s, at Crixey, 224.

Hervey, 273, 298. Hcthe, 221. Hetherington’s, 100. Hewett’s, 94, 295. Hey, Rev. Thomas, 124, 126,

Heyman, Mary,

1

16

Peter,

;

241, 242, 291, 312; Sir Henry, 242; William, 299, 311 ; Heyman’s.94,106,307 account

of,

309.

Heyton manor,

in Stanford,

67, A. 552. Heyton’s, 68. Hieron,Sampfon,cIerk, A. 544, Hill, John, clerk, 108. Hills, Avery, 20; Hills’s, 102. Hills, extraordinary iiiftance of their flipping forward, 287. Hinxhill, See Lid.

.

of,

of,

a. 549.

Hencle’s, 104.

Hyda.

Henden’s, 376, 490, 496. Heneage, Thomas, 510.

Hoade court manor,

Henewood farm,

Hoadley,

inPcJilingj

Henewood, Edmund

bifliop, a. 540.

Hobday, Stephen, 150

215. de, 21:;.

Hendley, Walter, 260, 341 ,396, 417, 494> 497* Henhurjl^ in Staplehurft, a. 541.

Henniker, John, 456. Henihaw, Edward, 513. Flerbert, Sir Charles, 99. flerdfon’s, of Folkeftone, 93, i39> H3» 165, 181, 185, 191, 202.

Heringod’s, 35, 47, 50. 277. Herlackenden*s,ot\Vuodchurch 402.

in

Bleane, 528.

;

Hob-

day’s, 20, 195. Hockeridge, in Cranbrook,

a. 540 in Hawkhurll, a. 542. Hode-houfe,m Acrife, iii. Hodges, Thomas, pojfcjfts Par;

ker’s

MANOR,in Warehorne,

372

a houfp at the Lecon,

;

in Warehorne,366; tiodges’s,

3/2. 373-

Hodifokd, Great and Little,

in Sellindge,

Hodiford, John, Hogbea’s, 323,

310.

ibid.

Holgatc>‘

xxm

INDEX Holgate, Rev. George, pojfeffes the advowlon of Stowting re<^foi y, 5

1

;

re£ior

lirefent

of

Hollway, William, 87* Holm,.^
Holyngbroke, William, 462.

Holyrood manor, alias Fry ERNE-PARK MANOR, in Stelling, 94.

Honychild MANOR,

Hope 277, 406, 416, in

417, 472, A. 555. Sir John,

pojfejfes

the court leet of the hundred Franchife, 2

of Bircholt

manor, and 4,

8

5,

;

Bra-

MANOR, 20; Helchin

houfe, 34; Holt, ibid. Evington SEAT, 39 ; and Bottfham, in Elmfted, 41 ; Clavertigh

MANOR,

in

Cafeborne

manor,

farm, ington, in

;

in

Cophurft,

324; LygheLiminge, a. 552; in court, John, a. Sir John, 550; Bleane of clerk, 264; lefee MANOR, alias Hoade-court, Filmer, pojfejjes 529 in Aldington,



theHonywood FARM,inPoftRadbrook and ling, 215; Vedling man or, in Saltwood, S27 ; William, poJfe(Jes Lyghe-court manor, 87 ; Longage, in Liminge,A. 552 ;



Mary, of

parifi of,

4 »S»A- 5 S 5 Hopley, Mufgrave, a. 543. -

H OPTONS

MANOR,

in Alklia?n,

Hopton’s, 137. Horii-ftreet, in Cheriton, 189. Horne manor, in Kenarding-

136

;

ton, A. 543.

Horton A.

MoNKs,/ari/5 552; manor, 472

ORY,

7,

1

account

of,

o/",

;

52.

PRI-

22, 25, 30, 53,54; 58, 369, 417.

Horton Kirkby manor, ioi, 112.

Hrocing.

See

Rucking.

Hougham, William,

pojfejfes

a

fourth part ofStellingM a n o r

,

Hount’s, 355. Howdell, William, prcfcnt vicar of Weft Hyih, 258.

New206; Street MANOR,

Limne, 296

Z« Folke-

Che-

in

Sene, alias Singe ; 205, and Blackwole,

Canons-court,

Hope -HOUSE FARM,

94; Hougham’s,ofHougham,

riton, 194 alias

.

106; 193, and

Eleham,

Enbrook manor,

541

Hopday’s, 168.

Horne’s, 194.

Honywood,

borne

in Poftling.

Henewood. Hooker, John, of Brcnchley, a.

Hope, All Sai NTS,

Holy Maid of Kent,y?o>jye/',296.

Scott’s hall,

37,227,41,42,215,241,418.

Honywood farsi,

fone, 167.

in Lid, 4 ^ 3 * Elmfted, 34, Holt, in

Holmeftone,

Evegate-hall

oft

See

Stowting, ibid.

All Saints,

Honywood hmAy, account

Cliaring, 9

d z

'

167.

_

Howland,

fs\x . pojfejfes 'Y'wxKow

houfe, 366 ; Harman pojj'ejfes the court-lodge, and part of the demefnes of Tinton ma-

nor, in Warehorne, 370 ; Howland’s, of Warehorne, ibid.

H ugeflen

/o^^^rLittle , William, Hodiford, in Sellindge, 311 Hugeflen’s,ofProvender,3 16,

Hughes, Henry, 144. Hulle, Richard, 356. Hume’s, 84. Hund’s, of Lid, 416.

Hunt, Robert, and of Trienftone Burmarfli, 261.

o\.\\tx%,leJfui

manor,

in

Hun-

INDEX.

XXIV

Huntingdon, William de ClinHiirleigh, John, 487. 1:lvK%T, parijh of, 327 ,

Hilton, Godfrey

Hy THE TOWN,

a

554

.

.

328.

le,

Seafalter,

W

qo4

hitfaple, 517. of Jones, Mr. pojfeffes a houfe in Stanford -ftreet, 64. Jordan, Thomas, prefent re Bor

14; John, 137. Ireland, Robert de Vere, duke of, 510. Bircholt,

Jacks-court. See Jaqiies-court. Jacob, William, 183 ; Mr, the PudIijs obfcrvations on ding-pan rock, 508 ; Jacob’s,

of Dover. 30. yaques, alias Jack's cow

in

Lid

429. hoiiejiy

William,

Ifaac,

Ifurium, ftation of, 8 1 V E c H u R c H , pariJJi of, 400, Juxon, Elias, clerk, 327. I

K.

heirs

of,

fi^e/s

WeftburiesM ANOR.in Rucking, 356.

manor of, 394,401. Jeake, Samuel, 430. Ickham,

Jeffordftone, culet oj, 85. Jekin, Thomas, 372. Jemmett, William, lejfee of Orgarfwike manor, 271 ; jioffeffes

Apdale

Praul’s

FARM,

manor,

with

in Stone, 481.

Jenner, Dr. John, poJJeJfes?i part of the advowfon of Midlev

RECTORY, 413

;

prefejit rec-

tor of Midley, 4 1 Jenkin’s pojfefs Stowting

dred and MANOR, A.

55 »; Jenkin’s,

count of, 49. Jenkins, Sir Lionel,

liam, 512. Ikcnild way, 80, 81.

;

his

on

ohfervations

Pudding-pan rock, 508. Keinjkam, in Rolvenden a 542. Kelloivs MANOR, in Salt wood, the

,

.

Mr. poffejfcs a houfe in Hawking, 147; lej'ee of

Kelfey,

Fleggs-court, 149. Richard, prefent curate of Fairfield, 381.

Keljhe,

Kelway, Robert, clerk, 251.

Kempe, Sir Thomas, 340; Tho. Brenfet-place, 390 cardinal, archbifhopof York,

pojfejjes

392

;

Reginald, of Crundal,

49, 50.

Kempe’s, of Ollantigh, 49, 3 36. Tenterden, a. 543. Kenardingtnn manor, 348, 472 Great, borough of, 365. Kenardington, parijh of, a. 543,

Kenchill, in

;

Ken net’s

hun-

parochial

antiquities,

216.

Kennet,

33,

33

Mr.

Keate,

221.

ibid.

Jarpenville, William de, 448. Ibbott, Thomas, clerk, 355;

Sufannah,

Ifaac’s,

;

of his

James, Sir Henry, 430. Jamys, Matilda, 408. Jarman, Nathaniel, 537; Jarman’s /o^^Brenley manor,

Boughton Blean,

103

of Bridge, 513.

private treafurers, 309.

in

prefent curate

;

f

Jackman’s, 295, 376.

king,

f

Johnfon, Thomas., prefent i/icar

I.

II.

Edmund, 306,

Edmund, 166

Jnirnith,

port of,

and

Hyth?,Weil.^Vff Weft Hythe.

James

Ikin’s, 426.

Ingelthorpe, Sir 308.

158, 167.

ton, earl of,

ac-

Baftl, clerk, 218, 269 Laude,/^ef of Braborue par-

fonage, 26.

242; Wil-

Kennett, Thomas,

minge manor,

pojfejfes

in

He-

Braborne,

20.

Kem-

INDEX. Kennetts, alias BonningTON MANOR, 333,334.

Ke N N

A 549. ON I N G Kenrick, William, 242. Kent, Hubert de Burgh, earl of, 200, 277, 278, 416. Kent luall, in Lid, 42 1 Keriel, Sir Thomas, 407 ; Keriel’s, of Weflenhanger, 71. Kidder, Thomas, lejjee of the demefnes of Halfin^!i
King, the,

117; re£fory, 262

;

vicarage, 3 tory, 419.

King, Mr.

1

3

;

in Hajiingligh,

John,

538

a.

in

537;

Lade’s, of

;

Faverfliam, 412.

30.

Poltling

manor,

New

Cheney-court, in Ivechurch, 403 John, 298. Knatchbull, Sir Edward, and ;

others., /lojje/s Merrud, 316. Knatchbull’s, 223, 403, 453. Knevett’s, 201. pojfejfes

Palftre

manor, 490, and Owlie manor, in Witterfliam,49i Richard, of Hythe, 285 ; Valentine, 312; Nicholas,

429; Tliomas, 456, A. 544; Mrs. Elizabeth, a. 545 Knight’s, of Hythe, 251 of ;

j

Thomas, 461.

Lambarde, Thomas, of

Rom-

ney, 461.

Lambert, Mrs a. 538. N M A N o R , /« K.olvenJen.f I

486.

Lamport,

manor

of,

44;.

See Langport.

Langdon, abbot

05.

Mrs.

Judy of, 28, 29, 33 Henry, duke of, 182.

LA mB

and Pound farm, 20; Pent and Shrine farm, in Polt-

Knight,

Blean,

Lancafter,

Knatchbull, SirEdward,y^o^^er the rents and fervices of Braborne MANOR and PARK,

;

pof-

farm,

Boughton A,

John

;

Piiicke, pof-

Kingfnoth, Henry, and others, pnffefs Midley MANOR, A.555. Kirkby, William de, 35,48,50;

215

Lade, Michael, 67 /ejjes Gufliborne

103,

Kings MILL- DOWN hamlet,

;

Lad’s, alias Lade’s, ofElehanr* 101, 103.

Lancafter,

A. 549; Kingfley’s, 321,372.

211

L.

Seafalter

Burton, in Kennington,

ling,

Kyrieli’s, 291, 299.

of

MANOR, 501. Kingfley, Thomas

1

Knight’s,

;

Godmerfham, 335 > 336; 490, 491. Knott, Valentine, 50. Knowler, John, 403. Kiuite, king, 154, 288.

LaDWOOD manor,

lejfee

Kiricby’s,

I.imne, 299, 323

of Acrlfe of Burmarfli of Sellindge of Hope rec-

patron

re£lory,

XXV

of,

94, 192,

193.

Langhorne, William, A.

M

. i

c

i

185, 188.

Langport, hundred of 415; Old manor, 425, 448; New, alias Septvans manor, in Lid, 430. Langley’s, of Knolton, 530. Lapis PopuU, 169. Lauderdale, Maitlands, earls of, 333 -

Lavendene, priory

of,

205.

Laufe’s, 528. Lecon green, at \Varehornc,3C6.

Lee, Richard, 520; Sir John de la, 528, Leeds, priory of, 116. Leicefter, of,

17,

Simon Montfort, earl 28; Sidney's, earls

395 495 )

-

Leigh's,

INDEX.

xxvi

Lemanis

p

ORTUS,

Aldglofe

tingligh,

Leigh’s, of Liminge, 85. Le Hangre, 68.

and

Jhation

of,

64,8 ,2 c;6,282,284,465,466. Lennard, Sir Samuel, 244. Lentwardyn, Richard, 487.

other eftates in

ligh,

manor, Hafting-

29, 30.

London, Ironmongers company

1

Lelfington’s, 167.

Lewes, church of

St.

Pancrafe

in, 54, 58.

Lewknor’s, 19,99,102,103,1 13. Lewis, John, clerk, 117,231,

ham MANOR,

279.

287. Limene^ river of 282, 285, 286,

354, 366,440,447,465,466, 467, 468. Liminge, parifi of 78, a. 552; park, 79 ; mona/lery in, 82 ; MANOK OF, 118, 232;

church

Limne,

of,

119.

farijh

A. 553

;

of,

282,

318,

vicar of, 257.

port of

234, 236, 254,

255. Linacre, Thomas, M. D. 326. Lincoln, Edward Clinton, earl of, 1 59. Linfwell, in Liminge, 80, 19S. Lipyeatt’s, of Swaycliff’e, 512.

Little Cheney-court,

in

Ivechurch, 403. Little i2 ii\i\T,Jinridiof, a,

547 -

Lodenden,

;

fliop ot, 49.

Longage farm,

in

Liminge,

55 79 » Longley, John, fojfeffes Calcot MANOR, in Midley, 412. Lonik G BOROUGH, hundred of 78.

Lovejoy’s, 295. Lovelace’s, of Betherfden, 356, 531* Lough borough, Alexander, lord, 84.

Louth, Simon, clerk, 535. Loundes, Charles, pojj'ejfes an eftatein Eaflbridge, 276. L. S. A. meaning of, 35. Luckhurft, Elizabeth, pojjejfes Craythorne-houfe, inTenterden, A. 543.

Ludwell, Elizabeth, 312. Lumley, Martin, 430; ley’s,

Lum-

412.

Lufliington’s, of Elmfted, 34, 36, 42, 135. Lutteridge’s, 129, 130.

Lvghe-court, alias East Lyghe manor, in Liminge, 85, A. 552

Lynch, Robert, M. D. lifters of, poffefs Heyton manor, in Rev. George, Stanford, 68 ;

in

Staplehurft, a.

541.

68, 210. Lypeatt’s, of SwayclifFe, 522.

Smeeth, 3, 9. abbey of, in Normandy, Lolley,

Loftie’s, of

1

100.

London, Bridewell hofpital in, 29 mayor and commonalty of, 55 ; Thomas Kempe, bi-

^*

Leyborne’s, 98, 339. 'LiT>,pariJhof, 420. 'Li-D'DEVi, /lariJJi of 127. Light-kouje at Dengenefs, 424. Lights in Tenterden, a. 543. Lilfden, in Hawkhurft, a. 542. Limenarcha, or lord warden,

Limne,

in, pofjejjes a rent out of Ele-

79, 180, 186. Sir Thomas, 333.

Lombe,

London, governors of mas’s hofpital

St.

in, pofefs

M. Macdonald, Donald,

ThoHaf-

leffee of Poulton Stanfted manor, in Aldington, 316. Maidftone, All Saints college

in,

487.

Mackenzie,

XXVll

INDEX. Mackenzie, William, 43 ®* Malbraincs, John, a. 549Maklon, in Surry, college

at,

108.

fent reflor of St. Maries, near Romney, 409 > Marfh’s, of Brand^red, 113; of Canterbury, 36; of Netherfole,395.

Malmains, Alkham, manor of, I34> farm, 135*

Marflial of the king’s birds, of-

Malmains, Henry dc, 85; Mal-

Marfliall, VVilliam, 481

Maltravers, John, lord, 213. Maminot, barony of, 128. Mann, Janies, 194; Sir Hoat Egerton,

E".

A.

race rejides Mann’s, 353, 427. A. 547 ;

Maney’s, 490. Manley, Thomas, 103. Manfeil, John, clerk. 347 ; account of, 349 351, 428William-Auguftus, Mantell, priory, 61; poJJeJJ'es Horton of ManteU’s, Walter, 313; 60. Horton priory, Mantell, Mrs. and her daughKenchill, in

Ten-

Peter,

453

;

Man-

103, 271, 316. Majikhurji manor, in S taple tvood’s,

hurft, A. 541

Mapleton, Mr. a. 538. Marchant’s, 329.

MaPvDEN,

earls

broke, 17. Marinis, family

Markham,

of

539.

Pem-

273, 290.

of,

John pojfcjjes Suave MrtNOR, 395; Mrs. refdes at ;

Boughton-ftreet,

Terrey, hutt’s

a.

537;

heirs oi, pojfefs Scar-

MANOR,

;

Hon.

a. 547.

John, Charles, 245.

Marfliam,

Marfliam’s, lords

193

Romney,

ac-

foffejfes

Old

count of, 457*

Martin’s, 461. Mafcall, Robert,

Langport manor, in Lid, a houfe in Afiiford, a. 427 549 of Malcall’s, of Afliford, 319 ;

-

;

Romney,

461. Mafter, Richard, parfon of Al-

296, 297, 326; Mailer’s, 100, 251. Mauregge, alias Capell, chapel

dington,

Mavvhood, Collet, refides at Boughton Blean parfonage, A. 538.

Maxwell, Robert, 208. May, Thomas, of Godmerfliam, May’s, of Bi490, 491 May’s, 329. brooke, 22 Maytham, in Kolvenden, 479. Meadman, John, 516. Menel, Sir Walter, 436 Mr.

in

;

;

490.

lady, 20,

Marlin’s, 430. of, 293. Marriage, El ode Marfl), Nicholas, in; Acrife, John houle, in Brandred, at eftate an poffef'es. 115; Richard poJ[eJfes2, houle at Hearn foiftaii, in Folkeftone, 132 ; a part of Sweet Arden manor, in Cheriton,

195

Rev.

;

farijhof, a

Marefchall’s,.

;

of, 140.

terden, a. 543.

Manwood,

448.

Edmund,

niains, 134.

ters,

fice of,

Boughton

Blean, a. 53b; William, pre-

Menseies, William-Philip, juefini red} 01

of Orlcfione, 363.

Mereworlh, Roger dc, J90. Merrett, John, 306.

Merrud manor, 316. Merfc'voarum

4^ 5

now Romney Mafis,

'

Mersham,

paiifii of

A. 549,

Merton college, in Oxford, warden and iellows of p'ofiej's the parfonage and advowlon of Eleham vicarage, 109. Merton, Walter de, oS. l

Mervyle, lands of, 185. M.ethodifls,

INDEX.

xxviil Methodifts, meeting of, Michel, John, 137. Michelgrove’s, 328. Mickicthvvaite, John,

i

More

72.

MANOR,/«'.Ktfr^/«^,357 r

COURT,

in

Ivechurch,

401

;

pof}cJjfes

HALL, in Folkejlone, 166. More, Mathew at, 357 More’s,

Hawkhurft-place and Hernden M A NOR, A 542. Middleton, Dr. Conyers, 56

of Ivechurch, account of, 401 Moreton, George, 241. Morinis, family ot, 41, 67, 68;

;

See alfo Marinis.

Edward, 428.

Midley, parUh ^,410, Milkey down, in Newington, near Hythe, 198, 199. a. 555.

IMilles,

Jeremiah, clerk, 23

Minet, Hughes, Sole

pojjeffes

t.

;

Capel Capel,

FARM, 142; Mary le Merge ma-

alias St.

nor, 144;

MANOR,

alias

Southligh

in Elmjled, 34.

Mode, Sir Thomas,* 340. Mo LASH, jiarijh of, a. 544. Monger, Jofliua, 105. ISfonins, Richard,

clerk,

141

parifli.

in

Eleham,

101, 102.

Mount Bottom,

lands, in Ele-

ham, 109. Mount Morris seat, in Horton, 52, 56. 1,

429. ;

S’f<;Hor-

ton Monks. Montchenfie’s, 18. Monteifont, James, clerk, 436. Montfort, Hugo de, 129, 199, 221, 232,339,353,354,368, 369; Montfort’s, 3, 4, 10,

n, 16, i7, 53, 56, 58, 212, 273, 276,277,290,293,294, 416. 305*307-332. 3^51. Montefquieu, baron de, pojfcjfes a fourth part of Stellijig m aNOR, 93. Monypenny,

James, pcjfcjfes Kduilhain manor, in Rolvenden, a. 542. Moore, Nicholas, 107 Dr. Henry, 403; Chaiks, clerk, A. 538. ^loraunt’s, 367. Mordaunt, Sir Charles, pojfejfes Eire holt manor and advow-

fon of redory, 12, a. 551.

account of,

Mountjoy, Blounts, lord, 41

Monins's, 128, 130, 223,276. !Monkcniands, in Eleham, 106.

Plonks Horton

of Florton, 55, 56, 61. Morton’s, 307. ris’s,

Mount manor,

Capel’s, ibid.

Minfter abbey, in Thanet, 40. Mingay, John, 452.

Mizlings,

Morphett, John, pojjejfes Pixweli, in Tenterden, a. 543. Morris, Drake Morris, 55, 56; Mr. of Horton, 309 Mor-

Moyle,

Sir

355

Thomas, 333

;

Wal-

*

Moyfe, John,

alias

Tenterden,

laf prior of Bilfington, 350. Mimeville, Nigell de, 156, 164, 179, 186; Hugo de, 294; Muneville’s, 143.

Murray, Hon. and Rev. lord George, a. 538. Myfton, dame Anne, 228.

N. Nackington, tithes in, 534. Nailbourne at Eleham, account of, 80, 96 ; at Alkham, 134. Nairn, Mrs. prfejfes Plufliinghurlf, and a noufe at Milkhoufe, in Cranbrooke, a. '540; Mrs. of London, lejfee of Cranbrooke parlonage, a. ibid.

fares. Rev Edivard, A. 541. Napieton’s, 276.

Na(h, Gawin Harris, 390. Nalh-court, in Weftwell, a. 546.

Natyndon,

XXIX

INDEX.

Norton, |ohn, 501, 530; Nor-

Natyncion, tithes in, 533 * Needham, John, 502. Nefle, in L\d, cha/2Blat, 438*

ton’s, 334.

Norwich, John Salmon, bi drop of, 177.

Nelherfole’s, 20, loi. Nevill, Edward, lord

BergaEdward, 223* venny, 4^ clerk. 230. Nevinfon, Stephen, »

New

Saltwood,

Buildings,

225, 226.

New Cheney court, in

Ive-

Norwood, Rev, Edward,

20. "Noufe field, in

405. NEWCHURCH,^K«^/;Tfi? church, 403,

337

>

pnri/h of, 319, 338, A. 554.

Newenden, 466. Dimchurch, 266,

Nevjhnll, in

nor,

165, 202.

Hythe, manor, 197; Newington Bel h ouse,

Newington,

near

parijh of

199,267.

Newington Fee, alias iJiMCHURCH MANOR, 267,472, Newington Brenset manor, 389. J^etv Inn green, in Stanford, 66.

Newland’s, 442.

Newman, George, LL.D.452; Sir

George, 502. maiifon

of,

Midley,

in

alias

BROOKE manor,

,

,

Old Chene-court,

alias

Hall-court

Ollantigh, in

No; tJdye h A M let,! n Elmfted, 34 Northlfure, 319. Northumberland, Percys, earls and dukes of, 70, 165, 191.

rish and

MANOR

Whitflaple. VOL. Vlll,

OF.

Wye,

a. 545.

Orderne’s, 308. Ore Boys, 105.

manor,

in

New-

chu’-ch, 341,

O r’g

R s

^• 553

w -

I

K E, parijh

of,

2 70*

^

Orlanltone, family of, 395. Oi laivefton, in Lid, 421.

f, 360, a. 554; 472. Orleflone, lamily of, 362, 371. Olborne, John,/'^ifyifJ Liifden, in Hawkhurfl, a. 542. Ofpringe, Maifon Dieu in, 261,

MANOR,

North, Brownlow, clerk, 439.

JVorM
Chene-

See aljo

court Oliver, Thomas, poffeffes Peafridge manor, in Frittendeiij A. 541.

Orleftcne,/«/i//i

Swingfield, 122.

in

Tve-

in

.

Norlands, alias Northlands, in Ebene, 496. Norman’s, 461. Norris, Charles, LL. B. 27.

MANOR,

En-

in Chcri‘

ton, 193. Odiarne’s, 490, 491. Offa. king, 270, 353 . 3 S 4 » 425 > 441, 465,

Organers

433-

North,

Oaks,

O. Bishops

church, 402.

A. 553.

Nodd,

Midley, 434.

Nutt and Walker, Meffrs, 130. Nutt, Mr. and others, pojjefs Whitflaple manor, and Sti Agnes court lees farm, 51 1.

473-

Newington Bertram ma-

fiof-

Shooters land, in St. Maries, near Romney, 407 ; Jaques-court, in Lid, 430. Nott, Valentine, 299 ; Nott’s, feffes the

paSee

514.

Ostenhanger, of 66, fn seat, and MANOR y6 ;

Stanford,

e

69

;

PoyningS, Ba-

rons of, 289, Otford,

XXX Otford, Richard de, 334,

INDEX.' 335. Pa ESTER manor,

manor,

Otterpoole

in

Limne, 290. Otway, Stephen, 321. Ovens-court

M a nor

,

in Sellinge,

A. 538 ; Little Ovens in the fame, a, 539. Oivlie

MANOR,

in

FARM,

IVitterJham,

Oxenden, Sir Henry, JtoJfeJJes Eleham manor, 99. Oxenden earm, in Saltwood, 227.

Oxford, warden and fellows of All Souls college in, pojfefs Googie-hall, in Nevvchurch, Bletch342; Scotney, ing-court, in Lid,-43r; the parfonage and advovvfon of New Romney vicarage, 463 All Souls college in, 457;

Magdalen

college in,

Mount-couit manor, Oxroad, alias Oftrude MANOR, 104; Canterwood MANOR, 104, and Ladwood MANOR, in Eleham, 103; Acrife manor and place, 10

1

in, 496. Oxford, mayor

348

Padlefworth

19;

Shottlesfield

in Eleham,

a. 55a; David Broadnax pojfe/fes farm, in Burmarfli, »6i Bonnington MANOR, 333 and advowfon of redory, 336 ; Scott’s-hall annuity, 363; David, 433; ;

Papillon’s, of Acrife, 79, 116; account of, 1 1 3 .

478, 480.

rt//«xOsTRUDE MA104. Whitftaple, 307.

Paramor’s, ple,

Park far?}!,

in Braborne, 19, Parker, Roger, 274; William, of Warehorne, 362. Parker’s, 353 ; of Warehorne, 371. in

Ware-

horne, ibid.

Packmanstone manor,

in

Par KG ATE FARM,

Neivchurch, 339. 4/2. A. 334.

log.

u8;

Parrot,

PADLESWORTH,/fln^/ of, 84,

512; of Whitfta-

316.

Parker’s manor,

P.

church

manor, manor,

Vere’s,

;

manor, 319. Oxney, {/land and hundred of

at

1x3; 1

354

of,

earls of, 310.

Oyfer fijhery,

;

Philip, clerk, prejent curate of S’iving field, 126 ; prefent rector of Bonnington, 3 37, a.

Oxney, appendage to Aldington

NOR ,/'«

;

458 founded

leftures mathematical

OXRO AD,

Paifworth. See Padlefworth. Panns, George, 333. Papillon, Thomas, pofe/fesLon* gage FA RM, in Liminge, 79; Bowick,<3//i7jBoyke MANOR,

103

490.

WitUf*

in

Jham, 488.

88.

Pagehurf, Lozver, in Staplehurft, A. 341. Paget, Thomas, 368. Paisfor, Ofbn de, 488. Palefter, Colonel, 320. Palgrave, John, 493. Palmer’s, of Wiiigham, 124, 126 j Palmci’s, of Howlets, 436.

in

Eleham y

Thomas, 487.

Parfons, Philip, prefent reflor of

Snave, 399. Parfonage-houfe,in Goudhurft, A. 539. Palhley’s, Paflele’s, 4, 383, Patten, Thomas, clerk, 504,3 7, 1 Paveley’s, 48. Payler, Thomas pojjejfes

Watkinfon, Arundel farm, in

EImfted, 34,

Payne,

INDEX, Payne, Robert, clerk* 239. Peachy, lady Elizabeth, Brookland manor, 384. Peake, Humphry, clerk, 90,1 1 7. Pean farm, 174; in Cheriton, 1S9; ill Newington, 198. Peafridge manor, den, A. 341 . Pearce, Mr. ./tojfejfes a corn mill Mr. a. in Cheriton, 189; Fritten-

in



manor

fojfejjes

and

farm,

court lees

St.

5

WhitAgnes

i i .

Peckham’s, 368, 489.

Pedling manor,

in Saltwood^

227. Peirce, John,

/o^^jHall,

Wingmere manor,

alias

in Ele-

ham, 106. Charing, a. 547.

Peirce-houfe, in

Pembrook,

earls of,

marllialls,

Valence’s, earls of, 18. Penchefter tower, in Dover caf17

tle,

;

54,

Pent farm, in PollUng, 31 1. Penton, Henry, 403. Pepper, William, and others, of Trienftone manor, in Burmarfli, z6i. Perkins, Sir George, 443. Perry town, in \Veftwell, a. 546.

Perryn

MANOR, inLiddon,

i

30.

Perry’s, 520.

Peterborough,

Thomas White,

bifliop of, 334. Peters, Peter,

Pinfold, Charles, pojcff'esMorft-

MANOR,

court

in ivechurchj

401 Pimt-houfe, in

Bonnington, 331,

r

:?

j5'

Pinnenden heath, great affemlly

fU 353. 354 426. Pinyon Quarter, in Witterfliam* ^

_

M.D,

Philipott,

V luV

parifI of, Pole, Ed'ccardy prefent

K

348.

vicar of

Netv Romney, 464 Pollard, John, 105. Pollard, oyfer ground ih Seafalter,

300.

Pomfret, John, clerk, 344; Jofiah, clerk, 399. Pontiniac, abbot of,

44, 313,

463 45 Porter, John, bifliop of Clog/ »

her, A. 548. Porteus, Bidby, cleric, 339, 492. Portus Lcmanis, 441. V o ST pari/Ji ma-

nor

OF, 347. Braborne, 20.

MANOR,

in

Rucking, 336. herald.^

Pounds, nor,

;

William

Fryerne park,inStelJofeph 461. ;

94

of New Romney, 408. Pimpe’s, of Nettlefted, 4. Pilcher’s, 125

542. Pixwell, in Tenterden, a. 543. Place-houie, in Woodchurchj A. 543. Planers, William de, 305. Playze college, in EHex, 506. Plecy college, in E(Tex,5 10,5 16,

PoUNDIlURST

account ofy 178. pojfejfes

Pixes hall, in Hawkhurft, a.

Pound farm

138.

John, Somerfet

Philpot, William, 43

Pitlifden’s, 491, Fix’s, 461.

Potter, John, clerk, 439.

Pevcrel, honor of 361. Peyforer’s, 41 1.

ling,

Pincerna, William de Albini, fo named, 97, 346, 351.

486.

540 Pear fe's, 355. Pcarfon, Charles, ftaple

xxxi

;

F.

a

alias

Stephens ma-

in BnxJiolt,

1

2.

PoULTON St ANSTED MANOR, in Aldington, 3

Powell, 103

I

3.

Thomas Symonds, 99,

;

Acrife,

Giles, prefent reAor of 1 1 7,

Pownall,

INDEX.

xxxii

Pownall, governor, hh obfervationson the Pudding-pan fand, 508.

Poynings, Sir Edward, 29, 30, 65 Thomas, baron of OIj

tenhanger, 73, 289. Poynings’s, 31, 69, 76, 118, 138, 143,164, 191, 289,291. Poynings, barony of\ 70. Praul’s FARM, in Stone, in

Oxney, 481. Preceptory of St. John's^ inS wingfield, 123. Prentice, George, a. 541. Price, Rev. Ralph, pojfejfes Li-

minge manor, and advowfon of redfory and vicarage, 85, 88, 89 prefent re^or and ;

vicar of Lhnirtge, 90, 91. Prior, Arthur, 105. Prifot’s, 355. Promehill, parijh of 421, 422, 446. Prowfe, Thomas, la. Pudding-Jian rock, near Whitftaple, 50S. Punde’s, 12.

Purjiioufe, borne,

A. prefent vicar of Braprefent redor of 27 ;

Horton, 63.

5ijr;

Radcliffe’s,

of

Hert-

tordfli're,

23. Radnor, Jacob, earl of, claims a right to Swinfield Minnis,

122; pojfejjes Halton and Wolverton manor, in Alkham, 139 Folkeftone hundred and MANOR, Wallon ;

manor

and Folkeftone park, 163, 165, 177; BredmerMANOR, 166; Morehall manor, 167, and the fcite and manor of Folkeftone priory, 181

;

nor,

Ackhanger ma-

and

in Cheriton, 193.

Radnor, Jacob,

150;

ear! of,

account of

162, 163, 187. Rainsford, Sir John. 201. Railback, John, clerk, 268. Raittinge, Chriftopher, M. D. 207. Raileigh, Henry de Eftex, baron of, I 7, 222. Randolph, Rev. Ihomas, 230 ; prefent redor of Saltvcood, 231;

Rev. Herbert, a. 541

;

Ran-

dolph’s, of Biddenden, 319. Rayfield, Thomas, 490.

Rayham

'SKV.u,

in Swaycliffe,

518. Rayner’s, 166.

Putot, William de, 305.

Pybus, Henry, clerk, 32. Pyx, Michael, 107.

Reade, Henry, 390 ; Reade’s, of Folkeftone, 185; Reade’s, 357; ofBrookland, 384.

Q.

Reading-frect

Queen

Elizabeth, her hrosiefs ^ into Kent, 74.

borough of in

hamlet, and Ebeney, 478,

4 / 9 . 493 Reculver parfonage, a. 537. Redford, Thomas, poffejfes Havvkhurft,«//fljNewLodge, -

Quakers, meeting of, 172. Quarry hills, range of, 153. Quekes, John, 511. Querling, in Cheriton, 189. K.

Radbrooks manor, •wood,

/» Si

227.

Radcliffe, Sir Charles poffejfes

pojfejfcs

Farnab

Hampton manor

Braborne,

23,

A. 542.

Remington,

245;

la,

Hampton manor.

Sir Robert,

452.

Retling, Sir Richard de, 56. Reyner’s, 521.

Reynolds, Mr. poffejfes Bankhmife FARM, and Sweet Arden, in Cheriton, 145. Rhecvsall, in Romney Marfli,

467.

Rhode

INDEX. Rhde

Minnlsy in Liminge, 79.

Rhoiles-court, in Selling, a.

Kicaiit, Sir Peter,

iticeboroiigh toryof^

539.

Walter, 130; Richards’s, of Braborne, 25.

Richards,

Stuart,

RicfnnoJid's Jhave,

duke of, 1 89. in Cheriton,

143,

164,

289, 291

Romans,

Boughton

Rider’s, of

352 ; Monchenfie, 348. Rigden, John, pojfejfes Dowles FARM, in Elmfted, 34; Geo. 121 William lejfee oi Combe MAN OR, in Newington, 206 and a Broadftreet-houfe, houie at Eachend,inLiminge, ;

A. 5?2. Rifby, Richard, 297. Roberts, Sir John, 84; Roberts’s, of Glaflenbury, 402, Robertlbridge, abbot and convent of, 495. Robinfon’s, of Horton, 55 account of, 56.

228, 246; Fiflier, biftiop of, 261, 297, 514. Rochefier caltle, lands held of, 412. Rogers, Francis, clerk, 141. Rolfe, Nicholas, 152; William, 207 Rolfe’s, 103 ofFolke;

;

fione, 19:;.

Rolvenden,

parijh of, A . ^42. Mathew, \ard, Jwjfejfes

in Elmfied,

34

;

8,

168,256, 283, 284; antiquities found, 199, 219, 220, 508; ways, 81, 219, 284. Romenel, Robert de, 369, 425, 426; family of, 447, 448 account of,

465, 468; 6,258,266,471, A. 543, 546, 552 ; cujiom of tithes in, 358, 373, 377, 393, 398, 404, 409, 419, 463. Romney, Old, parijh of, 439.

Romney, new town, and PORT

OF, 446; 235, 439, 457, 469; vicarage of, 419.

Romnev, aljo

Sir Robert Romenel.

See

de.

Romney, Henry Sidney, of,

456

;

Marfliam’s,

earl

lords,

account of, 457.

Rooke, Laurence, 62 Sir George, 403 ; Sir William, 531; Rooke’s, of Horton, ;

55, 61.

Roos, William, lord, of lake, 527, Roper, Francis, a, 538

Ham;

Ro-

per’s, of St. Dunfian’s, 391,

513, 518, 522, 525, 531.

Rochefier, Elamo, bifhop of,

JDunders, with

1

Ro-

in Britain,

Romney Marsh,

190.

Rider, Ingram, /lojjejjis Billington Inferior manor, 349; of Bilfington priory, lejfee Bilfington Supf^JJe/Jes 350; perior, alias Priory manor, 351 ,and advowfon of curacy,

Rokeby,

Rokefle, Sir Richard de,69, 1 kelle’s, 19T.

490.

Monachorum,w-

413.

Richmond,

XXXlll

tiie ;

park land

Up-Horton

Ros, Anlchitiiius de, loi, U2. Rofamond’s tower, in Wefienhanger-'houfe, 64, 65. Rot, Azor, 339. Bother river, 283, 440, 447, 45

465,468,478. Roting-llrcet, A. 548. Routh, Sir

in Little Chart,

John, 525,

Roydon, Thomas, 277.

Rucking, /tarl/h of, 554; manor, 472.

352, a.

Rudfion’s, 489.

5? ; Sherford, alias EafiIJorton Manor, and Mount

Rufeins-uill,

Morris seat, in Horton, 58.

Ruffin’s, of Aldington, ibid.

f 3

r

in

Aldington,

321.

Rumba Id,

index.

xxxtv Rumbald, *"

I

and

feaft

ivhitings,

r*

Rumeneia, river, 465, 466.

Rumney,

Sir W^illiatn de, 448,

<2^ Romenel and ney. Rndiout’s, iz\. *

9 ?^

Rom-

547

Riiflell’s, 403; Ruflell’s,ofLid,

436. Riitton, Ifciac,

Rntton,

251;

li’aac,

M.

Say, barony of, 128. Sayer, George, pojfejfes Bladbean, in Eleham, 102 ; Mrs. A. 552; Sayer’s, of Sandwich, 102. Sayer, Rev. Mr. of Charing, a.

D. 501.

Ryiner, Thomas, clerk,

1

1

7,

-

Scar butts MANOR, in Boughton Blean, a. 538. Scoteni, family of, 431,

ScoTNEY, alias BletchingCOURT MANOR, ill Lid, 43 , J

Thomas, ii Ceci* lia, 20; Thomas, of Liminge, 101; Sir Edward, 242, 41 1,

Scott, Sir

126. Ry/ie^ at

Lid, 423. of, 468.

Rye, port

429

S.

;

Richard, George, 244.

73

;

lord

Salburga, i^,

Reginald, 452 Regiof Scotts-hal), account ;

jiald’s,

Sackville,

;

of 4. 5 9» '9» 21, 24, 68, 304, 362, 371, 390; Scott’s, of Liminge, 79,88. ’

Sa'keld’s, 85, 87,

ScoTTs-HALL sEAT,i» Smce/b,

Saltwood, 'parijh of^ 2 18, A. manor, 332, 233 553

Scotts-half, annuity out

;

;

callle, account of,

219, 321. Sah-icorks, at Whitftaple, 507. Sandford, Thomas, clerk, 209 ;

John, clerk, 405.

Sandgaxe HAMLET handling,

OF,

it!

182;

Cheritou, 189.

Saltwood,

220.

Sandwich

de,

family of, 158,

:64. Sandys’s, 193.

30,

3

Savile,

in

Hallingiigh,

I-.

Sir

holpital, in

London, 29.

Sa\y bridge, Samiiel-Elias, pofJeJJes Liminge park, and \V eilv\ood, in Liminge, 79, 89 ; Sawbridge, a. 539; John,

244.

Sawkmss,

of Or-

363.

Seabrook Jlream, 189, 198 in Cheriton, 189. holly,

or holm

trees,

;

at

;«///,

Lid,

423.

Seasalter,

liberty

and Jiari/h

of 499, 506. Seavans-court. See Septvans. Sedley, Sir Charles, 416, 453,

Sellindge, 554

of,

303, a.

*

William, /r/oj-g/'Chriffchurch, 379; Selling’s, of Saltwood, 166, 223.

Selling,

Henry, provoft of

Eaton, 496.

Savoy

manor,

454; Sedley’s, 37Q, 4;6. Segrave, John de, 158, 177,

Sankey, Richard, poiJeJJ'esYf\n'^{mill-dovvn,

leftone

Sea

castle,

Great^ in

2, A. 550.

ol T.iminge, 79, 8c,

87, 88; ol ( anrerbiiiy, 443. Saxons, battle of, 169, 253. Say, Jclfry dc, 159J Say’s, 30.

Selling,

g/',

a. 338.

Sel/lcd hamlet, \n Swingfield,

Sene,

alias

JS’ eivington,

2

Septvans’s,

1

in

204.

Septvans, alias PORT manor, 434

1

Singe farm,

New Lang-

in Lid, 43 o ; family of, 430,

-

Sergeantry, lands held by, 190, 328, 347, 350,

Sewers*

-

XXXV

INDEX. Sidney’s, Rom-

Sewers, commiffions of., in ney and VVallatid Marflies, 467* 47i> 475* .. Shannon, Richard, vilcount,

495

;

MANOR,

Richard,

Simonds, Richard, 149. Singe FARM. iSfeSene.

BonningSing LETo N , TON MANOR, 332, 333, 334. Skeffington Hon. and Rev.W, C. 430.

426

Skinner, Henry, 247 ; Skinner’s, of Lid, 436. Slabrook frcam, 220, 240.

Shelley’s, 22, 329.

167.

Shelving’s,

Limne, 287*

East HorSherford, ton MANOR, 55 Shiphurf MANOR, in Marden, a.

Slater’s,

S

Thomas,

428

39.

Elizabeth-Farewell,

farm,

foffeffes Fairbrook Bonghton Blean,

39 Sir

i

Slodden,

'

Shirley,

1,

,

469, Sir William,

Shejiivay crofs, in

12

.125.

Shatterden, Daniel, 104. Sheep, in Romney Marfli, acShelley,

Newchurch ,341.

in

Simnell, Robert, ibid. Simmons’s, of Smerfole,

frefent vicar of Brookland, 388. Sharfted’s, 307.

count of,

^ biLWELL

Silverdeiijin Havvkhurft,A. 542. SiMNELLS, in Aldington, 322.

well, A. 546.

20

-

SiLLOWSBREG,

243. Sharp, Barling, poffejfes Nadicourt and Gignalh, in Weft-

Sharpe, Jacob,

of Pcnftiurft, 395,

a.

in

537

»

Slodden’s, of Broadftreet, 80. Smallhyth, 478, 479; ferry of,

;

Thomas, 487. Shoefmith, Thomas, guardians of,

489. Smardcn, parifi of,K. 54 ^Smart, Mr. pffeffes Little

DeringsdrofF, in Lid, 434. near

gley, in Cranbrooke, a. 54 °* Smeeds f a r m , n a ft n gl g h , 2 g

Romney, 407.

Smeeth,

/o^jBIackmanftone manor, 274, A. 553, 554;

Shooters land, in St. Maries,

i

Shot tenton-hill, in Selling, A. 538.

ShOTTLESFIELD MANOR,

in

fleham, 100, a. 552.

Shourt

,

in Stvayclijfe,

518, 522.

farm, in Poftling, 211. SHRYMPEirOEN MANOR, in

Sh'rhie

Jlldingion, 321. Sibberfnoth, appendage to Aldington MANOR, 319. Sib ETON MANOR, in Liminge,

86

.

Siberton, ^oroK^// of,\n Liminge,

Siddenham, Nicholas, 319. Sidley’s,

of

Aylesford,

370.

See alfo Sedlev.

Henry 1 Romney, 456 e 4

Sidney, Algernon, 12 created earl of

;

;

H

i

An-

i

A. 550. 3/", 2, S 7nerfole farm, in Swjngfieid, 121 ; William, 125 ; Thomas, 1 49. Smith, Wx.poffeffes a third part of Malmains manor and farm, in Alkham, i 35, 136; Alexander, James, prejent vicar of Alkham, 142 Sir William, 214, 310; Edward, 319; Thomas, of Romney, ;

'

461. Smith’s, alias Smyth’s, oi Weftenhanger, 68, 74, 123, 214, 291, 304, 340, 511. Snaith’s, of Addington, 489. StiXXLOX'VV.,pariJhof, 375. z, pari/hof 394, A. 5S5 ;

w

MANOR,

472. Snave’s, 395.

Sn AVE-

INDEX.

xxxvi

Snaveleeze manor, 394. Snavewick, alias CouKT-

AT-WeEK

MANOK.,/‘«.S7/irZW,

416, 481, A. 553. Snoad, Charles, lejfetoi Brookland parionage, a. 555. Soame, Sir William, 520.

So MEK FIELD MANOR,

in Scl-

308.

litulge,

Somery, Roger de, 347, 349. Somner, V/illiam, the anticfuary^ 60 his ti eatife on gavelkind, 333 ; William, clerk, 91 ; John, 107. Sondes, Edward, lord, 43?; ;

Lewis-Thomas, \ox<\, pojjcjfes Colkins, in Boughton Kiean, A. 538 ; Ovens court, in Selling, ibid. Lewis-Thomas, lord, 538, 339.

H

in

St.

of, 65.

Augustine, lath of 498. Auguftine, abbey of, 13, 21,40, 36, 239, 262, 268,

St.

339. 3^4>39S» 39<^»398» 448 , 482, 319. St. Bai tholome^v's hojpiial, near Elythe, 228, 243, 246. St. Botulfe, chapel of St. Clere’s, 29. St.

in tho

Bleane. See Bleane. Crifpin and Crifpianus, tomb of, 42 3 St. Eadburg’swr//, at Liminge, 80.

Eanfwitb, 172, 176; St. Eanfwith’s xvater, at Eolkeftone,

74.

PRECEPTORY

in Sioivgfield,

St.

Southligh MANOR, in Elmfled, See alfo Miz41, A. 531. lings.

1

Sx. John’s,

;

of,

123.

John of Jerufalem, knights

of, 123,

126, 128, 149, 332,

333 336 . >

John’s, vifeount St. John, 128, 502. St. John's hofpitsl, in Hythc,

St.

member

Southre,

of Aldington

MANOR, 319. Sparkes, in Challock, a. 543. Spencer, Alban, 1 36 ; Spenca 's, 135, 146, 520.

George -John, ear! Aghne-court manor, in Old Romney, 442. Spicer, David, 87, 88; Spi Spencer,

of

36. 80, 83.

Spong, VVilliam, plehurft

pojjejjh

MANOR,

Ma-

in Staple-

hurft, A. 34! Spracklyn, Adam, 443. Spiingett, Robert, Jiojfefes Einchcocks, in Goudhurft,

A- 539-

Springham, Richard, 402, 403. Squire, Mr. a. 338; Squire’s, 371*

Cofmus and Dnm.ian,

St,

7-

459-.

cer’s,

in Whitftaple, 511. his pig, figure

Anthony and

St.

Capcll,

Southbrooks Marfli, 469. Southland, William, 452 John,

leJJ'cc

Agnes court-lees ma-

nor,

St.

SOTMERE MANOR, 145,

St.

243, 247. Laurence’s, 308. St. Leger, Sir Arnold, 68; Sir Anthony, 418 ; Ralph, 301; Sir John, 302; St. Leger’s, of 0kombe,428; St. Leger’s, St.

35o>3S»* St. Martin’s Pountney, hundred 399. St. Maries parish, near Romney, 406. St. Mary le Merge, alias

f

,

Capell manor,

143; cha-

pel of, 141

Mildred, 82 ; St. Mildred’s abbey, in Thanet, 318.

St.

St.

Nicholas,

flytlic,

chapel

of,

near

20Q. St.

INDEX. St.

Owen, Bernard

St. Radigund’s,

Strangford,

de, 155.

abbey 4 °>

*

106,

of,

45

*

74, 121, 123, 214, 291., Stretchland manor, in Bircholt, 12.

Street, hundred of, 281.

manor, m

Street

ham, 93.

MANOR

viicount,

Philip,

237, 242, 511. Strangford, Smyth’s, vifeounts,

136, 139, 148, 149,150,205,206,212, 216. Stace’s, 481. Staffords, dukes of BuckingI

XXXVII

of, 179.

Limne, 292,

Standen, SxANFORD,/>rtri//i^,63,A.552; church of, 84, 88 ; land in,

294, 472, A. 553., Strickland, William, 513. Stringer, William, 41 1 ; Strin-

302. Stanley, William, 323 ley’s, 214, 310. Stanwix, Jofeph, 512.

ger’s, 336. Strode, Col. governor of

Stan-

;

callle,

Staplehurst,

355 [lariMi

of,

A.

54 «-

Stapleton, Sir Thomas, 397. Steeling, paiijh of, 91 ; Stel-

Minnis, 79, 91. Stephens, al ias Founds manor, ling

in Bircholt, 12. Steeple, curious one, at

Struggle’s,'

alias

-

Stuppenye’s, 436. Sturry, manor of, 518, 519. Stutfall castle, in Limne, 284, 441. Sugar-loaf,

_

in

Orleftone

and

Warehorne, 371, 366. Swabert, king, 40.

Brook-

FARM, in Smeeth, 3. Stoddart, Charles, prefent reilor

SvvAYCLiFFE, parl/hof, 518, A* S5S-,

Sweet Arden

of Newchurch, 344.

480

in Liddon,'

i2g.

Stocks

parijh in Oxney,

Swanfeombe, manor of, 412.

SWANTON MANOR,

land, 384. Stinton, George, clerk, 493.

Stone,

234, 451.

Stroughill’s,

Staplegate’s, 347.

Dover

;

near Faverfliam, 484. Stone-end, at Lid, 423. Stonehoufe’s, of Berkfhire,

Cheriton, 194. Sznetton

manor,

191. Swifts,

Great,

manor, in

in

Cheriton,

seat, in Cran-

brooke, a. 540.

SwiNGFIELD, Aldington, 315.

Roman way, 46, 52, 64, 79, 91, 284, 286. Storms, dreadful ones, 448, 467, 468. Stoughton, Thomas, 102. Stour river, principal head of,

Stone-ftreet,

46, 21

1.

Stowting, hundred of 33, a. 551 ; PARISH OF, 46, 318, A

.

55

t

.

Strabolgie’s, earls of Athol, i8,

19, 509.

parijh of

Park wood, 12 i

J

120;

Minnis, ib.

122. Swingfield’s, 122, 124,

Swyt, Arden, William de, 194, Sydall, Elias, clerk, 405.

Symonds, Thomas, 99, 103. Symons, William, io 3 ; Janies, '323-

T. Talbot, Thomas,

118.

Talboyes, Ralph, clerk, 230.

Tangreton William de, 514.

Tan-

xxxvm

INDEX.

Tankerton

manor,///

Tims,

Tattenham, eflate of, 304. Tatteflia!, Robert de, 346. Taylor, ]dimes, poj/ejes lilmfted

MANOR,

36; Edivardyjirefait

of Ruchng 360. Taylor’s, of Elinlted, 42

of

;

of Bifrons, 187; Taylor’s, Taylor’s, 371; of Shadoxof Seafalhurft, 401 ; ter, 503.

Telegraph, in Selling parifli, A.

538.

Tenifon, Edward, clerk, 439,

^492-

Tenterden, parijh

o/*, a 543 Terlingham, manor of, 179, Terry, James, 412. .

Teynham, Henry-Roper, lord, 5ii,A. 538; Ropers, lords, 391.

Caldhani

Capell,

145

;

earl of, pof-

manor,

Tinton

in

houfe,

Warehorne,

Tinton manor,

in

Warehorne,

368. 373, 472, A. 554. Tiptoft’s, 86, 306.

Tirlingham

manor,

in

Folkejione,

164, 122, 191, 195, a02. Titentone, 339. Toke, Francis, prefe 7it redor of Orgarfivike, 272; NicholasRounJell, A. 548.

Toldervy, Chriftopher, 241.

Tong, John,

185.

Tonge, William, 125. ^ongs, in Hawkhurft, a. 542. Tooke’s, of Weft cliffe, 418. 1 ookey’s, of Romney, 461, Topcliffe’s, 195.

193.

the profits of

I'niirnay,

Rev, Thomas, pf.

366 368

manor, in

fffes Mount in Eleham,

; ;

Lid,

See

Bottom lands, 109

heirs of, poffefs

Brockhull

New

Eve-

gate.

Hope-

houfe FARM, in Folkeftone, 168; Thomas’s, of Alkham, 195; Thomas’s, 436. Thornden wood, 518. Thorne, alias Brockhull manor, in Saltwood, 224. Thornton, John, D. D. 326, Thurbarne’s, 452. Thwayts’s, 295, 376. Tighe, Sarah, 482. Timewell, Benjamin, 138. poj/ejes i:>ane

court, in Elmfted, 36.

Robert,

;

the fcite of

manor,

226

j

Buildings, in Saltwood,

227; William, Jioffejfes

Timms, Thomas,

,

Toroid’s,

Thevegate manor.

Thomas, John,

of

prefent curalp

in

Warehorne fairs, Warehorne manor, Dengemarfli 432.

retlor

366.

Liminge, 84.

feJJ'es

prefent

of Folkeftone, i88, Tindal, William, pojfejfes Midley MANOR, 412, Tintern, abbey of, 437.

rcllor

Thanet, Sackville,

John,

Hawking, 151;

Jlaple, 513. Tate, Sir Richard, 60.

prefent ledor

of Eaf bridge, 280 ; reHor of Hope, 420

prefeat

M illiam pojfejjes Mount ;

Rev. Bot-

tom, in Eleham, A. 55 2, 553; 1 homas, pojfeftes Brockhull, A, 553, and New Buildings, in Saltwood, ibid. Thomas, clerk, 492; Tournay’s, of Saltwood, account of, 225, 226, 22S, 229.

Trienstone manor, marjh, 261.

Thomas, 48. ucker, Jofeph, 430.

Trivet, 1

Tufton’s,

xxxix

INDEX. Tuftou’s, of HothfieId> 368, 432. Turbeville’s, 306. 'I^urnacetifes

of,

i

45 >

Staplehurft, a. 541.

Roman detachment

W.

283.

Turner, William, 79, loi, 116; Turner’s, of London, 333

Ufborne, Nicholas-Toke, /o/^ fejfes Loddenden seat, in

*

Thomas, 368. Twort, John, and others,/?^ Shiphurft MANOR, in Mar-

Tvvifden,

den, A. 539. Twvman’s, 512. Twyfden, Sir William, 454; Tvvyfden’s, 276, 277, 416.

Tyler, Mr. and others, fojfejs Shiphurft manor, in Marden, A. 539. Tylle, William, alias Sellinge, prior of Chrift-church, 304. Tylle’s, 308.

Tithes, cvfiom 5/, in Romney Marfli, 358, 262, 263, 269, 3s8

373 . 377 393 . 398, 404, 409,419, 463.

343

»

.

»

V.

529-

Wakeley, Mrs.

pojfejfes

Peirce-

houfe, in Charing, a. 547.

Wald, an appendage

to Alding-

MANOR,

ton

319. Wall, Nathaniel, 329. a L L a N D Marsh, accotmt

W

4^ 9

of,

4 / 4» Waller, William, of Groombridge, 418. Walter, Stephen, and others, poffefs Lower Pagehurft, in Staplehurft, a. 541. ’Waltham, church of, 43. ’

W’’alton manor,

in

Folks-

fone, 158, 165, 179. Wannefleet/f//;^)9', in Lid, 422. Warbtirton, W, P. prefent vicar of Lid, 439.

Warehorne,

Valence, Sir Stephen de, 48. Valence’s, earls of Pembroke,

0/',

365,

a. 554.

Warguin,

Ifaac,

M.

D. 461.

W^arlee, Richard,^o^^'^j’afarm

18.

Valentia, William de, 166. Valoigns, Riiolanus de, 36 Waretius de, 85 ; family of,

167, 190, 202, 203, 204. Vaughan, Cuthbert, 277,416. Veal’s, of Capell, 144.

Ver, Robert de, 16, 22,25, 58, 369, 416, 417. Verien, John, clerk, 229. Verney, Sir Edmund, 453. Vicecomes, tiamo, 41.

S4>

Vinon, Hugh de, 41. U?tdejhill, in

Cheriton, 189*

Unwin, John, the

Wadenhale, Roger de, 500. Wake, Rev. Charles, account of

JioJfeJJes

a part of

adyowlon of Midley rec-

tory, 413,

Vortimer, king, 169,

in

34

North Lye,

in

EImfted,

-

Warley, Jonas, D. D. 107. Warner’s, 418. Warren, a noted one, for rabbits, on Braborne lees, 15. W^arren, John, 134. Warwick, John-Dudley, earl of, 73, 223, 319.

Wafte, none

Romney

to the king, in Marfli, 470.

Waterman, John, 370, 416. Watfon, hon. Edward, 455. Watfon, Thomas, pojfeffes Hen* hurft, in Staplehurft, a. 541.

Watton, Robert, 489, 491. W'atts, Richard, 356, Jf'cbjler,

xl

INDEX. retior Whorwood, Thomas,

IVebfler^ Willia?n, prefent of Dlmcliurch,

270. Weddeol, John, 325. Weddeburn, Alexander, 84. William, prefent reftor of Hajlingltgk, 32 prefent vicar of Elmjied, 45.

W

;

Well,

Wild-couut,

alias

in Bleane, 530.

Weller, Laurence, 228.

Wellop,manorof, iuLimne, 288, 297.

Wentworth, Roger, 86 clerk, 392. ^fingmerfc, in

W

Romney

;

John,

Marfli,

465.

ill

Lid,

432, 434-

Westenha NOER MANOR and s^A.T,in Sta?iford, 63,64,68.

;

parijhof, 254,

port of, 234, 466. of, 127,

Weft Langdon, abbey 131.

Weitminfter, St. Stephen’s chapel in, 98.

Wefton,

Upper Wilfley,

refdes at in Cran-

brooke, a. 540.

Westwell, Weftwood,

parijh of, a. 1:46.

Liminge, 79. Wetherden, Jofeph, 541. Whale, drove on fliorc at Seain

falter,

^00. heat ^ocksifCoveredvoith matting in wet weather, 142.

W

White’s, 3.,

355

,

W

Wild-court. See Well-court. Wild’s, 331. Wilde, Colonel Dudley, 102 Uluuile, 339.

Wildgoofe, Alexander, 376. Wildman, James, of Chilham-

3,;,

324, 334,

-

"W bitfield, John, 94 Walter, 454^ 455 ^Whitfield’s, 261. JL hitfeld-houfe, in Tenterden, ;

;

A. 543.

Whiting’s, 12.

Whitmore, Mr. 298

;

James,

320.

WuiTSTAPLE, hmdredof, PARi’sn nifibid.

505

John

W. M.

P. for

Romney, 436.

Williams, Sir John, 99, 107 John, 333.

;

Williams, Charles, prefent redor xrehorne, 374; Ed ward , of 442 ; Williams’s, of Eleham, 103. Willop MANOR, 472.

W

Willoughbye’s, 307.

W ilmington, nor,

William,

ao.

Charing, A.

-

New

West Hythe,

in

547 Wightwick’s, 461. Wigmere, William de, 104. \‘^n\oxt,fijherycf, in Lid, 432. Wilcocke, Edward, 429; Wilcocke’s, 436, 461. Wilcock’s, 22, 23, 432.

Willett,

354-

VVESTBUOOKE SEAT,

SEAT,

caftle, A. 344.

WesTBERIES MANOR,

302

JVickins

Great, ma-

in Sellindge,

308.

Wilmington, Little, manor,

in

Limne,

ibid.

W^ilmington’s, ibid. Wjlsford, William, 145. Ifdflcy, Upper,

seat,

brooke, a. 340. Wilfon, Frederick,

Tongs,

in

in

Cran-

foffejfes

Hawkhurft,

a.

.542.

Winch, Richard, heirs of, pofffs Hockeridge and Pixeshall; in Hawkhurft, a. 342. Winchelfea, Thomas Finch, earl of, 260. Winchelfea, pert of, 468. Windlefore, Hugh de, 367. Winge, John, 432.

W’ingham, Manor of, 481. Windfor, lords, 41 j, 413. Wife’s, of Sandwich, 67. Wltherf-

INDEX. Witherfden,

iaWye,

inell

a.

54 ?’

WlTTERSHAM, parijh of, 486; COLLEGE, MANOR OF, 487, Wollet’s, of Ealhy, 133, 136. Wolton, Thomas de, 527, 528.

WoLVERTON MANOR,

430. Wroth’s, lor. Wyatt, Sir Thomas, 41, 274, 29O1 34 «. 368,393,487,489;

Mr.

ill

ham, 138

ibid.

Woollett, Daniel, ic2. Woolverton Y

in

;

of Bretifet,

394

;

Wood’s, 102, 383.

Wood CHURCH,

pari/Ji

MANOR

ofy

Wyk,

land

of,

239.

Wynne,SirRov;Iand, and others, pojfefs Condies-ball, in WhitRaple, 513; Cheftfield manor, in SwayclitFe, 522 ; Clowes wood, 525, and Bo-

a.

teler’s-court, in Bleane, 531.

-

Woodman, Mrs.

of Brookland parfonage, 387. Woodnelboroiigh, lands in, 511.

WoodrofFe, Alice, 431.

Woo DROVE vey,

manor,

Ehe^

495.

Jofiah, D. D. 344. "Worccfter, Tiptoft’s, earls of,

306.

Worger’s, 166. hmidretl of, 253. Wotton’s, ^of Boughton

Mal-

herb, 43, 99, 426.

none

in

Romney 470.

Yate’s, 397.

Yew

trees, remariable large

25* 5 ^’ 94 * lork, Philip,

FARM,

otiesy

Marfli,

in

pojfejfes

Chilton

Alkham,

133;

York’s, of Dover, ibid. York, John Kempe, archbilhop of, 208, 392. Young’s, of Capell, 144; of

A

Worth,

to the king,

Y.

,

in

Woodward,

ffyec,

Al.

392.

Alkham,

133; MANORjiii Folkeftone, i6ij. See alfo Woolverton. Wood, Robert, 105 fohn,pre'vicar

424.

543 ; court, OF, 254, 432; college of, 268, 392 ; curate and Ichoolmailer of, 208,

291.

Wool, tithe, cuftom of, in Romney Marlh, 263, 269, 343.

543

the archlted,

'^YE,pari/hof,

Wombwell, Thomas,

Jent

xli

Wright, Oliver, 144. Writtle, Mr. 190 ; Writtle’s,

111

ford, 407.

Z. Zouch, Richard, LL. D. 241.

Aiy ERRORS

or

MISTAKES,

hi the

former

edition^

or

com-

munications towards the' imp-ovemoit of thefe volumes^ will, at any time, in future, be thanhfdly received, if dire^cd to

W. Bristow,

Parade, Canterbury.

——

.

•rt-igOy

y

DIRECTIONS TO THE BINDER. 1.

To face

2.

To face p.

3.

To face p.

title, ...

I....

Plate of JTfa/

limne castle.

^/“sTOWTiNG,

Cs’r.

Plateofno¥K church.

hundreds^

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be-

longing to this Folime, which will be given in the courfe ofthe work.

Lonimgborough, (b’r. hundreds, at Ji. 7S. Worth, ^c. hundreds, including Kou^ey Marsh, at /i. 253. Westgate, ^c. hundreds, at ji. 499.

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The Editor

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every attention pojjible, he has in lefs than

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latter

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and

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the ten volumes only;

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to render

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with the addition of a fmall Appendix,

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THE

HUNDRED o r

BIRCHOLT FRANCHISE Lies

the next eaftward from that of Chart and Longbridge, and is fo called from its being within

the franchife or liberty of the archbijhop of Canter bury y as well as to diftinguilh it from the adjoining hundred

of Bircholt Barony. It is called in Domefday by the feveral names of Rilijjoldy Berifolt^ Berifout, and Br/feode ; and in a roll of the feveral parilhes within the kingdom, and the fees in them, taken by inquifition in the 7th year of king Edward I. this hundred and VOL. VIII. B that

1

BIRCHOLT FRANCHISE HUNDRED.

a

two half hundreds of Bircholt, the archbilhop of Canterbury being then lord of it, as being within his court of Ald-

that of Bircholt Barony are called the

ington. IT

CONTAINS WITHIN S

ITS

M

BOUNDS THE PARISH OF

E E

T

H,

And part of the parifhe* of Aldington and Mersham, the churches of which are in other hundreds. One conjlable has ju> rifdidlion over it.

A court

leet is

held for this hundred, as appendant

manor of Smeeth,

to the

Stonehill, in the

the owner of

name

of

Smeeth and John Sir' Honywood, bart. alternately at

it.

SMEETH LIES

the next parifli to Merfliam eaflward, being antiently written, and now ufually called Smede, a

name

tignifying an

openfmooth

plain,

and kingOlfa

gave the pafture for fifty hogs bimiam Smede, Smede^ to the church of Canterbury. It is but a fmall parifli, being not more than a mile acrofs each way ; it lies mollly on the hill, where the country has but a rough and lonely appearance, there being but little traffic through it. The village of Smeeth is fituated, with the church dole to it, on the brow of the hill, having a fine view from it over the valley fouthward and there is ano; ther hamlet of houfes called Ridgeway, at no great iu

i.

79

»

e. zviihin

from it ; towards Merfliam-lees, there is a long narrow common, called Smeeth, alias Hatch heath. Near the foot of the hill fouthward is Scottshall, which Bands fome way down the hill. It is a veiy large manfion ; the front of it eaflward is moern, of brick; but the north front, built in the reign

‘diftance

of king

Henry VIII.

is

very grand, and has a fine effed.

SMEETH.

3

fed. It is fituated very pleafantly, having a good profped from it; the grounds are well watered, by fprings which rife between it and the church, on the About a mile weftward from it, in fide of the hill. at a fmall diftance from the bottom, is Evegate which is a farm called Stocks, which was for many ge;

nerations the property of the Lofties, originally of Weftwell, where they refided in Henry the Vlllth.’s

they removed hither, at leaftas.early as king Charles the Ild.’s reign, bearing for their arms, Sable, a chevron engrailed, between three trefoils Jlipt, argent. After winch they continued owners of this eflate till the Rev. John Loftie, of reign,

and continued there

Canterbury, fold

it

lately

till

to

The head of the

lives in it.

Mr. John Dunk, who river Stour,

which

rifes

at Poftling, flows along the fouthern fide of this parifh, where there is a mill on it, called Evegate-mill; and fo on to Merfliam towards Afhford. Arch bi (hop

Stratford procured the grant of a market and fair at Smeeth, in the nth year of king Edward III. The market has never been ufed, but the fairs are flill held

and Sept. 29, for toys and pedlary ware. The former of them was held likevvife for the fale of There are two bolive flock within remembrance.

on

May

12,

rouglis in

it.

The manor of Aldington claims paramount over parifli, fubordinate

gate,

as

it

is

to

now

is

this

the manor of Eve-

ufually called, but in aniient re-

cords written Thevegate, which lies at the bottom of the hill, about half a mile Ibuthward of the church. At the time of taking the general furvey of Domefday, anno 1080, this manor was accounted to lie within the hundred of Longbridge, and was then part of the pofleflions of Hugh de Montfort, under the general title of whofe lands it is entered in it as follows

:

In Langebrige hundred, Hugo himfelf holds in demefie one yoke and an half in Teuegate, Gods, held it of king B a

Edward.

BIRCHOLT FRANCHISE HUNDRED. Edivard^ ^here is now one villein^ with one carucate,

4

and

meadow. In the time of it was zvorth twenty Jhil^

there are eight acres of

king

Edward

lings,

the

Confeffor

and afterwards

ten Jhillings,

now twenty Jlnllings,

On

the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort, grandfon of Hugo above-mentioned, in Henry I.’s

manor, among the

of his eftates, came after which it appears to ; have come into the poft'eftion of the family of Pafl’ele, or Pafldey, as they were afterwards called, their arms, being lion rampant, crowned, are carved on the roof of the cloyfters at Canterbury one of whom, Edw. de Paflele, held it in the 20th year of Edward III. by knight’s fervice of the archbilbop, as of his manor of Aldington. His delcendant John Paftjley, efq. died poflefled of this manor in the 31ft year of Henry VI. reign, this

reft

into the hands of the crown

A

leaving a foie daughter and heir Elizabeth, who entitled her hufband Reginald Pimpe, efq. of Nettlefted,

and he likewife left an only daughter and heir Anne, married to Sir John Scott, of ^cotts hall, who in her right became poflefled of it, and died about the middle of the reign of king Henry VIII. and in to

it,

his defcendants this

manor continued down

to Francis

Talbot Scott, efq. whole truftees, about the year 1784, conveyed it, with Scotts hall and his other eftates in this and the neighbouring parifhes, to Sir

John Honywood, feflbr

of

bart. of

Evington, the prefent pol-

it.

The manor manhon of

it,

of Hall,

from

its

cents the inheritance

in

this parifh,

having been for

and refidence

with the

many de

of the

-

eminent

an knightly family of Scott, has for a great length of time obtained the name oi Scott s-hall. Indeed there are no earlier owners of it mentioned in any of our antient lecords. The original name of this family. D 01. sf* PinT p. ripe-rolls, anno 17

Slype’s Stow’s Survey, B. ^

Edward

1

II,

whofc

,

SMEETH.

5 over widely extended this whofe poflefTions afterwards county, appears by papers in the polleffion of the family to have been Baliol.^’ William Baliol, younger brother of Alexander de Baliol, and brother of John Baliol, king of Scotland, frequently wrote his name William de Baliol le Scot ; and it is further probable, after the contell between king Edward I. and his brother John, for the Ibvereignty of that kingdom, which ended in the latter’s overthrow, that William Baliol above-mentioned, to avoid the future anger of that prince, fo highly incenfed againfl his family, altered his nan)e, and retained that of Scot only. And Philipott adds, that the antient

arms of Baliol

college, in

Oxford, founded by John Baliol his grandfather, was a Catherine wheels now part of the paternal coat of this family, which is three Juch wheels ; and although the prefent arms of that college are now wholly different, yet there feems fome foundation for this affertion ; for on the moft antient part of the college now remaining, are two fhields carved in ftone, having a Catherine wheel in each ; and I am informed, the mark of the college on their plate and furniture, which has been of long time ufed, is likewife a cathe^ rine zoheel.

family of Scoty now fpelt Scott, was originally feated in the adjoining parifh of Braborne, the church of which has continued the place of their burials to the prefent time, their arms then being Argent^three Catherine wheels fable, within a bordure engrailed, gules. y The firft of them that we have any account of, as feated there, was Sir William Scott, knight marfhal of England, who died in 1350, and was there buried, and they feem to have continued there till Henry VI. ’s reign,when Sir Scott, removing to Scottshall, kept his Ihrievalty at it in the yth year of king ‘The

Wm.

^

of

See fome mention of the Baliols under Chilham, vol. 271

vii,

this hiftory, p.

«

3

Henry

BIRCHOLT FRANCHISE HUNDRED.

6

Henry VI. anno 1429 the next

for

fix

;

and

his defcendants, knights,

lucceffive generations,

and men of

eminent cliaradler, employed in flat ions of high truft and honor by the refpedlive princes in whole reigns they lived, many of them flierifts, and knights in parliament for this county, continued afterwards to refide at this feat with great reputation

;

of ihefe, Sir Wil-

liam Scott, K. B. was warden of the five ports, and lieutenant of Dover caflle in the reigns of king Henry VII. and Vlil. He new built the manfion of Scotts-hall, the north front of w’hich now remains, and has the appearance of much grandeur, according Sir Reginald, to the flile of building of that time. or Raynold Scott, captain of the caflle of Calais in the 3 ft year of king Henry VIIL procured his lands Of his fons, to be difgavelled by the aft then pafied. Charles was of Eggarton, under which a full account has been given of him, and Raynold was author of the Difcovery of Witchcraft. Sir Thomas Scott, the eldefl; fon, in the memorable year of the Span ilh armada, anno 1588, was appointed commander in chief of the Kentilh forces, to oppofe that formidable invafion. The day after he had received the council’s letters, fo much was he beloved by the country, that he was enabled to colleft and fend to Dover four thoufand armed men. He was much noted for his great and liberal houfekeeping, which he continued tor thirty-eight years at Scottshall, feeding in his houfe not lei's than one hundred I

'perfons, befides

other extraordinary refort of people,

notwithflanding which, he increafed his lands, buildings,

and furniture.

From

management of he might be called the preferver of it, and from his contrivance at Dover pier, the founder of that haven. No man’s death could be more his wife

Romney Marfh

See an account of him in Wood’s Ath. Oxon. vol. and Bayle, vol. V. p. 85. '

i.

p. ^ 207,

lamented.

lamented, or

SMEETH. memory more beloved, infomuch

7 that

the inhabitants of the neighbouring town of Alhford folicited to pay the charges of his funeral, if they might have his remains depofited in their church. He died in 1594, and was buried with his anceifors in

Braborne church, having had by

his firft wife fever>-

teen children, of whom Thomas fucceeded him at Sir John Scott, of NetScotts-hall, but died /. p. tlefted, the fecond fon, died J. p. of whom a full ac-

count may be feen under Nettleded.

Edward,, the

became heir to his brother Thomas at Scotts-hall, and Robert the youngell fon, was of Merfham, whofe -ilfue by his firft wife fettled at Li-

third fon,

account may be feen of them. From Edward Scott, of Scott’s hall, defcended Geo. Scott, efq. likewife of Scotts-hall, who was twice married ; by his firft he had Edward, his fucceflbr here ; by his fecond he had feven fons and feven daughters ; of whom William is now of Canterbury, efq. unmarried, born in 1713 ; Arthur was a commifiioner of the navy, and married Mary, daughter of Charles Compton, efq. and died f. p. and Cholmley was a colonel in the army. Of the daughters, Cecilia died unmarried at Canterbury in 1 785, and Caroline married-Thomas Beft, efq. of Chilfton, but died f.p. The eldeft fon Edward Scott, efq. fucceeded him here, and refided at Scotts-hall, where he died in 1765, having married Margaret, daughter of John Sutherland, efq. by whom he had twelve children, of whom Francis Talbot Scott, efq. the eldeft, was of London, barrifter-at -law, and died in 1789, having married his firft-coufin Cecilia, daughter of his half-

minge, where a

full

uncle George Scott, elq. and widow of Brice Fletcher, efq. of Bombay, in the Eaft-Indies, by whom he had two fons, George and Francis-Peach ; Edward Scott, efq. one of the equerries to the prince of Wales ; Thomas, late vicar of Lenham and retftor of Denton;

William, an

officer in

the navy B 4

j

andTufton-Charles; Cecilia

j

BIRCHOLT FRANCHISE HUNDRED.

8•^

Cecilia; Katherine; Caroline, married in 1784, to George Beft, efq. now of Chilfton, younger Ton of

James

Bert, efq.

length, after this

Chatham, and Charlotte.** At raanfion had continued for fo great of

defcended down to Edward Scott, el'q. (the eldert fon of George as before mentioned) who was the lart of this family who refided at it. He died here poflefled of it in i76'5, and fucceeded in the inheritance of this manor and feat by his eldert fon Francis Talbot Scott, efq. whofe trurtees, about the year 1784, conveyed it, with the rert of his ertates in this parilh and neighbourhood, a length of time in

to Sir

this family, it

John Honywood,

bart. the prefent pofl'eflbr of

them,

CHARITIES.

William Fordred,

by

will in

1550, gave to this

parifli,

among

others, a proportion of the rents of 25 acres of land, in St. Mary’s parifli, in Romney Marfli ; which portion to this pa-

of the annual produce of 4I. 12s. 4|d. to be diftributed annually to the poor, and is vefted in certain truftees. This land is let for 35I. per annum, and is divided among the parifhes

rifli is

of Smeeth, Aldington, Limne, Horton, Sellindge, Stanford, and Braborne. Richard Hart, by deed in 1619, gave to the poor of this parilh for ever, five acres of land at Newchurch, in Romney IVlarlh, now of the annual produce of 7I. which is vefted in truftees.

Timothy Bedingfield, by will in 1691, gave towards the education and maintenance of poor children of this parifli, Lyminge, and Dimchurch, and to pay los. yearly to two poor wornen of each of thefe parilhes, a houfe and land lying in the pariflies of St. Mary, Romney Marfti, Lyminge, and Woodchurch, now of the annual produce of C4I. los. which is vefted in truftees.

The poor fifty-five.

conftantly relieved are about twenty-five, cafuallv '

Smeeth

is

diction of the Limne. "

within the dioceje

ecclesiastical jurisof Canterbury, and deanry of

See pedigrees of this family in the

Harl.MSS. No. 1156-11.

The

SMEETH.

The

church, which

dedicated to St. Mary,

9

a fmall building, confilling of two ifles and two chancels, having a low fteeple fliingled at the weft end. The north chancel belongs to Scotts-hall. In the north wall is a tomb, with an antient ornamented arch over it, and in the window above thele arms, Sable^ a Againft the north w'all lion rampant^ double tailed, or. is a monument, having two figures in a ftanding pofture, and an infcription for Prifcilla Scott, daughter of Sir Thomas Honywood,and wife of Robert Scott, is

is

of Merlham, obt, 1648, and for' Mary Scott, daughter of John Moyle, efq. of Buckwell, wife of Robert Scott, efq. obt. 1652, being formerly the wife of Richard Godfrey, efq. of Wye, by whom flie had twenty-two children, being the firft who made Mary Honywood, of Charing, a great-grandmother in the fifth generation, who lived to fee 366 of her iffue living. In the fouth ifle is a memorial for Thomas Loftie, obt. 1678. Over the great arch at the eaft end of this ifle, exceedingly high, are two monuments for the family of Loftie. The above arch is a very fine one, of Saxon architefture, with zig-zag ornaments round it. In the north ifle is a memorial for Margaret, wife of Richard Gokin, of Canterbury, obt. 1719. In the church-yard is a tomb over John and Elizabeth Dunk. He died in 1779. This church is exempted from the jurifdidion of the archdeacon. It has always been efteemed a chapel to the church of Aldington, the recftor of which pa-^ rifh is prefented to the church of Aldington with the chapel ofSmeeth annexed. It is included in the valuation of Aldington in the king’s books. In 1640 here were communicants one hundred and eighty. efq.

THE

'

;

lO

(

)

THE HUNDRED OF BIRCHOLT BARONY the next northward from that Jaft-defcribed, being ftiled in antient records the neutral hundred of

LIES

from its having been exempt from and it had the the jurifdi(ftion of any lath whatever addition of barony^ as well to diftinguilh it from the 3aft-defcribed hundred, within the archbifhop’s franchife, as from its having been part of the lands which were held by barony of Dover caftle, and made up the barony called the Confabularie, in the tenure of the

Bircholt Barony y

;

conftable of

Domefday,

it.

The name

of

varioufly Ipelt in

it is

as Berifolt, Berijout^ BcUce^ Brijeode^

and

Billfold.

THIS

HUNDRED CONTAINS WITHIN

ITS

BOUNDS THE

PARISHES OF 1.

Bircholt,

2.

Braborne, and

And

o/*

..

3.

H astinglei gh,

||

the churches of ihofe

One

pariflies.

tioii

over

conjiable

has jurifdif-

it.

BIRCHOLT IS the nerxt

parifli

from Smeeth northward, being

ufually called Birchall.

In

Domefday

it

is

written

between Braborne lees and Hatchpark, and is a very Imall parifh, having in it no more than the court-lodge, and four or five other houfes. The foil of it mofUy a deep fliff clay. It is a very obIcure out of the way place, not having any traffic through it, and is but very little known. Bircholt, at the time of the taking of Domefday, was held by Hugo de Montfort, under the general title of whofe lands it is thus entered in it Belice.

It

lies

^he

BIRCHOLT.

II

fame Htigo holds Beltce. furgis held it of king Edwardy and it was taxed for one filing, Ihe arable In demejne there is one carucate, and land is T^he

two

villeins^

with one borderer having one carucate.

*There arc three acres of

Ihefe'two Confejfor^

twenty

ejlates^

in

were worth

meadow. the

.

time of king

fixty fhillings^

Edward the

and afterwards

[hillings, novo fixty Jhillings.

Robert de Montfort, grandibn of

Hugh

before-

mentioned, fubmitting to a voluntary exile, the king took pofleffion of this among the reft of his eftates ; after which it was held by the Criols, and under them again, in the reign of king Edward I. by Philip de Columbers, in which name it docs not feem to have continued long ; for in the reign of Edward III. it was held jointly by a family who took their name of Bircholt from it. How long the portion above-mentioned, in which the manor of Bircholt, and two parts of the advowfon of the church of Bircholt was included, continued in the name of Bircholt, I do not find ; but in king Henry IV.’s reign, as appears by feveral antient court-rolls, Richard Elalke, or Hawke as they were ufually called, of Weft Halks, in Kingfnoth, was the proprietor of it ; in whofe defcend.ants it continued down to William Halke, who refided here He left an only in the reign of queen Elizabeth. who married Hamon Handdaughter and heir Joane, ville, of Ulcombe, and thereby entitled him to the poffeflion of this manor. This family was originally of Handville, or Hanville- green, in Waltham. They removed to Ulcombe in the beginning of queen Elizabeth’s reign, and bore for their arms, Argent, a lion rampant, fable, the field femee of crojfes, patee of the fe~ cond.^ One of his defeendants, Stephen Anvill, or

Handfield, having purchafed of Sir

Thomas

Scott in

' There is a pedigree of them in the Vifitation of the county of Kent, anno 1619.

the

11

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED.

the reign of king Charles II. the manors of Stretchlandy alias Foreland and of Stephens^ alias Pounds^ (which

had formerly owners of the name of Punde, and afterwards became the property of the Whiting’s) in this parilh of Bircholt and in Braborne, together with the other third part of the advowfon of the church of Bircholt, which had been vefted in the fame proprietors, became pofTeffed of the whole property of thefe manors, as well as of the advowfon of this church, and there is yet a farm in this parifh called by the name of Handheld, from their poflcfllng it all which he conveyed, about the year 1727, to Cale, in which name it continued down to John Cale, efq. of Barming, barrifter-at-law, who died poflefled of it in 1777, and by his will devifed this, among the reft of his eftates in this county, to the heirs of Thomas Prowfe, efq. of Somerfetfhire, in confequence of which his two daughters and coheirs became entitled to it the youngeft of whom married Sir John Mordaunt, bart. of WarwickIhire,^ and they continue the prefent pofleflbrs of this manor, with the advowfon of the church of Bircholt as above-mentioned, in undivided moieties. There is a large antient houfe ftill remaining on this eftate. There are no charities belonging to this parifh. The poor conftantly relieved are two, cafually the fame. ;

;

This parish diction of

is

within the

ecclesiastical jurisof

the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry

Trlham.

The

church, which was dedicated to St. Margaret, has been many years in ruins, though fome fmall part of the walls are yet remaining. It was ftanding in the year 15 1 8, as appears by a legacy then left towards the repair of itj but in 1578, the return made at the vifitation was, that there was no church ftandin^^. f See more of the Cales and vol. iv. of this hiftory, p. 3^0.

Morda unts. under Barming,

It

EIRCHOLT.

Ij

a redlory, valued in the king’s books at 2I. 10s. lod. and the yearly tenths at 5s. id. In 1578 here were communicants fourteen, and it was valued at ten pounds. It is now worth about twenty pounds per It

is

annum, and has three acres of glebe land belonging to

it.

The patronage

of

this redlory

was always annexed to

manor of Bircholt,

as has been already mentioned before, according to the fiiares the refpeftive owners had in it, that is to fay, two turns in three in the family

the

of Halk, or Hawke, as they were ufually called, and afterwards of that of Handheld, or Hanville, one of whom having purchafed a remaining part of that manor, to which a third turn of prefentation to this rectory was annexed, became polTeffed of the entire advowfon of it. From the Handhelds it w'ent by fale to Calc, and afterwards, in like way with the manor, as has been already mentioned, to the coheirs of Prowfe, who are the prefent poflelTors of it, with the advowfon of the redory of Bircholt.

CHURCH OF BIRCHOLT. PATRONS,

RECTORS.

Oi by ivbom prejcntcd. The

(^ucen, hac vice

fohn Cadham, April 8, 1596, obt. i6i6.»

inUiam Halke, gent,

of Bircholt,

Thomas

Johnfoiiy

May

obt. 1623. Lancelot Harrifon, Sir

A.

20, 1617,

M, May

20, 1623, obt. 1641.’’ Hugh Harrifon, A.B. Auguft 5,

Edward Scott

l

64 r.

ITiliiam Belcher, eje£ted 1662.^

Thomas Handfield, of Ulcomhe

.

..

John

Rojfc,

Nov.

4,

1662.

‘‘

Simon How, obt. 1673. Chrifojiher

Harris,

A. B.

0 £f.

17, 1673.* C

And

reftor

of Braborne.

f In 1626 a diljenfatioii his holding this reftory

pafled, for

with Orlelionc.

Rym.

Fted. vol. xviii.

p.

£75.

1 And reftor of Ukombt. See Calamy’s Life of Baxter, p. z86. •c And reifloi of Braborne. 1 was likewife perpetual curate of Winghitm.

PATRONS,

BfRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED. PATRONS, 7 he King,

rectors.

O/c.

Howdell, A. M. 0£1. 2j 1731, ref] gned 1743.™

M‘'illiajti

by lapfe

Curteis Wiglifwick,

Charles Hayes, efq.,,

The King, by

duaed Oa.

15, 1743s 1750." John Howdell, Sept. 28,

lapfe. ......

obt.

John Cale,

n>

He w»s

A. M. in-

1

i

75 ®»

762.

Polhill, A. B. Nov. 19, 1762, refigned 1773.“ the Thomas Jordan, A. B. prefent reaor.

William efq^.

vicar of

Leyfdown

like-

vife, by difpenfatioii. n He had a difiienfalion to hold the vicaraj^e of SCt IVIary Bredin, bury, With this re£\«ry, and

Canter-

was

af-

He terwards rcffVor of Bonnington. was of Pembroke college, Oxford,

which college Richard Wlghtwick, who was a younger fen of the Wightwicks, of Kingfnoib, was greatly inftrumental in the foundation of. o He refigned this on taking the vicarage of Linton, as he did that isi

1779

the vicarage of Dc.ling.

braborne LIES

the next parifh to Bircholt north-eaftward,

being written in Domel'day both Brahurne and Bradehurne, and taking its name from its fituation on the broad bourne or rivulet which rifes in it.

of the upper range of the chalk or down-hills, which reach from hence to the fca fliore at Folkeftone, and here take the name of Braborne downs ; it is an unfrequented place, and from the foils of it not a pleafant one, for near the downs it is moftly chalk ; the middle part, though

The

parish

there are various

is

fituated at the foot

foils in it,

confifts moflly

of a

ftifF,

though not unfertile clay, and the fouthern part is a deep red fand. It is about two miles acrofs from north tofouth, and fomewhatmore from eaft to weft, ftretching itfelf along a narrow flip beyond Hampton, almoft as far as the village of Brooke, and on the other part within a very little of Stowting court-lodge. The village of Braborne, having the church and court-lodge in

BRABORNE. in

it, lies at

I5

the foot of the Down-hill, on the fide of a

which extends below it fouthward. At the foot of the hills weftward are Combe, Bedleftone, the hamlet of Weft Braborne-ftreet and Hampton. The parilh is well watered by feveral rivulets, one of them, which riles in and near Braborne-ftreet, runs fouthward into that branch of the Stour below Scottshall, and fo on by Sevington to Alhford; and there are others, which from the foot of the hills, more towards the weft, which join the ftream which runs by Swatfield bridge towards Afhford likewife. In the fouthern part of the parifh is the heath called Braborne-lees, one half of which only is within the bounds of it ; acrofs thefe lees the high road goes from Alhford towards Hythe. Here is a noted zvarren for rabbits^ belonging to the Scotts-hall eftate, they are of a remarkable fine flavor, from which Canterbury, and all the neighbouring towns are plentifully fupplied with fair is held in the village on the laft day of them. May, for pedlary and toys. That part of it which is within the borough of Cocklefcombe, is in the hundred, and within the liberty ye. of the royal manor of The manor of Braborne, foon after the diflblution of the Saxon heptarchy, was, according to a very

wide

valley,

A

W

of a lady called Salis ftiled in it Domina de Brabourney and by the year 864, ordered that the future poffliould give yearly to the monaftery of St.

antient record,

burga^

her

who

will, in

the

inheritance

of it Auguftine, a quantity of provifions, on condition of their performing certain religious'icrvices for the healtli of her foul ; which provifions were forty meafurcs of malt, fifteen rams, twenty loaves of bread, one rneafure of butter, one rneafure of cheefe, four cart loads of wood, and twenty hens. Who were the pofieflors of this manor afterwards till the time of the Norman conqueft, does not appear ; but at the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, it was become part of the pol-

felTors

ieftions

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED.

l6

of Hugo de Montfort, on whom that prince had beftowed likewife more than thirty other manors

felTions

andeRates in the neighbourhood of it. Accordingly he is numbered in that record as one of the thirteen, (for there are no more) who held lands in this county at that time, and under the general title of his lands thus entered in it. Jn Pfivart lath, in Berifout hundred, Hugo himfelf holds Breburne, Godvic de Bunies held it of king Edward, and

this

manor

is

feven fulings, and now for five fulings and an half and half a yoke, becaufe another part of it is without the divifion of Hugo, and that the bijhop of Baieux The arable land is fifteen carucates. In demefne holds. there are tzvo, and thirty-one villeins, with ten borderers having ten carucates. There is a church, and eight fer^ vants, and two mills of feven fhillings, and twenty acres of meadow. Wood for the pannage of twenty-five hogs. it

was

tailed at

In the time of king Edward the Confejfor it twenty poutids, and afterwards eight pounds,

was worth now fixteen

pounds.

That

part mentioned above, as without the divifion

of Hugo de Montfort, is likewife noticed in the fame book, in the defeription of the adjoining manors of Haftingligh and Aldelows, belonging to the bifhop of Baieux, as may be feen hereafter, in the account of them. On the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort, grandfon of Hugh above-mentioned, in the reign of king Henry I. this manor, among the reft of his pof-

came into the king’s hands, whence it was foon afterwards granted to Robert, fon of Bernard de Ver, conftable of England, who had married Adeliza, daugh-

felfions,

Hugh

de Montfort, and was the founder of the priory of Horton, in the next adjoining parifh.P After which it appears to have come into the pofieflion of Henry de Effex, who was conftable likewife of Eng-

ter of

This appears by the Reglfter of Horton priory, cart, See Dugd. Mon. vol. i. p. 621, 622. ’’

i

and

2.

land.

BHABORNE.

I'j

which, as well as from other circumftances, it Ihould feem that he became entitled to this manor by inheritance. Henry de Efland,

fex,

from

his fucccfllon

to

before-mentioned, was baron of Raleigh, in Ef-

and hereditary ftandard-bearc;* of England but by his mifbehaviour in a battle againfb the VVellh, in the loth year of that reign, he forfeited Before which he had all his poffeffions to the crown. confirmed to the priory of Horton all the former grants of his anceftors. And by another charter he granted to it, in free and perpetual alms, the pafiure of twelve oxen in his park of Braborne, with his own oxen, for fo long as they fhould be at feed, whether within his park or without; and all tithe of his hay, to be taken wholly and fully with his carriages to the barns of the monks. After which this manor appears to have been held by Baldwin de Betun, earl of Albermarle, who, in the 5th year of king John, granted it to William Marefchal, earl of Pembroke, with Alice his daughter in frank marriage, to hold to them and their heirs. William, earl of Pembroke, in the 10th year of king Henry III. his firft wife being decealed, married Alianore, the king’s filler, and in the 14th year of that reign had a confirmation of this manor, on condition that Alianore his wife, if Ihe furvived him, fex, his chief feat, ;

fhould enjoy

it

for

that reign, and

flie

He

life.

became

died in the

1

5th year of

and afterof Leiceller, who was

poflefled of

it,

wards remarried Simon, earl flain fighting on the part of the difeontented barons at the battle of Evelham. After which the countefs and her children were forced to forfake the realm, and fhe died abroad in great poverty. In the mean time the four-brothers of William, earl of Pembroke, fuccdfively earls of Pembroke, being dead f. p. their inheritance became divided between their five fillers and their heirs, and upon the divifion ol it, the manor of '

See Morant’s Eflex, vol,

YOL, viir.

i.

p.

272. Mado.x’s Exch. p. 409.

c

Braborne,

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED.

iS

the Braborne, among others, was allotted to Joane, Montiecond fifter, then the widow of Warine dc and a chenfie, by whom flie had one Ton William, daughter Joane, married to William de Valence, the king’s half brother, who afterwards, through the king’s favour, on William de Montchenfie’s taking part with the difeontented barons, and his eftates being confif-

of this manor, of which he died poflefled in the 23d year of king Edward I. leaving Joane his widow furviving, who had it aligned to her as part of her dower. She died in the ift year of king Edward II. holding it hi capite by knight’s fervice, as of the king’s marechalfy, and leaving one fon Adomar or Aymer de Valente, earl of Pembroke, and three Anne, married to Maurice Fitzgerald, Sedaughters condly to Hugh Baliol, and laftly to John de Avenues ; Ifabel, to John de Haftings, of Bergavenny ; and Joane, to John Comyn, of Badenagh.' Aymer de Valence, earl of Pembroke, on her death, fucceeded to this manor, and in the 6th year of that reign, obtained a charter of privileges for it, among which were He was a thofe of a market, fair, and free-zvarren. nobleman greatly favoured by king Edward I. and II. cated,

became

pofTetTed

j

but in the

1

yth year of the latter reign, attending the

queen into France, he was murdered there that year. He died poflelTed of this manor, and without ifliie fo that John de Haftings, fon of Ifabel, one of the earl’s fifters, and John Comyn, of Badenagh, in Scotland, fon of Joane, another of the earl’s fifters, were found to be his coheirs and next of kin ; and the latter of them, on the divifion of their inheritance, had this manor, in his mother’s right, allotted to him. He died y. p. in the 19th year of king Edward II. leaving his two fifters his coheirs, of whom the eldeft, Joane, married to David de Strabolgie, earl of Athol, poffefled this manor as part of his wife’s inheritance, and ;;

*

See more of the Monchenhes and V alences, vol.

ii.

p.

404.

died

BRABORNE.

19

died next year. His defcendant David de Strabolgie, earl of Athol, died in the 49th year of that reign, poffelTed of this manor,’ leaving by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Henry, lord Ferrers, who died the fame year, anno 1375, and was buried in the high chancel

of Afhford church, two daughters

his

coheirs, the

youngeft of whom Philippa, married to John Halfliam, of Halfham, in SulTcx, by her father’s will, became The Halfhams bore for their entitled to this manor. arms. Argent^ a chevron engrailed^ between three ko-

Their grandfon Sir Hugh HalHenry VI. leaving Joane, his only daughter and heir, who entitled her hulband John Lcwknor, efq. of Suffex, to the polTefifion of it ; in whofc defcendants it continued till the latter end of king Henry VII.’s reign, when Sybilla, daughter of Sir Thomas Lewknor, carried it in marriage to Sir William Scott, K. B. and in his defcendants, refident at Scotts-hall, this manor, with the rents, fervices, courtlodge, and demefne lands, remained, till at length George Scott, efq. about the year 1700, fold the manor-houfe, called Braborne court-lodge^ with the demefne lands belonging to it, being enabled fo to do by an a6b palfed anno 10 and ii William III. to Tho. Denne, of Patrickfborne, whofe grandfons Daniel and Thomas Denne, of Sittingborne, in £768, conveyed this eflatc to William Deedes, efq. of St. Stephen’s, (who was before polfelfed of an eftate in this parifli, which had been purchafed of George Scott, efq. by his grandfather William Deedes, M. D. of Canterbury) and his cldeft fon of the lame name, now of Hyche, efq. is the prefent owner of it. But the manor rents and services remained in the family of Scott for fome time afterwards, and till Edward Scott, efq. fome few years ago, alienated the quit-rents of this manor, together with the Park fards headsy gules. Iham, died anno 21



See Cotton’s Records, p.

C 2

3,

5,

and 104.

and

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED. to

Thomas Whof-

and Pound farms, in this parilh, will devifed them for wood, efq, of Denton, who by of Scott, of Canterbury, daughter life to Mrs. Cecilia on whole death George Scott, efq. before- mentioned, became veiled in lady in 178c the property of them bart. of Markham, widow of Sir James Markham, htir-at-law. Lincolnlhire, who was Mr. VVhorwood’s Knatchbull, and Ihefold them in 1787 to Sir Edward bare, the prefent owner of them. But the manor of Braborne itself, with the belonging to it, court baron and other manerial rights Scott, elq. remained in the defeendants of George

Talbot Scott, efq. whofe truftees, eftates about the year 1784, conveyed it, with his other bart. in this neighbourhood, to Sir John Oonywood,

down

to Francis

the prefent proprietor of it. Heminge is a manor, lying at the fouth-eaft corner of this parifli, next to Horton, which in antient time

of Evington, who

is

gave both furname and refidence to a family fo called, (hew. as the deeds without date belonging to it plainly At length, after this manor had been in the pofl'eflion of this name, as might be traced out fully by thefe evidences for almoft three hundred years, it was conveyed by William Heminge, in the 2d year of Edward VL’s reign, to Peter Nott, in whofe defeendants it continued them till the 1 6th year of Charles II. when one of alienated it to Avery Flills, by whofe daughter and heir it went in marriage to Hobday, whofe defeendant 17T3, to Mr. John Netherfole, who left three fons furviving, John, who was of Barham ; Stephen, who was of Wimlinfwold ; and William, who was of Canterbury, in whofe three daughters, or their fold

it,

in the year

reprefentatives, this

manor

at

length became vefted.

agreed on a partition of their inheritance, on which the whole of this manor was allotted to Jacob Sharpe, efq. of Canterbury, the furviving fon of Mr, Jacob Sharpe, by Elizabeth, the eldeft of the three

They

daughters,

who

in

1796

fold

it

to

Mr. Thomas Kennett,

:

21

BRABORNE.

poffdTor of it. of Brabourn, who is the prefent court baron is held for this manor. Combe is another manor, in the northern part of foot of the dovvns, which name this parifh, clofe at the

nett,

A

the

Saxon

fignifying in had from its fituation, it from other a bottom or valley, and to diftinguilh it manors of the fame name in this neighbourhood, one was called Braborne Combe. About the year 990, Edward de Cumbe, whofe Ton Leofard was a monk in his will bequeatned the St. Auguftine’s monaftery, by Whether the abbot land of Cumbe to that monaftery. or if they and convent ever gained the polTelTion of it, it

with them, 1 do not find ; but at Domefday, in the the time of taking the furvey of Conqueror’s reign, it was parcel of the pofleftions of of whofe the biftiop of Baieux, under the general title did,

how long

lands

it is

it

ftaid

entered in

it

as follows

holds of the bilhop, Cumbe. It was taxed at one Julin^. 1‘he avable land is two catiicates. there is one, and nine villeins, with five bor-

Jame Wadard

In demefne

derers having one carucate teen acres of

hogs.

and an

half,

Inhere a) e four-

Wood for the pannage of five king Edward the ConfeJJor it was

meadow.

In the time of

worth fixty fhillings, and aft envards fifty fhillings, noiv Leuret de four pounds, and the fervice of one knight. of king Edward. After this, on the biftiop of Baieux’s difgrace, this manor was held of the crown, by a family who took whom Ritheir name from their refidence at it; of chard de Combe, and Simon his fon, ferved the office

rochinge held

it

John de Northwood, in for their the 20th year of king Edward I. and bore

offheriff, as affiftants to Sir

gules.

arms, Sable, three lions pajjant-guar dant, in pale, At length by a female heir of this name, it went by marriage, in the reign of king Richard II. to John Scott, who afterwards refided at it, as did his defendants till Sir William Scott removed to Scotts-hall at the latter end of king

Henry fV .’s c

2

reign

and in his defendants.

;

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED. dcfcendants, of Scotts-hall, this manor continued down

22 to

George

Scott, efq. of Scotts-hall,

who procured an

king William, to veft this manor, among his other edates, in truftees, to be fold for payment of his debts, in purfuance of which it was foon afterwards fold to Brook Bridges, efq. of Goodneftone, afterwards created a baronet, whofe great-grandfon Sir Brook Bridges, bart. of Goodneftone, is the prefent polfeffor of it. Hampton is the laft manor to be defcribed in this parifh, being fituated in the north-weft: corner of it, adjoining to Brooke. It has the name in antient deeds of Hampton Cocklefcombe,and fometimes is defcribed by the name of the manor of Cocklefcombe only, being fo called from its fituation in the borough of that name, and within the hundred of Wye. This manor was given by Robert de Vcr, conftable of England, and lord of Braborne, to Olbert his marfhal, and Erneline his wife, who gave it again to the priory in the adjoining parifh of Horton, by the defcription of the land of Hanetone ; which gift was confirmed to the priory by the fame Robert de Ver, and Adeliza de Momfort his wife, and afterwards by Henry de Effex,* as appears by the regifter of it ; of the priory of Horton this manor w’as afterwards again held, at the rent of forty ftdllings in perpetual fee farm, by a family who took their name of Hampton from their refidence

aft anno lo and

at

1 1

as appears not only

by the above regifter, but by antient deeds and court- rolis,*and that they remained here till the reign of king Henry VI. when it,

John Hamp-

ton pafled

away

one of the name of Shelley, by whofe heir general it became the property of John May, of Bibroke, in Kennington, whofe fon of the fame name leaving an only daughter Alice, flie carried It in marriage to John Edolph, of Brenfet, and his daughter Elizabeth entitled her hufband William Wil•

Regift.

it

>

Horton

to

priory, cart. 3, 4, 96,

103, and 104.

cocks.

«

BRABORNE. died poflefTed cocks, efq. of New Romney, to it, who 6th year of queen Elizabeth, of this manor in the him, holding it in free focage. His widow furvived 1

and afterwards married Ralph Radclilfe, efq. ofHItchin, She died in the in Hertfordfliire, who furvived her. laft will devifed -^9th year of that reign, and by her fifft hufband, John this manor to her only fbn by her Wilcocks, who dying /. p. his two lifters became his coheirs, of whom Martha married Sir Edward Radand phyfician to clifFe, of Sevington, in this county, king James I. and Elizabeth married William Andrews; and^ on the partition of their inheritance. Sir Edward Radclilfe became entitled to the foie polTeftion of it, in

whofe defendants

it

continued

down

who dying

efq. of Hitchin priory,

to

in

John i

came

Radclilfe,

7

*

P'

to Sir Charles

manor, among Farnaby, bart. of Sevenoke, in right of his wife Penelope, fifter and heir-at law of the above-mentioned John Radclilfe. Sir Charles Farnaby afterwards took the name of Radclilfe," and removed to Hitchin, where he died in 1798, and his heirs are now entitled to it. his other eftates,

CHARITIES, will in 1550, gave to this pari fli, the rents of 25 acres of land in of among others, a proportion which portion to this paMarfli ; St. Mary’s parifli, in Romney 4^d. to be diftributed 12s. 4I. of rilh is of the annual produce

William Fordred, by

annually to the poor, and veiled in truftees. Mr. Knott gave for the ufe of the poor, a fum of money, annual proveiled in Robert Goddard, of Merlliam, now of the

duce of

8s.

The poor

conllantly relieved

nr r r U are about nfty-nve, calually

twenty-five,

Braborne

is

diction of the

within the ecclesiastical jurisdiocefe

of Canterbury, and deamy of

Elham. “ See more of the Radclilfes, vol. Sevington, p. 530.

c 4

vii.

of this hillory, under

The

.

24

BIRCHOLT BARONV HUNDRED. The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary,

is a two and large handfome chancels, having a fquare tower fteeple at the weft end, in which are five bells. The northern ifle is much loftier than the other, having an upper ftory, choir-like, with the three upper windows to the fouth j below which is the roof of the north ifle. Both chancels are full of the interments of the Scott family ; but the brafles and infcriptions are almoft all gone. Againft a is wall tomb, with an arch and recefs over the north it ; againft the back have been two figures, with infcriptions, and two fhields of brafs, now gone ; on the fide of the tomb are two fliields carved in ftone, one Pympe, the other Scott. Againft the oppofite wall is a kind of altar, the form of which is given before, p. i. At the eaft end, within the rails, is a large altar-tomb againft the wall, of Betherfden marble ; on it the marks of a figure, the brafs gone ; on the front five fhields, with the arms of Scott, and their fevcral impalements. Over the tomb is a kind of altar-piece, ornamented with ftone carve-work, and three fhields of arms i ; Scott impaling obht. over it the date 1290 ; 2, being the middle fhield, Scott and the following quarterings, Beaufitz, Pympe, Pafhley, Normanville, Warren, Sergeaux, Gower, and Cogan In which arms of Scott

building, confifting

it is

noted,

<7//

the borduxes are plain.

of two

ifles

In the fouth chan-

cel belonging likewife to the Scott family, the brafles on the graveftones, with which the pavement

is cogone. In the fouth wall is a very antient with an arch over it underneath this tomb the

vered, are

all

tomb late Edward Scott, efq. was buried. Againft this wall is a monument for Arthur Scott, commiflioner of the ;

navy, thmd fon of Geo. Scott, of Scotts-hall. the noi th wall a

melcy Scott,

monument

Againft

for lieutenant-colonel

Chol-

efq.

youngeft fon of George Scott, efq. of .cotts-hall._ Wcever mentions feveral memorials of t us ami y in the body of die church remaining in his time, all which have been long fincc obliteratal, and their

BRABORN^. In the fouth

their brafles deftroyed.

the figure of a

man

in

25 ifle is

brafs, habited in

a (lone, with

armour, with

iword and fpurs on, the latter having the rowels much like the figure of a Catherine wheel ; a greyhound under his feet; the infcription gone, excepting the words of Braboui ne, armigr. and anno Dni mil, Againft the north wall, a monument for William Richards, put up by Gabriel Richards, gent, of Rowling, in 1672 arms, SahUt a chevron between three Jieurs de //j, argent a crefeent for difference. Another for John Richards, vicar, obt. 1727. In the fouth feite of the body of the church, is a memorial for Dionifia, daughter of Vincent Fynche, alias Harbert, efq. obt. 1458; arms. Finch impaling Cralle ; and in the fame ifle is a ftone, robbed of the figure on it, but the brafs infcription remains, for Joane, daughter of Sir Gervas Clifton, mar;

\

ried to

John Diggs

Diggs impaling

;

arms, Clifton impaling Finchy and

Clifton.

The

tower at the weft: end is top, and only of equal height

of a large fize, but flat at with the roof of the north ifle. Mr. Evelyn, in his Difeourfe on Foreft Trees, mennons a fuperannuated yew-tree growing in this churchyard, which being 58 feet 1 1 inches in circumference, bore near 20 feet diameter ; and befides which there were goodly planks, and other confiderable pieces of fquare and clear timber, which he obferved to lie about it, which had been hewed and fawn out of fome of the arms only, torn from it by impetuous winds. This tree has been many years fince gone, and a fine ftately young one now flourifhes in the room of it. The church was formerly appendant to the manor, and continued fo till it was given, in the beginning of king Henry II. ’s reign, by Robert de Ver, lord of the manor of Braborne, to the priory of Horton, at his firft foundation of it ; and it was appropriated to the priory before the 8th year of king Richard II. the priory being bound to pay the tenth of the vicarage. Put there does not feem to have been any endowment

made

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED. anno 1445, when there was one afllgned by

26

made

till

dc Banftede, the vicar of it.'" In which ftate this church, with the advowfon of the vicarage, continued till the diflblution of the priory in the reign of king Henry VIII. when it came into the king’s hands, and remained there till it was granted in the prior to

Thomas

exchange to the archbifliop, where it itill continues, the parfonage being at this time parcel of the fee of Canterbury, and his grace the archbifhop the prefent patron of the vicarage. The parfonage is a very handfbme brick houfe, (landing at a fmall diftance from the churcii-yard, to

which the vicarage adjoins likewife, being a neat fmall brick building. The family of Kennet have been leffees for many years, Mr. Claude Kennet being the prefent lelfee of it, who refides at it. The vicarage of Braborne is valued in the king’s books at 1 1. 1 2s. 6d. and the yearly tenths at 1 1. 3s. 3d. And there is annually, by the endowment of it, paid out of the parfonage to the vicar, one feam or quarter of wheat, and the like of barley; and archbifhop Juxon, anno 1 5 Charles II. augmented it fixteen pounds per annum, to be paid by the leflee of the parfonage. In 1640 this vicarage was valued at fixty-four pounds, communicants one hundred and fix. In 1733 it was valued at one hundred pounds. There is one acre of 1

glebe land belonging to it. This vicarage was confolidated in the year 1776, with the redory of Horton Monks adjoining. * It appears by the regifter of Horton priory, that there was a procefs for the endowment of this vicarage in 1359; but it did not fucceed Cart. 239. Endowment ibid. cart. 240, and MSS. in Chrift-clnirch, Canterbury, marked A. ii, fol. 68\ In the fame regilter, cart.

241,

anno 10 Richard

I.

a certificate of the bounds of this parifli, and another, without date, cart. 243.

is

CHURCH

BRABORNE

27

CmiRCH OF BRABORNE. Or Ihe

by

PATRONS, whom prejentcd.

vicars. John Cadman^M^tch 28, 1 594, obt. 1616. Alexander L um/den, Fe b 7 1616,

Aichb\jholi

.

,

obt. 1625.

A.

John RoJJe, 1625.

M,

July 25,

Willlatn JohnfoH^ A. B, July 14, 1664, obt. 1675.

John Richards^ induced March 8, 1675, obt. November 28, 1727. John ^Francis., A<- M. Jan. 23, *^

728, refigned 1733-’' LL. B. Aug. 1 1, obt. 1767.^ 1733, Jofejih Price, B. D. March 5, 1767, refigned 1786.^ A. Purjhouje, 1786, the prefeut 1

Charles Norris,

vicar.

X

And

reftor of

difpenfation.

He

Horton

Monks by

buried in the

lies

north ifleof this church.

His

in the Prerog. off. Cant. y He refigned this church

will

is

He lies buried in the north iflc of tliis church, without any memorial over him. a

for the

reftory of Harbledown. Hewasniafler of the King’s fchool in Canterbury, and before perpetual curate ofNack-

He died in 1734. * Likewife reftor of Goodneflone,

ington.

Hehada

fecond induftion to

tliis

vicarage, on March 1 1, 1776, on the confolidaiion of this vicarage with the reflory of Horton adjoining. He rcligned this vicarage with that reiftoiy, on being prefented to the vicarage of

Hci ne.

and perpetual curate of Nackington.

HASTINGLIGH IS the next parifh northward from Braborne, being called in the record of Domefday, Uaflingelai, taking its

name from

and

the

two Saxon words,

or place, denoting

hehjlau.,

higheft,

high fituation. Though that part of this parifh which contains the village and church is in the hundred of Bircholt Franleah, a field

chife, yet

fomuch of it

as

is

in

its

Town

Borough,

is

in

the

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED.

2g

the hundred of

There

manor.

within the liberty of that only one borough, called HaJHngligh

Wye, and is

boroughy in the parifh. Hastingligh is fituated in a healthy

poor country,

the greateft part of it very high, at a fmall diftancc northward from the fummit of the chalk, or Down hills, though it extends fouthward to the foot of them, and comprehends moft of what is called Brabornedow-ns. The church, and the court- lodge which adjoins the church-yard, are in a valley on the northern fide of the parilh.

The whole of it

is

a continuation

of the former being chalk, and the latter a reddifli earth, mixed with quantities of (tones ; the whole very poor and barren. There is much open down in it, efpecially towards the fouth, though there are in different parts of it, feveral fmall pieces of coppice wood. The houfes in it are about twenty, and the inhabitants about one hundred. There is not any cf

hill

and dale

fair held in

;

the

foil

it.

The manor

of Hastingligh, being within the liberty of the duchy of Lancalter, was formerly part of the poffeffions of Odo, bifhop of Baieux j accordingly

it is

thus entered in the furvey of

Domefday, un-

title of that prelate’s lands : Briceode hundred^ In Rogers fon of Anjchitily holds of the fee of the bi/hop, Hajiingelaiy which Ulnod held of king Edwardy and zvas then taxed at one fiding, and

der the general

flow for three yokes y becaufe ther part within

Hugo de Montfort

his divifion.

T^he arable

holds ano^

land

is

three

In demefne there are twOy and two villeins, zvilh fix borderers having one carucate. There are four JervantSy and wood for the pannage of one hog. In the carucates.

time of king JhillingSy

Edward

wat zvorth Jixty thirty Jhillings, uow fixty jhil-

the Confejfor

and afierzvards

it

lings.

Four years and this

after the bifliop

of Baieux was difgraced, crown, whence manor was afterwards granted to the earl of Leiall

hiseftates were confifcated to the

cefter.

:

HASTINCLIGH.

whom

was held by the family of St. Clere i but they had quitted the poflenion of it before the 20th year of king Edward III. when Thomas de Bax held it by knight’s fervice of the above-mentioned earl. How long his defcendants continued in the polTeffion of it, I have not found ; but it afterwards became the property of the Hauts, one of whom, Richard Haut, died poITefTed of it in the 3d year of Henry VII, holding it of the king as of his duchy of Lancafter. Soon after which this manor pafled to Sir Edward Poynings, who died in the 14th year of king Henry VIII. not only without lawful ifllie,but without any collateral kindred, who could make claim to his e dates, upon which this manor, with his other lands, efcheaced to the crown, where it continued till the king granted it, with the manors of Aldglofe^ Combe ^ Grove, Fan/combe, and ccfler,

of

it

Smeeds-farm, in thisparifh, among other eftates, to the hofpital of the Savoy, in London, which being fupprelTed in the 7th year of king Edward VI. he gave

mayor and commonalty, citizens of the city of London, in trud, for the hofpital of Bridewell, and St. Thomas’s hofpital, in Southwark fome few years after which a partition was made of thele edate?, when this manor, with thofe of Aldglofe, them

that year to the

;

Combe,Grove and Fatifcombe, in thisparini, \v\i\\Smeeds~ farm, and other lands adjoining, were allotted to St. Thomas’s hofpital, part of vvhofe polfcdions they remain at this time, Mr. Thomas Kidder being the prefent leflee of the demefne lands of the manors of Hadingbut the manerial rights, royalties, ligh and Aldglofe and quit-rents, the governors of the hofpital retain in ;

own hands. Aldglose, as

their

now ufually called, but more properly Aldelofe, is a manor here, which at the time of taking the furvey of Domefday was part of the poflcfit Is

iions of the bidiop of Baieux,

whofc lands

it is

under the general

thus entered in

it

title

of

BIRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED.

30

OJbert holds of JVilliamy Jon nejne there is one cavucatey and is tzvo carucates , three villeins having half a carucaie. In the time of king

In Bilifold hundredy

was worth thirty foillingSy afterwards twenty JhillingSy now forty Jhilling. This land

Edward

the Confefory

it

withof the fee of the bifhop of Baienx, and remained Godric held it of king Edwardy with out his divifton, Bradeburne manor. Upon the bifhop’s difgrace four years after the takis

ing of the above furvey, all his poflclTions were confif* cated to the crown, whence this manor was granted to Jeffry de Saye, of whom it was held by a family who afllimed their furname from it, feveral of whom were But in the aoth benefadtors to the priory of Horton. year of king Edward III. it was feparated in the hands

of different poffeflbrs. After which, that part of Aldelofe which comprehended the manor, paffed into the family of Haut, and was afterwards eftcemed as an appendage to the manor of Haftingligh, and as fuch paffed with it from that name to Poynings and thence again, in like manner as has been related before, in the account of that manor, to Sc. Thomas’s hofpital, in Sou.hwark, part of the poffeffions of which it continues at this time. The manerial rights the governors of the hofpital retain in their own hands; but the demefne lands are let to Mr. Thomas Kidder. Kingsmill down is afmall hamlet in the fouthern part of this parilTi, in which is a feat, which formerly belonged to a family named Beling, or Belling, which name was till lately in the weft w'indow of this church. ;

came into the pofleftion of the family of Jacob, and Mr. Abraham Jacob, of Dover, owned it in the reign of king George I. from which name it palled to Mr. John Sankey, whofe fon Mr. Richard Sankey is the prelent owner of it. It afterwards

!

Regift, of

Horton priory,

cart. 107,

in

to

1

14.

There

HASTINGLIGH. There

are no parochial charities.

poor conftantly relieved arc about

The number of

ten, cafually five.

Hastingligh within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Elham. The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, confifts of two ifles and a chancel, having a fquare tower fteeple at the weft end of the fouth ifle, in which is only one bell. The chancel, which is at the end of the north ifle, is nearly of the fame length with it. The two ifles and tower feem very antient, and the chancel is

much

having fmall narrow windows, and feveral circular arches or door-ways in the outfide walls, now walled up. In the eaft window of the chancel are two circular fliiclds of arms ; the firft, within the garter, of four coats, Poynings, Fitzpaine, Bryan, and 4th as firft; the other fhield is obliterated. There is no other painted glafs in the church. In the chancel are memorials for feveral of the Sankeys. In the north ifle, on a brafs plate, a memorial for John Halke, obt. 1604, and on a brafs plate a hawk. The church was antiently part of the poflfefllons of the fiimily of Poynings, one of whom, Michael de Poynings, of Terlingham, in Foikeftone, held the advowfon of

antienter

it

Edward

ftill,

in capite at his

and

death

in

the

43d year of king

defcendants the property of it continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, who died polfelTed of it in the 14th year of king Henry VIII. holding it in capife by knight’s .fervice, and by the ferIII.

in his

vice of fupporting and repairing the moiety of a chapel and hall in the caftle of Dover, as often as neceflary, at his

own expence, and by

the fervice of paying to

the great and the fmall wards of the caftle, on his death,

without lawful ilTue, and even without any collateral kindred, who could make claim to his eftates, the

advowfon of this church efeheated to the crown, whence it was afterwards granted to White, whofe heirs fold it to Sir John Baker, of SifTinghurft, and he in the 38th year

BiRCHOLT BARONY HUNDRED.

^2 year of

Henry VIII. conveyed

ic

and Edward VI.

to the king,

ic

in hands of the crown till and three acres of his ill year, granted this advowlbn Cranmer Since land ill this parifh, to archbifhop ot the which it has remained parcel of the pofiefTions of Canterbury, his grace the archbilhop being the

remained

in the

fee

prefent patron

of this redtory.

reftory of Haftingligh is valued in the king’s books at lol. 5s. and the yearly tenths at il. os. 6d. It of 6bl. 19s. is now of the clear yearly certified value

The

In 1587 here were communicants feventy-five, and ic was valued at feventy pounds per annum. In 1 640 the communicants were three hundred and thirty-feven,and the value of

it

was only

fixty

pounds per annum.

CHURCH OF HJSTIKGLIGH. PATRONS, Or

6y

whom

rectors.

prefented.

The Archbijhop

Henry JHayland, Feb. 13, 1586» refigned 1601 yohn Taylor, A. ^ 1 . Dec. 12,

The King.

Henry Pybus, A.

1601

M.

hJov. 114*

1647, obt. 1686.

The

Thomas

Archbijhiop

Cornell, clerk,

Jan. 13,

1686.

A. M. June 26, Dec. 1732.'^ Cumberland, Feb. 12,

yohn Smith,

1694, obt. Robert I

733, obt.

Nov.

6,

1734.*

yohn Conant, A. M. Dec. 20, 1734, obt. April 9, 1779-^ Hicholas Simons, A. M. July 19, 1779, refigned 1795 William Welfitt, S. T. P. 1795, -'*

the prefent re£lor.‘‘

c

Afterwards S. T. B. and

in

16:9

Jircfenicd to the vicarage of Elmlled. d Alfo vicar of Chart Sutton. = He was firll re£lorof Fordwich, and afterwards redlor both of St. Andrew’s and St. George’s, in Canterbury, which latter he refigned for this rec-

tory. «

vicarage of Elmfled, which he held

with this reAory by ilifj-enfatioii. B Alfo vicar of Elmlled, which h'e heldwiih this reftory, both which he refigned for the vicarage of Welton, in Yorkihire.

h Prebendary of Canterbury, and vicar of Elmlled, and of Ticchurft, in Sufife.'t.

likewife

In 1756 he was prefented to the

THK

{

33

)

THE HUNDRED OF STOWTING. THE next hundred from that of Bircholt Barony, eaftward,

that of Stowting, called in the record of both Stotinges and Eflotinges. In the reign

is

Domefday of king Henry

was held by the family of Heringod, one of whom, Stephen Heringod, lord likewife of the manor of Stowting, died polTdied of it in the 41ft year of it, holding it of the king hi capile, by the fervice ol fix men and one conftable, to guard the paflage of the fea, if it fliould be neceffary on account III.

it

of the king’s enemies, at Sandgate. And in his fuccefTors, owners of that manor, this hundred has continued down to Mr. John Jenkin, gent, and his nephew Mr. William Jenkin, clerk, of Sutfex, the prefent proprietors of the court leet of this hundred, and court baron of the manor of Stowting. THIS

HUNDRED CONTAINS WITHIN

ITS

BOUNDS THE

PARISHES OF

Elmsted. Stowting.

1.

2.

And

11

part ofthe parithes of

ham,

3.

Monks Horton;

4.

Stanford.

II

the churches of

Sellindge, Stellin o, and

which are in other hundreds.

Jlables have jurifdidion over

and

WaltTwo

con-

it.

ELMSTED IS the next parifh northward from Haflingligh laftdefcribed, taking its name, as many other places do, which are recorded in the furvey of Domefday, from the quantity of elms

growing

in it,

dm

fignlfying in

Saxon, that tree, and Jiede^ a place. The manor of Haflingligh claims over fome part of this parifh, whicli partis within the liberty of the duchy of Lancalter.

VOL.

VIII.

D

This

^

STOWTlNG HUN*DRED.

^4

unfrequented part of the country, above the down hills, in a It lies moftly on high ground, havhealthy air. ing continued hill and dale throughout it. The foil is but poor, and in general chalk, and much covered with flints, efpecially in the dales, where lome of the The church (lands on a earth is of a reddidi call. hill in the middle of it, having a green, with the viland at lage near it, among which is the court-lodge a fmall diftance weftward, Helchin-houjey belonging to Sir John Honywood, but now and for fome time pad inhabited by the Lufhingtons. Lower down in the bottom is Evington-courr, in a dull ineligible fituation, to which however the prefentSir John Honywood has added much, and laid out fome park -grounds round

This parish

is

fituated

in a lonely

:

it.

At

a fmall diftance

is

a fmall heath, called

Eving-

ton-lees, with feveral houfes

bounds of the

parifli lie

round it. At the fouthern Botfham, and Holt, both be-

longing to Sir John Honywood. At the north-eaft corner of it, near Stone-ftreet, is a hamlet called Northlye, the principal farm in which belongs to Mr. Richard V/arlee, gent, of Canterbury, about half a mile from

which is Deane or Dane manor-houje ; and ftill further Dowles-farmy belonging to Mr. John Rigden, of Faverfliam j near Stone-ftreet is the manor of Southlighy now called Mizlings^ by which name only it is now known here ; and near the fame ftreet is Arundel farm ^ belonging to Thomas Watkinfon Payler, cfq. and at the fouthern extremity of the parifh, the manor-houfe of Dunders^ with the lands belonging to it, called the Darky formerly belonging to the Graydons, ofFordwich, of whom they were purchaled, and are now the property of the right hon. Matthew Robinfon Morris, lord

Rokeby, who

refides at Horton. There are but two fmall coppice woods in this parifli, lying at fome diftance from each other, in the middle part of it. There IS a fair kept yearly in this parifli on St. James s day, the 25th of July.

The



ELMSTED.

The manor

of

Elmsted was

35 the year 8ii

in

bought by archbifliop Wlfrecl, of Cenulf, king of Mercia, for the benefit of Chrift-church, in Canterbury, L. S. A. which letters meant, that it fliould be free, and privileged with the fame liberties that Adifham was, when given to that church. Thefe privileges were, to be freed from all fecular fervices, excepting the trinoda necejjitas of repelling invafions, and the repairing of bridges and fortifications. There is no mention of this manor in the fUrvey of Domefday, under the title of the archbifhop’s lands, and of thofe held of him by knight’s fervice, and yet I find mention of its being held of him in feveral records fubfequent to that time ; for foon afterwards it appears to have been fo held by a family who afiiimed their name from it, one of whom, Hamo de Elmefted, held

of the archbifhop, by knight’s fervice. But they were extindl here before the middle of king Henry III. ’s reign, when the Heringods were become poflefied of It

it,

appears by the TeJIa de

as

N

evil,

bearing for their

arms. Gules, three herrings ere£l, two and one, or ; as they were formerly in the windows of Newington church, near Sittingborne. John de Heringod held

death in the 41 ft year of that reign.^ His grandfon, of the fame name, died in the next reign of king Edward I. without male iftlie, leaving three daughters his coheirs, of whom, Grace married Philip de Hardres, of Hardres, in this county; Chriftiana married William de Kirkby and Jane married Thomas Burgate, of Suffolk but he had before his death, by a deed, which bears the form of a Latin will, and, the other is without a date, fettled this manor, with lands in this neighbourhood, on the former of them, Philip de Hardres, a man of eminent repute of that time, in whofe fucceffors the manor of Elmfted reit

at his

;

:

mained

till

the

13th year of king James

I.

when

Sir l

'

Dugd. Mon.

vol.

i.

p. 19.

D

2

Dec, Script, •

col.

2215.

Thomas

STOWTING hundred. Thomas Hardres fold the manor of Dane

^6

cowtt an apof pendage to this of Elmfled, in the north-eaft part Rlmjled itjelf this pariQi, to Cloake, and the manor of Thomas Marfh, gent, of Canterbury, whofe fon to

1634, conveyed it to John Lufhinghis ton, whofe great-grandfon of the fame name, at death left it to his two fons, Richard and John, the former of whom was of Faverfham, and left an only daughter Elizabeth, married to Mr. James Taylor, of

John Marfh,

in

of his wife became poflefTed of his moiety of it, and having in 1787 purchafed the other moiety of John Lufhington, of Helchin, in this

Rodmerfham,who

in right

above-mentioned) became poflefled of the whole of this manor, and continues owner of it at this time. The manor of Dane, now called Deane-couriy above-mentioned, remained in the name of Cloake for fome time afterwards, and in 1652 Mr. Samuel Cloake held it. It afterwards pafTed into the name of Elwes, in which it continued down to John Elwes, efq. of Marcham, in Berkfliire, who died in 1789, and by will gave it to his nephew Thomas Timms, cfq. the prefent owner of it. The yoke of Evington is an eftate and feat in the fouth-weft part of this parifli, over which the manor of Barton, near Canterbury, claims jurifdiftion. The manfion of it, called Evington-courty was the inheritance of gentlemen of the fame furname, who bore for their arms. Argent y a fefs between thee burganetts, or jleel capSy azure ; and in a book, copied out from antient deeds by William Glover, Somerfet herald, afterwards in the pofleflion of John Philipott, likewife Somerfet, there was the copy of an old deed without date, in which William Fitzneal, called in Latin, FiHus Nige/liy paffed over fome land to Ruallo de Valoigns, which is ftrengthened by the appendant teftirnony of one Robert de Evington, who was anceftor of the Evingtons, of Evington-court, of whom there is mention parifh,

(fon of Richard

ELMSTED.

37

-

mention in the deeds of this place, both in the reigns of king Henry III, and king Edward I. After this family was extindl here, the Gays became pofiefled of It, a family originally defeended out of France, where they were called Le Gay, and remained feme time afterwards in the province of Normandy, from whence thofe of this name in jerfey and Guernfey defeended, and from them again thofe of Ha.iipQiire, and one of them, before they had left off their French appellation, John le Gay, is mentioned in the leigerbook of Horton priory, in this neighbourhood, as a benef^ftor to it. But to proceed ; although Evington-court was not originally credled by the family of Gay, yet It was much improved by them with additional buildings, and in allufion to their name, both the wainfeot and windows of it were adorned with nofegays. At length after the Gays, who bore for their arms, Gules^ three lions rampant y argent y an ork of crofs-crojletsyjitcheeyor.^ had continued owners of this manfion till the beginning of the reign of king Henry VII. Humphry Gay, efq. alienated it to John Hony wood, efq. of Sene, in Newington, near Hythe, and afterwards of St. Gregory’s, Canterbury, where he died in 1557, and was buried in that cathedral.

Honywood, antiently written Henew'ood, take their name from the manor of Henewood, in Poftling, where they refidedas early as Henry III.’s reign, when F'dmund de Henewood, or Honywood, as the name was afterwards fpelt, of that parifh, was a liberal benefadlor to the priory of Horton, and is men-

The

family of

tioned as fuch in the leiger as appears

by

book of

it.

After which,

their wills in the Prerogative-office, in

Canterbury, they refided at Hythe, for which port feveral of them ferved in parliament, bearing for their arms, Argent y a chevroHy between three hazvks heads In the Vifitation of the county of Kent, digree of Gay.

anno 1574,

is

a pe-

STOWTING HUNDRED. Thomas Honywood, died erafedi azure one of them, IV. leaving a fon John, in the reicrn of king Edward ;

wife defcendedthe elder branch of this and by his family, fettled at Evington, and baronets ; Hofecond wife defcended the younger branch of the and at Marksny woods, feated at Petts, in Charing,

by whofe

firfl:

Eflex, which branch is now extinft.' John Honywood, efq. the eldeft fon of John above-menEvington, tioned, by hisfirft wife, was the purchafer of hall,

in

grandfon Sir Thomas Honywood refided. He died in 1622, and was buried at Elmfted, the bufirfl; wife ferial place of this family." He left by his veral fons and daughters} of the former, John fucceeded him at Evington and Sene, and Edward was anceftor of Frazer Honywood, banker, of London, and of Mailing abbey, who died /. p. in 1764." Sir John Honywood, the eldeft fon, refided during his father’s time at Sene, in Newington, and on his death removed to Evington. He ferved the office of fheriff in the

where

his

18th, 19th, and 2cth years of king Charles I. Sir Edward Honywood, his eldeft fon, refided like wife at

Evington, and was created a baronet on July

His great-grandfon

Sir

John Honywood,

1

9,

1

660.

bart.

at

i748,fucceeded to the title and family eftates, ancf afterwards refided at Evington, where he kept his fhrievalty in 1752. On the death of his relation Frazer Honywood, efq. banker, of London, in 1764, he fucceeded by his will to his feats at Mailing abbey, and at Hampfted, in Middlefcx, befides a large perfonal cftate after which he refided at times both here and at Hampfted, at which latter he died in 1781, set. 71, and was buried with his anceftors in this church. He had been twice married ; firfl; to Annabella, daughter of William Goqdenough, efq. of Langford, in Berklength

in

;

*



See vol. V. p. 424, and vol.

vii, p.

436.

Several ol tueir wills are in the Prerog. See vol. iv. of this hiftory, p. 526.

off.

Cant,

fhire,

ELMSTED.

39

and le(hire, whofe iffue will be mentioned hereafter ; condly to Dorothy, daughter of Sir Edward Filmcr, fons, Filbart. of Eaft Sutton, by whom he had two mer Honywood, el(^* ol IVlarks-hall, in Edcx, to winch, and In this as well as other large eftates in that county, of Kent, he fucceeded by the will of his relation Gen. Philip Honywood, and lately was IVI. P. for this counand John, late ol All ty, and is at prelent unmarried Souls college, Oxford, who married Mifs Wake, daughter of Dr. Charles Wake, late prebendary of ;

Weftminfterj and Mary, married to Willlhirc Emmett, efq. late of Wiarton. By his firlt wife Sir John illiam Honywood had two Ions and four daughters the eldeft, was of Mailing abbey, efq. and died in his father’s life-time, having married Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. Clack, of Wallingford, in Berkfhire, by whom he had three Ions and one daughter Annabella, married of the forto R. G. D. Yate, efq of GloucefterlFire mer, John was heir to his grandfather, and is the prelent baronet ; William is now of Liminge, efq. and married Mary, lifter of James Drake Brockman, efq. of Beechborough, and Edward married Sophia, daugh;

W

;

Rev. Mr. Long, of Suffolk. Edward, the fecond fon, was in the army, and died without iflue.

ter of the

daughters were, Annabella, married to Edmund Filmer, redor of Crundal; and Thomafine, married to William Weftern HugeflTen, efq. of Provenders, both fince deceafed. On Sir John Honywood’s death

The

hewas fucceeded by his eldeft grandlbn abovementioned, the prefent Sir John Honywood, bart. who great imrefides at Evington, to which he has made provements and additions. He married Frances, one of the daughters of William, vifeount Courtenay, by

in 1781,

he has three daughters, Frances- Elizabeth, Charlotte-Dorothea, and Annabella-Chriftiana, and ono ion John, born in 1787.“

whom

®

See Collins’s Baronetage, vol.

o ^

iii.

p. 10 ^.

Bottsham,

STOWTING HUNDRED.

40

and more properly writtea Bodefhamy is a manor in the vveft-ern part of this paAbout the year 687 Swabert, king of Kent, gave rifh.

Bottsham,

among

antiently

BoThanet, and

others, three plough-lands in a place called

deniam, to Eabba, abbefs of Minder, in in the reign of king Edward the Confeffor, one -lElgeric Bigg gave another part of it to the abbey of St. Augulline, by the defeription of the lands called Bodeiham, on condition that Wade, his knight, fhould poffels them during his life.^ The former of thefe continued in the monaftery till the reign of king Canute, when it was plundered and burnt by the Danes. After which the church and lands of the monaftery of Minder, and thofe of Bodefham among them, were granted to St. Auguftine’s monallery, and remained, together with thofe given as above-mentioned by iElgeric Bigg, part of the pofledions of it at the taking of the furvey of Domefday, in which record it is thus deferibed In Lhnowart leji, in Siotinges hundredy Gaufrid holds Bode/ham of the abbot. It zvas taxed atone fuling. The :

arable land borderers y

is

tzvo carucateSy

and

there are^ zviih eight

wood for

the pannage offifteen hogs. In the time of king Edward the Confejfor it zvas zvorth four poundsy and aft erzvards tzveniy fhillings nozv four pounds, y certain villein held it.

A

Hugh, abbot of the year

1

1

St.

Augudine, and

10, granted to

his chapter, in

Hamo,deward of the

king’s land of Bodefham, upon condition that he fhould, if there fhould be occadon, advife and affid him and his fucetdors in any pleas brought againd

houfhold,

this

him by any baron,

either in

the county or in the

king’s court.

Hamo above-mentioned, whofe furname was Crevequer, had come over into this kingdom with the -onqueior, and was rewarded afterwards with much ^ Regift.

Mon.

Sci. Aiig.

marked

,

cart.

280.

land

ELMSTED. land in this county, and was

made

41 fherifF

of it during

from whence he was frequently ftiled Hamo ViceMmes^ or the fheriff. He lived till the middle of king Henry I.’s reign and in his defcendants it moft probably remained till it came into the potrdTion of the family of Gay, or Le Gay as they were fometimes written, owners of the yoke of Evington likcwife, iti which it continued till it was at length fold with it, in the beginning of Henry VII. 's reign, to Honywood, as has been fully mentioned before ; in whofe defcendants it ftill remains, being now the property of Sir John Honywood, bart. ot Evington. In the reign of king Edward I. Thomas de Morincs held half a knight’s fee of the archbifhop inElmfted, which eftate afterwards pafled into the family of Haut, and in the reign of king Edward III. had acquired the name of the manor' of Elmsted, alias SouTHLiGH. In which family ot Haut it continued down to Sir William Haut, of Biflioplborne, w^ho lived in the reign of king Henry VIII. and left two daughters his coheirs, Elizabeth, married to Thomas Culpeper, of Bedgbury j and Jane, to Thomas Wyatt. The former of whom, in the divifion of their inherifrom his heirs it pafied tance, became poflelTed of it by fale to Beft, and from thence again to Rich. Hardres, efq. of Hardres, whofe defeendant Sir Tho. Elardres, poiTelfed it in king James I.’s reign j at length, after fome intermediate owners, it pafied to Browning, whofe defeendant M. John Browning, of Yoklets, in Waltham, is the prefent owner of this manor. There are no parochial charities. The poor conftantly relieved are about thirty, cafually fevcntecn. Elmsted is within the ecclesiastical ju-

his life,

;

;

risdiction oi sht of Elham, ^ ' ,

Mr.

diocefe

Petit

of Canterbury,

Feedary of Kent

his

2in
deanry

Book.

The

STOWTINC HUNDRED.

^2

dedicated to St. James, is a handlbme building, confjfting of three iOes and three chancels, having a low pointed wooden fteeple at the

church, which

7 lie

is

weft end, in which are

fix

bells.

The

chancels are

open, one towards the other, the fpaces between the the whole a pillars not being filled up, which gives In the middle chancel, lierht and airy appearance. which is dedicated to St. James, are memorials for the Taylors, who intermarried with the Honywoods, and for the Lufiiingtons, of Helchin; one for John Cloke, gent, of Northlye, obt. 1617. In the eaft window is lion rampant, or ; a fhield ot arms, firft and fourth,

A

fecond.

On

obliterated.

a fejs, argent, three erofs-crojlets In another compartment of the

;

third,

window

the figure of an antient man fitting, in robes lined with ermine, a large knotted ftaff in his left hand. is

The

north chancel which is an elegant

is

called the parifh chancel, in

monument, of white marble, with the buft of the late Sir John Honywood, bart. (a gentleman whofe worthy charafler is ftill remembered with the higheft commendation and refpedt, by all who knew him). He died much lamented by his neighand on the bours and the country in general in 1781 pavement are numbers of graveftones for the family of ;

Honywood and

their relatives.

The

fouth chancel,

dedicated to St. John, belongs to Evington, in which

monuments, and numbers of graveftones, the pavement being covered with them, for the Honywood family, fome of which have inferiptions and figures on braftes remaining on them. Underneath this chancel is a large vault, in which the remains of there are feveral

the family

lie

depofited.

On

the north fide of this

tomb, having had the figures on it of a his two wives and at each corner a fhield of arms in brafs for Gay. On the capital of a pillar at the eaft end of this tomb is this legend, in old Englifh letters, in gold, which have been lately repaired Pray for the fowlys of Xtopher Gay, Agnes and chancel

is

a

man between

;

:

ilmsted.

he^

1*

fVipr

andjohnnh.sw.fes

^

divider and

all

Xtian fowlys*

at leaft the repairer a niield of arms

foumlerfor T * to tr was^Ae carved Underneath

*r of

is

chancel, this^ehanccl

t„,o ihields of arms,

ofmodern oil's o’a monument tor .

»

-

endowment by arcnoim p

bert, atnong

bart.

’he'chm^h^^""

belonged '"The" drurX'oA:imfted

t the Conqueror, and was confirmed

ifle is

of kveral jOe are

Honywood.

*

f,rrne;.°coffin draped.

ChXh"

In the louth

Hony wood.

for

to the priory

appropriated to

of

it,

Hu

-

priory by archbidiop /^otit the reign of

m

t

church, with five wood, and the chapel

^1^.^

five acres of and uv ana acres ot arable,

oSle'

.fteemed as chapels to

°z;;r£* “waim,

.h..pFT~-

of the difiblution where ‘V!'^‘"LlSshLrds, in when it was furrendere ^ archbilhop the king and the ''’'ffXtC'to paflfed th y > means it

till

^

eX

to

make

became the

j^y

an part of the

of the fee of Canterbury, archbilhop, among

^

le^^ Pf Tofrrelt-f of the re above-mentioned ex-

reft

which had come change, in mife

it

one

has

of the above

eftates,

of

de-

to time ever fince.

„ ,,

Chefter e Philip, carl of leflce

which kind

^ i

m

heir to

whic

theWottons, was parfonage was P

.

STOWTING HUNDRED.

44

whole deceafc in i773> his intcrcft in the leafe of them has been fold by his executors to Geo. Gipps, efq of Canterbury, who is the prefent leffee, under the archbifliop, for them. But the vicarage of tliis church feems never to have belonged to the priory of St. Gregory, and in the 8th year of Richard II. anno 1384, appears to have been part of the poireflions of the abbot of Pontiniac, at which time it was valued at four pounds. How long it ftaid there, I have not found but it became afterwards part of the poflclTions of the fee of Canterbury, and remains fo at this time, his grace the archbifliop being the prefent patron of it. The vicarage of Elmfted is endowed with the tenths o{ \id.WiJilva cedua^ mills, heifers, calves, chicken, pigs, lambs, wool, geefe, ducks, eggs, bees, honey, wax, included

j

fince

;

butter, cheefe, milk-meats, flax,

fwans, pidgeons, merchandife,

hemp, fifh,

apples, pears,

onions, fowlings,

other fmall tithes or obventions whatfoever within the parifh ; and alfo with all grals of gardens or other clofes, vulgarly called homeftalls, although they alfo all

be at any time reduced to arable and the of all and Angular feedings and paflures, even if thofe lands fo let for feedings and paftures ihould be accuftomed to be ploughed, as often and whenfoever they fhouklatany time be let for the ufe of paflurc ; which portion to the vicar was then valued at twelve fliould

;

tithes

marcs.' It is

valued

now

a difeharged living,

in

the king’s

books

at

61 . 13s. 4d.

It

of the clear yearly certified In 1587 it was' valued at thirty pounds, communicants one hundred and eighty. In 1640 it was valued at ninety pounds, the fame number of communicants. There was an antient ftipend is

value of forty-five pounds.

'

The endowment

is

in

the leiger

Gregory, in bifliop More’s library it is

book of the priory of

St.

Cambridge, and a copy of among the aichives of Chrift-church, in Canterbury, marked

'A. II,

fol.

at

8g.

of



ELMSTED.

45

of ten pounds, payable from the parfonage to the vicar, which was augmented with the 'like fum by archbilkop Juxon, anno 15 Charles II. to be paid by the leffee of the parfonage ; which fiim of twenty pounds continues at this time to be paid yearly by the lelTee. There was a yearly penfionof il. 6s. payable from the vicar of Elmfted to the priory of St. Gregory; which Hill continues to be paid by him to the archbilhop’s Idfce here.

CHURCH OF ELMSTED. PATRONS, Or

^^

by ivliom prefentecL

James Shaw, A. B. Auguft

The Archbijhoh.

13,

1590, obt. 1624.

John

M.

A.

ITilfon,

Oft. 14,

1624, refigned 1629. John Taylor, S. T. B. Nov. 27, 1629.*

Arthur Kay,

M.

A,

Feb.

i,

1664, refigned 1673. Charles Kay, A. M. Aug. 25, 1673, refigned 1675. Safnuel Richards, A. M.Feb. i i, 1675, obt. 1686.

A. M. July

Laurenee Wright, 20, 1686, obt.

Eger ton I

Cutler,

I

A.

708. April 10,

M.

708.

IVilliam Sprakeling, obt.

1736. 20, 1736, obt. April 9, 1779.“ JKicholas Simons, A.B. July 19, 1779, refigned 1795."' William Welfitt, 8. T. P. I 795,

John Conant,

A.

M. May

the prel'ent vicar.^

*

Likewife reftor of Haftingligh,

and before vicar of Sc. Mary Brediii, Canterbury. t Afterwards D. D. and reilor of St. Andrew's, Canterbury, obt. 1701, and was buried in that church. * Before

redlur

of

Haftingligh,

which he held with this vicarage. He was likewife prebendary of Bangor, and redforof the finecure of

Wrough-

ton, in Wiltfhirc. w He held this vicarage with the rcdlory of Haftir.gligh.

*

And redlor

of Haftingligh.

STOWTING

46

STOWTING HUNDRED.

'

STOWTING from Elmfted, IS the next parifh foiith-eaflvvard both beln" written in the furvey of Domefday and

EJiotinges

now Stowting. STOWTING try, for the

is

mod

j

in later records, SluttngeSy

and

fituated in a wild and forlorn counpart on die great ridge of chalk, or crofs this pariHi. The church ftands

which from the in the vale, at fome fmall didance fouthward court-lodge. foot of them, in which part of it is the A little above the church arifes the Ipring, which is this the head of the dream, which running through by Horparifli fouthward by Broad-dreet, and thence ton priory, joins the Podling branch of the river Stour There are feveral at fome didance below Sellindge.

down

hills

Abov’^e the hill is Stowting common, fmall hamlets. and a little further Limridge green ; round both which are hamlets of houles. In this part the hills aie very fliarp and frequent, the foil barren and very flinty,

confiding either of chalk, or a poor reddilb earth, mixed with quantities of flint dones ; and here there and a is much rough ground and poor coppice wood, very comfortlels dreary country, which continues for the Si one-Jlreet northward, on t2ich ’wav, towards Canterbury, throughout which, if the country cannot boad of w'ealth, yet it can of being exceeding healthy, as all the hills and unfertile parts of this county in general are. Below the church, in the

feveral miles

vale, the foil

is

rather

more

fertile,

though

dill

in--

dined to chalk, having much wet and fwampy padure ground in it, and I'ome few hops on a piece of land belonging to Stowting court, which thrive exceeding well.

appears by a manufcript in the Surrenden library, that in the old park here, long before it was difIt

,

.

parked

STOWTING.

47

parked and laid open, there were feveral urns found, lying in a trough of ftone ; and Dr. Gale, in his Comment on Antoninus’s Itinerary, fays, Roman coins have been found in this parilh at different times, which may eafily be accounted for, from its contiguity to the Stone-ftreet, which was the Roman way between their flations Durovernum and Fortum Lent anisJ

1 HE

MANOR OF Stowting

was given, in the Egelric Bigge, to Chritf -church, in Canterbury, and on the partition of the lands of it foon after the conqueft, between the archbifhop and year 1044, by one

monks

was allotted as a limb of the manor of Aldington, which it was then accounted, with it his

there,

to the former, being held of the archbifhop, as fuch, foon afterwards, by the earl of ICwe ; accordingly it is

thus entered, under the general title of the archbifliop’s lands, in the furvey of Domefday, in the next entry to that of the manor of Aldington Of the fame manor (viz. Aldington) the earl of Ewe holds Eflotinges for one manor. It was taxed at one fnling and an half. In the time of king Edivard the Conand now, for one fuling only. The arable land is fejfor, :

eight carucates.

[even

In demefne there are tzvo, and twenty-

with thirteen borderers, having [even cariicaies,and one mill of twenty-five -pence. I here is a church, and twenty acres of meadozv. Wood for the pannage of ten hogs, and eight fervants. In the time king villeins,

of

Edward the

Confeffor,

eight pounds,

now

and

afterzvards,

it

was worth

ten pounds.

In the reign of king Henry II. this manor was held of the archbifhop by the family of Heringod, who were good benefadors to the priory of Horton, as appears by the regifler of it one of them, Stephen

de Heringod, ^ f

in the

beginning of king Henry

III.

had

Gale, p. 84. See Harris’s Hift. Kent, p. 30a. Cart. 86 ad cart. 91. Rot. N. 43.

the

STOWTING HUNDRED.

4^

the grant of a market, to be held weekly here, on a Tuelday, and a fair yearly for two days, on the vigil

the aflumption of the Virgin Mary, and died poilefled of this manor in the 41ft year of that reign. After which, by a female heir, Chriftiana He-

and day

oi

ringod, this

manor went

in marriage to

William de

Kirkby, who farmed the whole hundred of the king, and he died poffeffed of it in the 30th year of king Edw’ard I. holding it by knight’s lervice. Soon after which it pafled into the family of Burgherfli, and Robert de BurgherOi, conftable of Dover caftle, died pofreffed of it in the 34th year of that reign, whofe Ion Stephen de Burgherfli, in the ift year of king Edward II. obtained a charter of free-warren in all his demefne lands within it. How long his defcendants continued in the poffeffion of this manor I have not found ; but it appears by the efcheat-rolls of the ift year of king Edward III. that Walter de Pavely died that year poflefled of it, and in the aoth year of ,the fame reign, Thomas de Aldon appears by the Book of Aid, to have died pofTeffed of it in the t^5th year of that reign ; after which it came again into the family of Pavely, for Sir Walter de Pavely, knight of the garter, died pofTeffed of it in the 49th year of that reign, whofe grandfon, of the fame name, in the 3d year of king Richard II. releafed and quit-claimed to Sir Stephen de Valence and others, all his right and intereft in this manor and they paffedit away to Sir Thomas 1 rivet, whofe wddow Elizabeth died poffeffed of it in the 1 2th year of Henry VI. when it w'as found, that Elizabeth, then wdfe of Edward Nevill, fourth ion of Ralph, earl of Weflmoreland, was her next heir in remainder to this manor. She entitled her hufband Edward Nevill, above mentioned, lord Bergavenny, to the poffeffion of it. He furvived her, This deed

is

fcaled with his arms, a crofs fiory.

See Rennet’s

Parochial Antiq. p. 512.

and

and died anno 19 it,

among

STOWTING. Edward IV. being then

49 poflefled of

by the courGeorge Nevill,

others of her eftates, as tenant

His elded fon Sir manor to lord Bergavenny, feems to have fold this teVy of England.

Thomas Kempc,whofe younged

fon

Sir

Thomas, bi (hop

king of London, died poifenTcd of it in the 4th year of Henry VII. leaving Sir Tho. Kempe, K. B of Olwas a lantigh, his nephew, his next heir, when there park here, which continued as fuCh when Ldmbarde wrote his Perambulation in 157 '^* hhs delcendant of Ollantigh, dying in 1607, without ilfue male, dcvifed this manor by will to his brother Mr. Reginald Kempe, afterwards of Tremworth, in Crundal, whofe three daughters at length became his coheirs, and they with their trudees, ill the 19th year of king James I. joined in the conversance of the whole of it to Jolias Clerke, efc|. of Wefelded of terneld, in Edex, who had married Anne the them. He alienated it, in king Charles I.’s reign, to Sir

Thomas Kempe,

gent, of Eythorne, who was delcended from a lamily of this name in the noith of England, from whence they came into Kent, and fetVJII. tled at Folkedone about the reign or Henry There are feveral memorials of them, after the pur-

Mr. Thomas Jenkin,

chafe of this manor, in the chancel

of this church.

bore for their arms. Argent a lion rampant re-In whofe defcendr.nts it continueci gar dant fable Jcnkih, gent, of Horfemonceux, who down to barred the entail made of this manor, and then de-

They

y

y

vifed

it

Wm.

by

vvill

John Jenkin, gent, nCphew VV m. Jenkin, clerk,

to his brother

and to his of Frampton, in Gloucederfliire, \vho, fince dead,

W'lth the

four

children of the former, are the prefent proprietors

A court leet and court baron of this manor. held for the hundred and tnanor of Stowting. ^

There is a pedigree of county of Kent, anno 1619.

VOL,

VIII.

this

family in the

E

\ ifitatlon of

the

CHARITIES,

STOWTING HUNDRED.

50

CHARITIES.

Valentine Knott, gent, gave by will to the poor not receiving conftant relief, out of a farm in Bonnington, called Bonnington-pinn, in the occupation of Robert Goddard, of Merfhani, the annual

fum of

8s,

1 he poor conftantly receiving alms are about eighteen, cafually eight.

Stowting diction of Elham.

The



is

within the ecclesiastical juris-

the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of

church, which

dedicated to St. Mary, confifls of one ifle and one chancel, having at the weft end a low pointed turret of wood, projecting over the lower part of it, which is built of brick. In it are four is

This church has hardly any thing worth notice in it. The memorials of the Jenkin family, as has been already mentioned, are in the chancel, and in the window of the north ifle is this legend, on the bells.

Ora/e p nibs Rycardy Stotync fff Jidiane Stotync tix. ejus-f and three figures of antient men with beards, their fiaves in their hands j and underneath fix fmaller figures, in a praying pofiure. In the upper part of the window is a canopy, very finely painted. In the church-yard, which is of higher ground than that round it, feemingly thrown up in former times as a place of defence, are two fine large yew trees, of great glafs.

age, and three others, younger

and more

flourifliing

near them.

The

patronage of this reflory was antiently appendant to the manor of Stowting; and in the 21 ft year of king Edward I. the king brought his claim for the advowfon of it, againfi William de Kirkby, then owner of the manor by marriage with Chriftian Henngod; but the jury gave it againfi: the king; and the property of it continued in his fucceflors, lords of the manor, till the death of Mr. Reginald Kempe in

1622, whofe coheirs afterwards became entitled to

it.

How

STOWTING.

How

it

pafled from them,

51

have not found, only that

I

was afterwards feparated from the manor, and in the hands of different owners. In the reign of Charles II. Margaret An'.'ell, widow, was owner of it, and her fon

it

became entitled to it, from whofe heirs it palTed to John Collier, elq. who owned it in king George I’s reign afterwards James Cranfton, efq. of Kaltings, became poffeded of it ; from whom it pafled to the Rev. George Holgate, the prelent patron and redtor of this church. This rectory is valued in the king’s books at In 7I. 17s. I id. and the yearly tenths at 15s. 9ld. 1588 it was valued at eighty pounds per annum, communicants eighty. In 1 640 it was valued at the fame, and the like number of communicants. It is now of John

Anfell, clerk, afterwards

;

about the

like

annual value.

CHURCH OF STOH^ING. PATRONS, Or

RECTORS

by ivhom lirefented.

Thomas Kemlie^

Pf 'ye

Ihomas Woody Aug. 20,

1

593,

vacated 1605.** Sir Thomas Kempe.

Richard

Allcrty S.

T. B.

May 9,

1605, and in 1633. Reginald A?fell, obt. 1.679.

Magdalen Anfell y

loidoxv

John Anfell, A. M. January 8, 1679, obt. 725.® James Cranflon, A. M. 1725* I

John

Colliery

James

efq

Cranfiony efq, of Hafiings,


I

obt. 1771. George Holgate, LL. B. June 7, 1771, the prefent re£lor.^ e

He was

fentcd

by

his

real patron, but

was pre-

mother Magdalen An*

fell.

f

E 2

The

prefent patron of this rectory

MONKS

52

STOWTING HUNDRED,

-

MONKS .HORTON. THE

parilh of

Horton, ufually

called

Monks

Horton, from the priory fituated in it, as well as to diftinguilli it from others of that name in this county, lies the next fouthward from Stowting, It lies adjoining to the down hills which crofs the parilh, and though it has a variety of fituation it is in the whole efteemed healthy. The high road from

.

Canterbury called Stone-ltreet way, leads over Hampton-hill, along the eafl fide of it above this it is a ; dreary forlorn country, the foil wretchedly poor, and covered with (harp flints, much the fame as that in Stowting before defcribed, but at the foot of the hill It changes to a better foil, and a much more pleafant afpeft, in which part it rnay, in comparifon of the lower part of the valley fouthward, over which there is an extenfive view% be called high ground, which occafioned this part of it to be called formerly Uphorton ; in which part of it is Mount Morris, flanding in the midfl of ieveral hundred acres of dry paflurc grounds, extending oyer the greatefl part of this

and

into the adjoining pariflies, which have been all open one to the other for fome time the trees ; and coppice wood, round the former inclofures, luftered to

grow

having been

for

many

years natural and luxu-

and being interfperled with other woods and plimtations, form a fcene uncommonly pleafant and riant,

pia-urel^que for a lopg

way round. At a fmall diftance

from Mount Morns, among thefe now uninclofcd jmftures, ftands Horton court-lodge and the church.

The

weftern part of the parilh is very low, wet, and fwampy ; the ftream which rifes northward from hence at runs along this fide of it by the hamlets of Horton and Broad-ftreet, and fo on into the Poft-

Wing,

ling

:

MONKS HORTON. ling branch below Sellinge; here the

53 foil

is

a deep,

though on the fide of the ftream tliere are fome fertile good meadows, among which is Horton priory, handing in a bottom near the ftream, below Broad-ftreet, in a very low and damp fituation, and fo olifcure and retired, having a large wood which

miry

clay,

reaches clofe

up

to

it,

that

it

is

hardly feen

till

you

but a fmall part of it remainwhat is left is made ufe of for the dwellinging houfe, being a long narrow building, of afliler ftone and flints, feemingly of the time of king Henry VI though by the windows it appears to have been much altered at different times ; and there are the remains of a tower at the eaft end, and a fmall part of a very fine, large, circular arch, with zigzag ornaments of a much antienter date, feemingly the great entrance into the priory, or perhaps the church of it ; beyond which, ftill further eaftward, that part which was taken down by the king’s order foon after the fiipprefflon of it, fee ms to have flood. At THE TIME of taking the furvey of Domefday, Horton was part of the pofTeflions of Hugo dc Montfort ; accordingly it is thus entered in Domefday, under the general title of his lands In Stolinges hundred^ Alnod holds of Hugo-^ Hortone. Leuuht held it of king Edward^ and it was taxed at half a fiding. 'The arable land is three carucates. In demefne there are two carucates^ and five villeins^ zvith fix bor~ There is a derers having one carucate and an half. church, and one mill of twenty fiiie pence, and twentylod for the pannage of ten hogs. four acres of meadow. are clofe to

it.

I'here

is

;

W

In the time of king

Edward

the Confejjor

it

was

zvorth

and afterwards twenty, now fixty fi.nllings. fame place Alnod holds one yoke, of Hugo, but

forty [hillings,

In the there

is

nothing.

The fame Hugo holds three rood and a half in 'the fame lath, which three fochmen hold of king Edzvard. There E 3

54

STOWTING HUNDRED.

Ihere now one

villein has half a carncate.,

with three bor-

and was worth Jeparately ten /hillings And a little further below, in the fame record /« Stotinges hundred^ Ralph holds of HugOy Hortun. *T%vo fochmen held it of king Edzvard^ and it was taxed at one yoke and an half. The arable land is one carncate and an half. In demefne there is onCy with four villeins^ and one mill of thirty pence, and ten acres of meadozv. Of the wood there is pannage for fix hogs. On the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort, grandfon of Hugh above-mentioned, in the reign of king Henry I. his eftates in this parilh, among the reft derers.

It is

:

of his poflefiions, came into the king’s hands, whence they were, with others adjoining in this neighbourhood, foon afterwards granted to Robert de Ver, conftable of England, who had married Adeliza, daughter of Hugh de Montfort, and they jointly, by which it

fliouid

feem that

flie

had a

fpecial intereft in this

manor as part of her inheritance, granted the manor OF Horton, alias Uphorton, in the early part of the reign of king Henry II. to the prior and monks of their new-founded priory in this parilh, to

.

hold to them, on the payment of one marc of filver yearly to the church of St. Pancrace, of Lewes, as an acknowledgment.^ It appears by the record of Dover caflle, taken in king Edward I.’s reign, that the prior of Horton held one knight’s fee in Horton, by the fervice of ward to that caftle, being part of that barony held of it, called the Conftabularie ; fo called from its being held as part of the barony of the earl of Bologne, conftable of that caftle in the reign of king Henry I. and Darell,in histreatile, fays the pofteflbrs

of this manor,

tower

was

in it,

among

others, were

called Penchefter

bound

to repair a tower; which iervice

afterwards changed for the annual Regilb Horton priory,

gut.

Dugd. Mon.

vol.

i.

cart. i. p.

621

payment of ten

See the confirmations of

et feq

Ihillings

MONKS HORTON.

55

In which (late it continued till fhillings in lieu of the general dilTolution of religious houfes In the reign of king Henry VIII. in the 27th year of which, an ad: it.

having palled for the rupprefhon of all luch, whofe revenues did not amount to two hundred pounds per annum, this priory was lurrendered into the king’s hands; whence this manor, as well as all the reft of the pofleffions belonging to it, was granted by the king. In his 29th year, to archbifliop Cranmer, and It continued part of the pofl'ellions of that fee till the

was by a6t again vefted in the crown, where it (laid till king Charles I. in his 4th year, granted it to truftees for the ule of

reign of queen Elizabeth,

when

it

the mayor and commonalty of the city of London ; whence it was fold two years afterwards to George Rooke, gent, of Merfham, from whofe family were defcended the Rookes, of St. Laurence, near Canterbury, now extind. They bore for their arms. Argent, on a chevron engrailed^ fable, three chefs rooks, argent, between three rooks, fable} His defcendant Heyman Rooke alienated it in the reign of queen Anne to

Tho. Morris,

efq.

of this parIlh,who dying without

male, deviled this manor by will to his daughter’s Ion Morris Drake Morris, efq. and on failure of iflue male in that branch, to the iflue male of the faid Morris’s After Elizabeth Drake, by her hufband Matiflue

of Yorkfliire; by virtue of which, their eldeft fon the Right Hon. Matthew Robinfon Morris, lord Rookby, of whom a further

thew Robinfon,

account tled to

will

it.

efq.

be given hereafter, is now become entiA court baron is regularly held for this

manor.

The manor of Sherford,

alias

East Hor-

time of king Edward the Confeflbr, part of the poffeflions of the abbot and convent of

ton, was,

in the

There is a pedigree of this family in the Heraldic Villa, co. Kent, anno 1619. Seealfo Wood’s Ath. vol.ii, col. 1921. **

STOWTING HUNDRED.

5^

Augufline, being then efteemed as one yoke of land ; but after the Norman conqueft it was taken

Sr.

from them, and given, among much other land in this neighbourhood, to Hugh de Montforr, notwithffanding the oppofition which the monks made to it, which their chronicles fay, was all in vain, and this

manor

accordingly included in the defcription before-mentioned of his lands in the furvey of Domefday. On his voluntary exile in the reign of Henry I. it was, with the reft of his poffeftions, leized on by the is

crown, and was moft probably afterwards returned to the abbot j for in the 23d year of king Edward III. Sir Richard de Retling held it of the abbot at his death, that year, and left it to Joane his foie daughter and heir, who marrying John Spicer, entitled him to it, and in this name and family this manor continued till the reign of queen Elizabeth, about the latter end of w'hich it was alienated by one of them to Thomas Morris, gent, of London, whofe grandfon Thonias Morris, elq. late of London, merchant, in the reign of king William, erefted on the fcite of this manor, on an eminence, a handfome manfion for his reiidence, which he named Mount Morris. He died in lyi?* having had an only fon Thomas, who was drowned under London bridge, on his return from Holland, in 1697, ait. 23 ; and one daughter, married firft to Drake, of Cambridgefhire, and fecondly to the learned Dr. Conyers Middleton by the for; mer of whomfhe had Morris Drake, and a daughter Elizabeth, who married Matthew Robinfon, efq. The family of Morris bore for their arms, Jr^ent, a fpread eagle within a bcrdure, fable} Thomas Mor-

by will deviled this feat, of Eaft Horton, among his other ris,

*

efq.

as vyell as the

manor

eftates, at his

death

Among

the Harleian mapnfcripts, N. 7176 and are two volumes of the lives of jllufuious men, educated 7177, in theuniyerlity of Cambridge, colleaed from different authors, by Morns Drake Morris, efq. of Mount Morris, late of

Trinity college.

111

y

MONKS HORTON. in 1717, to bis grandlbn

57

Morris Drake,

efq.

who took

the name of Morris, and afterwards refided here, and dying f p. it came by the entail in the above will to his lifter Elizabeth

Drake, married to Matthew

binfon, efq. of Yorklhire, for her

life,

Ro-

and afterwards

to her iftue. The Robinfonsare originally defcended from the Robinfons, ot Strouan, in Perthfhire, in the highlands of Scotland, where at this time there is a

numerous clan of this name. The of them, of this branch, who came into England,

confiderable and firft

Kendal, in VVeftmoreland, in the reign of king Henry VIII. After which William Robinfon, of the eldeft branch of them, refided at Rookhy, in Yorkfhire, which he had purchafed in queen Elizabeth’s reign, whole eldeft fon I'homas was killed in the civil wars in i6^^3, leaving feveral Ions and daughters. From William the eldeji^ defcended William Robinfon, of Rookby, of whofe fons, Thomas the eldeft, was of Rookby, and created a baronet in 1 730, but died / p^ Richard, the fixth fon, was archbilhop of Armagh, and primate of Ireland, and on failure of iftue by his brother, fncceeded to the title of baronet in 1777. He was created Lord Rokeby, of the kingdom of Ireland, with remainder to Matthew Robinfon, efq. his kinfman, of Weft Layton, in Yorkfltire, and his heirs male. He died unmarried in i 794, and Septimius, the feventh fon, was knighted and gentleman ufher of the black rod. Leonard, the youngejl fon of ‘Thomas who was flain in 1643 as above-mentioned, was chamberlain of London, and knighted. He left three fons and fix daughters, of whom the eldeft and only furviving fon was Matthew Robinfon, efq. of Weft Layton, who married Elizabeth Drake, by whom he became poffefTed of Horton during her life, as above-mentioned. He died in London in 1778, St. 84, having had by her feven fons and two fettled at

daughters.

Of

the former,

Matthew Robinfon Mor-

Horton, twice ferved in parliament for Canterbury, and is the prefent Lord Rokeby 3 Tho-

ris,

efq. of

mas,

;

STOWTING HUNDRED.

5S

mas was

barrifter-at-law,

ireatije on

Gavelkind^

Morris was

who

author of ihe celebrated died unmarried in 1748 ;

Iblicitor in chancery,

who

died in Ireland

1777, leaving two Tons, Morris and Matthew; William was late redor of Denton, whofe fon Matthew is ill orders, and his daughter Elizabeth is the lecond wife of Samuel Egerton Brydges, efq. of Denton ; John was fellow of Trinity-hall, Cambridge; and Charles is barrifler-at law, recorder of Canterbury, and ferved twice in parliament for that city he has one daughter Mary, who married William Hougham, jun. efq. The two daughters were Elizabeth married to Edw. Montague, efq. of Allethorpe, in Yorkfliire ; and Sarah to G. L. Scott, efq. They bear'for their arms, Verty a chevron between three roebucks trippanty or^ By virtue of Mr. Morris’s will, on the death of Elizabeth, w'ife of Matthew Robinfon, efq. this eftate pafled immediately, notwithftanding her hufband furvived, to her eideft fon Matthew in

Robinfon, efq. who in compliance with the fame will, took the additional name of Morris, of whom a full account has already been given before. In 1794, on the death of the lord primate of Ireland, unmarried, he fucceeded, by the limitation of the patent, to the title of lord Rokeby, which he now enjoys. He is to entitled this manor and feat, in which he renow being at prefent unmarried. In the very beginning of king Henry II. ’s reign, Robert, fon of Bernard de Ver, with the king’s li-

fides,

cence, founded

a priory

(on part of the demefnes of the manor of Horton) in honor of the Virgin Mary, and St. John the Evangelift, placing in it monks of the order of Clugni, and fubjefting it in this pariOi,

as a cell to the priory of St. Pancrace, of that order, at Lewes, in Suflex. After which he, together with his wife Adeliza, “

daughter of

Hugh

de Montfort,

See Kimber’s Baronetage, vol. hi, p. 93.

gave

MONKS HORTON.

5^

gave to them their manor of Horton, with its appurtenances, and other lands and fervices elfewhere, the prior paying yearly to the church of St. Pancracc before-mentioned, one marc of filver as an acknowledgment. And they ordained that the prior of St. Pancrace, of Lewes, fhould have the marageinent and dilpofition of the prior and monks of Honon, in the fame manner as of liis own, according to the rule ofSt. Benedid, and the oider of Clugni ; and they gave to them befides, by different fublequent charters, feveral other lands, tithes, churches, and other pofleffions, and confirmed their former donations to it i and thel'e were afterwards increafed by others made at different times to it, as appears by the fevcral charters in the regifter of it, and thole again confirmed by Henry de Eflex, by king Stephen, and by feveral different popes.

year, releafed this

King Edward

III. in his

47th

priory from

its flare of an alien and made it indigenous, indigena, that is, upon the fame footing as other Englilh priories. In the 8th year of the next reign of king Richard II. the revenues of it, in temporalities and fpiritualities, were valued at 98 1. i6s. 8d. In the reign of king Henry VI, they were taxed at 106I. i6s. 8d. though the total revenue of it was 117I. 12s. 6d. At which time, as appears by the regifter of the priory, there were here only fix monks, with the prior, all priefts and profefled, though by their charter of foundation, they were to maintain thirteen monks, or if their revenue came fhort, at leaft eight. And in this ftate it continued till the 27th year of king Henry VIII. when this priory was lupprefled by adl, as not having revenues of the clear yearly value of two hundred pounds, the yearly revenues of it amounting to no more than 95I. 12s. 2d. clear yearly income, and ml. i6s. iiid.'total yearly revenue,* and it was furrendercd up with all its lands

priory,

1

Tan.

Pvlon. p, 2j 5.

Dugd, Mon,

vol.

i.

p, 1041.

and

STOWTING HUNDRED.

6o

and

by Richard of it, who had

king’s hands,

pofTeffions, into the

then prior fifteen pounds a year penfion granted to him.™ Gloucefter, alias Brilley,

The

original of the regiflcr of this priory

was

for-

of the family of Rooke, afterw'ards of William Somner, of Canterbury and a tranfeript of it was not many years fincein the Surrenden library, though now in other hands. Among the Harleian MSS. are col left ions from the chartularie of this priory, taken anno 1648, No. 2044-38; and there is a manufeript chartularie in the Bodleian library at Oxford, Dodfworth LV, which feems to be that once in the pofleffion of William Somner abovementioned. The scite of the priory of Horton, with the poifeffions belonging to it, did not remain long in the hands of the crown, during which time howevermuch of the buildings of it were pulled down and carried off, for the king, in his 29th year, granted them, fubjedt to certain exceptions and payments to archbiQiop Cranmer, who that year conveyed them back again to the crown ; whence they were next year granted, capile by knight’s fervice, to Richard Tate, to hold efq. of Stockbury, w’ho was then in poffeflion of them by a former leafe from the crown. He w'as afterwards knighted, and in the ift year of Edward VI. .alienated the feite of the priory, with the lands belonging to it, to Walter Mantell, efq. grandfon of Sir Walter Mantell, of Heyford, in Northamptonfhire, who bore for his arms, Argent^ a crofs engrailed^ between four mullets Jahle ; but he being, with his nephew AValter Mantel! and others, attainted and executed, for being concerned in Sir Thomas Wyatt’s rebellion, in the ift year of queen Mary, this eftate became forfeited to the crowm, where it flaid till queen Elizamerly

in the poffeffion

;

j

beth, in her 13th year, reftored ^ See grants in the Augtn. vol. ii. p. loi.

off.

it

to his eldeft fon

and Willis’s Mitred Abbeys,

Matthew

MONKS HORTON. Matthew Mantell,

6l

him and his heirs maky whole direift defcendants continued to rdide in it for I'everal generations afterwards, in one of whoin it ftill continues, being at this time veiled in Mr. Auguilus William Mantell. to

hold

to

CHARITIES. WiLMAM Fordred, by Will in 1550, among

gave to

this

parlfli,

others, a proportion of the rents

of twenty -five acres of land in St. Mary’s parifli, in Romney Marlh ; which portion to this parifit is of the annual produce of 4I. 12s. 4H. to be dif» tributed annually to the poor, and veiled in certain trullees. 'I'he poor conllantly relieved are about eight, cafually four.

This parish diction of Elham.

is

within the ecclesiastical juris-

the diocefe of Canterbury,

and deanry of

The

church, which is dedicated to St. Peter, is but a fmall building, confiding of one ifle and one chancel, having a low pointed turret at the weft end, in which are four liells. In the chancel are two monuments for the family of Rooke, and feveral memorials for the Morris’s, who lie in a vault underneath. In the ifle there are monuments and memorials likewile of the Morris’s. Againft the north wall, over lord Rokeby’s pew, is a curious tablet of vellum, on which is written a long copy of l.atin verfes, round it are ornaments, with the lafl-mentioned arms, and the date, 1647, Ihemingly done in needle-work, mofl probably by Mrs. Sarah, wife of Thomas Morris, gent, of Horton, who died in 1646, whole monument is here near

There are no remains of painted glafs in the winRichard Surcherdc, of Canterbury, by will in

it.

dows. “

There

a pedigree of this family in the Vifln. co. Kent, curious manufeript, drawn up by one of this family in the reign of queen Elizabeth, with the particulars of their delcents, marriages, 5£C. the feveral deeds and wills relating to the cllates they pollell’ed, and other remarkable occurrences relating to them, moll of which are attefled under their hands and fealsj is among the mauuferipts in the Critifli Mufeum,

1619, and

is

a

^

534

»

62

STOWTING HUNDRED.

153^, gave three pounds to tables of alabafter for

two

this

altars

church, to buy two in the body of it, on

one to be the ftory of our Lady, and on the other that of St. John ; near them w'asthe tabernacle of St. Nicholas ; and he gave four pounds towards making a window, the I'araeas that on the north fide there. The church of Horton appears, after the general diflblution of monafteries in the reign of

to have beep: veiled in the crown, where

Henry VIII. it

remained

thekip^, in his 34th year, exchanged the advowlon of this rc6tory, among other premifes, with the archbilhop of Canterbury, and it has remained parcel of the polfelTions of that fee ever fince, his grace the archbiQiop being the prefent patron of it. Thisredlory isvaluedinthe king’s booksatyl. los. 8d. It is now a difeharged living, of the clear yearly certified value of forty pounds. In 1588 it was valued at thirty pounds, communicants loS. In 1640 it was valued at fixty pounds, communicants i 80. There was a decree made in the court of exchequer, on the complaint of Laurence Rook, then the queen’s farmer, of the feite and demelhes of Horton manor, in the 39th year of queen Elizabeth, touching the payment of tithes to the recflor of this parilh, by which, certified by the queen’s letters of infpeximus, a modus was eftablifihed as having been time out of mind, for all pafture grounds, and of the dry cattle, and the wool of flieep and lambs feeding on them, and for certain forts of wood mentioned therein. Bryan FaulTett, foon after he became redlor, commenced a fuit in the exchequer, for tithes due to him, in oppofition to the above decree ; but after carrying his fuit on for feveral years, he dropped it, and the tithes have been ever fince received by the fucceeding redors according to the above-mentioned decree. till

CHURCH

y



-

f



4

V f

4

%



A-

P

MONKS HORTON. CHURCH OF MONKS HORTON. PATRONS,

Or

RECTORS.

by ivhom JireJented,

The Archbijhop

Adam

A. B, Mayaf, 588, obt. 1625." John Strout, A. B. February 1 1, 1635. Edward Tuke, A. M. Oft. 10, Cleater,

1

j

The King, fede vac

1645. Samuel Smith, in 1663. fVilliam Johnfon, A. B. Jan. 12,

The Archbijhoh

1668, obr. 1675.

John Richards, 4 .

March

8,

M. ml lifted

.

i

1675, obt.

M

1

728.

John Clough, A. Feb. 22, 1728, obt. Dec. 1764.'* Bryan FauJJett, A. M. May ii, 776.'' 1765, obt. Feb. 10, jofeph Price, B. D, March ii, 1776, reiigned 1786.’ A. Purjhoufe, 786, the prefent 1

1

reftor.

He

«

haJ a fccomi induction 1698, being prefeiucil by ^ueen, by lapfe.

May

r6,

the

P

Likewife vicar of Braborne, as

was his fucceflbr here. Vicar of Alhtord likewife.

r

And

perpetual curate of

Nack-

ington. s

He

held the vicarage of Braborne by, difpenfation, does his fucceffor Mr. Burfhoufe.

with

m

this retBory,

STANFORD. THE

next parifh fouth-eaftward from Horton is that of Sranford, which takes its name both from its foil

and

fitiiation,_/?t2«e in

Saxon fignifying

a ftone,

and

The parifh of Stanford itfelf lies in the hundred of Stowting, but that of Weflenhanger, now united to it, is within the hundred of Street.

/ore/, a rivulet.

It

the greateftpart of it, a low unpleafant fituation, lying at a fmall diftance below the down hills.

The The

is,

greateft part of foil is

it is

pafture ground, and very wet.

very clity and j)Oor ne.ar the

hill,

where the ground

STOWTING HUNDRED. ground lies higher, but lower down it becorties richer, and has fome good fertile meadows in it. There is 64

but little wood, only two fmall coppices in the northern part ot it j the rents are about 900I. per annum. The high road along the Stone-ftrect way from Canterbury, and over

Hampton

hill,

leads through this

towards Newinn-green, whence it continues ilrait forward to Limne, the Portus Lernanis of the Romans, and to the right and left to Afliford anti parilh

Hythe. there

is

Stanford-ftreet

is

built

on

this road, in

which

a neat modern-built houfe, belonging to

who

Jones, eaftward from

lives in it;

rife

dream which

rifes

Mr.

the church Hands on a gentle

The

watered by the above Poftling church, being the

it.

parilh

is

head of that branch of the river called the Old Stour, which running from thence hither, having been joined by feveral fmaller dreams from the north-wed, erodes the high road vvedward below Stanford-dreet towards 7\ndbrd. The bridge under which it runs here, being broken down anno 7 Edward I. the jury found, that it ought to be repaired by Nicholas de Criol, and not by the adjacent hundreds. At a fmall didance wedward from this bridge, and not far from the dream, dands the antient manfion of Wedenhanger, havinga gloomy appearance, in a low unpleafant fituation, having an extent of flat country and padure grounds in front of it, the above dream fupplying the broad deep moat which furrounds

The

it.

of this manfion, though very fmall, Ihcw' it to have been formerly a very large and magnificent pile of building. 1 he antiquity of this manfion was, no doubt, very high, and if not originally built by one of the family of Criol, was afterwards much enlarged and drengthened by them. From one of the towers dill retaining the name of Rofamond’s tower, where the tradition is, that fair midrefs of king Henry II. was kept for fome time, it fhould feem to have been built before his reign, or perhaps even belonging to him. ruins

Which

STANFORD.

65

feems the more probable from there having been found among the ruins the left hand of a well carved ftatue, with the end of a fceptre grafped in it; a pofition peculiar to this prince, one of whole feals was fo made in the life time of his father.* The fcite of the houfe, moated round, had a drawbridge, a gatehoufe and portal, the arch of which was large and ilrong, fpringing from fix pol}'gonal pillars, with a The walls were very high, and of portcullis to it. great thicknefs, the whole of them embattled, and iortified with nine great towers, alternately iquareand round, and a gallery reaching throughout the whole from one to the other. One of thefe, wnth the gallery adjoining to it on the north fide, was called, as has been already ni'^'ntioned, Fair Roi'amond’s ; and it is fuppoled file was kept here (ome time before her re-

Which

moval to Woodlfock. The room called her prifon, was a long upper one, of i6o feet in length, which was likewife called her gallery. Over the door of entrance into the houfe was carved in ftone, the figure

of St. George on horfeback, and under it four fliields of arms ; one of which w'as the arms of England, and another a key and crown, fupported by two angels. On the right hand w'as a flight of freeltone fleps, which led into a chapel, now a liable, curioufly vaulted with

Edward Poynings, in the of king Henry VIll. At each corner of the winereded by

flone, being

reign

dow of

this chapel

Sir

was curioufly carved

in flone,

a

There vv'ere likewilc in it feveral pedeflalsfor flatues, and over the window flood a flatue of St. Anthony, with a pig at his feet, and a bell hanging to

canopy.

one of

its ears.

At

the weft end were the flatues of St.

Chriflopher and king Herod; feet long, w'iih

The great

and other apartments *

VOL. VIII.

was

a mufic gallery at one end of

at the other a range of cloiflers pel,

hall

which

it,

fifty

and

led to the cha-

of the houfe.

There were

See Sandford's Gcii. Hift.. p. 66.

F

one

66

STOWTING

HUNDRED.

one hundred and twenty-fix rooms in it, and, by report, three hundred and fixty-five windows. In the year 1701, more than three parts of it w'as pulled down, for the fake of the fale of the materials, which were then fold for loool. After this Mr. Champneis, the purchafer of it, converted the remainder into a fmall neat edifice for his refidence ; which houfe,

within thefe few years, has been again pulled down, and a yet fmaller modern one built on the fcite of it. All that now remains therefore of this great manfion

and itsextenfive furrounding buildings, are the walls and two towers on the north and eaft fides of it, which being undermined by length of time, are yearly falling in huge mafies into the adjoining moat ; and the remaining ruins being covered with ivy and trees, growing fpontaneoufly on and through the fides of every part of them, exhibit an awful fcene, and a melancholy remembrance of itsantient grandeur ; the under part of the great entrance yet remains, the arch over it having been taken down but lately ; and there are numberlefs fragments of carved ftone-work lying fcattered about. The whole was built of quarry-ftone, faid to have been dug in the quarries of the adjoining manor of Otterpoole, in Limne, ornamented with fculptured ftone brought from Caen. The park which belonged to this manfion, extended over the eaft and fouth parts of this parifli, rather on rifing ground, formerly comprehending the whole parochial diftrid of Oftenhanger, at the fouthern boundary of which is New-Inn-green, fo called from a new inn built there in king Henry the Vlllth’s time, near which there is a fmall hamlet built on the road leading from Hythe to Afiiford. Near the weftern boundary of the parifli is a fmall green, built round wdth houfes, called Gibbins brook, fituated in the borough of Gimminge, its proper name, in a very wet and

fwampy country. There

STANFORD.

by

There was an annual fair inllituted in 1758, to be holden in Stanford-ftreet on June 7, for all forts of cattle, but it was foon left off, and there has not been any held

for near

The MANOR

twenty years

paft.

OP Stanford

of the poffeflions of the family of De Morinis, whofe deIcendants the Derings continued afterwards to poffefs Sir Richard Dering, of Hayton, was owner of it it. anno 22 Richard II. and then qukted the poffeffion w^as antiently part

of it to Sir Arnald St. Leger.“ How it palled afterwards, I have not found ; but in 1659 it was the property of Richard Bulbridge, of Nottinghamfhire, one of whofe defeendants fold it in 1699 to George Hamond, of Stanford, and he in 1733 alienated it to Michael Lade, of Canterbury, who parted with it again two years afterwards to Wile, of Sandwich, from which name it came to Mr. Odiarne Coates, of

New Romney, whofe heirs now poffefs it. The manor of Bekehurst, alias ShornecouRT, lay fomewhere in, or near this parilh; for by the Book of Aid, levied anno 20 Edward III. it apWaiter de Shorne paid aid for it, as the eighth part of a knight’s fee, which the laid Walter before held in Bokehurft of John de Crldl,as of his manor of Weftenhanger. In king Henry VIII. ’s reign, this manor was in the poffeffion of Humphry Gay, gent, but in 1613 it was become the property pears, that the heirs of

of Sir Thomas Hardres, who that year levied a line of it ; but where it is fituated, or who have poffeffecl it fmee, I have not, with all my endeavours, been able to difeover.

Heyton

another manor, lying at the north-well; corner of thisparifli, next to Horton, being frequently mentioned in antient deeds by the name of Hayte. It was in very early times poffeffed by a family which took its furname from it, and bore for their cognizance is

"

Deed

in the Surre.nden library.

F a

m

STOWTING HUNDRED.

68

in antient armorials, Gules-, three piles, argent. Alanus de Heyton was owner of this manor in the reign of king Henry 11 in which reign he held by knight’s fervice of Gilbert de Magminot, but dying p. El.

f.

veva

married to Deringus de Morinis, became his heir, and entitled her hufband to it, and wrote himfelf, as appears by feveral datelcfs deeds, his filler,

Dominus de Heyton. Their fun Deringus Fitz Dering, was the firft who deferted the name of Morinis, whofe fon Richard Fitz Dering, who likewife wrote himfelf Dominus de Heyton, died poflefled of it at the latter end of the reign of king Henry III. and left it to his fon Peter Dering, whofe grandfon Sir Richard Der^ ing appears to have poflfefled it in the 2zd year of king Richard II. and that year to have quitted the pofleffion of

Arnald Seyntleger. After which paired into the family of Scott, of Braborne, in which it continued till the reign of queen Elizabeth, when it was alienated by one of them to Mr. William it

to Sir

jt

Smith, of Stanford, yeoman,

in w'hofe defcendants,

relident at it, this manor continued down to Mr. WilJiam Smith, gent, of Heyton, who dying/ p. by will deviled it to his widow Anne, daughter of Mr. John Drake, of London, and llie having in 1769 remarried with the Rev. George Lynch, he in her right became poflelTed of it, and for fome time refided here, till on the death of his brother Robert Lynch, M. d! he removed to Ripple, where he died in 1789, p. and by his will deviled it to his two furviving / fillers

who IS

are the prefent polTelfors of it.'^ held for this manor.

A

court baron

Westenhanger

is an eminent manor here, which was once a parilh of itfelf, though now united to otanrord. Its antient and more proper name, as appears by the regifter of the monaftery of St. Anguftine; was Le Hangre, yet I find it called likewiS

in

! See

more of them under Ripple. records

^

STANFORD.

69

records as high as the reign of Richard l.by the names

both of Oltcnhanger and Weflenhanger, which certainly arofe from its having been divided, and in the hands of feparate owners, being pofTefied by the two eminent families of Criol and Auberville. Bertram de Criol, who was conftable of Dover cadle, lord warden of the five ports, and fheriff of Kent, for feveral years in the reign of king Henry III. who from his great polfeffions in this county, was ufually ftiled the great lord of Kent is written in the pipe-rolls of the 27th year of that reign, of Oftenhanger, where it is faid he rebuilt great part of the then antient manfion. He left two fons, Nicholas and John, the former of whom marrying with Joane, daughter and heir of Sir William de Auberville, inherited in her right the other part of this manor, called Weftenhanger, as will be further mentioned hereafter. John, the younger fon, feems to have inherited his father’s fliare of this, manor, called Oftenhanger, of which he died poffefted in the 48th year of king Henry 111 as did his fon Bertram de Criol in the 23d year of Edward I. leaving two fons, John and Bertram, who both died /. p. and a daughter Joane, v,'ho upon the death of the .

became

and carried Oftenhanger^ among the reft of her inheritance, in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokefle, fenefchal and governor of Poi(ftu and Montreul in Picardy, a man of eminent charadfer in that time, having been created a knight-banneret by latter

his heir,

king Edward I. at the liege of Carlaverock, in Scotland. He died without ilTue male, leaving his two daughters his coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldeft, married Thomas de Poynings ; and Joane, the youngeft, firft Hugh de Patefhall, and fecondly Sir William le Baud, and upon the divifion of their inheritance, Oftenhanger was wholly allotted to Thomas de Poynings, who died anno 13 Edward III. bearing for his arms, Barry of fx, or, and verty over all a bend, gules.

He

left

and Lucas

three fons, Nicholas, Michael,

F

3

STOWTING HUNDRED. Lucas de Poynings, all three fummoned at different times to parliament, among the barons of this realm. The defeendants of the latter being fummoned as ba-

yO

rons Poynings de St. John, which barony became veiled in the late duke of Bolton. Upon the divifion of their inheritance, this manor was allotted to

the lecond Ion Michael, who died anno 43 king Edward in. and left two fons, Thomas and Richard. Thomas de Poynings, the eldeft Ion, poffeffed it on his father’s death, but he died anno 49 Edward III. having bequeathed his body to be buried in the f. p. midft of the choir of St. K.adigund’s, of his own patronage, before the high altar, appointing that a fair tomb Ihould be placed over his grave, with the image of a knight made thereon. Upon his death, Richard de Poynings, his youngeft brother, fucceeded to it," and died poffeffed of it in the nth year of Ling Richard II. as did his fon Robert anno 25 Henry VI.

having had two fons, Richard de Poynings, who died in his life-time, leaving a foie daughter and heir Alianore, who married Sir Henry Percy, afterwards earl of Northumberland, and brought him a large inheritance, together with the baronies of Poynings, Bryan, and Fitzpain, now enjoyed by theprefent duke of Northumberland ; and a fecond fon Robert, who fucceeded his father in Oftenhanger, of which he died poffeffed anno 9 Edward IV.* who, as w'ell ashisfeveral anceftors above-mentioned, were fummoned among the barons to parliament, and his fon Sir Edward Poynings, who having purchafed the other part of this great manor, called Weftenhanger, became poffelffd of the whole property of it, as will be further

mentioned

A

hereafter.

grant pafTed anno

Robert,

late lord

berland. Harl.

i

Richard

Pownynges,

to

III.

of

all

the great eflate of

Henry Percy,

MSS. No. 433-1570.

earl of

Northum-

STANFORD.

7I

To yeluTH now to that part of this eminent manor, cUftinguithed from its fituation by the name of fVeftenhanger^ which was in the reign of king Richard I. in the pofleffion of the family of Auberville, one of whom, Sir William de Auberville, defcended from William de Ogburville, mentioned in the furvey of

Domefday, being one of thofe who attended the Conqueror in his expedition hither, refided in that reign in the borough of Weftenhanger, and was founder of the abbey of Weft Langdon, and a benefaftor to the priory of Chrift church, and as appears by his feal appendant to a deed in the Surrenden library, dated 29 Henry III. bore for his arms. Parted per dancette^two

Hisgrandfon, of the fame name, left an only daughter and heir Joane, who marrying with Nicholas de Criol, brought him this eftate as part of her inheritance. His defcendant Sir John de Criol, in the 19th year of Edward III. obtained a licence to found and endow a chantry in the chapel of St. John, in Weftenhanger, ; and before, in the 17th year of that reign, he had a grant to embattle and make loop-holes in his manfion-houfe of Weftenhanger. His defcendant Sir Nicholas de Criol, or Keriel, died pofleffed of it in the 3d year of king Richard II. and from him it devolved at length annulets in chiefs

by

and

one in baje.

Thomas Keriel, for general fpelt, who wasflain

fucceffion to Sir

fo their

name

fecond battle of St. Albans, in the 3 8th year of Henry VI. in afl'erting the caufe of the houfe of York. On his death without male ifl'ue, his two daughters became his coheirs,^^ viz. Elizabeth, married to John Bourchier, efq. and Alice, to John Fogge, efq. ofRepton, afterwards knighted, whole fecond wife fhe was ; and

was then

on the

in

divifion of their inheritance,

in the

Weftenhanger

Hijloriola defathe Harleian MSS. No. 1 179'33» videtur. See Leland, in ut milia de Kryell exveteri qiiondam fcripto, vi. . vol. V. of his Itin, f. 1 14 , and vol, p. 9

Among

F 4

was

STOWTING HUNDRED.

72

was

allotted to the latter.

Sir

Thomas Fogge,

reigns of king tcreft in

it

wife Alice

He

had by her one Ton,

fergeant-porter of Calais in the

Henry Vll. and Vi II. who

fold his in-

to his elder brother, (by his father’s

Haut)

Sir

firffc

John Fogge, of Repton, and

he, about the beginning of king Henry VIII. ’s reign, alienated it to Sir Edward Poynings, the pofleflbr of

the other part of this manor, who thereupon became poflefled of both Oftenhanger and Weflenhanger, being the entire property of the whole manor. Fie was a man of much eminence ot that time, and greatly in favour both with king Henry VII. and VIII. being governor of Dover caflle, lord warden of the five ports, and knight of the garter. He refided at Weftenhanger, where he began building magnificently, but he died before his ftately manlion here was finilhed, anno 14 Henry VIII. having married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Scott, of Scotts-hall, by

whom

he had one only child John, who died in his life time ; fo that thus deceafing without legitimate iflue, and even without any collateral kindred, who could make claim to his eftates, this manor, among the reft of them, efeheated to the crown. Although Sir Edward Poynings died without legitimate ifiue, yet he left by four difterent concubines three fons. Sir

Thomas, who afterwards died

f.p.

Sir

Adrian

Poynings, who died without male ifiue; and Edward, flain at Bologne in the 3.8th year of Henry VIII.

and likewife four daughters. 1 his manor thus becoming vefted in the crown, was by the kings bounty foon afterwards conferred on his eldeft natural fon Sir Thomas Poyninos abovementioned, who was a gentleman noted for the beauty and elegapce of his perfon, and was of equal merit j and being of remarkable ftrength and courage, greatly fignalized himfelf at the jults and tournaments of thole times, of which the king being himlclf exceedingly fond, it recommended him ftill more to the royal

favour,

STANFORD.

73 was and fummoned favour, and he was made K. B. to parliament as baron Poynings, of Oftenhanger. But in the 3 zd year of the fame reign, he, with dame Catherine his wife, exchanged this manor, park, and fundry premifes belonging to it, with the king, for other eftates in Dorfetlhire and Wiltlhire."' Soon after which, the king feems to have intended this manor asamanfionfitforhis royal refidence ; for he not only

expended much on the completing of the unfinilhed ftate of it, but two years afterwards laid into the park, a large circuit of land, inclofing

many manfions,

and buildings of the inhabitants within the pale of it ; at which time this manor feems to have been indiferiminately called by both the names of Oilenhanger and Weftenhanger. After which, the manor, together with the manfion, park, and other appurtenances belonging to it, continued in the hands of the crown till the reign of Edward VI. when that houfes,

with

appurtenances, to John Dudley, earl of Warwick, to hold in capite by knight’s fervice ; but in the 3d year of that reign, the earl joined with dame Joane his wife, in the reconveyance of it to the king, in exchange for premifes in other counties. The next year after w'hich the king granted it, among other premifes, to Edward Fynes, lord Clinton, fon of Thomas, lord Clinton, by Mary, one of the four daughters of Sir Edward Poynings before-mentioned, to hold in capite by knight’s fervice, and in the 6th year of his reign, he made a new grant to him and Henry Herdfon, his truftee of it, together with the advowfon of the rectory, to hold by the like fervice ; and they not long afterwards alienated the manor of Weftenhanger with its appurtenances, to Richard Sackville, efq. who died poflefled of it in the 8th year of queen Elizabeth j

prince, in his

*

firft

year, granted

Augmentation-office, Kent,

Box A.

it

its

53. See alfo

Box A. 46,

and C. 20.

but

STOWTING HUNDRED.

74

fhould feem that he had it only for his life, or perhaps might not be in pofleflion of the manfioa of Weflcnlianger itfelf ; for that queen, in the progrefs

but

it

which (he made through this county, at the latter end of the fummer in the year 1 573, is faid in the courfe of it to have flayed at her own houfe of Weftenhan* ger, the keeper of which was then Thomas, lord Buckhurfl, fon of Richard Sackville, before-mentioned. And further, for that the qneen, in her 27th yrar, granted the manor of Eaflenhanger with its appurtenances, in fee to Thomas Smith, efq. He was commonly called the Cuftomer, from his farming the cuftomsof the port of London, and he having greatly increafed the beauty of this manfion, which had been impaired and defaced by fire, with magnificent additions, refided here ; and when Lambarde wrote his Perambulation in 1570, there were here two parks, which continued till one of the family of Smith dijparked them both. He died in 1591, and was fucceeded by his eldefl fon Sir John Smythe, who was of Oflenhanger, where he kept his flirievalty in the 42d year of queen Elizabeth, and died in 1 609. His fon Sir Thomas Smythe, K. B. refided likewife at Wefienhanger, (for by both thefe names this place w'as yet at times differently called) and was in 1628 created vifeount Strangford, of the kingdom of Ireland. His fon Philip, vifeount Strangford, conveyed it to truftees,* and they, at the latter end of king

Charles IP’s reign, alienated this manor, with its manfion, lands, and appurtenances, to Finch, who having in 1701 pulled down by far the greateft part of this fiately manfion, then paffed it away by fale to Juflinian Champneis, efq.

The

family of

Champneis

are

defeended from Sir AmyanCharnpneis, who flouriflied See the A£ts anno 16 and 17 Charles II. and 18 and 20 of the fame reign; and 4 and 5 of queen Anne, relating to this and other ellates of lord Strangford. *

in

STANFORD,

75

king Henry the Ild.’s reign, whofe defcendants fettled in Somerfetlhire ; one of whom, Robt.Champneis, of Chew, in that county, was father of Sir John Champneis, lord mayor of London anno 26 king Henry VIII. who was pofleffed of Hall- place, in Bex(ucceedcd ley, where he refided, and in which he was by his fon, the yoiingeft and only furviving fon of feven, Juftinian. One of his defcendants, Walter Champneis, fon of William, appears by the parifli regifter of Boxley to have lived in that parifh in queen Elizabeth’s reign, anno 1-582. After w'hich there is

ill

continued mention in it of them down to the burial of Juftinian Champneis, efq. in 1712. Juftinian Champneis, the purchafer of this eftate, bore for his arms, Parted per pale, argent and fable, a lion rampant, gules, within a bordiire, engrailed and count ere hanged, of afterwards refided here, having built a the field.

He

houfe on the fame feite, out of the ruins remaining of it. He was one of the five Kentilh gentlemen, who in 1701, delivered the noted petition from this county to the houfe of commons. He died

fmallei-

pofleffed of this

manor and

eftate,

far

advanced

in

leaving three fons, Juftinian, William, and Henry. On his death, by the fettlement made on his marriage, one fixth part of this eftate

years, in 1748,

devolved to the two younger fons, and the

reft

of

it

Champneis, efq. who dying abroad,/, p. in 1754, gave by will his intereft in it to his younger brother Henry ; and the remaining fixth part came by compromife wholly to the then eldeft furviving brother VVilliam Champneis, efq. who refided at Vintners, in Boxley. He left by his firtl

on the

eldeft fon Juftinian

two daughters his coheirs, Frances, now unmarried, and Harriot, who married John Burt, efq. of Rochefter, by whom flie had two fons, WilliamHenry and Thomas, and a daughter Harriot, as will be further mentioned hereafter. On his death in 1762, his fixth part of this eftate came to his two

wife

daughters

STOWTING HUNDRED.

76

daughters and coheirs before-mentioned, the eldcft of whom, in her own right, and the two Tons of John Burt, efq. dcceafed, in right of the youngeft, is at this time entitled to it. The remaining part of ihiseftate was by Henry Champneis, efq. of Vintners, in Boxley, who died unmarried in lySi.devifed to his great nephew William-Henry Burt, the eldeft Ton of John Burt, efq. by his wife Harriot before-mentioned, for whom he had in his life-time obtained a privy feal, to take the furname and bear the arms of Champneis^

Which William-Henry Champneis, tled to the inheritance of

efq.

is

now

enti-

it.

*The parijb of Oftenhanger flood, as to its ecclefiafUcal

deanry of Limne and diocefe of Canterbury. The church, which was a reftory, was formerly in the patronage of the owners of the manor, and came to the crown on the death of Sir Edward Poynings, in the 14th year of king Henry VIII.

jurifdi£iton,

whence

in the

was granted,

appurtenant to the manor, to Sir Thomas Poynings, who in the 34th year of that reign, granted it to the crown in exchange in ; which year the king having laid a large circuit of land into his park here, of w'hich the redlor had received the yearly tithes, and having likewife inclofed and imparked in it many houfes, barns, and glebe-lands belonging to the reftory, and injoined the parifhioners and inhabitants to refort to the parifh to which they lay neareft, by which means the redtor was deftitute of a maintenance, granted to him for life, a yearly pcnfion of fix pounds, to be had of his treafurer of the Augmentation-office. 1 hus this parilh became, as to its it

ecclefajiical jurifdi^ion,

as

united to Stanford, to which

church the owners of this eftate, in whom the tithes of the whole of it are veiled, pay a compofition of eleven Ihillings as an acknowledgment for the privilege the inhabitants within

it

enjoy of the rites of the church

there.

The

STANFORD.

77 of Eaftenhanger is valued In the king’s books at 7I. I2S. 6d. and the yearly tenths at 15s. 3d. which are paid to the crown receiver, and not to the

The

rc(5lory

archbifhop.

The church of Weftenhangcr

has been entirely down, and the materials removed, feveral years ago. It flood at a fmall diflance weflward of the houfe, and of the drawbridge at the entrance to it, between the latter and the great barn, which report fays, was partly built out of the ruins of it. Several flceletons have from time to time been dug up within the fcite ol it and adjoining to it and in fome of the graves, feveral fculls in one grave and fome years ago a flone coffin was dug up. The font, which was in this church, was removed to the church of Stanford, where it now pulled

;

;

remains. I

find the

names of only two of the re5iors of thispaLombardy in the 34th year of king and 'Thomas Eaton, A, M. prefentcd by

rifh, viz. IVilltam

Henry the crown

in 1636.'

CHARITIES,

William Fordred,

by w?'ll in 1550, gave to this parifli, others, a proportion of the rents of tvventv-five acres of land in St. Mary’s, in Romney Marfli which poi'tion to this ;

among

parifli is of the annual produce of 4I, 12s, 4id. to be diflributed annually to the poor, andvefled in certain trulfees.

The poor conftantly

Stanford

is

diction of tlie Elham.

relieved are about ten, cafually eight.

within the ecclesiastical jurisdiocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of

1 he church, which a fmall

mean

building,

is

dedicated to All Saints,

and

confifls

of one

ifle

is

but

and one

chancel, having a low pointed turret at the vvefl end, in which arc two bells. There are no memorials in it. *’

lair

See Inrolments in the Augmentation office. preiencedto this rectory, vacant by the death of the incumbent. Rym. P'a-d. vol. XX. p. 135.

The

STOWTING HUNDRED.

ys

of Stanford has always been efteemed as a chapel to the church of Liminge ; the redor of which is inducted to the redlory of Liminge, with the chapels of Padlefwoith and Stanford annexed, under which parifli a further account of it may be feen. In

The church

the year 1588 here were communicants forty. There was an acre of land in this parifh, given to

maintain a light, called the pafchal light, in this church; which, on the fupprefTion of fuch lights, with others of the like fort, by the a<5l which pafTed in the beginning of king Edward VI. ’s reign, became veiled in the .crown.

THE HUNDRED OF LONINGBOROUGH. THE next hundred callward from that of StowtLoningborough, written in the record of Domef* day by the different names of Honinberg^ MonibergCy and Nuniberg ; and it is in feme more modern records ing

is

written Lovingborough,

CONTAINS WITHIN

IT

s.

Liminge. Steeling.

3.

Eleham.

1.

And

ITS

BOUNDS THE TARISHES OF 4,

Acrise, and

5.

Padlesworth.

Upper Hardres, the church of which another hundred. Two conjiables have jurifdiftion over it.

part of the parifli of

is id

LIMINGE IS the next parifh eaftward, both to Stowting and Elmfled. It is written in the book of Domefday, Le~ mingeSy and in other records, Lywiege. There are three

boroughs in it, thofe of Liminge, Siberton,and Eatchend.

The

LIMINGE.

The

79

on the northern or oppofite fide of the down hills from Stanford, at no great diltance from the fummit of them. It is a large parifli, being about fix miles in length, and about three in breadth, from ealt to weft, and the rents of it about 2000I. per annum. It lies the greateft part of it on high ground, on theeaft fide of the Stone-ftreet way, where it is a dreary and barren country of rough grounds, covered with woods, fcrubby coppice, broom, and the like, the foil being an unfertile red earth, with quantities of hard and ftiarp flint ftones among it. In that part adjoining to the Stone-ftreet way, is Weftwood, near two miles in length and not far from it, two long commons or

parish

lies

;

heaths, the one called

Rhode, the other

Stelling

Min-

a fmall part only being within this parifli, there are numbers of houfes and cottages built promifeuoufly on and about them, the inhabitants of

nis

;

of the

latter,

and

rough

country they dwell in. Near the fouthern boundary of the parifh is the eftate and manor of Liminge park, which, as well as Weftwood, belongs to Mr. Sawbridge, of Ollantigh, who has near 700 acres of woodland in this parifh, the whole of his eftate here having been formerly appurtenant to the manor- of Liminge, and together with it, exchanged by archbifhop Cranmer as before-mentioned, with king Henry VIII. in his 31ft

which are

On

as wild,

in as

a ftate as the

towards the declivity of them, the foil changes to chalk, and not far from the foot of them are the houfes of Longage and Siberton, the former of which belonged to the Sawyear.

the eaft part of thefe

hills,

and then to the Scotts, a younger branch of thofe of Scotts-hall ; afterwards by marriage to William Turner, of the White Friars, in Canterbury, and then again in like manner to David Papillon,efq. whofe grandfon Thomas Papillon, efq. of Acrife, now owns it. Below thefe hills is the great Nailbourn valley, which is very fpacious and wide here, on each fide of which the hills are high and very frequent, and the kins’s,

lands

;

LONINCBOROUGH HUNDRED.

So

lands poor, but in the vale near the ftream there

is

a

of fertilelands and meadows, .and the country

trafl

becoming of the

far

parirti

from unpleafant, the

above it, on the minge, in which

parifli

fide is

as well as the reft

The

exceedingly healthy.

quite through

from north

of the

hill,

is

valley extends to fouth

it, ftill

;

juft

the village of Li-

the parfonage-houfe, a

modern dwelling, and above

More

is

handfome

higher, the church*

ftreet,

fouthward in the valley is a houfe, called Broadthe property and refidence of the Sloddens for

many

generations

boundary

j

ftill

of the parifh,

further in the valley, near the

and adjoining

to the

Hangres,

of the down or chalk, hills, which continue Caldham, near Folkeftone, a fpace of near fix miles, is the hamlet of Echinghill, or Eachand, corruptly fo called for Ikenild, dole under the hill of which name it lies, the principal houfe in which formerly be-

being

on

a part

to

longed to the Spicers, of Stanford i hence the road leads to Beechborough, and fo on to Hythe.

A

fair is

held

in

the village of Liminge yearly, on

July 5, for toys, pedlary »

Near Eching

&c*

fouthward of it, isafpring or well, called Lint- well, which runs from thence fouthward below Newington towards the fea and on the oppofite or north fide of that ftreet rifes another fpring, which takes a diredt contrary courfe from the former,one running through the valley northward towards North Liminge, where it is joined by

two

ftreet, a little to the

which rife in Liminge village, at a fmall diftance north-ealt from the church, guftiing out of the rock at a very fmall fpace from each other, the lowerfprings,

moft of which called St. Eadburg’s well, never fails in its water. Thele united jprings, in fummer time in general, flow no further than Ottinge, about one mile from their rife, at which time the I'pace from thence to Barham is dry there j but whenever their waters burft forth and form the ftream ulually called the Nailbourn, which the country people call the Nailbourne’s coming

down.

'

LIMINGE. down, then, though

in

8l

the midft of fummer,- they be-

a confiderable ft ream, and widi a great gufli and rapidity of waters, flow on to a place called Bromp-

come

which is a large deep pond, a little above Wigmore, having a fpring likewife of its own, which hardly ever overflows its bounds, excepting at thefe ton’s Pot,

when, congenial with the others, it burfts forth with a rapidity of water, about three miles and an half northward from Liminge, and having jointly with thole fprings overfilled its bounds, takes its courfe on by Barham into the head of the Little Stour, at Bilhoplborne, times,

own

Thefe Nailbourns, or temporary land-fprings, are not unuilial in the parts of this county eaftward of Sittingborne, for I know of

making

a little river

of

its

fize.

but one, at Addington near Alaidftone, which is on the other fide of it/ Their time of breaking forth or continuance of running, is very uncertain j but whenever they do break forth, it is held by the common people as the forerunner of fcarcity and dcarncfs of corn and viduals. Sometimes they break out for one or perhaps two fucceffive years, and at others with two, three, or more years intervention, and their running continues fometimes only for a few months, and at others for three or four years, as their fprings afford a fupply/

Dr. Gale, rary,

in his

Comment on

conjectures that at

Antoninus’s Itinethis village of Leming

Roman ways, one from Lenham

to

Salt wood caftle,

and the other from Canterbury to Stutfal caflle, interfedfed each other ; as indeed they do at no great diftance from it, nearer to Limne ; and that the word was by our Lemen, now by modern ufe written Hence early anceftors uled to denote a public way. to Gatarabio^ that military w'ay leading from nium, is called Leming-lane, and the town near it Lc-

*

See vol. iv. of this hifiory, p. 543, and vol. vi. p. ^01. See Packe’s E.-iplanation to his Chart, p. 6i.

YOL. VIII,

G

ming.

S2

loningborough hundred,

ming.

in the

So way, there

county of Gloucefter, on the fofleis a town called Leniington. Hence, he adds, that Durolevumy in this county, changed its name into lic

Lenham, to way or road

its being fituated on the puband perhaps the name of Ikenhill,

fignify ;

very probably fo called corruptly for Ickneld, in this parifli before-mentioned, has ftill further ftrengthened this conjedure 5 there being faid to have been two Boman ways of the name of Icknild-ftreet, in this kingdom, though no one yet has determined precifely where they were.

The manor

of Liminge was part of the antient poflefTions of the monaftery of Chrift-church, in Canterbury, to which it had been given in the year 964, on the fupprelTion of the monaftery founded in this parifli by Ethel burga, called by fome F^adburga, daughter of king Ethelhert, who by the fwour of her brother king Eadbald, built this monaftery to the honor of the blcfted Virgin Mary, and of her own niece St, Mildred. Ethelburga, the founder, was buried in it, as was St. Mildred, whole bodies were afterwards removed by archbifliop l .anfranc to St. Gregories church, in Canterbury. This monaftery was at firft faid to confift of nuns, but afterwards came under the government of an abbot, and continued lo, till fuffering much

by

the continual ravages of the Danes, it was fupprefted and granted to the monaftery of Chrift-church as before-mentioned,^

T. he pofteflions of it here were times during the Saxon heptarchy; fome of them were given to this church of Liminge, in the time ot archbifhop Cuthbert, who had been abbot of it. After which this manor remained part of the poffeffions of the monaftery of Chrift-church, till archbifhop Lanfranc dividing the revenues of his church

given

at different

between

hirnfclf

and

to the archbiftiop

;

monks, this manor was allotted which ftate it continued at the

his

in

See Lei. Coll. vol.

iii,

p. 53 to 56, 166, 167.

time

:

LIMIHGE.

83

time of taking the furvey of Domefday,

in

which

it is

thus entered

In Moriiberge hundred., the archhijhop himjelf holds Leminges, in demefne. It ivas taxed at [even Julings.

land

T'he arable

four^

is Jixty

carucates.

and one hundred and one

of forty

eels,

with fixteen borThere is a church and

villeins,

derers having fifty-five carucates. ten fervants'y

In demejne there are

and one mill of thirty pence, and one fijhery and thirty acres of pafiiire. Wood for the

pannage of one hundred hogs. There belong to it fix burgeffes

Hede.

In the time of king Edward the ConfeJJor it zvas zvorth twenty four pounds, and afterzvards forty pounds, and now the like,

and yet

it

in

yields fixty pounds.

Of this manor fulings

and

three tenants of the archbiftoop hold tzvo an half, and half a yoke, and they have there

five carucates in demefne, and twenty villeins, zvith fixteen borderers having five carucates and an ha f, and one

fervant, and tivo mills of feven fldilUngs and fix -pence, and forty acres of meadozv. Wood for the pannage of eleven hogs.

was worth

There are

tzvo churches.

In the whole

eleven pounds.

-

it '

Whilft tills manor was in the pofiefrion of the fee of Canterbury, archbifliop Ralph, who came to it in the year 1114, granted a penny a day to the hofpital of Harbledown out of this manor, which gift was confirmed and renew'ed by archbifhop Theobald, and by king Edward III. in his 5th year. The manor of Liminge was valued, as appears by an antient furvey of it, at 56I. 8s. 8d. yearly income and it continued in this ftate till the 31ft year of king Henry VIII. when archbifhop Cranmer that year, exchanged it, then in the occupation of John and Henry Spycer, with the king for other premifes. In which deed all prefentations, advowfons, ike. of churches and chapels, were excepted to the archbifliop, and it appears, that whilft *

See alfo

Lambeth MSS, C. N.

G

2

14, p. 170.

this

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

$4 this

manor was

in

the hands of the crown, that nine

W

cald belonging to it out of the twelve dennes in the entered into an agreement to pay an additional rent to

the lord, for licence in future to cut their

ing on them at their

wood grow-

which by antient cuftom they were reftrained from.'' After which the king, in his 38th year, granted this manor of Liminge, with the advowfon of the churches of Liminge, Stanford, and Padlefworth, with their appurtenances, which advowfon the king had had a grant of from the archbifhop that fame year, to Sir Anthony Auchcr, of Otterden, to hold in capite. He was flain at the fiege of Calais in the laft year of queen Mary’s reign, anno 1557, and will,

defendants, feated at Bifhopfborne, it continued to Sir Anthony Aucher, of Bifliopfborne, who foon after the death of king Charles I. alienated it, with the advowfon above-mentioned, to Sir John Roberts, of Canterbury, who died in 1658, and was buried in Alphage’s church, in Canterbury. He was defended of a collateral branch of the Roberts’s, of GlafTenbury, Hawkhurf, and Brenchlcy, and bore for his arms. Parted per pale, azure, and gules, three pheons, or. His heirs fold it to William Taylor, gent, whofc defendant John Taylor dying/, p. it defended in 1778 to Robert Hume, efq. as his heir and fccond coufin, and in his

down

he

in

1722 conveyed

The

to Sir

Andrew Hume, who

734, leaving one fon and four daughformer died inteftate in 1736, on which

died inteftate in ters.

it

i

came to his four fifters and coheirs, who about the year 1775 joined in the conveyance of it to Alexander Wedderburne, efq. folicitor-general, fince created lord Loughborough, and made lord chancellor,* and he in the year 1784 conveyed this manor, with the advowfon of the church of Liminge, and its appurtethis eftate

Inrolment in the Augmentation-office. See an account of him in Longmate’s Supplement to Collinses Peerage, p.274. ‘

nances.

LIMINGE.

85

nances, to Ralph Price, clerk, reftor and vicar of this court baron church, who is the prefent owner of ir. ch this wh extends for manor, into is regularly held

A

Romney

Marfh, over the culets of Eaftbridge and

Jeffordltone.

East Lyghe, now

called Lyghe- courts

is

a

manor

in the north- weft corner of this parifii, near the Stone-

way, which in king Edward 11. ’s reign was held by Stephen Gerard, of Henry de Malmayns, who again held it of the caftle of Dover. After which it became the property of Thomas Adclyn, in right of his wife, daughter of Waretius de Valoigns, and he poflefted it in the 20 th year of king Edward 111. holding it by knight’s fervice ; after which the family of Leigh appear to have become owners of this manor, who before this were poflelfed of lands here j for I find William ftreet

and Robert de Leigh held lands by knight’s fervice, in Leghe and Sibeton, of Ralph Fitzbernard, as he again did of the archbiftiop. John Leigh, efq. died pofiTelfed of the manor of Eaillegh in the firft year of

king Henry VI. then held of the manor of Sibton, as did his defcendant Nicholas Leigh, then of Addington, in Surry, who, in confequence of a bargain made by his father John Leigh with king Henry Vi II. fold to that king in his 36 th year, this manor, in exchange for other premifes.*^ After which it was granted by the crown to Allen, of the family of that name feated at Borden, whence it was foon afterwards alienated to Fogge, from which name it fhortly afterwards was conveyed toCobbe, of Cobbes-court ; and from thence again, within a few years, to Salkeld, defeended originally from the Salkelds, of Yorkfhire, and bifhopricof Durham. One of his defeendants alienated it, about the latter end of queen Elizabeth’s reign, to Mr. Nicholas Sawkins, of Longage, in this parifh, who died ^

vol,

off. deeds of inrolm. and exch. See inoreofthe Leighs of this hiftory, p. 197 and 356, and vol. iv. p. 458,

Augtn. ii.

LONINGBOROUGH HUKDRED.

86

Mr. William Saw-* gave kins it in marriage with his daughter to Mr Anlell, and his heirs palFcd it away by lale to Bridges, whofe dcfcendant 1 homas Bridges, efq. of St. Nicholas, in the Hie of Thanct, is now the proprietor of it.

in 161.9; at length his defcendanc

SiBETON, vulgarly

is a manor here, lying about half a mile northward from the church. Jt was formerly held of the archbilhpp by the family of

called Sibton,

Fitzbernard, by knight’s fervice. Ralph Fitzbernard held of the archbilhop two knights fees in Sibeton and Leghe, of which he died pofTetFcd in the 34th year of king Edward I. leaving a fon Thomas, who died /. p, and a daughter Margaret, who at length carried this

manor of Sibeton

marriage to Guiicelin de Badlefmere, whofe fon Bartholomew fucceeded to it, and bemg a man 'much in favour with king Edward II. he obtained many liberties and franchifes for his manors, in

and among others that of free zvarren in the demefne lands of this manor.' His fon Giles de Badlefmere died anno 12 Edward III./ p. being then po defied of this manor, fo that his four fifters became his coheirs, and upon a partition of their inheritance, this manor was allotted to the fliare of Margaret, wife of Sir John Tiptoft. His Ion Robert Tiptoft dying in the 46th year of that reign, without male ifiue, his three daughters became his coheirs, of whom Elizabeth, married to Sir Philip le DcTpencer, on the partition ofhisefiates, had this

manor among others

allotted to her Ihare. He lenry VI. upon which it came to their daughter Margery, then the wife of Roger Wentworth, efq. one of whofe deicendants pafied it away

died anno 2

F

to Haut* from which name it went to that of Allen, and thence to Sii James Hales, of the Dungeon, in Canterbury, and one of thejuftices of the common pleas. His grandfon Sir James Hales, of the Dungeon, in the Rot. Cart, anno 9 Edward efmeres, vol. vi. p, 469, 470

II.

N.

57. See

more of the Ba.

reign

;

LIMINGE. to Salked,

87 one

reign of queen Elizabeth, alienated of whole defeendants conveyed it to Mr. Nicholas Sawkins, in whole family and name it continued till ^ the year i 36 , when Mr Jacob Sawkins, of Sibton, it

conveyed

ii

Honywood, efq. next John Honywood, bart. who rcfides here,

by

fale to

VVilliam

btother to Sir anJ IS theprefent owner ot this manor.™

ron

is

held for

A

court ba-

it.

CHARITIES. Thomas BEOiNCFiELn gave by will

in 1691, a,houfe and Marfli, this parifh, and Romney Mary, at. of lands in thepaiiih maintenance of poor and education the Woodchiircn, towards Dimduirch and Liminge, bmeeth, of children of the parlflies and I os unto two poor women of each of the laid parilhes They are of the annual value of 54I, 10s. and are vefted •yearly

in truftees

of this parifli, by will in 1558, devifed to the poor of it 20I. to be paid them yearly at 20s, a year. There is an unendozved fciool \\trc, for the teaching of boys and girls reading, writing, and accounts ; and an aims-houfe, confifting of two dwellings, the donor of it to the parilh un-

David Spycee,

known.

The poor

conflantly maintained are about

fifty,

cafually 30.

within the ecclesiastical jURisriCTiON of the diocefe of Canterbury, and dcanry of

Liminge

is

Elham. church, which is dedicated to St. Mary and St. Eadburgh, confifts of twoiflesand a chancel, having a fquare tower fteeple, with a low pointed turret on it,

The

at the weft: end, in

which are

five bells.

handfome, being built of quarry ftone. and pillars on the north fide of the fouth is

This church

The ifle

arches

are ele-

In the chancel is a monument for William Hollway, efq. chief juftice of Gibraltar, obt. 1767, who with his mother and wife, lie buried in a vault

gant.

underneath, arms.

and memorials in

Sable., it,

“ See more of the

two fwords

in faltier^ argents

as well as in the fouth ifle, for the

Honywoods

G 4

before under Elmfted.

family

;

88

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

family of Sawkins.

In the north

ifle

a

memorial

for

John Lyndon, A. M. vicar, obt. 1756. In the eaft window are the arms of the fee of Canterbury impaling Bourchier and in one of the louth windows a bi;

head and mitre. On the outfide of the fteeple, are the arms of the fee of Canterbury impaling Warham, that on the fouth fide having a cardinal’s hat over corner of the chancel is a very it., At the fouth-eaft remarkable buttrefs to it, the abutment being at fome feet diflance from the chancel, and joined to it by the half of a circular arch, feemingly very antient. In the church-yard are two tombs for the Scotts, of Longage, Henry Brockman, of Liminge, appears by his will in 1 527, to have been buried in this church, and devifed to the making of the fleeple five pounds, as the work went forward ; and David Spycer, of this parifh, by will in 1558, devifed to this church a chalice, of the price of five pounds." This church, with the chapels of Stanford and Padlefworth annexed, was always accounted an appendage to the manor, and continued fo till the 3 ift year of king Henry VIII. when the archbifhop conveyed the manor to the king, but referved the patronage and advowlbn of this church out of the grant to hiir.feif, by which means it became feparated from the manor, and became an advowfon in grofs and though the archbifliop afterwards, by his deed anno 38 Henry VIII. conveyed it to the king and his heirs, and the king that fame year granted it, with the manor and its appurtenances in fee, to Sir Anthony Auciu r as before-mentioned, and it was polfdfed by the fame owners as the manor from time to time, yet having been once Icparated, it could never be apppendant to 1 hit. ugh which chain of ownerlhip it afterit again. wards came at length to lord Loughborough, and from him again to tlie Key. Mr. Ralph Price, the prelent proprietor and patron of it. lliop’i)

I Wills in the Prerogative-office,

Canterbury.

The

LIMINGE.

*9

church of Limlnge is exempt from the jurif* diftion of the archdeacon. There is both a redory and vicarage endo ved belonging to this church, which appears to have been before the 8th of king Richard II. The redory is a finecure, and the vicar performs the whole fervice of the cure, but they both receive inftitution and indudion, and although fome years ago this cflabliHiment of it was attempted by the ordinary to be fet afide as feparate benefices, it was without effed, and the Rev. Mr. Ralph Price, the patron, continues to prefent to both redory and vicarage. The rectory, with the two chapels above-mentioned, los. and the yearly is valued in the king’s books at 21I Procurations il. los. The vicarage tenths at dl. 3s.

The

at lol.

1

8s.

9d. and the yearly tenths at

il.

is.

io|d.

In 1588 here were communicants two hundred and cighty-three.

In

1640 there were two hundred and

and the vicarage was valued at eighty pounds. The tithes and profits of this parifii, and the glebeland, about forty acres, are now worth upwards of four hundred pounds per annum, cxclufive of the chapels annexed to it. Mr. Sawbridge’s eftates in this parifii, formerly park land, pay by cuftom only half a crown

fifty-five,

compofition yearly, in lieu of tithes, but .Weft wood pays full tithes. It appears by the regifter of Horton priory, that Liminge was once the head of a rural deanry\ Sir Hugh, dean of Liminge, being mentioned as a witnefs to a datelefs deed of Stephen de Heringod, of a gift of land to that priory, of about the reign of king

Henry ®

I 1 I.°

Cart. 89. See

ries, vol. vi.

fome account of the

inftitution of rural dean-

of this hiftory, p, 527,

CHURCH

,



LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED,

50

CHURCH CF LIMINGE.

^

PATRONS, Or Family

RECTORS,

hy ivhom prefented.

^ Aucher

Henry Wayland, S. T. P, Tcfig. April 1611. James Parker, A. M. inuucied April i6i j, obt, 1621. Jonas Taylor, A. M. indu6led' 1621, obt. JNov. 16-32.'’ Miles Barnes, A. M. June 20,

I

1634.''

Humphry Peake,

S.

-5* *^34 j obt. Ahiel Borfet, A.

Tie Archhijhop.

T. P. June

164c;.''

M, induced

1671, obt. 1714. Tlie

Kingy hac

Richard Halford, A. M. indu6l. January 1715, obt. May 24, 1726 * Q^uimus Naylcr, A. M. inducted Augutt 1726, obt. Auguft 1734John Lyndon, Feb. 1735, obt, Dec. 24, 756.' Ralpih Price, Feb. i, 1757, obt,

vice. ...........

Annabella Taylor^ widow.

I

Nov. Ralph Price, hac

20, 1776.“

Ralph Price, A.

vice

M.

Dec. 1776,

the prefent reftor.*

VICARS. John Grimjion, in 1581, obt, Jan. 1602.*

He was

tlien vicar of this church, buried in the chancel of it.— His will is in the Prerogative-olfice,

P and

lies

Canterbury.

Rym. Feed. vot. xix. p. 623, f Ibid. p. 608. He had been before q

reftor

of Acrife.

In

1626

made prebendary of Marfton

he was St.

Lau-

rence, in the church of Lincoln, and in 1632 prebendary ol Canterbury. •

His will

He was t

He

is

in the Prerog.off.

Cant.

likewife vicar here. lies buried in

this church.

the north

ille

of

«

He was

likewife reftor of Farn-

borough, in Berkfhirc, the patronage of which had been in the pofleflion of his family for feme time. He was a good benefactor to this redtory, by rebuilding the huufe of it, which ic lituated clofe to the fouth fide of the church-yard, in a very handfomc manner, in which his fon, the Rev. Mr,

Ralph Priced now relides. w Son of the former, and likewife rcflor of Farnborough, and now by purchafe patron of this advowfon. * His will it in the Pierog. off. Cant.

PATRONS, 0

N

LIMINGE. patrons,

91 VICARS.

Csff.

Jc7ias

Taylor,

Nov.

cbt.

Williatn

A.

M,

Dec. 1616,

1632.

Somner,

A.

M,

obt,

A,

M.

ind.

*

William Taylor^

1693 Alexander

gent.

Pollock.,

Nov.

1693. Abiel Borjet, A.

John

Taylor.,

M.

Richard Halford,

gent

obt. 1714,*

A.

M.

[aa.

I7t4, obt. May 24, 1726. Qninfuj Naylor, A.M. indu£lcd June 1726, obt. Aug. 1734. John Lyndon, iudufV. Feb. i 735,

Jrabella Taylor , ividow.

obt. Dec. 24, 1 756. Ralph Price, Bth. 1, 1737, obt,

Nov. Ralph

20, 1776.

Price,

A. M. Dec. 20,

1776, the prefent vicar. y He was

re6lor llkewlfe of this

church afterwards. See above, * Son of the antiquary of the fame Eame. See Somner’s life, in Roman

S

T

E

L

Ports, p. 103, and Biog. Brit. vol. vl, p.

3762. a

were

L

Likewife rcftorof

this church, as

all his fuccelTors.

I

N G

IS the next parifh northward from Liminge, being written in Domefday, SteUinges. The greateft part

of it, in which the church (lands, Loningborough, and the reft of it

hundred of the hundred of.

is

in this

is

in

Stowting.

Stelling

is

an obfeure

parifti,

lying clofe on the

of the Stone-ftreet way, juft above or fouthward of Lower Hardres, in a wild hilly country. It is moftly fituated on high ground, and is exceeding healthy. The foil is but barren, confiding of an unfertile red earth, intermixed with quantities of flints. On the north and eaft fidcs it is covered with woods. The heath called Stelling-minnis, comprehends mod of the parifli, extending acrofs it, and a confiderable way beyond, into the parilhes of Liminge and Eleham, being in the whole more than two miles in length, though it caft fide

Cy2

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

of a very different breadth at different parts of it. It is along the whole of it interfperfed with houfes and cottages, many of which are built on the middle of it, with fields and orchards taken out of it and inclofed round them, which form altogether an uncommon and not unpleafant feene, the inhabitants of them being as rude and wild as the country they live in. Thefe dwellings on the minnis may be faid to form the village of Stelling, for there is no other, A little beyond the minnis ftands the church, on an hill, and a little further the court-lodge, at the north-weft boundary of the is

parifh.

There

two fairs held annually, one on Afcenfionday, the other on Alhollan-day, Nov. i, now, by alteration of the hile, on N ov. 1 2, yearly, on the minnis, for horfes, cattle, and pedlary. At the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, Stelling was part of the poffeffions of Odo, bilhop of Baieux, the king’s half-brother, under the general title of whole lands it is entered in it as follows he fame bi/hop (of Baieux) holds in demefne Stel^ linges. It was taxed at one yoke. I'he arable land is one carucale and an half. In demefne there is nothings ex^ are

:



cept one borderer.

nage of two hogs.

’I

here

is

a church.

In the time of king

Wood for the Edward the

fefor, it zvas worth fixt\ Jhiilings ^ and afterwards Alret held it of king Edivard. nozv forty fhillings.

pan~

Con-

and

Four years after the taking of this furvey the bifhop was difgraced, and his eftates were confifeated to the crown i but how this manor palled from it afterwards, I have not found, nor further concerning it, till it was become part of the pollelTions of the family of Haut, one of whom, William de Flaut, was polfelTed of it in the I ft year of king Edward I and relided at Wadenhall, in the adjoining parifh of Waltham; and in his defeendants it continued till the latter end of king Henry VI.’s reign, when William Haut, efq. of Biflioplborne, conveyed it to Humphry Stafford, duke of

STELLIN®.

93

of Buckingham, whofe grandfon Edward, duke of Buckingham, being attainted and beheaded anno 13 Henry VIII. this manor, with the reft of his eftatcs, came to the crown,'’ where it lay till the ift and 2d of Philip and Mary, when the queen granted it to Edw. Fynes, lord Clinton, who about the end of that reign conveyed it to Mr. Henry Herdfon, whofe grandfon

Mr. Francis Herdfon

alienated

it

to

his

uncle

Mr.

John Herdfon, about the latter end of queen Elizabeth’s reign, and he deceafing, /. p. gave it by will to and baronet, afterwards of Terlingham, who likewife dying f. p. in 1641, Mark Dixsvell, efq. his nephew, became his heir, but fucceeded only to his eftates, for his title became extincft. His fon Sir Bafill Dixwell, bart. of Brome, fo created in 1660, died poITeflcdof it in king Charles II.’s reign.’’ Soon after which it was alienated by his heirs to Sir Thomas Hardres, bart. of Mardrescourt, and his grandfon Sir William Hardres, bart, dying/, p. in 1764, devifed it by will to his widow Frances, (third daughter and coheir of Thomas Corbet, of Salop), on whofe death inteftate in 1783 it became vefted in her heirs, who were her four fillers or their reprefentatives, viz. the Rev. James-Charles Beckingham, fon of Katherine her lifter, fecond wife of Stephen Beckingham, efq. w'ho is polfelfed of one fourth part of it; Elizabeth her filler, wife of Thomas Denward, clerk, deceafed, who is polfelfed of another fourth part of it ; Ignatius Geohegan, efq. of London, in right of his wife Antonina, her filler, and Ighis

nephew

natius

Sir Bafill Dixwell, knight

Geohegan,

their fon,

all

three fince deceafed

j

when by the death of volved to

his filler,

tefcjuieu

and

;

the latter his fourth part defince married to the baron Mon-

Wm.

place, only fon of iier

Hougham, jun. efq. of Bartonfilter Hannah deceafed, late wife

See vol. V. of this hiftory, p. 214. See Philipott, p. 158, 3 15, and more of the Herdfons and Dixwells, under Fulkeltone and Jdarharn.

of

94

Wm.

of

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED. Hougham, efq. of Barton, who is

the remaining fourth part of

it

in

poiTefled

undivided

of

fliares.

The manor of Holyrood, alias FryernePark, lies in

the eadern part of this parifh, and in the

book

of aid, anno 20 Edward III. it is faid to have been held by the abbot of Langdon, by knight’s fervice, which the heirs of Simon de Holte before held in Flolyrode of the heirs of William de Auberville. This manor continued in the poffelTion of the monaftery tdl the diffolution of it in the reign of king Elenry VIH. when it came into the hands of the crown, whence anno 29 Henry VIII. it was granted to the archbilhop, who exchanged it again with the crown,** whence it was granted to Heyman, who fold it to Hewytt. The demefnes called the Parky afterwards became the property of John Whitfield, efq. of Canterbury, and are now of m. Philpot, gent, of Sandwich, but the manor belongs to the right hon. George-Auguftus, earl of Guildford. There are no parochial charities. The poor conftantly relieved are about fifteen, cafually ten.

W

Steeling is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction oi sho. diocefe of Canterbury, Vidd. deanry of Bridge,

The

church, which

is dedicated to St. Mary, is large and handfome, confifling of two ifles and one chancel, having a low fquare tower at the north-wefl:

corner of

it.

There are exceeding good remains of

painted glafs in this church, efpecially"in the eaft window of the fouth ifle, in which there are many figures well preferved, with curious canopies and ornaments about them, very little of it having been deflroycd. At bottom are two lliields of arms, one, AzurCy jemee of crojs croJletSy ory

a

ermine y over all a fefsy gules tlie ; other, GhleSy a lion rampanty erminey over it a chevroHy or. In the church-yard are three fine yew-trees, of a

remarkable large ^

lion

fize.

* Augmeutation-ofFice, Kent, box D. 35.

The

STELLING.

The

church of Stelling has always been efteemed as a chapel to the church of Upper Hardres, the redfor of which is induced to that redory, with the chapel of Stelling annexed to it. It^is

included

in the valuation of that redory in the kings books. In 1588 here were communicants ninety- two, and in 1640, ninety.

E

OR,

as

it is

L

E

H A

M,

as frequently written,

Elhanty lies the next pariHi fouth-eaftward from Stelling. It was written in the time of the Saxons both Uleham and Mlham, in Domefclay, Alham, Philipott lays, it was antiendy Written Plelham, denoting the lituation of it to be a valley little

among

the

hills,

whilll others fuppole, but with

jprobability, that

it took its name from the quanof eels which the Nailbourn throws out when it begins to run. There zxt Jeven boroughs init, ofBlad-

tity

bean, Boyke, Canterwood, Lyminge, Eleham,

Eleham

IS

parts of this

Town,

laid to

be thelargeft parifli in the eaftern county, extending itfelf in length

from

north to louth, through the Nailbourn valley, about three miles and an half and in breadth five miles and ; a half that is, from part of Stelling-minnis, within the

bounds of

acrofs the valley to Eleham down and VVinteridge, and the fouthern part of Swinfield-minnis, almofl up to Hairn-forfial, in Uphill Folkdlone. village, or

it,

town of Eleham,

The

as

ufuailycalled, is fituatec in the above-mentioned valley, rather on a rife, on the fide of the flream. It is both healthy and plealant, the houfes in it being mofily modern and wellbuilt, of brick and fafhed. As an inftance of the heaithinefs of this parifii, there have been wichinthefe few years feveral inhabitants of it buried here, of the it is

ages

of

loningborough hundred.

96

of 95, 97, and 99, and one of 105 i the age of 40 years being efteemed that of a young perfon, in this The church, with the vicarage on the fide of parifli. the church-yard, is fituated on the eafternfide of it, and the court lodge at a fmall diftance from it. This is now no more than a fmall mean cottage, thatched, of, I believe, only two rooms on a floor, and unfit for habitaIt appears to be the remains of a much larger tion. edifice, and is built of quarry-ftone, with frnall arched gothic windows and doors, the frames of which are of and fcemingly very ancient indeed. It is flill accounted a market-town, the market having been obtained to it by prince Edward, afterwards king Edaflilar (tone,

anno 35 Henry III. to be held on a Monday weekly, which, though difufed for a regular conflancy, is held in the market-houfc here once in five or fix years, to keep up the claim to befides which there are three markets the right of it regularly held, for the buying and felling of cattle, in hit Mondays, and every year, on Palm, Eafter, and one fair on Odl. 20th, by the alteration of the ftile, being formerly held on the day of St. Dionis, 06t. 9, The Nailbourn^ as has been alfor toys and pedlary. ready mentioned before, in the defeription ofLiminge,

ward

I. in his father’s

life-time,

;

W

runs along

this

valley northward, entering this parifh

fouthward, by the hamlet of Ottinge, and running thence by the town of Eleham, and at half a mile’s diftance, by the hamlet of North Eleham, where there are feveral deep ponds, in which are from time to time quantities of eels, and fo on to Brompton’s Pot and Wingmere, at the northern extremity of this pa-

The

the valley

moftly an unfertile red earth, mixed with many flints j but the hills on each fide of it, which are very frequent and fteep, extend to a wild romantic country, with frequent woods and unrifli.

foil in

is

inclofed downs, where the foil confifts moftly of chalk, excepting towards Stelling and Swinfield minnis’s, where it partakes of a like quality to that of the v.alley,

only

:

ELEHAM.

97 Only ftill more poor and barren. At the north-weft corner of the parifh, on the hill, is Eleham park, being a large wood, belonging to the lord of Eleham manor. Dr. Plot faysj he was informed, that there was the cujlom of borough Englijh prevailing over fome copyhold lands in this parilh, the general iifage of which is, that the youngeft fon Ihould inherit

all

the lands

and

tenements which his father had within the borough, &Ci but I cannot find any here fubjed to it. On the contrary,

the cuftom here

the clddt fon,

portions of in

it,

is,

to give the

whole

eftate to

who

pays to the younger ones their proas valued by the homage of the manor,

money.

At the

the furvey of Domefday, was part of the pofielTions of the anno 1080, this place bifhop of Baieux, under the general tide of whofc lands

time of taking

thus entered in it In Honinberg hundred^ the bifhop of Baieux holds in demejne Alham. It was taxed at fix juUns. The a rable land is twent'^-four carucates. In demefne there are five it is

carucates

and forty -one villeins yVoith

ing eighteen carucates.

There

is

eight borderers

hav-

a church, and eight fer-

and tzvo mills of fix fJnUings, and tzventy eight acres of meadow. Wood for the pannage of one hundred hogs. In the time of king Edward the Confejfor, and afterwards, it was worth thirty pounds, nozv forty, and yet it yields fifty pounds. Ederic held this manor of king vants,

Edward. Four years after

the bifliop was difgraced, and

all

his

were confifeated to the crown, whence this manor feems to have been granted to William de Albineto, or Albini, furnamed Pincerna, who had followed the Conqueror from Normandy in his expedition hither. He was fucceeded by his fon, of the fame name, who was made Earl of Arundel anno 15 king Stephen, and Alida his daughter carried it in marriage to John, earl of Ewe, in Normandy, whofe eldefl: fon Henry, earl of Ewe, was flain at the fiege of Ptolepoflefiions

voL,

VIII.

H

'

maU,

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

9^

1217, leaving A lice his foie daughter and heir, who entitled her hufband Ralph D’llTondon to the poffenion of this manor, as v\'ell as to the title of earl of Ewe. She died in the reign of king Henry III. pof-. felled of this manor, with the advowfon of the church, and fealed with Barry a label of fx points^ as appears by a deed in the Surrenden library ; after which it appears to have come into the pofielllon of prince Edward, the king’s eldeft Ton, who in the 35th year of it obtained the grant of a market on a Monday, and a fair, at this manor,® and afterwards, in the 41ft year of mais

in

^

that reign, alienated

it

to archbifliop Boniface,

who,

he Ihould ftill further inflame that enmity which this nation had conceived againft him, among other foreigners and aliens, by thus increafing his poflclTions

left

in

it,

who

paired this

manor away

died poflelTed of

to

Roger de Ley borne,

56th year of that reign, at which time it appears that there was a park here y and in his name it continued till Juliana de Leyborne, daughter of Thomas, became the foie heir of their pofit

in the

from the greatnefs of which fhc was ufually called the Infanta of Kent. She was thrice married, yet Ihe had no ilTue by either of her hulbands, all of whom Ihe furvived, and died in the 41ft year of king Edward III. upon which this manor, among the reft of her eftates, efcheated to the crown, there beino- no one who could make claim to them, by diredl or even by collateral alliance.*' Afterwards it continued in the crown till king Richard II. veiled it in feoffees in truft, towards the endowment of St. Stephen’s chapel, in his palace of Weftminfter, which he had in his 2 2d year, completed and made collegiate, and had the year before granted to the dean and canons this manor, felflons,

• ^

Allowed before the juftices itinerant anno 7 Edward I. Regift, of St. Radigund’s abbey, cart. 595 to 61 c, 6ig,

and

1036. *

Inqnif. Poft. mort. See

more of her under Leyborne,

vol.

iv. of this hiftory, p. 498.

among

eleham.

among others,

in

99

mortmain.** All which was confirmed

by king Henry IV. and VI. and by king Edward IV. the latter of

whom,

9th year, granted to them a fair in this parifh yearly, on the Monday after Palm -Sunday, and on the Wednefday following, with all liberties, See. In which fituation it continued till the ift year of king Edward VI. when this college was, with all its polTeflions, furrendered into the king's hands, where this manor did not continue long ; for the king in his 5th year, granted it to in their

firft

years

;

in his

Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, and he reconveyed it to the crown the fame year. After which the king determ of eighty years, to Sir Edward Wotton, one of his privy council, whofe fon Thomas tVotton, efq. fold his intereft in it to Alexander Hamon, efq. of Acrife, who died in 1613, leaving two daughters his coheirs, the youngeft of whom Catherine, married to Sir Robert Lewknor, entitled him to it ; he was at his death fucceeded by his fon Hamoii Lewknor, efq. but the reverfion in fee having been purchafed of the crown fome few years before the expiration of the above-mentioned term, which ended the laft year of king James I.’s reign, to Sir Charles Herbert, mafter of the revels. He at the latter end of mifed

it,

for the

king Charles I.’s reign, alienated it to Mr. John Aellf, merchant, of London ; after which, I find by the court rolls, that it was vefted in Thomas Alderne, John Filher, and Roger Jackfon, efqrs. who in the year 1681 conveyed it to Sir John Williams, whofe daughter and foie heir Penelope carried it in marriage to Thomas Symonds, efq. of Hercfordfliire, by the heirs of whofe only furviving fon efq. of

Pengethley, in that county,

fold to Sir

to

Henry Oxenden,

bart.

Powell,

has been lately

it

who

is

now

entitled

it.

See more of p. 587. **

Thomas Symonds

this

endowment

H

2

in vol.

of

v.

-

this

hiftory,

A

court

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

100

A court leet and which

is

court baron very extenfive. There

is is

held for this manor, much copyhold land

The demefnes

of it are tithe-free. There is a yearly rent charge, payable for ever out of it, of 87I. 13s. id. to the ironmongers company, in London.

held of

it.

Shottlesfield

is

a

manor,

fituated

at the fouth-

boundary of this parifh, the houfe ftanding partly in Liminge, at a fmall diftance fouthward from the ftreet or hamlet of the fame name. It was, as early as the reign of king Edward II. the inheritance of a family called le Grubbe, fome of whom had afterwards pofleflions about Yalding and Eythorne. Thomas le Grubbe was pofTelTcd of it in the 3d year of that reign, and wrote himfclfof Shottlesfeld, and from him it continued down by paternal defcent to John Grubbe, who in the 2d year of king Richard III. conveyed it by fale to Thomas Brockman, of I.,iminge,‘ whofe grandfon Henry Brockman, in the ift year of queen Mary, alienated it to George Fogge, efq. of Braborne, and he, in the beginning of queen Elizabeth’s reign, fold it to Bing, who, before the end of that reign, pafled it away to Mr. John Mailers, of Sandwich, from whom it defcended to Sir Edward Mailers, of Canterbury, who at his deceafe, foon after the death of Charles I. gave it to his fecond fon, then LL. D. from whofe heirs it was alienated to Hetherington, whofe laft furviving fon the Rev. William Hetherington, of North Cray place, died pplTelTed of it unmarried in 1778, and by will devifed it, among his other ellates, to Thomas Coventry, efq. of London, who lately died poT lelTed of \tf, p, and the trullees of his will are now eneafl:

titled to

it.

1 HE MANOR OF BowicK, now fituated likewife in the eaftern

the borough of tient times the

:

There are

Called

Boykcy

is

part of this parilh, in

own name, which was in very anrefidence of the Lads, who in leveral its

feveral of their wills in the Prerog. off. Cant.

of

ELEHAM.

lOI

were written De Lad, by which name there is an antient farm, once reputed a manor, (till known, as it has been for many ages before, in the adjoining parifh of Acrife, which till the reign of queen Elizabeth, was in the tenure of this family. It is certain that they were refident here at Bowick in the beginning of king Henry V I. ’s reign, and in the next of of

their old evidences

by the regillers of their wills in the office at Canterbury, they conftantly ftiled themThomas Lade, of Bowick, died felves of Eleham. poflefled of it in 1515, as did his defcendant Vincent

Edward IV.

as appears

1563, anno 6 Elizabeth. Soon after which it paired by purchafe into the name of Netherfole, from whence it quickly afterwards was alienated to Aucher, and thence again to Wroth, who at the latter end of king Charles I.’s reign fold it to Elgar; whence, after

Lade

in

fome intermiffion, it was fold to Thomas Scott, efq. of Liminge, whofe daughter and coheir Elizabeth, married to William Turner, efq. of the Friars, in Canterbury, at length, in her right, became poflelfed of it;

daughter and heir Bridget married David Papillon, efq. of Acrife, and entitled him to this manor, and his grandfon Thomas Papillon, efq. of Acrife, is the prefent owner of it. Mount and Bladbean are two manors, fituated on the hills, on the oppofite lides of this parifh, the former near the eaftern, and the latter near the weftern boundaries of it the latter being antiently called Bladhis only furviving

;

bean^ alias Jacobs-court^ a

name now

quite forgotten.

Both thefe manors appear to have been in the reign of the Conqueror, part of the polTcfiionsof Anfchitillusde Ros, who is mentioned in Domelday as holding much land in the weftern part of this county, their principal there being that of Horton, nea’r Farningham. of this family made a grant of it to the Cofentons,

manor

One

of Cofenton, in Aylesford, to hold of their barony of Ros, as of their manor of Horton before mentioned, by knight’s fcrvice. In the 7th year of Edward HI.

H

3

Sir

102

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

Sir Stephen de Col'enton obtained a charter of fyce'warren for his lands here. was the fon of Sir Wil-

He

liam de Colenton, fheriff anno jbmetimes written of Cofenton,

Edward

and was and fometimes of Mount, in Eleham, At length his defcendant dying in the beginning of king Henry VIII.’s reign, without male ilTue, his three daughters, married to Duke, Wood, and Alexander Hamon, elq. became his coheiis, and fhared a large inheritance between them, and upon their divifionofit, the manor of Bladbean, alias Jacobs-court, was allotted to Wood, and Mount tq Alexander Hamon. I.

The manor Bladbean^ ^\^^yacohs-court^ was afterwards alienated by the heirs of Wood to Thomas Stoughton, efq. of St. Martin’s, near Canterbury, who

by

will in 1591''

gave this manor, with its rents and fervices, to Elizabeth his daughter and coheir, married to Thomas Wilde, efq. of St. Martin’s, whole grandfon Colonel Dudley Wilde, at his death in 1653, deviled it to p. his widow, J. from whom it went by fale to Hills, and Mr. James Hills, in 1683, palled it away to Mr. Daniel Woollet, whofe children divided ^iis eftatc among them a few years after which John Brice became, bypurchafe of it at different times, poffeffed of the whole of it, w'hich he in 1729 conveyed ^J-y^Ientine Sayer, of Sandwich, W'ho died poffeffed of it in 1766, and the heirs of his eldeft fon Mr. George Sayer, of Sandwich, are now entitled to it j

The manor

which was

of

Mount, now

called

court

allotted as

above-mentioned, to Alexander Hamon, continued down to his grandfon, of the fame name who died poffeffed of it in 1613, leaving two daughters his coheirs, the youngeft of whom, Catherine, entiled her hufband Sir Robert Lewknor, to it in whole deu endants it continued till Robert Lewknor, efq. his grandfon, in 1666, alienated it, with other “

Proved in the Prerogative-office, Canterbury.

lands

ELEHAM. lands In this parlfli, to

benham,

Thomas

in Leicefterflilre,

lOJ PapIIlon, elq* of

whofe defcendant

Lu-

Thomas

Papillon, efq. of Acrife, is the prefent proprietor of it. Ladwood is another manor in this parifh, lying at the eaftern boundary of it, likewife on the hills next to Acrife. It was written in old evidences Ladfwood, whence it may with probability be conje(5lured, that

being converted into a farm of arable land, and the erecting of a habitation here, it was a wood belonging to the family of Lad, refident at Bowick ; butfince the latterend of king Edward III.’s reign, it continued uninterrupted in the family of Rolfe till the reign of king Charles II. foon after which it was aliebefore

its

nated to Williams, in which name it remained till Pencr lope, daughter of Sir John Williams, carried it in marriage to Thomas Symonds, efq. the Iieirs of whole only furviving fon Thomas Symonds Powell, efq. fold it

to

efq.

David Papillon,

now

poflefTes

efq.

whofe fon Thomas Papillon,

it.

appears by an old manufcript, feemingly of the time of Henry VIII. was formerly the eftate of Thomas de Garwinton, of

The manor

of

Canterwood,

as

W^elle, lying in the eaftern part of the parifli, and who lived in the reigns of Edward II. and III. whofe great-



grandfon William Garwinton, dying f. p. Joane his kinfwoman, married to Richard Elaut, was, in the 9th year of king Henry IV. found to be his heir, not only in this manor, but much other land in thefe parts, and their fon Richard Haut having an only daughter and heir Margery, fhc carried this manor in marriage to William Ifaak. After which, as appears from the court-rolls, which do not reach very high, that the family of Hales became poftelfed of it, in which it ftaid

queen Elizabeth’s reign, when it went by file to Manwood, from which name it was alienated to Sir Robert Lewknor, whofe grandfon Robert Lewknor, efq. in 1666 fold it, with other lands in this parifli already mentioned, to Thomas Papillon, efq. of Lu-

till

the end of

H

4

benham.

loningborough hundred.

104 benham,

in Leicefterfhire,

whofe defcendant Thomas Papillon, efq. of Acrife, is the prefent owner of it. OxROAD, now ulually called Oftvude, is a manor, fitiiated a little diftance caftward from North.Eleham. It had antiently owners of the fame name Andrew de ; Oxroad held it of the countels of Ewe, in the reign of king Edwara I. by knight’s fervice, as appears by the book of them in the king’s remembrancer’s office. In the 20th year of king Edward 111. John, fon of Simon atte \^^elle, held it of the earl of Ewe by the like I'ervice. After which the Hencles became poffefled of it, from the reign of king Henry IV. to that of king

Henry VIII. when

Ifabel,

daughter ofTho. Hencle, entitled him to it, and in his deIcendants it continued till king Charles l.’s reign, when it was alienated to Mr, Daniel Shatterden, gent, of this parifli, defeended from thofe of Shatterden, in Great Chart, which place they had poffcfl'ed for many

marrying John Beane,

At

generations.

length, after this manor had contifome time in his defeendants, it was fold to Adams, in which name it remained till the heirs of Randall Adams paffed it away by laie to Papillon, in whole family it hill continues, being now the

nued

of

for

Thomas Papillon, efq. of Acrife. Hall, alias V\ ingmere, is a manor,

property

fituated in the valley at the northern boundary of this parifh, next to Barhain, in which fome part of the demclhe lands of it of tke manor ofEleham, and

had moft probably once owners of the name of VVigmere as it was ong^nally fpeJt, of which name there was a family in Ealt Kent, and in feveral antient evidences there is mention made of William de Wigmere and others of this name. However this be, the family of Brent appear to have been for leveral generations poITdled of this manor, and continued fo till Thomas Brent, of \\nfborough, dying in 1612, /;>. it palled into the familyof De'ing, of Mirrendeni for in king

James

l.’s

gent, of Egerton, ddelf fon of ^1' n, the fourth Ion of Jlohn John Deiing, elq, of Sur ren-

7

'"^

den.

den,

ELEHAM. who had married Thomas Brent’s

fider,

105 was be-

heir Thocome poflelled of it and his mas Dei ing, gent, in 1649, alienated it to William Codd, gent. ‘of Watringbury, who was fucceeded in

only Ion and

;

it

by

his Ton

James Codd,

efq. of

Watringbury, who

1708, being then IherifF of this county, and being pollefTed at his death of this manor in fee,

died

f.

p. in

upon which it came to the reprelentatwo aunts, Jane, the wife of Boys Ore, and

in cravelkind

tives of his

\

Anne, of R-obert Wood, and they, in 1715’ his levied, entitled Thomas Manley, and Elizabeth, lives, wife, to the pofleffion of this manor for their and afterwards to them in fee, in feparate moieties. He died/. />. in 1716, and by will gave his moiety to John Pollard on whole death / p, it came, by the limitation in the above will, to Jolhua Monger, whofc only daughter and heir Rachael carried it in marriage to her hufband Arthur Pryor, and they in 1750 joined in the fale of it to Mr. Richard Halford, gent, of Canterbury. ^Ihe other moiety of this manor leems to have been devifed by Elizabeth Manley abovem-.entioned, at her death, to her nephew Thomas Kirkby, whofe Tons Thomas, John, and Manley Kirkby, ;

joined, in the above year, in the conveyance of

it

to

Mr. Richard Halford above-mentioned, who then became poflefTed of the whole of it. He was third fon of Richard Halford, clerk, redor of the adjoining parifh of Liminge, deicended from the Halfords, -of Warwicklhire, as appears by his will in the Prerogative-office, Canterbury, by which he devifed to his feveral fons fucceffively in tail, the eftate in Warwick(liire, which he was entitled to by the will of his

kinfman William Halford, gent^ of that county.

They bear

for their arms, Argent> a greyhound paffanf^

fable^ on a chief of the fecond^ three fleurs de

died >

pofl'efl'ed

See more of

this hiftory, p.

of this

it

in 1766, leaving by

liSy or.

Mary

branch of the family of Dering

He

his wife,

vol.

vii.

of

450.

daughter

;

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

I06

daughter of Mr. Chriftopher Creed, of Canterbury, one fon Richard Halford, gent, now of Canterbury and two daughters, Mary married to Mr. John Peirce, lurgeon, of Canterbury; and Sarah. In 1794, Mr. Peirce purchafed the fhares of Mr. Richard and Mrs. Sarah Halford, and he is now the prefent owner of this manor. He bears for his arms. Azure fields wavy bendy or^ two unicorns hendsy proper. The manor of Clavertigh is fituated on the hills at the north-weft boundary of this parilh, next to Liminge, which antiently belonged to the abbey of Bradfole, or Sr. Radigund, near Dover, and it continued among the pofl'eftions of it till the 27th year of king Henry VIII. when by the act then pafl'cd, it was fupprefl'ed, as net having the clear yearly revenue of two hundred pounds, and was furrendered into the king’s hands, who in his 29th year, granted the feite of this priory, with all its lands and pofl'eftions, among which this manor was included, with certain exceptions, however, mentioned in it, to archbilbop Craniner, who in the 38th year of that reign, conveyed this manor of Clavertigh, with lands called Monkenlands, late belonging to the fame priory in this parilh, back again to the king, who that fame year granted all thofe premiles to Sir James Hales, one of thejuftices of the common pleas, to hold in capiteP^ and he, in the beginning of king Edward VI. ’s reign, palTed them away to Peter Hey man, efq. one of the gentlemen of that prince’s bedchamber who feems to have had a new grant of them from the crown, in the 2d year of that reign. He was lucceeded by his eldeft; Ion, Ralph Heyman, elq. of Sellindge, whofe de-

fendant

Sir Peter

of Clavetigh

Heyman, bai t, alienated the manor Edward Honywood, of Evington,

to Sir

created a baronet in 1660, in whole defendants this manor has continued down to Sir John Honywood, bart. of

Evington,

wiio'

is

the prefent poflefTor of

it.

™ Augmentation-office, Kent, box D. 75. Rot. Efch. anno 5S Henry VIII. pt. 3.

CHARITIES.

ELEHAM.

107

CHJRITIES, JoKAS Warley, D. D. gave by will in 1722, 50I. to be put out on good fecuriiy, the produce to be given yearly in bread on every Sunday in the year, after divine fervice, to fix poor widows, to each of them a two-penny loaf. The money is

now

verted

in the

vicar

and churchwardens, and the produce

being no more than 2I. 5s. per annnm, only a three-halfpenny loal is given to each widow. Land in this parlrti, of the annual produce of il. was given by ape rfon unknown, to be difpofed of to the indigent. It is verted in the minirter, churchwardens, and overfeers. Four small cottages were given to the paiifli,by a perfon unknown, and are now inhabited by poor perfons. They are verted in the churchwardens and overfeers. Sir John Williams, by will in 1725, founded a charity SCHOOL in this parirti for fix poor boys, legal inhabitants, and born in this parirti, to be taught reading, writing, and accounts, to be cloathed once in two years ; and one fuch boy to be bound out apprentice, as often as money fufficient could be raifed for that ufe. The minirter, churchwardens, and overfeers to be trurtees, who have power to nominate others to aflift them in the management of it. The maker has a houfe to live in, and the lanxls given to it are let by the trurtees. The poor conflantly relieved are about feventy-five, cafually ot

it

hfty-five,

Eleham

is

diction of the its own name.

The

ecclesiastical jurisof Canterbury, and deanry of

within the dioceje

dedicated to St. Mary, is large and handfome, confifting of three ifles, the middle one having an upper range of windows, and one chancel, having a tower fteeple, with a fpire lhaft on it,

church, which

at the weft end,

in

is

which are eight

bells, a

clock,

Within the altar- rails is a memorial for John Somner, gent, fon of the learned William Som-

and chimes.

ner, of Canterbury, obt.

1695; arms, Ermine^ a chev-

In the chancel a brafs plate for Michael Pyx, of Folkeftone, mayor and once high bailiff to Yarmouth, obt. 1601. Another for Nicholas Moore, gent, of Bcttenham, in Cranbrooke ; he died at Wingron voided.

jner in

1

577.

In the middle

ifle

a memorial for Captain

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

I08

William Symons, obt. 1674; arms. Parted per paky and fefs, three trefoils fipt. A brafs plate for John Hill, dean and vicar of Eleham, obt, 1730. In this church was a lamp burning, called the light of Wyngmer, given before the )'car 1468, probably by one of the owners of that manor. The church of Eleham was given by archbifhop Boniface, lord of the manor of Eleham, and patron of this church appendant to'it, at the inftance of Walter de Merton, then canon of St. Paul’s, and afterwards bifhop of Rochefter, to the college founded by the latter in 1263, at Maldon, in Surry." After which the archbifliop, in 1268, appropriated this church to the college, whenever it fliould become vacant by the death or cefllon of the redor of it, faving a reafonable vicarage of thirty marcs, to be endowed by him in it, to which the warden of tlie college fhould prefent to him and his fucceflbrs, a fit vicar, as often as it fliould be vacant, to be nominated to the warden by the archbifhop ; otherwife the archbifhop and his fucceflbrs fhould freely from thence difpofe of the vicarage for tain

that turn."

The

Walter de Merton had begun ahoufe in Oxford, whither fome of the fcholars were from time to time to refort for the advancement of their fludies, to which the whole fociety of Maldon was, within a few years afterwards, removed, and both focieties united at Oxford, under the name of the warden and fellows of Merton college. This portion of thirty marcs, which was a hated falary, and not tithes, &c. to that amount, was continued by a fublequent year before

this,

compolition or decree of archbifhop Warham, in 15325 but in 1559, the college, of their own accord, “

See Tanner’s Monafticon, p. 543.

Oxon. p °

in Bibl.

97.

MSS. Tanner

Oxon.

MSS. Tanner

in chartulario Archiep. Cant, in

Bibl. Bodl.

p. 97.

agreed

.

^

109

ELEHAM.*

agreed to let the vicarial tithes, &c. to Thomas Car«» den, then vicar, at an eafy rent, upon his difehargin^ the college from the before-mentioned portion of and this leafe, with the like condition, thirty marcs has been renewed to every iubfequent vicar ever fince ; and as an addition to their income, the vicars have for fome time had another leafe, of fome wood :

grounds here, from the college.

The appropriation or parfonage of this church is now held by leaic from the warden and fellows, by the Rev. John Kenward Shaw Brooke, of Town-Mailing*

The it,

archbifhop nominates a clerk to the vicarage of

whom

prefent to

the warden and fellows above-mentioned

him

for inftitution. ^

This vicarage

Is

valued In

king

the

s

books^ at

tw'enty pounds, (being the original endowment of tnirty marcs), and the yearly tenths at two pounds, the clear

yearly certified

value of

it

being 59^*

^

5 ^*

1640 it was valued at one hundred pounds per annum. Communicants fix hundred. It is now of about the yearly value of one hundred and fifty pounds. All the lands in this parilli pay tithes to the redor or vicar, excepting Parkgate farm, Farthingfole farm^ and Eleham-park wood, all belonging to the lord ot Eleham manor, which claim a modus in lieu of tithes, 1 he of twenty fliillings yearly paid to the vicar. manor farm of Clavertigh, belonging to Sir John EIonyw'ood, bart and a parcel of lands called Mount Bottom, belonging to the Rev. Mr. Thomas Tournay, of

Dover, claim

a like

modus

in lieu

of

tithes.

p ArSee Diicarell’s Repert. p. 45. Compofitio realis MSS. Cod. chiep. inter proprietar. de Elham Sc Vicar perpet. p

Bibl, Yelvertoniae,

No. 525

'’oh xii. fol.

66 Catal. .

MSS. Ang.

pt. II, p. ii 6 .

CHURCH

^

no

*

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED-

CHURCH OF ELEHAM. PATRONS, Or

AR

by luhom Jirefented.

Warden and felloios of Merton eollege,

Oxford.

A.M. March

Richard Mathew 20,

I

589, obt. 1601.

Zach. Evans., A. M. May |6< 1601 , refigned 1607. John Fitche, S. T. P. March 19, 1607, f’ht. 1612.

James

Ellye.,

A. M,

Sept. ii|

16 t2, refigned 1613. "1 nomas Allen ^ A.M. Feb. i8^ 1613, oht. 1636.*’

John Woodcock^ A.

M. Feb.

Ij

1636, fequeftered 1643.'' Hen. Hannington, obt, 1691.’ JohnLijilis, A.M. Nov. 1691, refigned 1692.

William Hunt, A.

M.

17,

1692, re-

ligned i 707.' Robert Harrifon^ A. M, Oft. 1707, refigned 171 1.

I,

John Hill, A. B. Nov. 3, 1711 obt, Feb. 1731. Philip Bearcroft, S. T. P. Oft. 20, 1731, obt. 1761.“

Thomas Thomjfon, 1

761, obt.

1

A.M.

Dec. I«

773.*

Edward Fulham, A. M. Dec. refigned 1777. j 773, William Cornwallis, A.M.

1778, the prefent q In 1617 a difpenfation palTed for holding this vicarage with the rectory of Kingfnoth. r Sec White’s Century, p. 19. On his being f<.queftered, onejohn Salmon was placed in it. See Walker’s Suff. of Clergy, pt. ii. p. 400. • Somner’s Lite, in his Rom. Ports, p. 103. t Afterwards curate of Swinfield. u He held this vicarage with the fiis

J3,

Mar,

vicar.’‘

^ He was likewife one of the fix preachers of Canterbury cathedral. He went a miflionary to Africa, but finding he could be of no fervice, with all the pains he took, he returned to England, and was by the archbifhop nominated to this vicarage. * In March 1778 a difpenfation paired for his

holding this vicarage

with the reftory of Witterlham.

reftory of Stourmouth, by difpenfation.

ACRISE

1

ACRISE.

1

1

ACRISE LIES It its

is

the next parifh fouth-eaftward from

written in the furvey of

name from

its

growing

in

trees

mon

Domefday,

Eleham.

AcreSy taking

high fituation, and the plenty of oak it. It is vulgarly called by the com-

people in the neighbourhood,

AwkeridgCy by which name I it written, both in The north-eafb part of it, in which wills and deeds. part of the manor of Brandred lies, is in the hundred of Folkeftone, and the remainder of it within this hundred of Loningborough. Ac RISE is an obfcure parifh, which, like all the others on thefe hills, is, though poor, exceedingly healthy. It is fituated great part of it on high ground, in a wild, dreary and flinty country, among thofe hills which are here very frequent and deep. It is rather more than two miles long, and about one mile broad. In the fouth-weft part of it, encircled by a large grove of trees, is Acrife-court, a rcfpedlable brick manfion, leemingly of the age of Henry VII. and alnioft clofe to it, on the north fide of the church, about a mile from which Hands the parfonage, and a fmall hamlet of houfcs round Acrife-green. At fome diftance further is Hode, the houfe of which is built of (lone, with arched windows and doors of the gothic form, belonging to Mr. Nicholas Marfh, of Eleham ; and at the northern boundary of the parifh is the hamlet of Brandred, near which there is fome coppice wood. The large heath, calletl Swinfield minnis, extends along the eaftcrn fide of this parifh, part of which is within the bounds of it. I'he foil is moftly a red

have fometimes feen

mixed with quantities of flints, the reft of it is chalk, a barren unfertile foil. I'here is a fair held here, on the Tuefday next after

earth,

06t, 10, yearly.

Acrise,

:

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

X12

Acrise, at the time of taking the general furvey of Domefday, was part of the pofleffions of the bifhop of Baieux, under the general tide of whofe lands it is thus entered in it Anfchitil de Ros holds of the /;i Nuniberg hundredy hifhopy AcreSy ivhich two brothers held^ and each had a for one manors and it ivas taxed for In de^ One ftding. ‘The arable land is two carucales viefne there is one c ante ate and an halfy and fine villeins y hallmote

;

now

it is

with five borderers having one caruca e. IVlod for the pannage of ten hogs, and a church. In the time of king Edward the Confeffor it was worth forty jhillingSy and afterwards thirty JhilltngSy noiv fixty fhilHngs. Four years after the taking of the above furvey, the bidaop of Baieux was difgraccd, and

were

confifeated to the

crown

;

all

his

poncHions

upon which the

feig-

nory of this manor feems to have been immediately granted to the above-mentioned Anfchitil de Ros, the mefne tenant of it, who thenceforward became lordparamounty holding it immediately of the cro'^nin capite. Of his defeendants this manor was again held by the family of Cofenton, or Codington as they were fometimes fpelt, who refided both here and at Cofenton, in Aylesford.

This manor of Acrife, alias Okcridge, was granted to them to hold of the barony of Rofs, as of the manor of Horton Kirkby, which feems to have been the chief manor of that barony, and in imitation of whofe arms, Or, three rofes, gules, the Cofentons bore Azurey Sir Stephen de Cofenton poifeded it three rojes, or. in the 7th year of Edward III. and that year obtained a charter of fret-warren for his lands in Acrife, Coffyngtone, and Suthbertone.’' At length, after it had continued in his defeendants till the reign of king Henry VIII. Thomas Cofenton, efq. dying in the beginning of it without male iffue, his three daughters »

See more of the family of Colenton under i\ylesford.

became

1^3

ACRISE.

became his coheirs, and fliared a large inheritance between them ; upon the divifion of which, this manor was allotted to the youngeft, Elizabeth, married to Alexander Hamon,

efq.

who bore

for his

arms. Azure,

He

afterwards three demi Horn, pafjant-guardant, or. refided at Acrife-place, as did his grandfon Alexander

of this manor in 1 6 1 3, leaving two daughters his coheirs ; Elizabeth married to Sir Edward Boys, of Fredville, and Catherine to Sir Robert Lewknor, to the latter of whom, by his He afterwards will, he devifed this manor and ellatc. refided at Acrife place, and bore for his arms, Argent,

Hamon, efq. who died poflefled

three

chevronels,

poUelTed of

it

His delcendants continued Robert Lewknor his grandfon, in

gules.

till

1666, alienated it, with other ellates in this neighbourhood, to Thomas Papillon, efq. of Lubenham, in Leiceflerlhire.

family of Papillon, or Papillion, feems to have been of good account in this kingdom in very early times; for I find Toraldus de Papilion, one of the

The

William the illiam PaConqueror, to the church of Durham. pilion was one of king Edward I. s futhful lervants, and recommended by him to the abbot and conv'ent of Leicefter, fora corodie from that houfe in the 31ft year of his reign. “ And from him it is very probable witnefles to a deed of confirmation of

the Papillons, of their defeent and pillon, of

Lubenham, firft

Lubenham,

W

in that county,

fettlement in

it.

derive

Thomas Pa-

the purchafer of this manor,

was an eminent merchant of London, for which he ferved in parliament, as he had before done for Dover, and bore for his arms. Azure, a chevron, or, between three butterflies, or papillons, argent. He was of the Mercers company, to which he gave loool. Philip Papillon, his fon, ferved in

parliament feveral times

See Diigd. Mon. vol. i. p. 44. p. 202. Prynne, vol. iii. p. lOlI. *

VOL.

vm.

1

Willis’s

Mitred Abbies,

for

;

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED. Dover, and once for New Romney. His

IT4 for

was Anne,

firfl;

wife

daughter of William JollifFe, cfq. of Sr afford (hire, by her he had a Ton David. He married fecondly Sufan HenOiaw, by whom he had a Ion Philip, who was of Eaft Mailing, and three daughters. David Papillon, the eldefl fon, was cholen to lerve in parliament for New Romney, and for Dover likewife. He was one of the commilYioners of excife, and refided both here and at Lee. He died in 1762, leaving by Mary, daughter of Timothy Keyier, efq. of London, a fon David, and five daughters. David Papillon, efq. the fon, refided at times both here and at Lee, and was one of the commifiioners of excife. }?y his firfl; wife Bridget, daughter of William Turner, of the White Friars, Canterbury, fon of William, by Anna-Maria Papillon, he had furviving feven children, Thomas, born in 1757, lieutenant-colonel eldefl;

Eaft Kent battalion of militia, and by his father’s gift the prefent pofTefTor of this manor and feat Philip, redlor of Eythorne, and vicar of Kennington in the

;

William,

in orders likewife,

of

Wymundham,

Norfolk, who married the daughter of the Rev. Richard Drake, of that parifh John-Rawflerne, vicar of Tunbridge, and George. Elizabeth and Sarah. He married fecondly Hefler, daughter of the Rev. Dr. Curteis, of Sevenokc, and prebendary of Canterbury ; by his fecond wife, who died in 1782. Thomas in

;

f.

Papillon, efq. the eldefl fon above-mentioned, the prefent pofieffor of this manor, married Anne, daughter of FJenry

Pelham,

efq.

and now

refides at Acrife-

place.

BrandredIs a manor,

in the north-eafl part

of this hamlet of its own name within it, which, at tlic time of taking the general furvey of Domefday,feems to have been part of the pofiefiions of the canons of St. Martin’s priory, in Dover, under the dcfcription of which it is entered thus Ibe land of Brandet pays twenty JhlUings and fix-pence to St. Marparifh, having a

:

>

tin

.

115

ACRISE. tin in alms.

And

a little below, under the fame title

of their poflefiions

Martin layid at

Jmong

the

common land of

St.

others, one hundred acres of which acquit themJelveSy that is, are free

there are^

Brand

:

among

from payment of cuftom and fcot This manor continued part of the poffeffions of the church and priory of St. Martin above-mentioned, in the 27th year of the reign of till’ its dilfolution havking Henry VIII. when it was lupprefled, as not \alue ing revenues to the amount of the clear yearly not of two hundred pounds, thofe of this priory

amounting to more than 170I. income, and was lurrendered

14s. 11 2d. clear yearly

that year, with

all

its

did lands and pofrefTions, to the king s uie. But thej^ for the not remain long in the hands of the crown, king, in his 29th year, granted the feite of the priory, except with all lands and pofTeflions belonging to it, it, in the patronage of certain churches mentioned in exchange to a'rchbillrop Cranmer,’^ in whofe fucceflfor, tlfe they have continued to the prefent time, his grace archbifliop being now entitled to the inheritance of it. houfe In the hamlet of Brandred, is an eftate, the early of which, though now only a farm-houfe, was, as refidence as queen Elizabeth’s reign, the property and of the MarOi’s, defeended from thofe of Marton, in Eafl Langdon, and it continued fo down toT. Marfli,

of Brandred, daughter of

who died in 1664, leaving by Anne, Thomas Netherfole, of Netherfole, in

Wimlingfwold, a

fon,

John MarPn, vyho

in

1665, re-

moved thither, m wliofe defeendants it has continued^ down to John Marfh, efq. of Salifbury, afterwards of Netherfole, who is the prefent polTelTor of this eflate, but now refides at Chichefter, in SuiTex. *

Augrncntntion

office,

I

2

Kent, box A. 21.

CIURITIES

^

ii6

lONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED, CHARITIES.

A

PERSON unknown gave land in this parifli, for the benefiff of the poor, now of the annual value of il. occupied at prefent by John Sharp. 1 he poor conftantly relieved are about eleven, cafually nine.

.

Acrise

The

within the ecclesiastical juristhe dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of

is

diction of Eleham.

church, which

is dedicated to St. Martin, is but fmalJ, confifting of only one ifle and one chancel, having a tower at the weft end, w'ith a low turret on it, flat at top, in which there is one bell. The church is kept^ very neat. In the chancel, on a (tone, is a memorial and figure of a woman in brafs, for Mary,

wife of Peler

Heyman, elq. daughter and coheir of William Tirrill, efq. of Eflex, obt. 6o i On a ftone, a memorial in brals, for Alexander Hamon, efq. obt. 1613. A monument for William Turner, efq. late of Grays-Inn, obt. 1729; married Anna-Maria, daughter of Thomas Papillon, efq. obt. 1738 ; arms, Turtier, argent and ermine, three fer de molhis, fable, a pale 1

.

counterchangedin fefi, on a chief, or, a lion rampantguar datit, between two rofes, gules, impaling Papillon ;

and

a monurnent for Anne, late wife of Mr. Philip Papillon, of London, merchant, eldefl daughter of William Jollifte, efq. obt. 1 693. There are many hatchments of the Papillon family round the ifle between ; which and the chancel there is a large pointed arch, with zig-zag ornaments. This church was given, about the reign of kincr Henry II. by William de Cofenton, lord of the manor of Acrife, to the priory of Leeds, to which the patronage of it afterwards belonged but it never was appropriated, and archbilhop Baldwin, who lived in that reign, granted out of it to the priory an annual penfion of forty Ihillings. In which ftate the patronage of It continued till the dillblation of the ;

priory,

or

ACRISE,

117

was then called, in the 31ft year of Henry Vlll. when it came, with the reft of the pofleffions of it, into the hands of the crown, in which or abbey of Leeds as

it

it

has continued ever fince, the king being the prefent

patron of

it.

The above-mentioned penfionof forty

ftiillings

has

not been paid fince the diflblution of the priory. This redlory is valued in the king’s books at feven pounds, and the yearly tenths at fourteen fliillings. In

1588

it

was valued

iixty-eight.

cants, and

it

101640

number

the like

of

communi-

was valued at one hundred pounds.

CHURCH OF Or

pounds, communicants

at eighty

ACRISE, RECTORS.

hy luhom prefented.

The Crown.

John Bankes, 1620. Humjihry Peake^ D. D. June 14, 1627.”

Thomas Gage^ l 642 John King. John Floate^ obt. 1699. John Ltvjis, 0 £t. 6, 1699, re» .*

figned

1

706.'

Thomas Rymer, D. D. 1706, ob,

March 23,

1

761.'*

A. M. John Hardy April II, 1761, obt. June Franklyn^

I

782.

W-lliam 1

Swanee,

inducted

782.

Giles Powtf//, in

1786, the pre-

fent redtor.

h Likewife reAor of Liminge and prebendary of Canterbury, and had a fecoiid induction to this re£tory

onMay

20, 1636. ® He rellgned this reftory for that of Saltwood. See bis life in Biog. Brit.

i

3

2927, and more of him uaderMinfter, in Thanet. ^ Likewife re£lor of Witterfliam, and perpetual curate of Sy^infield, vol. V. p.

'

paddles

ii8

LONINGBOROUGH HUNDRED.

P

A D L

E S

W

o R T

II,

USUALLY

called Paljworth^ is the next parifh fouthward from Acrife. The manors of Liminge and Eleham both claim within this parilh. Padlesworth is a lonely and unfrequented parifli, fituated very high, among the hills; thefayingin this country being, that Padlefzvorth is the highejl ground and the lowejl church in the whole county. It is very-fmall, the church flanding in the middle of it, near three or four mean cottages, which make the village, the inhabitants of which are poor indeed. The loil is much like that of the laft-defcribcd parifli of Acrife, only flill more barren, with a great deal of heath or common throughout it, a wretched and mi-

ferable country.

The manor

of Padlesworth v/as antiently part of the eftate of the great lamily of Criol; one of whom, Bertram de Criol, died poflefled of it in the 23d year of king Edward 1 whole two fons dying .

without ifilie, ]oane their fifler became poffetred of this manor, with the reft of her brother’s inheritance, which ftie carried in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokefle, who left his tw'o daughters his coheirs, ofwhom Agnes, the eldeft, married Thomas de Poynings, and entitled her hufband to the pofteflion of this manor. Lie died anno 13 Edward 111 and in his defcendants it continued down to Robert de Poynings, who lived in king Edward IV. ’s reign, and was, as his feveral .

ancellors were,

barons of

fummoned

to parliament

among

the

and he palled it away by lale to Sir Thomas F'ogge, of Repton, in whole delcendants it remained till king James I ’s reign, when it w'as alienated to Lingley, whofe heirs conveyed it to Thomas Talbot, cfq. and he fold it to Mr. Ralph HarW'cod, from which name it palled by fale, in to j 748, this realm,

Mr.

1^9

PADLESWORTH. Mr. Tames Hammond, of Dover,

fince

whofe death

Thomas

has been fold by his heirs to proprietor ot it. Papillon, efq. of Acrife, the prefent A court baron is held for this manor, which extends Swingfield, Capel, and into the parilhes of Liminge,

in 1700,

it

Newington. There are no charitable donations to ,

The poor



i -n this parilii.

more

conftantly orcafually relieved are not

than one or two.

Padlesworth RISDICTION of

is

within the

ecclesiastical Ju*

anJ deanry the dioceji of Canterbury,

ofEleham.

.

u

^



is, The church, which is dedicated to St. Ofwald, It is the lead in the county I believe the loweft and large flint nones, vervantient indeed, being built of ftill (mailer and confifls of one very Irnall ifle, and and the ead chancel; the roof of both is unceiled, boarded up, and only window of the chancel being noon-day.^ Between the ifle and it is quite dark at Saxon ornaments. chancel is a circular arch, wdth

of a laige ciicular the w'efl end of the ifle is part very antlent, leeiningly the pillar, about two feet high, 1 here is is none now. bafis of the font, which there the root no fleepleor turret, but at the wed end of

At

hangs one

bell.

There

are

no memorials

in

it.

On

door ; on each fide of the ifle is a very Imall circular remarkably ima I each flde of the fouthern one are two diflerent in their ornapillars, of Saxon architedfure, ments from each other. as a chapei This church has always been e deemed value of which it to the church of Liminge, in the books ; the ledlor of Liis included in the king’s ledioiy, minge being indituted and indudfed to that Fadlelvyorth anW'ith the chapels of Stanford and eighty-lix, In 1588 here were communicants and in 1640 the fame.

nexed.

I

4

the

(

12 °

) 9

*

THE HUNDRED OF FOLKESTONE LIES

the next fouth-eaftward to that of Loningborough, written in Domefday, Fulchejian, and in an-

deeds and records, univerfally, Folkeftone j though of late years it has been erroneoully written tient

Folkdone,

CONTAINS WITHIN ITS BOUNDS THE FOLLOWING PARISHES SwiNGFIELD. 5. Hawking.

IT

;

1.

3.

Liddon mp-ari. Alkham.

4.

Capell.

2.

6. 7.

Cheriton and Newington. j

And

the churches of thofe pariflies parilhes of Acrise, Hougham,

and likcwiTe part of the ; and Folkestone the town and liberty of Folkejlone, comprehending the church and a part or that parifl], having been long fince made a fejiaTate jurifdtfiion from it, and having oeace officers of its own. Two conjiables have jurifdiftion over 'this hundred. ;

This hundred, w'hich was appurtenant to the lord-

manor of Folkeftone, was, in the reign of the Conqueror, part of the pofteffions of the bilhop of Baieux, who being difgraced in the 19th year of fliip

or

it,

all his

were confil'cared to the crown the ; hundred of Folkeftone afterwards pafled, in the fame fucceffion of ownerfhip as the manors of Folkeftone eftates

and 1 irlingham did, as may be further feen hereafter, under the delcription of them, to the prefent lord and owner of it, the right hon. Jacob Pleydel Bouverie, earl of Radnor.

SWINGFIELD. WRITTEN

in antient

deeds both Swynefe/de eaftward from

Sivhifelci, lies the next'adjoining parilh

Acriie.

This

SWINGFIELD,

This parish

lies

in a very

111 lonely

and unfre-

quented country, moft of it is upon high ground. The church Rands in the north-eaR part of it, having a fmall village near it. On the eaRern fide of the minnis is Foxhole^ late belonging to Mr. James Hammond, of Dover j and Smerlole, formerly belonging to a family of the fame name, afterwards to the Simmons’s, then to Mr. George Rigden, of Wingham, who fold it a few years ago to the Rev. Edward Timewell Brydges, of

At

weR end

Wotton,

the prefent

owner of

it.

of the minnis is the hamlet of SelRed, the principal farm in which belongs to Mr. Brydges, of Denton. There are feveral coppice woods in this pariRi, the largeR of which are at the north and fouthern extremities of it ; the former of w'hicli It is called Swingfield park, confiRing of 185 acres. formerly belonged to the Strangford family, afterwards to the famous Algernon Sidney, who mortgaged it to one of the family of RuRiout, who purchaled and then fold their intereR in it to Edw. Brydges, efq. and it now belongs to hiseldcR fon,theRev. Mr. Bridges, of Wotton. The foil is much better than moR on thefe hills, efpecially adjoining to St. John’s, where it is lefs covered with flints, and the fields are more leIn the weRern part of vel, larger, and more open. this parifli is the large common, called Swingfieldminnis, which lies, the greateR part, within it, and the remainder in Acrife and Eleham. It is about two miles and an half long, and not quite half a mile wide, confiRing of about 550 acres of land. The property of this minnis w'as always fuppofed to belong to the crown, accordingly after the death of Charles I. when the royal lands were furveyed, in order to their being fold for the public ufe, it was returned, that this minnis contained 540 acres, of the annual improved rent of two hundred and fixteen pounds, which they finding to lie in common, imagined it to belong to the crown j but Colonel Dixwell, owner of the

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED,

j22

claimed it as the hiirony iind hundred or Folkeflone, that the feedparamount, as lying vvitnin it, alledging, enjo)’ed by the ining and commonage thereupon was with all habitants of the parilhes before- mentioned, who had luch other perfons bordering thereto ; and (mall acany lands adjoining, on paying to him forae knowledgment tor the lame, as lord paramount, which ftir he laid had been enjoyed by him and his ancellors

and the earl of Radnor, now lord paramount, and owner of the barony and hundicdof

many

generations

j

Folkeftone, claims as luch a like right to it. In 1745 there was a large alfembly of the noblemen, gentry, and commonalty of the calfern parts of

county, to the number ot four tliouland, who met here accoutred with arms and ammunition, to oppofe any invafion which might be made on thele coalls, of which there was then great appirhenfion in this this

county.

His PARISH was part of thofc lands which made np the barony of Averenches, or Folkellone as it was afterwards called. Ihe manors of Folkejlone and Tirling^ bam claim ‘paramount over it, fuborJinate to which are THE MANORS OF NoRTH, alias Hall-court, and Boynton, alias Bonnington, which were the tivo moieties ot which the manor cf Swingfield once confiifed ; the former of which appears by antient records to have been held by a himily of the name of Swynefeld, and the latter by that of Bonnington ; both being held by the performance of ward to the callle of Dover. John de Criol, younger Ton of Bertram, died poffelted of the manor of Boyton anno 48 Henry 11 f. whofe defeendant Nicholas Criol, in the j;d year of king Richard II. gave it to John Fineaux, efq. in '1

gratitude for his having faved his

at the battle

of and he feems to have been poffelfed of both Boynton and North-court ; but whether the latter came to him by the above gift, or by defeent, 1 am not life

I'oiifliers,

certain,

SWINGFIELD.

12j

both continued in his defeendants till John Fineux, efq. cf Herne, the grandfon of Sir John Fineux, chief jufticeof the king’s bench, who was born here and afterwards refidecl at Herne,* leaving an only daughter and heir Elizabeth. She en-titled her hufband Sir John Smythe, of VVeftenhanger, to the pofleffion of them, whole grandfon Philip, vifeount Strangford, conveyed them to truftecs for the payment of his debts ; and they, at the latter end of king Charles II. ’s reign, alienated them to William Gomeldon,efq.of Sellindge, whofe fon Richard, anno lo queen Anne, obtained an acl for the lale of the manors of Northcourt and Bointon, for the difcharging of his incumbrances, and immediately afterwards paired them away by fale to Sir Henry Furnefe, bart. of W'alderlhare, whole grand-daughter Catherine, countefs of Guildford, at her death in 1767, deviled them by will to her hufband Francis, earl of Guildford, whofe grandfon the right hon. George Augufcertain, only that they

tus,

earl

of Guildford,

is

the prefent poirefTor of

them. St. John’s, as it is now ufually called, was formerly a preceptofjy appertaining to the order of the knights of St. John of Jerulalem, to whom it belonged A preceptory was a manin king Henry II. ’s reign. fion, of which fort they had leveral indifferent places, in which fome of their brethren were placed, to take care of their lands and eflates in the neighbourhood of them. Tliis preceptory appears to have had feveral benefadions of lands made to it. This preceptory, with the lands belonging to it, cpntinued as fuch knights, till the general diffolution of this order of year of king Henry VIII. when they were in the

3V

fuppreHed by an act then Ipecially paffed for that purpole, and all their lands and revenues given to the Rot. Efch. anno 17 and 18 Henry VIII. His the Pi'erogative-ofFice, Canterbury. anno > is in *

I

557

will,

proved

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED. preceptory being then valued at 8 71. 3s. 3ld. But clear, and ml. 12s. 8d. total annual revenue. crown j for it did not remain long in the hands of the the king, in his 33d yeaiv granted it to Sir Anthony Aucher, of Otterden, by the defcription of the late monaftefy of Swynheld, and the re6lory of the fame,

king

;

this

to hold in capiie by knight’s fervice, and he, anno 5 Edw'ard VI. palled it away to Sir Henry Palmer, of Wingham, whole fon of the fame name was created a

baronet, and in his defeendants

it

continued

down

to

Palmer, bart. who died in 1723, and by will bequeathed it to his natural fon Herbert Palmer, efq. who died likewife /. p. in 1760, and by his will de^ vifed it firft to truftees for the payment of his debts, and lallly to his filler Mrs. Frances Palmer, in tail. Thefe truftees refilling to accept the truft, the court Sir

Thomas

among

others to be fold for that purpole, for the term of ninety-nine years,

of chancery decreed,

this eftate

to commence from his death ; which it accordingly was, in i777> to the Rev. Dr. Thomas Hey, of Wickhambreux, who likewife became entitled to the fee of it by tlie will of Mrs. Frances Palmer abovementioned, who having fuffered a recovery of it, and barred the entails, had deviled it to him at her death in 1770. He fold it in 1 792 to Samuel Egerton Bridges, dq. of Denton, the prefent pofleftbr of it. There is much remaining of this antient building of the preceptory, now made ufe of as the farm-houfe of the eftate, particularly the eaft end, which is lofty and handibme, in which are three narrow lancet windows with pointed arches, and three circular ones above them. This remains in its original ftate, and feems to have been part of the chapel, which no doubt adjoined to the manfjon of it. Richard de Swinfield^ S. T. P. a native of this parilh, was bifiiop of Hereford. He died anno 1316, and was buried in his own cathedral. He filled all the dignities

I

;

!

I

,

{

INGFTELD,

dignities of his

12^ church with Kentlih men, of which

two were likewife of the name of this parilh. SwiNGFiELD is W'ithin the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of tlie diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Dover.

The

church, w'hich is dedicated to St. Peter, confifls ot one ifle and one chancel, having a fquare tower, with a beacon turret at the weft end, in which is one bell. In the chancel are feveral memorials for the Pilchers, tenants of St. John’s. In the ifle are memorials for the Simmons’s, of Smerfall arms, Parted ; per feft and paUy three trefoils Jlipt. One of them, John Simmons, gent. obt. 1677, was great-grandfather of James Simmons, efq. alderman of Canterbury ; memorials’ for the Pilchers ; againft the north wall is a monument for Mary, widow of Richard Pilcher, gent, of Barham, obt. 1775 arms, Pilcher, argent y on a fefs dancette, gules, a Jleur de Us, between three torteauxes. In the fouth weft window is this legend, Ora p aiabs Willi Smerfolle Margarete uxoiis paia Saiindir Goldfiynch ; above were formerly fue thefc arms, A crofs impaling 0;/ a bend, cotized, a mullet between fix martlets. Weever fays, p. 274, there was an antient faire monument, whereon the portraiture of an armed knight, crolfe legged, was to be feen, and only Hie facet remaining of the infeription, and that there was this legend in a window Orate p aia Willi Tonge Johannis filii ejus qui hanc fenejlram fieri fecerimt j he died in 1478, and was buried here. And there was formerly in the windows, a figure of a knight of St. John’s, habited in his furcoat of arms, a plain crofs, and having his fword and fpurs, and kneeling on a cufhion, in a praying pofture, and in one of the windows were thefe arms, §>uarterly, firfh and fourth. Azure, a fquare cafile, fable ; fecond and third. Or, on a chevron, vert, three hazvks heads erafed, argent ; on a chief, gules, a crofs, argent j but there is nothing of thefe remaining now. ;

&

y

:

&

The

j26

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

'

The

was early appropriated John, which continued in the

redlory of this church

to the hofpital of St. difibiution pofiefiions of all the profits of it, till the VIII. of the hofpital in the 32d year of king Henry After which it w^as granted, with the preceptory here, Henr)' Palto Sir Anthony Aucher, who fold it to Sir mer, in whofe delcendants it continued down to Sir

Palmer, bart. after whofe death in 1725 it patfed, in manner as before-mentioned, to the Rev. Dr. Thomas Hey, of Wickham, who fold it, with St.

Thomas

John’s, and the redory as before-mentioned, to Mr. Biydges, of Denton, the prefent owner of it. This church is now a perpetual curacy, of the yearly certified value of twenty pounds, which ftipend is paid by the owner of the redory, who has the nomination of the curate. In 1640 here were communicants one hundred and twenty-feven.

CHURCH OF SPriNGFrELD, PATRONS, O* iv ivhom prefented. Sir T. Palmer, hart

$ir Hemy Palmer, knight and bart.

Sir

Thomas Palmer, hart.

PERPETUAL CURATES. Henry Hunt, obt. 1618.*^ William Lunn, A. M. admitted 1675, religned^ William Hunt, A. M. admitted June 1698, refigned 1707.'' Thomas Rymer, D. D. admitted April 1708, obt. March 23, 1761.’

John Cvfnan,

efq.

John Hardy Franklyn, A. M. admitted April 761,0b. I 782.*^ j

Rev, Thomas Hey

J'ldlliam Stvanne,

adm. 1782.*

Philip Pa/tillon, admitted 1785,

the prelent curate.'" f Wills, Prerog. oft. Cant.

Afterwards leftor of Denton, b And vicar of Eleham. 1 He was redtyr both of Acrife and

ft

VVitterlham.

It Likewife reAor of VVickhambreaux and of Eaftchnrch. 1 And rector of Acrife. Likewife rcAur of Ejlhorne, and _ vicar of Kcimingion.

LID DON

LIDDON.

127

LIDDON IS the next parifh eaftward, being fpclt In antient records Leddene. Part of it Jies in the hundred of Bewtboroiigh and lath of St. Auguftine, and the relt of it, in which is the church and village, in the bundled ot Folkeftone and lath of Shipway.

.

I

The PARISH

an unpicafant dreary country, having the look of poverty throughout it, the foil of it is in general very chalky, and equally poor. The village is fituated in the valley, on each tide of the high road leading from Canterbury to Dover, a little

,

I

I

I

lies in

j

way beyond

the 67th mile-ftone from I^ondon, having the church and court-lodge arafmall diftance on the north fide of it. The hills rife very high and bold on every fide, and toward the north are open and uninclofed. It extends tow'ards the north but a little

I

i

way j

;

but towards the fouth

it

reaches

more than a

mile from the village beyond Swanton houfe, a large antient ftone building, towards Swingfield and AJk-

I

ham. In this part there are fcveral woods, moll of which belonged to lord P>olingbroke, and were fold by him to the Rev. Edwaid Timewell Brydges, of Worton, the prefent pofleffor of them. There is no fair held here.

The lordship

I

'

of the barony

of Folhejlone claims paramount over that part of this parilh which is in that hundred, fubordinate to which is the manor OF Liddon, the court-lodge of which is fituated near the church. It belonged formerly to tlie abbey

of Weil Langdon,and on the diirolution of it came to the crown, whence it was granted, anno 29 kin«Henry Vlll. to the archbilhop, together with the reclory of the church to which it was appurtenant, in the delcription of whidi hcre.aftcr a more particular

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

tiS

given ot it. It fti 11 remains part cular account will be the arohbiniop. ^ the poireffions of hi. grace

of

of Cocklescombe, which lies in was antiently held ot the hundred of Bewfborough, knight’s fervice, being part of the catlle of Dover by the barony of Mammot, thofe lands which made up owners, called the baafterwards, from its fucceeding Kdward I. Ralph de rony of Saye. In the reign c")! was fucceeded Ceftreton appears to have held it, and Bodon j foon after which it was it by Stephen de

The manor

in

part of the polfelTions of the hofpital of the

become

kniglus of St.

continued

John of Jerulaiem, and

in their poffeffion

year of king

tion in the

till

this

manor

their general dilTola-

Henry VIII. when

it

was

fupprefled by an ad then ipecrally palled for the purpole, and their lands and revenues were given by it to the king, who in the next year fold it to Edward

Walderlhare, who, anno 2 and 3 Edward VI. procured his lands to be difgavelled, and died anno 6 Edward VI. whole defcendant Sir William Monins, of Walderlhare, was created a baronet

Monins,

in 1611.

efq. of

His fon

Sir

manor

Edward Monins,

bart. died pof-

1663, leaving Elizabeth his widow, furviving, who held it in jointure at her death in 1703; upon which it devolved to the heirs and truftees of Sulan, his eldelt daughter and coheir, late wife of the hon. Peregrine Bertie, and they, in the reign of William and Mary, joined in the fale of it to Sir Henry Furnefe, bart. of Walderlhare, whole grandfon Sir Henry Furnefe, bart. dying in 1735 under age and unmarried, this manor, among his other feffed of this

eftates,

in

became vefted

in his three fifters,

and coheirs

of their father, in equal fliares in coparcenary

;

after

which, anno 9 George II. on a writ of partition, this manor was allotted, among others, to Anne the elded daughter, wife of John, vifcount St. John, whofe fon Frederick, became-vifcount Bolingbroke, and his fon George, vifcount Bolingbroke, fold it to Mr. Baldock,

:

LIDDON.

129 to Mr. Pe-

of Canterbury, who In 1791 again fold it ter Harnett, the occupier, who is the prefent polA court baron Is held for this manor. feflbr of it. SwANTON Isa manor in the fouth- weft part of this parifli, within the hundred of Folkeftone, and adjoining to Swingfield, in which part of it lies. At the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, this manor, or at leaft the principal part of it, was in the poflelhon of the bilhop of Baieux, under the general title of whofe lands it is thus entered in it Ralph de Ciirbefpins holds of the hijhop S vane tone. The arable land is It was taxed at tzvo fuling^. In demefne there is one carucate, and tzvo borderers with half a carucate. Of this land Robert de Barbes holds one JuVng^ and has there three villeins with half a carucate, and one Hugo holds one fnling, and has there one carucate in de-

mefne and one borderer.

In the time of king

Edward the

was worth ten pounds, zvhen he received it thirty fJoilling^, now forty Jhillings, and yet it pays four pounds. Cohen held it of king Edward. That part of it mentioned above to have belonged ConfeJJbr

it

to one

Hugo, feems

Hugo

de Montfort

to have been in the pofteffion of ;

his poffeffions in the

entry

for

under the general

fame record

I

of find the following title

:

half a fuling The fame Hugo de Montfort has Norman Suanetone. The arable land is one carucate. held it of king Edward, and it was taxed at as much.

Ihre is There are four villeins having one Carucate. wood for the pannage of five hogs. In the time of king Edzvardthe Confefjbr it zvas zvorth twenty-five /hillings, and afterwards fifteen (hillings, nozv thirty /hillings. This manor afterwards came into the polfefiion of owners who took their name from it ; for William de Swanetone held it by knight’s fervice in the reign of king Henry III. by a female heir of which family it went in marriage to fmtteridgc, whofe daughter and

VOL, vni.

K

heir

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

1^0

John Greenford, entitled him to tins manor, on whole death anno ii Edward IV. Alice, one of his daughters and coheirs, carried it in marriage to Robert Monins, of Walderlbare, whofe (on John Monins refided at Swanton. The arms of Swan-

heir marrying

ton were. Argent^ a fefs^ gules^ betiveen three chejsrooks, fable j of Liitteridge, Argent, a bend betzveen fix martlets, fable ; and of Greenford, Gules, a chevron ermine, between three fquirrels, feiant, or.

John Motwo fons

Swanton above-mentioned, left from Edward, the eldeft, defcended Sir William Monins, created a baronet ; and from John, the youngeft, lieutenant of Dover caftle, defcended John Monins, efq. now of Canterbury. In the defendants of John Monins, this manor continued down to Sir Edward Monins, bart. of Walderfliare, who died poflefled of it in 1663. Since which it has palled, in like manner nins, of

with his other eftates here, as has been already mentioned before, in the defeription of the manor of Cocklefcombe, to George, lord vifeount Bolingbroke,

who

to Mefli-s. Nutt and Walker, and they, in again conveyed it to Samuel Egerton Brydges, 1792, elq. of Denton, the prefent owner of it. Swanton manor, with that of Perryn, in this parifli, the lituation of which is now unknown, are held of the manor of Folkeftone by knight’s fervice. fold

it

^he ma/ler and fellows of Emanuel college are poffelTed of lands in this pariQi and Ew'ell, which w^ere given by Walter Richards in i627> towards the maintenance of tw’o exhibitions, to be chofen out of the lizeis and lublizers of that college, and the produce of them is now applied to that purpofe.

CHARITIES.

Thomas Fisher, fll.

fa

of St. James’s, Dover, ^

by will in irq^. to be paid yearly at

(lays,

then the clnirdiwaidens fliould diftrain for I 2 S Ad the ^ cioney to t e oilir.bnted at their dilcretion to the poor!' 1 lepoorcouftaatly relieved are about nine, calually the fame.

Liddon

'Liddon

13? LIDDON. within the ecclesiastical juris"

is

DICTION oixht

diocefe

of Canterbury,

deanry o^

Dover. dedicated to St. Mary, confifts of only one ifle and one chancel, having a fquare tower at the weft end, in which is one bell. The church is unceiled, except one half of the chancel.

The church, which

is

In the fouth wall is an arch, ornamented, with a hollow underneath, moft probably for a tomb once at the bafe of it. There is nothing further worth mention in

it.

William de Aubervil’e, fenior, on his foundation of the priory of Weft Langdon, in 1192, gave to it this church of St. Mary of Ledene, in pure and perpetual alms, which was confirmed by Simon de Albrincis," and by Sir Simon de Cryoll, great-grand Ton After which, archbilhop Walter of the former. granted licence for the canons of the priory to ferve in it themfelves, which prevented a vicarage being endowed in it j and the prior and canons thenceforward appropriated the whole profits of this church to themIn which ftate it continued till the difiblution felves. of the priory, which happened anno 27 Henry VIII. when it was fupprefled, as not having annual revenues

of the amount of the clear value of two hundred pounds, and was given, with all its lands and poffeffions, to the king, who in his 29th year, granted it, among other pofteffions of the priory, in exchange to the archbilhop. In which ftate it continues at this time, his grace the archbilhop being now entitled to the reeftory of this church, with the manor of Liddon appurtenant to it. in the deed of exchange above-mentioned, anno 29 Henry VI II. of the grant of the feite of the abovementioned priory, and its pofiefiionsjto the archbifhop, they are made fubje
Sec Diigd.

Mon.

K

2

p. 622, 623,

to

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

1^2

by which it (hould feem that the cute of it was then elteemed a curacy. However, in the valuation in the king’s books it is mentioned as a vicarage, of the yearly value of 61 6s. 2d.

to the curate of Licidon

;

.

now

a difeharged living, of the yearly certified value of thirty-two pounds. In 1588 it was valued It

is

communicants fifty- two. In 1640 here were the fame number of communicants. Archbifhop Juxon, anno 15 Charles II. augmented this vicarage eighteen pounds per annum, to be paid by the leffee of the parfonage and archbi/liop Tenifon, by will in 1714, left to the augmentation of it two hundred pounds, to which was added two hundred pounds more by the governors of queen Anne’s at only ten pounds,

;

bounty.

CHURCH OF LID DON. PATRONS, O?' by

ViCARS.

"whom Frefented,

Th< Aichbi/hop.

Edward Parke^ A. B. ob. Robert Pownall,

1

63 7,*

Sept. 9, 1637. William Rujfell. in 1662.P John Harman Swinhell, March 8,

1669, obt. 1673,

Andrew Pearne, A. B. Dec. 23, 1672, obt. 1675.

Thomas Griffin^ clerk, Auguft 6, 1675, obt. 1704. Arthur Tucker^ A. B. June 13, Since which this vicarage has been

hdd in sequestration, Edward Hobbes, t 762.

Alexander James, in 1 762, Thomas Freeman. M. A. 1775.' • LikewJfe vicar of River, »5 were his two fucceflbrs.

Ewell, and afterwards of

9

Minor canon of Canterbury

; rcAor Martin, and Vicar of St. Paul’s, Canterbury : alfo the prefent fequef-

of

St.

traior of River.

ALKHAM

ALKHAMa

133

A L K H A

M

LIES This

the next parifii fouth-eaftward from Liddon. parish is lituated about three miles weflward

from Dover, and about two milesfrom the high London road on the right hand. It lies very much unknown and unfrequented, among the hills, which are in this part of Kent very high and bold, confifting raoflly of open and uninclofed grounds, which, as well as the deep vales between them, arc without trees or hedge-rows, clumps of coppice woods being interfperfed at diftances here and there on them, the whole affording a moft wild and romantic fcene ^ but thefe deep vales and high mountains are much pleafanter to view at a diftance, than to travel over, the roads being intolerably bad. 7 ’he village of Alkham, with the church in it, is fituated on almall knoll in

the bottom of the valley, nearly

middle of the of fpreading elms growing throughout the village, which make a pleafing contrail to the open expofed country round it. At about half a mile’s diflance is the fmall hamlet, called, from its fituation. South Alkham, which was once accounted a manor, having had owners which took About half a mile northward their name from it. from the village is Woolverton and further on, Chilton, both which belonged for many years totheWollet’s, of Eaftry ; the latter was in 1683 the property of Simon Yorke, of Dover, merchant, who died that year, and was the father of the lord chancellor Hardwick ; and of an elder fon, Plenry, to whom he gave Chilton, and it now belongs to his defcendant Philip parifh.

There

are

in the

numbers

;

K

3

York,

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

Ij4

of Denbighlliire. Ac the fouth weft boundary of the pariih is Evering,with a fmall ftreet of the fame name ; and at the fouth-eaft is the hamlet of Drelingore, where the fpring of the Nailbotirn rifes,

York,

cfq,

which occaflonally flows northward as far as that head of the river Dour which rifes in this parifh, at Chilton, about a mile and an half from it, and runs thence till it meets the other branch of that river, a little below Caftney court, in River. The foil throughout the parifh is in general chalk, and the lands exceedingly poor and barren.

The lordship

of the barony of Folkeflone claims paramount over this parifh, as being within the hundred of Folkeflone, fubordinate to which is the ma-

nor OF Alkham,

alias

Malmaines Alkham,

which was part of thole lands which made up the barony of Averenches, of which it was held as one knight’s fee, as of the caftle of Dover, by the performance of ward to it, by the family of Malmaines, whofe principal feat was at Walderlhare; the laft of which name, who was pofleffed of it about the reign of king Edward II. was Lora, widow of John de Malmains \ flie afterwards remarried Roger de Tilmanftone, who held this manor in her right. After which it palled into a family who took their name from their relidence in this parifli ; one of whom, John Alkham, defeended from Peter de Alkham, who poflefled lands here as early as the reign of king Henry III, was poflefled of it in the beginning of king Henry I V.’s'reign, in the 4.th year of which he was charged tor it towards the lubfidy for the marriage of Blanch, the king’s daughter; from which payment of land in this county were afterwards called by the name of Blanch lands. In this family of Alkham the manor of Malmains continued till the beginning of king Henry VII.’s reign, when Peter fev'eral parcels

Alkham

pafled

it

away

to

John Warren,

gent,

from which

ALKHAM. which name

it

W'as alienated,

about the

latter

135 end of

the next reign of king Henry VIII. to Sir Matthew Browne, of Beechworth-caftle, whole defcendant, of the fame name, fold it, at the very latter end of queen Elizabeth’s reign, to Lulliington, who conveyed it to Broome, and in the 22d year of James I. Robert

Broome, S. T. B. of Ringwold, alienated it to John Browne, of Alkham, whole defcendant in 1656 palled it away to Alban Spencer, efq. of Walmer callle, and his defcendant of the fame name left three daughters his coheirs

;

Sarah, married to Richard Halford, gent,

of Canterbury ; Sufannah, to Mr. Robert Buck, of Covent-garden, mercer and Mary, to the Rev. Robert Gunlley Ayerft, clerk, and they jointly lucceeded to this eftate. Mr. Halford died polTelledof his third ;

part in 1766, and left fold his third part of

it

to his only fon Richard, to

it,

who

Mr. Smith, of Alkham, Mr. Buck died f. p. and

the prefent polfelibr of it. by will devifed his third part to his niece Jane Ayerft, daughter of the Rev. Robert G. Ayerft, by Mary his wife above-mentioned, who is now entitled to it; and Ayerft, in right of his wife, is the prefent pofleflbr of the remaining third part of it. court baron is held for this manor, which is held of

the Rev.

Mr.

A

the manor of Folkeftone, by knight’s fervice, and ought to have inclofed fifteen perches of Folkeftone park. It pays a rent to the ward of Dover caftle. There is an eftate in thisparifh, probably once part

of the above-mentioned manor, and ftill called Mai' mains farniy which was for many years, and till lately, the property of the Graydon’s, of Fordwich.

Halmede,

alias

Hall-court,

is

another fmall

which in fome antient records is mentioned as having been originally the feite of the laftdeferibed manor of Malmaines ; the name of Hal *

manor

here,

a corruption for that of Halihad the lame owners from the ear-

mede being feemingly fnote

;

certainly

it

K

4

lielt

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

1^5

the reign of queen Elizabeth, when it was in the polieOion of Sir Matthew Browne, of Beech worth “Cafl-le, whopflifed it away by fale to Dapofletled niel Wollet, fome of which name was tlien

liefl t;nies till

the neighbouring parilh of Eleham. His fon Ingram Wollet alienated it to John Browne, of i'Mkham, whole fon, of the fame name, about the year

of lands

in

Alban Spencer, elq. Since which it has palled, in like manner as the manor of Alkham, alias Malmaines before-mentioned, to Mr. Smith, Jane Aycrft, and the Rev. RobeiT G. Ayerft, i6:;6,

conveyed

it

to

W'ho are the prelcnt owners of

it,

in

undivided third

parts.

Ho PTONS

which was antiently held of the barony of Folkeftone, by knight’s fervice, and ward to Dover caRle j and by the Book of Aid anno 20 Edward III. it appears that the abbot of St. Radignnd’s, and Peter dc Hall, and their coparceners, held this manor in manner as above-mentioned, How it paffed from them, I have not found ; but it afterwards came into the pofleffion of the Bakers, of Coldham; the lafl of whom, John Baker, was gentleman porter of Calais, under king Henry V. and VI. and died J. p, in the lyth year of the latter reign, 'leaving five daughters his coheirs, one of whom, Joane,^ carried it in marriage to Robert Brandred, whofe fon Robert, about the latter end of Henry VI. palfed it away to Sir Thomas Browne, of Beechworthcattle, treafurer of the king’s houlhold, whole greatgrandfon of the fame name had his lands dtfgavelled by the ads of the ift and 8th years of queen Elizabeth. His fon, Sir Matthew Browne, at the very latter end of queen Elizabeth’s reign, alienated it to Thomas Godman, of London ; from which name it v^'as fold, in the 3d year of king Charles 1. to John is

a

manor

Rot. Efch. anno iS

in this parilh,

Henry VI. See more of him

hereafter,

nnckr Capell.

El red.

^

alkham.

137

Elred, cfq. one of whofe defcendants, in the 34th year of king Charles II. pafled it away to John Michel,

and from him, anno 5 queen Anne, to Jacob Defbouverie, efq. who, the ,next year, conveyed it to Henry Barton, gent, of Folkellone, and he died potfetfedofit in 1730, leaving two daughters, Frances, married to John Jordan, and Catherine ; the former of whom conveyed their intereft in it to the latter, who marrying the Rev. Thomas Barton, he became efq.

entitled to

it ,

he bore for his arms, Azure^ three bars

His three fons, Thomas, Flenry, and John, and daughter Catherine, joined in levying a fine of it, and afterwards, in 1767, in the fale of it to Peter Fe(5tor, efq. of Dover, who is the prefent pofleflor of A court baron is held for this manor. it. I find mention of a family of the name of Hopton, who were of this parifh, of whom Walter de Hopton was awitnel's to king Edward I V.’s charter to the five Michael Hopton was a benefactor ports, anno 1477. to the church of Alkham, and William Hopton was ermine.

the pope’s notary in this parifli. Evering, now ufually c.alled Everden^

is a manor part of this parilh, weftern which was likewife in the Averenches, barony of or of the Folkeftone, held by knight’s fervice, and ward to Dover caftle ; of the fa-

mily of Averenches, or Avereng, as their name was pronounced in French, antient lords of that barony, this manor was held by that of Evering, who are faid to have been branched out from them. Certainly, as was frequently the cuftom, they ufed the fame coat of arms, perhaps as that of their fuperior lord,ofwhoni they held the fee, but with a difference, to dillinguilh it ; the Averenches bearing Or, five chevrons, gules ; whereas the Everings bore the chevrons azure. From their poffeffion of this manor, it affumed their name. *

See an account of this cuftom of bearing the arms of the fu-

perior lord, vol. V. of this hiftory, p. 297.

Wolvardus

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

138

Wolvardus de Evering held it in king Henry II. *s reign ; and from him it delcended down to John dc 20th year of Edward III. At in like manner, of the above-mentioned barony. length, after this manor had continued, in an uninterrupted feries of defcent, till the reign of James II. Evering,

who

held

John Evering,

it

in the

gent, in 1688, alienated

Timewell, gent, of Chatham, and he,

it

in

to

Benjamin

1698, palTed

away to Elizabeth, widow of Peter Peters, M. D. whofe only furvivingdaugliter and heir Elizabeth marrying Thomas Barrett, elq. of Lee, whofe fecond wife fhe was, entitled him to it. He died poffefled of it in 1757, leaving by her an only daughter Elizabeth, it

to whom it delcended, (he afterwards carried it in marriage to the Rev. W.Dejovas Byrche, of Canterbury, whofe Ible daughter and heir Elizabeth marrying Samuel Egerton Brydges, efq. of Denton, he is, lincc their deceafe, become by fettlement the prelent owner

of

it.

A

court baron is held for this manor, w'hich was bound formerly to inclofe forty-fix perches and an half of Folkeftone park.

Halton

and

Woolverton

two fmali manors in this parifh, the former of which was antiently held of the prior and convent of Chrift-church, by a family of the fame name, one of whom, William dc are

Halton, held it, at the ferme of nine pounds, in the reign of king Stephen ; after whofe death his widow Iden claimed it, as holding it to her and her heirs as an hereditary fee, but flie afterwards renounced all her right and title to it. How long the prior and convent retained their intereft in this manor, I have not found; but the fee of it afterwards came into the poffeffion of the family of Poynings, one of whom, Robert de Poynings, appears by the efcheat-rolls to have died potrefied of both thele manors anno 25 king Henry VI. and his grandfon Sir Edward Poynings, lord warden of the cinque ports, and K. G. in king

Henry

ALKHAM. Henry VIII. *s

reign, gave

his natural-daughter, to

them

139 in

dower with Mary

Thomas

Fynes, lord Clinton and Saye,* whole fon Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, in the beginning of the reign of Philip and Mary,

conveyed them to Mr. Henry Herdfon it

has continued in the like

the

which fucceflion of ownerlhip as ;

fince

manor and barony of Folkelfone, down

to

the

Jacob Pleydell Bouverie, earl of Radnor, who is the prelent owner of them. There arc courts baron held for both thefe manors. In the regifter of St. Radigund’s abbey, there arc many entries of lands in this parilh, given by different perlons to that abbey. Among the names of thefe benefaftors, are thofe of de Alkam, de Suthalkam, de Northalkam, Malmaines, Tilmanftone, de Burne, de Lenham, and de Hugham. There are no charitable benefaBions. There is a right hon.

charity fchool kept in the church, for teaching of read-

ing, arithmetic,

lieved are

and writing.

The poor conftantly

about twenty, cafually

Alkham

re-

ten,

within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of is

Dover.

The church, which is Martyr,

is

a

dedicated to St. Anthony

handfome building,

tlie

confifting of three

two chancels, having a tower fteeple, with a low pointed turret on it, in which hang three bells. The north ifle is Unit out by boarding from the reft of the church, and made no ufe of at prefent, to which iflesand

now kept

in the chancel might be removed, of communication with that part kind and have no of the church appropriated for divine fervice, which

the fchool

would prevent

that

unfeemly and indecent

refort

which

In the chancel are feveral memorials for the Slaters, leflees of the parfonage ;

it

is

at prefent fubjedt to.

* Sec more of the Poynings’s under Weftenhanger, and of the Fynes’s, lords Clinton, under Folkcllone,

and

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

140

and on the fouth

fide, againft

the wall,

is

an antient

tomb ofBetherlden marble. The church of Alkham, with the chapel of Mauregge, or Capell as it is now called, belonging to it,

Hamon

de Crevequer to the abbot and convent of St. Radigund, together w'ith the advovvIon of it, to hold in free, pure, and perpetual alms. It was appropriated to that abbey about the 43d year of king Henry Til. anno 1258, and was afterwards,, anno 8 Richard If. valued among the temporalities of the abbey at fourteen pounds. In which ftate this church and advowfon remained till the diflblution of the abbey, which happened in the 27th year of king Henry VI II. when it was fupprefled by theadl of that year, as being under the clear yearly value of twohundred pounds, and their lands and pofieffions given to the king, who granted the fcite of it, with the whole of its poflefiions, that year, to archbifliop Cranmer, in exchange for other lands, who in the fame year exchanged them back again with the king, being enabled lo to do by an aft then fpecially patfed for that purpofe ; but in the deed of exchange, among other exceptions, was that of all churches and advowfons of vicarages; by virtue of which, the appropriation of the church of Alkham, together with the advowfon of the vicarage, remained part of the pofleflions of the fee of Canterbury, as they do at this time, his grace the archbifhop of Canterbury being now entitled to them. The vicarage of Alkham, with the chapel of Feme, alias Capell, annexed to it, is valued in the king’s books at eleven pounds, and the yearly tenths at il.2s. per annum." It is now of the clear yearly certified value of 53I. 9s. 6d. In 1588 here were communi-

was given by



A

terrier

of the parfonage and vicarage, anno 1634,

Regift. -Laud, pars ima. fol. 207,

is

in

MSS, Lambeth. cants

i

,

ALKHAM. ctints

The

eighty

vicar of

;

in

it is

i^i

1640 it was valued at fixty pounds. induced into the vicarage of Alk-

ham, with the chapel of Capell le Feme, alias St. Mary le Merge, annexed to it. There are three acres of glebe land belonging to the vicarage.

The

great tithes of Evering ward, in this parilb

and

Swingfield ward,_part of the parfonageof Alkham, are held of the archbilhop for three lives, at the yearly rent ol il. 6s. 8d. and the parfonage for twenty-one years, at the yearly rent

of twelve pounds.

CHURCH

"

ALKHAM.

P ATRO NS, Or byvihom prefmed.

VICA RS, IVilliam Hull, A.

1596, relic ned Jolm Grave, S. T. 1600, refigned Francis R ogers S 1607, refigned ,

.

M. Dec. 6, 1600. March 14,

B.

1607.

T

. P u ne 2 7, . J 1627."'

A B Sept. 2 ^ 1627, living 1643. William Ru[[ell^ clerk, Feb. 16, 1675, obt. 1694. Jeremiah Allen, A. M. May 21, S
.

.

1694.

John 1 y

Dfiuling,

2

A.

M.

obt.

^

Aiehard Monins,A.

M.

Dec. 31,

1727, refigned 1747. Richard Smith, A. Al. Dec. 23, 1747, obt. May 1772.^ Janies Smith, July 1, 1 772, obt.

Feb. Son of Dr. Rogers, dean of Canterbury ; fufifragan bifhop of Dover. * Likewife reftor of Ringwould, as

was his fucceflbr, who died in 1750, and was buried in the chancel of this church. f See Blog. Brit. vol. vi. p. 3715. Alfo rcdloEof Butmarih.

8. 1784.-'

* He held this vicarage with the rrcSory of liallbridge and the fequeftration of Ewell, and in 1780 he waspreftnted to the vicarage of Cofmus-

Blcan, which, by the favour of archbilhop Cornwallis, he held with all the former.

PATRONS.

;

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

142

PATRONS,

VICARS.

Oj’f.

John Goftlingy A.

M.

Cgned 1 786/ Al James Smith, A.

I

784,

M.

17^^*

the prelcnt vicar.

* Likewife rcftor of Brooke, and this vicarage on being pre-

sefigned

lenicd to that of

Holy

LIES

Weft-

Crofs,

C

gate, and therefloryof St. Peter’s, In Canterbury, united,

A

P

.

E

L

L

the next parifli fouth-eaftward

from Alk-

ham, but within the hundred of Folkeftone, taking its

name from

eapellay

Capell

having ever been efteemed a chapel, to the church of Alkham. It is likewife called

le

its

FernCy and Capell by Folkejloney to diftin-

from another Tunbridge. guifh

it

Capell

lies

upon

parifli

of the fame name, near

the hills between

Dover and

Folkeftone, but the fituation of it is much lefs fubje
the center of it, near which the fields are of a more even furface than is ufual in this part of the county, and the lands are much more fertile, and of a higher

faw the Ihocks of wheat, whilft in the field, all covered in bad weather with bafs matting, to fecure them from the wet which, I am informed, is a ulual cuftom in this neighbourhood, though not much approved of by the moft intelligent farmers in it. At a fmall diftance fouthweft from the church is an eftate, called Capell-JoU farm, from a large pond clofe to it, belonging to Hughes Minet, elq. and now inhabited by Captain Ridley, of Dover. I'here is no village in it, the houfes being dilperfed fingly throughout it. The high road from Folkeftone to Dover goes over the high chalk rent.

In this parilh

I firft

cliffs,

CAPELL. cliffs,

14a

along the fouthern part of this

pariffi,

where

the lands are open uninclofed downs, and are bounded by the above-mentioned cliffs on the fea fliore. This part of the parilh is part of the poffeffions of the archbifliop of Canterbury, and within the liberty of the^ town of Folkeflone. There is no fair held in the parifli.

The manor

of Capell,

called Jikewife the maMerge, was antiently part of the poffeffions of Nigell de JVIuneviJle, whofe defeendant

nor of St.

Mary

le

William de Muneville leaving an only daughter and heir, ffie carried

it in marriage to W'illiam de Albrinor Averenches, whofe Ton, of the lams name, leaving likewife an only daughter and heir

cis,

Matilda, de Creveejuer to it. He whom Elene, married to Bertram de Crioll, on the partition of their inheri-

Hamo

fhe entitled her hufband left four daughters, of

tance, entitled herhufband to this manor, and he died polfeffed of it in the 23d year of Edward I. leaving two Tons John and Bertram, who both died f. p. and a daughter Joane, who upon the death of the latter became his heir, and carried this manor, among the reft of her inheritance, in marriage to Sir Richard

de

Rokeffc, vvhole eldeft daughter and coheir Agnes entitled her hufband Thomas de Poynings to the pofieffion of it ; in whofe defeendants it continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, of Weftenhanger,^’ governor of Dover caftle and lord warden, W'ho in the 12th year of king Henry the Vlll.th’s reign gave it in marriage with Mary, one of his natural daughters, to Thomas Pynes, lord Clinton and Saye, to w'hom this manor was confirmed in the 30th year of it. His fon Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, in the reign of

Mary, paffed after

and ^

which

it

queen

away by

fale to

continued

in like

it

his other eftates in this

Mr. Henry PJerdfon ; manner as Folkeftone,

neighbourhood,

till

the

See more offfie family of Poynings under Weftenhanger.

death

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

144

about the death of Sir Bafill Dixwell, bart. of Brome, foon after which latter end of king Charles II.’s reign; or the Oliver Wright and others, under the direftion to William court of chancery, in 1691, conveyed it

Young, who

down

pulled

the antient manfion of this

At his who death he devifed it to his fon Nicholas Young, upon which it came to his fifter Elidied unmarried by zabeth, who had married firft Henry Hughes, efq. whom fhe had a daughter, married to the Rev. John manor, and

built the prefent court-lodge

of

it.

;

Miner, ofEythorne and zdly, Wm. Veal, efq. ot Dover ; and on her death, by the entail of her fathers will, it came to her fon by herfetond hufband, Young Veal, who by recovery in 1744, barred the future remainders. After his death it was fold in i753» under a decree of chancery, to William Miner, efq. of Lon;

who

i7^7» vifed this manor, with Church and Capell-fole farms, and other lands belonging to it, to his nephew Hughes Minet, efq. of London, who is now the owner of don,

them."

Dover

died poflelfed of

This manor

is

it

in

fubjedt to a caftle-guard rent to

caftle.

Caldham, now

ufually called Coldham,

cold and expofed fituation,

is

a

manor

from

its

in the fouth-eaft

which appears by records to have been antiently the patrimony of owmers of the fame name, who bore for their arms, Gules^ a fefs, ermine., but before the reign of betvjeen three martlets, argent king Richard II. they had paffed it away to Baker, a family of good account in this fiart of the county, having a peculiar chancel belonging to them in Folkcftone church, who refided at it; and in this name it continued down to John Baker, of Caldham, who was gentleman porter of Calais in the reigns of Henry-V. and VI. and bore for his arms, Argent, on a fefs, nehu~ part of this

parlfli,

;

a tower, triple-towered, of the

lee, fable, ^ T

firjl,

between

See more of the Minets under Evthorne, ^

three

CAPELL. three keys of the fecond

j

perhaps

145 in allufion to his of-

He

died without male ifiue in the 17th year of the latter reign, holding this manor in capilCy and leaving five daughters his coheirs ; and upon the divifion fice.

of their inheritance, Robert Brandred, in right of Joan his wife, the fourth daughter, became entitled to it and their fon Robert, about the latter end of king Henry VI. paffed it away to Sir Thomas Browne, of Beechworth caftle, whofe defeendant, Sir Anthony Browne, in the 33d year of king Henry VIII. exchanged it for other premifes with that prince, who in his 36th year, granted it to William Wilsford, and others, citizens of London, to hold in capite and they, in the 37th year of it, alienated it to John Tufton, efq. of Hothfield, whole grandfon Sir Nicholas Tufton, knight and baronet, w'as by king Charles I. created Baron of Tufton and Earl of Thanet, in whole delcen;

;

dants

it

has continued

down

to the right hon. Sackville,

Thanet, the prefent owner of it. SoTMERE is a manor, in the eaflern part of this parilh, which feems to have been once part of the pofleifions of the neighbouring abbey of St. Radigund, and after the diflblution of it in the 27th year of Henry VIII. to have been granted by the king, among the reft of the pofleffions of it, in his 29th year, to the archbiftiop Cranmer, who the year afterwards exchanged the feite of St. Radigund’s, with almoft all the reft of the After which, this eftates of it, again with the king. manor being granted from the crown, palTed at length into the family of Gibbs, originally of Devonfhire, who fettled firft at Combe, in Hawking, and went from

carl of

thence to Elmeftone. Several of them lie buried in this church, and there is now in the chancel, a graveftone, with the figures of a

man and woman

in brafs,

with an infeription for John Gybbes and Mary his wyff, anno 1526. There is one Ihicldbf arms remaining, of four coats,

firft

and fourth,

fccond and third, tzvo

VOL. VIII.

rofes

L

in

tzvo majcles in fefs

like fefs.

From

;

this

name.

14^

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED. name, after fome intermediate owners, it was fold to Spencer, in which name it Teems to have been about the time of thereftoration of king Charles II. at length Alban Spencer, gent, who refided here, leaving three

daughters his coheirs, Sarah, married to Mr. Richard Halford ; Sufannah, to Mr. R. Buck ; and Mary, to

Mr. Robert Gunfley Ayerff, clerk, they jointly fucceeded to this manor. Mr. Richard Halford died poffeffed of his third part in 1766, and left it to his only fon Richard, who fold it to Mr. Robert Finnis, of Dover, the prefent polfcffor of it. Mr. Robert Buck, on his death without ilTue, devifed his third part to his niece Jane Ayerft ; and her father, the Rev. Mr. Ayerft, in right of his wife, is the prefent owner of the remaining third part

of it.

There has not been any court held for this manor for a great number of years paff, though there were antient perfbns within thele few years who

remember

its

having been held.

^he

archbijhop^

of^ Canterbury is entitled to lands in this parifh, and within the liberty of the town of Folkeftone, lying adjoining to the lands of

Sotmere, and between them and the fea fhore, called Abbot alias Clif-e lands, as having once belonged to the abbey of St. Radigund’s, which have been for many years held in leafe by the owners of Sotmere manor.

There

are

no

parochial charities.

ftantly relieved are

Capell .

DICTION Dover.

The of one

The poor

conabout eighteen, cafually fixteen.

within the ecclesiastical jurisof the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of is

church, which

is

dedicated to

St.

Mary,

confifts

and one chancel, having a low fquare tower at the weft end. This church was always efteemed as a chapel to the church of Alkham, and was given with it, by the name e c apel of Mauregge, by Hamo de Crevequer, ifle

to

CAfELL.

1'47

the abbot and convent of St. Radigimd, together, with the advowfon, to hold in free, pure and perpetual to

of the monafteries

king

alms.

After the

Henry

the Vlllth.’s reign, this chapel, with the church

diflTolution

in

of Alkham, pafled together, in manner as has been already related under that paridi, in exchange to the archbifliop ol Canterbury and his fucceflbrs, in which ftate it remains at this time, his grace the archbifhop being the prefent patron of the vicarage of Alkham, with the chapel of Capell le Feme, alias St. Mary le Merge, belonging to it. It is not valued feparately in the king’s books, being included in the valuation of the vicarage of Alkham. The great tithes of Sotmere and Capell wards, in this parilb, (formerly part of the pohefTions of St. Radigund’s), are held by leafe for three lives, of the archbilhop.

The

lelfee

of the parfonage of Folkeftone claims,

as fuch, a certain portion of the

great tithes of this

parilb.

%

H A

W

K

I

NORTH-weftward from Hawking,

now

written

in

is

a parish but

Gv

Capell

lies

the parilb of

antient records Havekyng^

ufually called in the

It

N

neighbourhood of

little

and

Hackinge,

it

known, having hardly any

through it. The greateft part is not unpleafantly fituated on high ground. The village, with the church, traffic

Hands

at the fouth-cafi: part.

In

it

there

is

a

handfome

new-built houfe, belonging to Mr. Kelfey, who rcfides To in it; and a little diftance from it the parfonage. the northward is Hawkinge-mill green, from a windmill on it, near which there is a fmall hamlet of houfes. It is upwards of a mile and a half in length, and about

one mile

in

breadth from eaft to weft.

La

The

foil

of

it,

in

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

J48

in the fouth eaft parts,

uninclofed, hilly

chalk, and the lands open,

is

downs

more even ground, and

;

but towards the north

the

foil

it

is

either a ftiff clay, or a

mixed with flints. There are large woods part of it, which extend into Swingfield and

reddifh earth in this

At

Alkhara.

Combe

the fouth-weft boundary of the parifii

farm, part of the houfe of which

is

is

within this

parifli.

There of

on

a fair held here

Od.

10, for the hiring fervants in the neighbourhood, whence it is called by is

the people, a fiatiite fair^ as

fuch held for that purpofe are, throughout this county.

The manor by which

latter

of

all

Hawking,

name

it is

alias

Fleggs-court,

ufually called,

was antiently

held of the barony of Folkeftone, or Averenches, by knight’s fervice, and ward to Dover caftle, by a family

who took

their

furname from

it ;

one of whom, Of-

Hawking, held it in manner as above-mentioned, in king Henry II.’s reign, of William de Albrincis. After they were extind here, it came into the bcrt de

pofleflion of the Fleghs, in

which

it

continued

till

the

Edward I. in die 23d year of which, William, fon of Johnde Flegh, gave all his manor in the hundred of Folkeftone, in Haueking and Evering, reign of king

together with the church of Haueking, to the abbot and convent of St. Radigund at which time the manfion of this manor had acquired its prefent name of Fleghs-court In which fituation this manor continued till the diflblution of the abbey in the 27th year of king .

Henry VIII. when

it came into the king’s hands, who, tvyo years afterwards, granted the feite of the abbey,,

with

pofleflions, in

exchange, to the archbifhop Cranmer : and he, that year, authorifed by an ad, reexchanged it again with the king. Notwithftanding which, this manor, but whether by any particular ext ception in the laft exchange, or by fome future grant, I all its

Regift. Sci Radig. cart.

764 to 780,

have

HAWKING.

149 have not found, became again foon afterwards part of the pofTefTions of the fee of Canterbury, where it ftill continues, his grace the archbifhop being to the inheritance of

the prcfent lelTee of

Bilcherst was

it,

Mr,

Kclfcy,

now

entitled

of this parilh,

is

it.

manor

northern part of this parifh, near Swingfield-minnis, which formerly belonged to the knights hofpitallcrs of St. John of Jerufalem. At the diffolution of the hofpital, in the gad of king Henry VIII, this manor came into the king’s hands, who in his 33d year granted it in leafe to Sir Anthony Aucher, and he fold it to Thomas Smerfole, a

in the

who

parted with his intereft in it to Mr. Richard Simonds, and he owned it at his death in 1 641, in whofe

continued for fome time ; but who have owned it fince, or where to point out its identical fituation, I have nor, with the molt diligent enquiries, been defeendants

it

able to find out.

Combe,

antiently written Cumbe,

is

a manor, fituated

though part of This manor was anit is within that of Folkeftone. Averenches, or Folketiently held of the barony of ftone, by knight’s fervice, and ward to Dover caftle, by a family of the fame name ; after which it became part of the poffefiions of the abbey of St. Radigund, at Bradfole, in the regifter of which there is mention made of feveral of the name of Cumbe, who were afterwards poflefled of lands in and near it during the reign of king Edward I. In which ftatc it remained till the difat the fouth-eaft

bounds of this

parifh,

folution of the abbey, in the 27th year of

when

it

came

into the king’s hands,

Henry VIII.

whence

it

was

granted in exchange, with the feite and the reft of the pofteftions of the abbey, two years afterwards, to the archbilhop Cranmer, who, that fame year exchanged it again with the king, when it was granted to Sir Tho-

of Eflex, on whofe attaint, it came again into the hands of the crown, where it feems to have ftaid till the reign of queen Mary, and to have been L

mas Cromwell,

earl

3

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

150

been granted, with other adjoining eftates, to Edward Fynes, lord Clinton and Saye, who conveyed it by fale to Mr. Henry Herdlbn fince which it has continued, in like manner as Folkeftone, and his other eftates in this neighbourhood, down to the right hon. Jacob Pleydell Bouverie, earl of Radnor, who is the prefent owner of it. ;

There parifh.

are

charitable donations belonging to this

The poor

cafually not

conftantly

relieved are about

fix,

more than one or two. is within the ecclesiastical juris-

Hawking diction of Dover.

the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of

1 he church, which

dedicated to St. Michael, ftands on the edge or knoll of a fleep hill, open and expofed to the fouth-weft for a great Ipace of country. is

long narrow building, confifting of one ifle, unand a chancel. It is but meanly built of flints, having a low wooden pointed turret, on the roof at the weft end, in which there is one bell. In the chancel is a monument for John Herdfon, efq. of Folkeftone, It is a

ceiled,

obt.

1622

j

monument,

to

whom

ftill

his

nephew and

remaining,

in

ereded a Folkeftone church, in heir

which parifti he lived. And there is a tomb for Stephen Hobday, the reft of the infeription obliterated. The church of Hawking was antiently appendant to the manor, and was given with it, as has been mentioned before, by William de Flegh, to the abbot and convent of St. Radigund, and in the regifter of that abbey, there is an entry that anno 1 200, &c. when Lewis reigned in England, this church of Havekyng was fpoiled by William de Averlinges, once baron of Folkcfton, who ftripped it in Inch a manner as to deprive it of all his tenants, with their tithes and oblations, &c. and he made them by force and compulfiongive their oblations four times in a year, in his hall, before they Ihould go to the priory of Fockerftone; after which he, with his armed followers, plundered the bodies of the dead. This

church

HAWKING.

15I

and was church (laid with the abbey till its diflbUitlon, part ot whofe then granted with it, to the archbifhop, pofleirions

remains, his grace the archbifliop

ftill

it

being the prefent patron of it. This church ftill continues a reftory, being valued ^

king’s books at 7I. 7s. lod. It is now a dif-^ charged living, of the clear yearly certified value of in the

58 8 here were fifty-four communiIn 1640, cants, and it was valued at thirty pounds. it was valued the fame number of communicants, and his will in at fixty pounds. Archbiftiop Xenilon, by this redtory 200I. to 1714, left to the augmentation of of which was added 200I. more by the governors In

thirty pounds.

1

queen Anne’s bounty.

CHURCH OF HAWKING. PATRONS, Or

by

rectors.

whom prefented. Henry Amie, A. B. July 4 > I 599 » obt. 1612. Alexander Udnie, A. M. Feb. 26, 1612, Peter Bonny, clerk, Feb. 27,

The Archbifhop

1666, obt. 1676. John Barham, A. B.

1

I

November

1676 The Crown, hac

John De Bray, A. M. 1690, obt. 1696.

vice.

0 £t.

20,

Robert Daniel, A. M. June 22, 1696, obt, 1713.'

The Archbifhop.

John Sachet te, A. M. Jan. 6, 1713, obt. Jan, 1754.^ Uniliam hanghotne, A. M. Feb. 26, 1754, obt. Feb. 1772.* John Tims, May 2, 1 772, the prefent reftor. and was vicar of Folkeftone, and maf»

deferted this reAory, which till his •was put under fequeftration e

He

ter of Eaftbridge hofpital.

w'as likewife vicar of ftonc, as was his fuccclTot.

%

death. f

He

had been vicar of WeftHythe,

t-

4

He

Folke-

FOLKESTONE.

ISZ

FOLKESTONE HUNPRED.

FOLKESTONE. TPIE

parlfh of Folkeftone, which gives name to this hundred, was antiently bounded towards the fouth by the lea, but now by the town and liberty of Folkeftone, which has long fince been made a corporation^

and exempt from the jurifdiaion of the hundred. The diftrifl of which liberty is a long narrow flip of land, having the town within it, and extending the whole length of the parilh, between the fea Ihore and that pan of the parifli ftill within the jurifdicftion of the hundred, and county magiftrates, which is by far the greateft part of it. The PARISH, which is about three miles acrols each way, is fituatcd exceedingly pleafantand healthy. The high chalk, or down hills uninclofed, and well covered with pafture, crofs the northern part of it, and form a fine romantic fcene. Northward of thefe, this part of the parifli is from its high fituation, called the uphill of olkeftone in this part is Tirlingham, the antient manfion of which has been fome years fince pulled down, and a modern farm-houfe erefted in its ftead near it is Hearn forftal, on which is a good houfe, late belonging to Mr. Nicholas Rolfe, " but now of Ricnard Marfh ; over this forftal the high road leads from Folkeftone to Canterbury. j



m

parilh

The

IS

in the

centre

and fertile vale called Folktftone vale, which has downs, meadows, brooks marlhes, arabk land, and every thing in fmall parcels* which IS found in much larger regions; perfed with houfes and cottages, and well watered bv which, at Ford forftalf ab^n about a mile northward from the town, there rifeV^a rong chalybeat fpring. This part of the parifli bv ftr the greateft part of it, as far'^s the hjr beautiful

SS S

ftor^i

Dover,

FOLKESTONE.

1

53

Dover, through it, towards Hythe, is within the juriidioUon of the hundred of Folkeftone, and thejullices of the county. The fmall part on the oppofite, or foLithern fide of that road is within the liberty of the town or corporation of Folkeftone, where the quarry or fand hills, on the broken fide of one of which, the town is fituated, are its fouthern maritime boundaries. Thefe hills begin clofe under the chalk or down hills, in the eaftern part of this parifh, clofe to the fea at Eaftware bay, and extend weftward along the fea fhorc almoft as far as Sandgate caftle, where they ftretch inland towards the north, leaving a fmall fpace between them and the fhore. So that this parifh there crolTing one of them, extends below it, a fmall fpace in the bot-

tom

as far as that caftle, thefe quarry, or land hills,

keeping on their courfe north-weft, form the northern boundary of Romney Marfh, and then the fouthern boundary of the Weald, both which they overlook, extending pretty nearly in a parallel line with the chalk or down hills. The profped over this delightful vale of Folkeftone from the hill, on the road from Dover as you defeend to the town, is very beautiful indeed for the paftures and various fertility of the vale in the centre, beyond it the church and town of Hythe, Romney Marfh, and the high promontory of Beachy head, boldly ftretching

On

the right the chain of lofty down hills, covered with verdure,and cattle feeding on them; on the left the town of Folkeftone, on the knole of a hill, clofe to the fea, with its fcattered environs, at this

into the fea.

beyond it the azure fea unbounded to the fight, except by the above-mentioned promontory, altogether formas pleafing a prof-

diftance a pleafing object, and

ped as any in this county. Folkestone was a place of note

time of the Romans, and afterwards in that of the Saxons, as will be more particularly noticed hereafter, under the defeription of the town itfelf. By what name it was called in the

by

:

TOWN AND PARISH by the Romans,

OF

by the Saxons it was the record of Domefday, FuU

uncerraln

is

j

written Folceflane, and in fon of king cheflan. In the year 927 king Athelftane, Edward the elder, and grandfon of king Alfred, gave

mentioned in the grant of it, on the Tea fhore, where there had been a monaftery, or abbey of holy virgins, in which St. Eanfwith was buto the ried, which had been deftroyed by the Danes, Folkjiane^ fituated, as

is

church of Canterbury, with the privilege of holding it L. S. A.*' But it feems afterwards to have been taken from it, for king Knute, in 1038, is recorded to have reftored to that church, the parifh of Folkftaney which had been given to it as above-mentioned ; but upon fhould never be alienated by the archbifhop, without the licence both of the king and the monks. Whether they joined in the alienation of uncertain ; it, or it was taken from them by force, is condition, that

it

but the church of Canterbury was not in polTefTion of this place at the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, in 1080, being the 14th year of the Conqueror’s reign, at which time it w^as part of the poflelTions of the bifliop of Baieux, the conqueror’s half-brother, under the general defeription of whofe lands it is thus entered in

it

In Limozvart

lejl^

in Fulchejian

hundred, William de

Atris holds Fulchejian. In the time of king Edivard the Confejfor, it %vas taxed at forty julings, and now at ^he arable land is one hundred and twenty thirty-nine,

In demefne there are tzvo hundred and nine •villeins, and four times twenty, and three borderers. Among all they have forty-five carucates. There are five carucates.

has fifty five Jhil^ There are three Jervants, and fevenmills of nine lings pounds and twelve fhillings. There are one hundred acres churches,

from zvhich

Dugd. Mon. L. S. A. vol. vii.

vol.

i.

the archbifhop

p. 20, See the

meaning of the

letters

p. 321.

ef

FOLKESTONE.

1^5 Eaid

cf meadozv. Wood for the pannage of forty hogs. Godwin held this manor. Of this manor, Hugo,fon of William, holds nine fulings

cf the land of the ’villeins, and there he has in demejne four cariicates and an half, and thirty-eight villeins, with Jeventeen borderers, who have fixteen carucates. There are three churches, and one mill and an half, of fixteen floillings

and five-pence, and one

Wood for

faltpit of thirty pence.

the pannage of fix hogs.

It is zvorth

twenty

pounds.

Walter de Appeuile holds of this manor three yokes and twelve acres of land, and there he has one carucate It is in demejne, and three villeins, zvilh one borderer. worth thirty fl.nllings. Alured holds one fuling and forty acres of land, and there he has in demejne two carucates, zvith fix borderers, and twelve acres of meadow. It is zvorth four pounds. Walter, Jon of Engelbert, holds half a filling and forty acres, and there he has in demejne one carucate, with feven borderers, and five acres of meadow. It is zvorth thirty (hillings.

Wefman

holds one filling,

and

there he has in demefne

with feven borderers having one carucate and an half. It is worth four pounds. Alured Dapifer holds one fuling and one yoke and fix

one carucate,

and

izvo

villeins,

acres of land, and there he has in demefne one carucate, It is zvorth fifty fhillinp. zvith eleven borderers.

holds half a fuling, and there he has in demejne one carucate, zvith four borderers, and three acres of mea-

Eudo

dow. It is worth twenty JhilUngs. Bernard de St. Ozven, four fulings, and there he has in demefne three carucates, and fix villeins, zvith eleven There arefour fervants, and two mills of tzventy-four (hillings, and twenty acres of meadow. Wood for the pannage of tzvo hogs. Of one denne, and of the land which is given from In the theje Julings to ferm, there goes out three pounds. borderers, having tzvo carucates.

whole

it is

worth nine pounds. Baldric

TOWN and parish OF

156

Baldric holds half a fuUng,

and there he has one caru^

and tzvo villeins^ zvith fix borderers having one carucate, and one mill of thirty pence* It is zvorth thirty catCi

Jbillings.

Richard holds fifty-eight acres of landy and there he has one cariicate^ with five borderers. It is worth ten Jhillings,

All Fulchefian, in the time of king fejfor^ zvas

Edzvard the Conworth one hundred and ten pounds^ when he

received it forty pounds^

now what he

has in demefne

is

worth one hundred pounds ; what the knights hold abovementioned together, is worth forty-five pounds and ten /hillings. It plainly

appears that

this entry in

Domefday does

not only relate to the lands within this parirti, but to thofe in the adjoining parifhes within the hundred, the

whole of which, moft probably, were held of the bifliop of Baieux, but to which of them each part refers in particular,

time impoflible to point out. About four years after the taking of the above furvey, the bifliop was difgraced, and all his pofiTeirions confifcated to the crown. After which, Nigell de Muneville, a defcendant of William de Arcis, mentioned before in Domefday, appears to have become poffefled is

at this

of the lordfhip of Folkeftone, and as fuch in 1095, being the 9th year of king William Rufus, removed the priory of Folkeftone from the bail of the caftle to the place where it afterwards continued. His fon William dying in his life-time Matilda his foie daugh/ p, ter and heir was given in marriage with the whole of her inheritance, by king Henry I. to Ruallanus de Albrincis, or Averenches, whofe defcendant Sir William de Albrincis, was become poflelTed of this lordftiip at the latter end of that reign ; and in the 3d year of the next reign of king Stephen, he confirmed the gifts of his anceftors above-mentioned to the priory heS. He appears to have been one of thofe knights, who had each a portion of lands, which they held for the defence

FOLKESTONE. fence of Dover

I57

being bound by the tenure of provide a certain number of foldicrs, who Ihould continually perform watch and ward within it, according to their particular allotment of time ; but fuch portions of thefe lands as were not adually in their caftle,

thofe lands to

own

were granted out by them to others, to hold by knight’s fervice, and they were to be ready for the like fervice at command, upon any neceffity whatever, and they were bound likewife, each knight to defend a certain tower in the caftle ; that defended by Sir William de Albrincis being called from him, Averenches tower, and afterwards Clinton tower, from the future owners of thofe lands.' Among thofe lands held by Sir William de Albrincis for this purpofe was Folkellonc, and he held them of the king in capite by barony. Thefe lands together made up the barony of Jverenches, or Folkejioney as it was afterwards called, from this place being made the chief of the barony y caput baronitty as it was filled in Latin; thus the manor OF Folkestone, frequently called in after times an HONOR,“ and the manfion of it the caflle, from its becoming the chief feat or refidence of the lords paramount of this barony, continued to be fo held by his defeendants, whole names were in Latin records frequently fpeic Albrincis, but in French Avereng and Averenches, and in after times in Englifh ones. Evepofleffion

in them it continued till Matilda, daughter and ; of William de Albrincis, carried it in marriage to Hamo de Crevequer, who, in the 20th year of that reign, had poffeflion given him of her inheritance. He died in the 47th year of that reign, pofTeffed of the manor of Folkeftone, held in capitey and by rent for the liberty of the hundred,and ward of Dover callle. Robert

ring heir

hisgrandfon, dying/.

/>.

his four fillers

became

his heirs,

Feod Mil Caftr Dovor in Curia Wardorum, Cotton Libr. Vefp. A. 5, fol. 68, N. 22. “ Sec a further account of land honors, vol, vii. p, 27Q. '

and

TOWN AND PARISH OF

1^8

and upon the divifion of their inheritance, and partition wife of this barony, John de Sandwich, in right of his Agnes, the eldeft fiftcr, became entitled to this manor and lordlhip of Folkeftone, being the chief feat of the of barony, a preference given to her by law, by feafon her elderfliip; and from this he has been by fome called Baron of Folkeftone, as has his fon Sir John de Sandan only daughter and heir Julian, w'ho carried this manor in marriage to Sir Johnde Segrave, w'ho bore for his arms, Sable, three g^rbsy arwich,

who

left

died in the 17th year of Edward III. who, as well as his fon, of the fame name, received fiimmons to parliament, though whether as barons of Folkeftone, Sir as they are both by fome called, I know not. John de Segrave, the fon, died poflefted of this manor Edward III. foon after which it appears to anno

gent.

He

23

have pafled into the family of Clinton, for William de Clinton, earl of Huntingdon, who bore for his arms, Argent, cnifulee, jitchee, fable, upon a chief, azure, two millets, or, pierced gules ; which coat differed from that

of his elder brother’s only in the croflets, which were not borne by any other of this family till long afterwards,* died pofiefted of it in the 28th year of that reign, at which time the manfion of this manor bore the name of the caftle. He died f.p. leaving his nephew Sir John de Clinton, fon of John de Clinton, of IVlaxtoke, in Warwickfliire, his heir, who was afterwards fummoned to parliament anno 42 Edward III. and was a man of great bravery and wifdom, and much employed in ftate affairs. He died poflefted of this manor, with the view of frank-pledge, a moiety of the hundred of Folkeftone, and the manor of Walton, which, though now firft: mentioned, appears to have had the fame owners as the manor of Folkeftone, from the earlicft account of it. He married Idonea, eldeft '

Diigdale’s

Warw,

p. 727. See

more of him

vol. iv. of this

hiftory, p. 500,

daughter

FOLKESTONE. daughter of Jeffry, lord Say, and at length the eldeft coheir of that family, and was fucceeded in thefe manors by his grandfon William, lord Clinton, who, anno 6 Henry IV. had poffeflion granted of his lhare of the lands of William de Say, as coheir to him in right of his grandmother Idonea, upon which he bore ?he title of lord Clinton and Sayc, which latter however he afterwards relinquifhed, though he ftill bore for his arms, Cltyrton ciud Sciyc^ '^^th tzvo ^vcyhoHfids for his fupporters.

After which the manor of Folkeftone, otherwife called Folkeftone Clinton, and Walton, continued to be held in capite

by

by knight’s fervice,

defcendants lords Clinton, till Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, which title he then bore, together with Elizabeth his wife, in the 30th year of Henry Vlll. his

conveyed thefe manors, with other premifes in this Thomas Cromwell lord Cromwell, afterwards created earl of Elfex, on whofe attainder two

parifh, to

years afterwards they reverted again to the crown, at which time the lordfhip of Folkeftone was ftiled an

whence they were granted in the fourth year of Edward VI. to the former pofTdTor of them, Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold in capite^ for the merihonor

;

had performed. In which year, title of lord Clinton and Saye, he was declared lord high admiral, and of the privy council, befides other favours conferred on him j and among other lands, he had a grant of thefe manors, as abovementioned, which he next year, anno 5 Edward VI. reconveyed back to the crown, in exchange for other premifes.™ He was afterwards inftalled knight of the garter, by the title of Earl of Lincoln and Baron of Clinton and Saye and in the laft year of that reign, conftable of the tower of London. I’hough in the ift year of queen Mary he loft all his great offices for a torious

fervices he

then bearing the

;

“ Augmentatii n-office deeds Kent, box G. 3+. ,

of

inrolment

and exchange ^ ’

fmall

TOWN AND PARISH

l6o

OF

fmall time, yet he had in recompence of his integrity and former fervices, a grant from her that year, of fevcral manors and eftates in this parifh, as well as elfe-

where, and among others, of thefe manors of Folkelloneand Walton, together with the caftle and park of Folkeftone, to hold in capite all which he, the next year, palTed away by fale to Mr. Henry Herdfon, citizen and alderman of London, who left feveral fons, of whom Thomas fucceeded him in this eftate, in whofe time the antient park of Folkeftone feems to have been ;

His fon Mr. Francis Herdfon alienated his intereft in thefe manors and premifes to his uncle Mr. John Herdfon, who refided at the manor of Tyrlingham, in this parifb, and dying in 1622, was buried in the chancel of Hawking church, where his monument remains ; and there is another fumptuous one befides credled for him in the fouth ifle of Folkeftone church.

difparked.

They

bore for their arms. Argent ^ a crojs fable between fourfieurs de lisy gules. He died /. p. and by will devifed thefe manors, with his other eftates in this parifti and neighbourhood, to his nephew Bafill, fecond fon of his fifter Abigail, by Charles Dixwell, efq. Bafill Dixwell, efq. afterwards refided at Tyrlingham, a part of the eftate deviled to him by his uncle, where, in the 3d year of king Charles I. he kept his Ihrievalty, with great honor and hofpitality

^

;

after

1

|

which he was knighted,

1627, anno 3 Charles I. created a baronet; but having rebuilt the manfion of Brome, in Barham, he removed thither before his death. On his deceafe unmarried, the title of baronet became extinft ; but he devifed thefe manors, with the reft of his eftates, to his nephew Mark Dixwell, fon of his elder brother William Dixwell, of Coton, in Warwickfhire, who afterwards refided at Brome. He married Elizabeth, fifter and heir of William Read, efq. of Folkeftone, by whom he had Bafill Dixwell, efq. of Brome, who in 1660, anno 12 Charles II. was created a baronet. His fon Sir Bafill Dixwell, bart. of Brome, about the

and

'

in

year

,

FOLKESTONE.

l

6l

year 1697, alienated thcfe manors, with the park-houfc and grounds, and other eftates in this parifli and neigh-

bourhood, to Jacob Delbouverie, elq. of London. He was defcended from Laurence de Bouverie, de la Bouverie, or Des Bouveries, of an antient and honorable extradtion in Flanders," who renouncing the tenets of the Romifli religion came into England in the year 1567, anno 10 Elizabeth, and feems to have fettled firft at Canterbury. He was a younger fon of Le Sieur dcs Bouveries, of the chateau de Bouverici near Lifle, in Flanders, where the eldeft branch of this family did not long fince poflefs a confiderable eftatCj a bend, vaire. Edward, bearing for their arms,

was an eminent T urkey merchant, was knighted by king James II. and died at his feat at Chefhunt, in Hertford (hi re, in 1694. He had feven fons and four daughters; of the former, William, the and eldeft, was likewife an eminent Turkey merchant, was, anno 12 queen Anne, created a baronet, and died Jacob, the third fon, was purchafer ofthefe: in 1717. manors; andChriftopher,thefeventh fon,wasknighted^ and feated at Chart Sutton, in this county, under which and Anne, the a further account of him may be feen his eldeft fon,

fecond daughter, married Sir Philip Boteler, bart. Jacob Defbouverie afterwards refided at Tyrlingham, and dying unmarried in 1722, by his will devifed thefe manors, with his other eftates here, to his nephew SirEd^ ward Defbouverie, bart. the eldeft fon of Sir William Defbouverie, bart. his elder brother, who died pofp. on which his title, with feffed of them in 1736, f.

thefe and

all his other eftates,

came

to his next fur-

viving brother and heir Sir Jacob Defbouverie, bart* who anno 10 George II. procured an a£t to enable himfelf and his defeendants to ufe the name of Bouvecreated rie only, and was by patent, on June 29, 17 47 ? f



"

Collins’s Peerage, edition 4th, vol. vi. (4 <3).. See vol. V. of this hiftory, p. 134-

VOL, VIII.

M

baron

i

town and parish of

62

baron of Longford, in Wiltfhire, and vifcount Folkeftone, of Folkeftone. He was twice married ; firfl: to IVlary, daughter and foie heir ot Bartholomew Clarke, efq. of Hardingftone, in Nortbamptonfhire, by whom he had feveral fons and daughters, of whom William, the. eldeft fon, fucceeded him in titles andcftates; Edward is now of Delapre abbey, near Northamptonfhire Anne married George, a younger fon of the lord chancellor Talbot; Charlotte; Mary married Anthony, earl of Shaftefbury; and Harriot married Sir James Tilney Long, bart. of Wiltflnre. By Elizabeth his fecond wife, daughter of Robert, lord Romney, he had Philip, who has taken the name of Pufey, and ;

mother Elizabeth, dowager vifcountefs Folkeftone, who died in 1782, feveral manors and eftates in the weftern part of this county. He died poflefles, as heir to his

in 1761, and was buried in the family vault at Britford, near Salifbury, being fucceeded in title and eftates by his eldeft fon by his

wife, William, vifcount FolkeSept. 28, anno 5 king George III. created Earl of Radnor, and Baron Pleydell Bouverie,

ftone,

firft

who was on

of Colelhill, in Berkfliire. been three times married; ter and heir of Sir hill, in

Berkfhire.

He firft,

died In 1776, having to Harriot, only daugh-

Mark Stuart Pleydell, bart. ofCoiefBy her, who died in 1750, and was

buried at Britford, though there is an elegant monument erefted for her at Coleflfill, he had Jacob, his fucceflbr ih tides and eftates, born in 1750. He married fecondly, Rebecca,

daughter of John Allcyne, cfq. of Barbadoes, by whom he had four fons; William-Henryj who married Bridget, daughter of James, carl of Morton ; Bartholomew, who married MaryW^yndham, daughter of JamesEverard Arundell, third fon of Henry, lord Arundell, of Wardour and Ed; ward, who married firft Catherine Murray, eldeft daughter of John, earl of Dunmore; and fecondly, Arabella, daughter of admiral Sir Chaloner Ogle. His third wife was

Anne,

relidt

of Anthony Duncombe,

y

163

FOLKESTONE.

Jord Faverfliam, and daughter of Sir Thomas Hales, bart. of Bekefborne, by whom he had two daughters, who both died young. He was fucceeded in titles and Pleydell eftates by his eldeft fon, the right hon. Jacob

Bouverie, earl of Radnor, who is the prelent poflTeflbr of thefe manors of Folkeftone and Walton, with the park-houfe and difparked grounds adjacent to it, formerly the antient park of Folkeftone, the warren, and other manors and eftates in

this

parifii

and

neigh-^

bourhood. Courts baron are regularly held for the manors of Folkeftone, free and copyhold, for there is much land and many houfes held ot it by copy of court-roll, and the manor of Walton ; and a court-leet is held regularly for the hundred of Folkeftone. The earl of Radnor is lord-lieutenant and cuftos rotulorum, and colonel of the Bcrklhire militia, recorder of New Sarum, and F. R. S. He married in 1777 Anne, youngeft daughter and coheir of Anthony Duncombe, lord Faverlham, above mentioned, by whom he has four fons, William, vifeount Folkeftone, Duncombe, Laurence, and Frederick ; and three daughdied infants, and ters, Mary-Anne, and Harriet, who He bears for his armSj Parted per fejs^ or, Barbara. a»d argent an imperial eagle y fable thereon an efeuty

theoHy gideSy charged ivilh a

bendy vaire

\

the firft^be-

ing thofe of Bouverie by Englilb grant, and the efciitclieon the original arms ol Bouverie ; with which arms he quarters thofe of Pleydell, being Argent a bendy y

gulesyguitee de larmesy between tzvo Cornijh dazves, pro^ For his creft, On a pery a chief chequyy or, and fable.

wreathy a demi eagle difplayedy with tiv 6 headsy fablCy beaked and ducally gorged, or, and charged on the breaji •with

a

crofs-crojlety argent.

For

his

lupporters,

on

each fide, An eagle regardant, fable, gorged zvith a ducal coronet, or, and charged on the breajl with a crofscrojlet,

argent.

M

2

The

;

TOWN AND PARISH OF The manor ok Tirlingham, with AOkhanger,

164

the former of which

northern or uphill part of this parilh, was antiently of very eminent account. In the reign of the Conqueror it fcems, with its appendage of Ackhanger, fituated in the adjoining parilh of Cheriton, to have been lield by Nigell de Muneville, and to have paflTed from him in like manner as has been mentioned before, to the family of Albrincis, or Averenches, and to have made up together the barony of Averenches, or Folkeftone, as it was after-

wards

is

fituated in the

which barony the manor of Tirlingham, with Ackhanger, was a principal limb ; and as fuch it afterwards pafled, in like manner as above-deferibed, from V/illiam de Albrincis, and his defeendants, to the Crevequers, which family ending in king Henry III.’s reign in four daughters and coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldeft, married to John de Sandwich and Eleanor, to Bertram de Crioll, entitled their refpeftive hufbands, the former as being the eldeft, to the manors of Folkeftone and Walton, with a moiety of the hundred, and likewife to the caftle of Folkeftone, as the caput baronU, or chief feat of the barony, and the latter to thefe manors of Tirlingham and Ackhanger, the next principal part of it, with the other moiety of the hundred ; the other two fifters moft probably fharing other parts of the inheritance, which lay at a diftance elfewhere. Bertram de Crioll died pofiefled of thele manors, and the moiety of the hundred, in the 23d year of king Edward I. Joane, his daughter, on the death of her brothers f. p, became heir to their inheritance, which ftie carried in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokefle, who left two daughters called, of

his co« each of whom feem to have entitled their refpeftive hulbands to thefe manors, in undivided moiepes ; but at length the whole of them became vefted in Michael, fon of Thomas de Poynings, by

heirs

;P

Agnes

!

See a further account of them, vol.

ii.

his

of this hiftory, p. 151. *

wife.

;

FOLKESTONE. wife, theeldeft of

them.

He

died in the

165

43d year o^

king Edward III. poflefled of this manor, and a moiety of the hundred, held in capite^ and by the fervice of repairing and maintaining a moiety of a hall and chapel in Dover caftle, at his own expence, and of paying to the great and fmall wards of the caftle, and to the aid of the IherifF of Kent yearly, for the ferrae of the faid moiety of the hundred 5 and he held in like manner the manor of Newington Bertram, as parcel of the manor In his defcendants they continued of Tirlingham. down to Robert de Poynings, who died poflelTed of them anno 25 Henry VI. On which the inheritance of them devolved to Alice, daughter of Richard his died in his life-time, wife of Henry, lord Percy, afterwards on his father’s death earl of Northumberland j in whole defcendants they continued' cldeft fon,

who

Henry, earl of Northumberland, who died in the 29th year of king Henry VIII./. />. having the year before, by deed inrolled in the Augmentationoffice, granted all his cftates to the king, in cafe he died without male ifllie. Thefe manors thus coming into the hands of the crown, were granted thence foon afterwards to Thomas, lord Cromwell, earl of Elfcx on whofe attainder in the 3 2d of that reign they reverted again to the crown, whence they were afterwards granted to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, together with the manors of Folkcftone, Walton, Woolverton, and Halton, the hundred of Folkeftone, and feveral other manors and eftates in this and the adjoining paaway by fale to rilhes ; all which he next year pafted Mr. Henry Herdfon j fince which they have pafted, particularly menin manner as has been already more of the tioned, and are now together in the pofteftion earl of right honorable Jacob^ Pleydell Bouverie, Radnor. ^ ot Courts baron are regularly held for the manors Tirlingham and Ackhanger.

down

to

M

3

Bredmer,

TOWN AND PARISH

l66

OF

Broadmead^ is Another nia* nor, near the weftern bounds of this parifli, adjoining to Cheriton, in which it is partly fituated. It was molt probably, in early times, in the polTeffion of a family of its own name j for in the antient deeds and courtrolls of Valoign?, who were owners of Cheriton in king Edward II. and III.’s reign, there is frequent mention of feveral of this name, who lield lands of the Valoigns family ; but before the latter end of king Edward III.’s reign, it was come into the poITefiTion of William de Brockhull, ofSaltwood, whofe fecond fon Thomas Brockhull leaving an only daughter and heir Elizabeth, fhe carried it in marriage to Richard Selling, in whofe defeendants it remained till Henry V III.’s reign, when it was palTed away to Edmund Inmith, a retainer to Thomas, lord Clinton, and he gave it to

'

Bp.fdmer,

ufually called

Edmund

Inmith, who leaving two daughters and coheirs, one of whom married Rayner, and the other Baker, the latter of them, in right of his wife, fhared this manor as part of her inheritance, and in king James I.’s reign alienated it to Beane, in which, name it continued fome length of time, and till it was fold to VVorger, and thence again to Bayley, in which name it remained till Mrs. Elizabeth Bailey and others conveyed it to William Bouverie, carl of Radnor, whofe fon the right hon. Jacob, earl of Radnor, is the prefent owner of it. court baron is held for this his fecond

fon

A

manor.

Morehall

is

manor near Cheriton, which the barony of Folkcftone by

a fmall

was

antiently held of knight’s fervice, by William de Valentia, who in the 27th year of king Henry III. obtained a charter of

privileges for

Edward

I

I.’s

it.

reign

William de Detling held ;

felhon of a family

after vvhich

it

it

in

king

palled into the pof-

who took

their name from it. was exfmdt here, which was about king Henry IV.’s reign, the Bakers, of Caldham, became pollefled of it. At length John Baker, of Cald-

When

this family

ham,

FOLKESTONE.

167

ham, dying anno 17 Henry VI. Joane, one of his daughters and coheirs, entitled her hulband Robert Brandred to it ; and their fon Robert, about the latter end of that reign, pafled is away to Sir Tho. Browne, of Beechworth-caftle, whofe defcendant Sir Matthew Browne, at the very latter end of queen Elizabeth’s reign, alienated it to Thomas Godman, of London from which name it was fold, anno 3 Charles I. to John Eldred, efq. one of whofe defendants, anno 34 Charles II. palTcd it away to John Michel, efq. and from him, anno 5 queen Anne, it was alienated to Jacob Delbouverie, efq. in whofe family it has continued in the fame manner as the reft of his eftates in this parifli, to the right hon. Jacob, earl of Radnor, the prefent pofleflbr of it. A court baron is regularly held for this

manor.

Hope-house,

ufually called

Hope-farm,

is

an eftate

in the northern part of this parifli, near Combe, which antienlly belonged to the knightly family ofHougham.

Robert de Hougham died

poffefled of

it

in the 41ft

year of king Henry 111 . and his grandfon, of the fame name, died anno 29 Edward I. without male ilTue, leaving two daughters his coheirs, married to Shelving and Valoigns. Soon after which, that is, in king Edward II. ’s reign, it appears to have been in the poflef-

of the Clintons, and William de Clinton,^ earl of Huntingdon, died poflTcfled of it anno 28 king Edward 111./, p. on which it came to his nephew and heir Sir John de Clinton, fon of his elder brother John de Clinton, of Maxtoke, in Warwickflime, who was afterwards fummoned to parliament ; in whofe defcenfion

continued down to John, lord Clinton, who, about the beginning of king Henry VII. ’s reign fold it to Davis, from which family, partly by marriage of a female heir, and partly by purchafe, it palled into the of pofl'efiion of Leflington, and he, about the end dants

it

I PhilipQtt,

p. 159. See before, p. 136.

M

4

queen

TOWN AND PARISH OF j68 queen Elizabeth’s reign, alienated it to Hopday, in whofe defcendants it coniinued for fome time, till at length by a daughter and coheir of that name, it was carried in marriage to Mr. Richard Thomas, of Alkbam, whofe fon Mr. John Thomas, of that place, continues owner of it, Folkestone appears to have been known to the Romans, from feveral of their coins and bricks having been from time to time found in it j but what name it had then is uncertain. It had in it a ftrong caftle or fort, which was probably, fays Camden, one of thofe towers which the Romans under Theodofius the younger, as Gildas tells us, built upon the ibuth coaft of Britain, at certain

diftances,

to guard

it againfl; the Saxons, to whofe depredations, from its fituation on the fea fliore, it was much expofed ; and though its fituation was eminent, yet there does not appear by the Noiitia^ to hav'C been any fettled garriibn here.

This

Roman

or watch tower, was built more than a mile and an half diftant from the fea ihore, on a very high hill, to dik:over the approach of thofe pirates fort,

j

was furrounded with a Itrong entrenchment, to repel their invafions, the remains of which are very vifible at this day j and it is fuppofed, that this watch tower, with its furrounding fort, was fjtuated on the fummit of that high eminence called Cajile-hill, about a mile and an half northward from the prefent church of Folkeftone. By the remains of the entrenchments it appears, that the inner or upper part of the work was fmall, and of an oval fliape, and the outer works below of much the lame form j the whole containino" about two acres of ground. On the fouth-eaft fide^ where the hill is very fteep, it is encompafTed but with one fingle ditch, but on the eaft with a double one, and on the north and weft with a triple one. At the bottom of it there is a fine fpringof water. The whole furface of the hill is entirely covered with green fwerd, nor is there a ftone, or any appearance whatever of a

and

it

building

FOLKESTONE.

169

building having ever been eredled on it. After the departure of the Romans it was taken pofleflion of by

the Britons firft,and by the Saxons afterwards, on their fettlemcnt in this country, by whom Lambarde fays, it was called Folceftane, id ejl^ populi lapisy which fignifies a rocke coafFe, or flaw of ftone, being a name purely of

Saxon etymology

;

and Mr. Baxter interprets Folcfton,

During their contefts in lemiirum Jive larium lapis. 456, in the early time of the heptarchy, a bloody battle was fought near this place, between Folkeftone and Hythe, between the Britons under king Vortimer, and the Saxons, who were retreating hither before him, after the conflidt he had with them on the banks of theDarent, in the weftern part of this county. Kennius and others write, that it was fought in a field on the (hore of the Gallic fea. This place certainly fuits beft with the defeription of it, on the fhore of the Gallic fea ; and what adds ftrength to it, are the two vaft heaps of fculls and human bones, piled up in two vaults under the churches of Folkeftone and Hythe, which, from the quantity of them, could not but be from fome battle ; and, from their whitenefs, appear to have been all bleached by lying for fome time probably on the fea Ihore ; and many of the fculls have deep cuts in them, as made by fome heavy weapon. Probably thofe at Hythe were of the Britons, and thofe at Folkeftone of the Saxons, who were purfued hither by them. Vortimer, the BritiOi king, died foon after this battle, and, as hiftorians tell us, on his death-bed defired to be buried near the place where the Saxons ufed to land, that his bones might deter them from any future attempts; and it is generally aflerted, that he was buried here at Folkeftone, though fome fay it waselfewhere.^ After which this fort was made ufe of by the feveral princes of it, to keep the diftreflTed Britons in fubjedlion, and king Ethelbert is [

See vol.

i.

of this

liiftory,

p.

58.

reported

y

TOWN AND PARISH OF

170

reported to have rebuilt it ; but his Ton and fuceflbr, Eadbald, Teems to have totally neglefted it, and in lieu of it to have built a caftle (with a nunnery within the precinft of it) on the high cliff, clofe to the feafhore, at no great diftance fouthward from the prefent church of Folkeftonc, where it had an extenfive command, efpecially towards the Tea

;

partly by the fury of the

Danes, and partly by earl

Godwin, when he ravaged

this coaft

but this being afterwards, in the

year 1052,

reduced to a heap of ruins, continued in that ftate till William de Albrincis, or Averenches, on his becoming lord of this place after the Norman conqueft, rebuilt the caftle, near, if not wholly on the foundations of the former one, and made it the chief feat of his barony which it continued to be to his fucceffors, lords of it, for feveral ages afterwards,

and

by dewas wholly deftroyed, with the cliff on which it flood, by the incroachments of the fea infomuch, that all which has remained belonging to it for a great length of tjme, is a fmall part of the bail or precind, ftill called the bailie, or caftle-yard, with fome fmall length of the antient wall on the eaftern fide of it, near grees,

till

at length,

it

;

the church.

The

tow'n of Folkestone

very antient, and moft probably had its origin loon after the building of the caftle and nunnery, as before-mentioned, by king Eadbald, on the cliff, clofe to the fea fhore ; and itinis

creafed fo rapidly,

that in the time of king Edward the Confeffor it feems to have become a town of fome note ; and notwithftandiiig it was afterwards in that reign fpoiled by earl Godwin, then owner of it, who having been baniflied, returned with a large force, and in revenge ravaged the coaft, and this town in

particular

;

Domefday,

yet at the time of taking the furvey of in the 14th year of the Conqueror’s reign,

fuppofed by fome to have had five churches^in it ; though I doubt much if the five churches, mentioned in Domefday, were all in the towm of Folkeit

is

ftone.

y

FOLKESTONE. no notice whatever of any, either in records or otherwife, but that of St. Peter and Sc. Paul, in the precind of the old caftJe, and the prefent one of St. Mary and St. Eanfwith, built after that was in ruins. ] fliould rather conjedure, the ftone, as I find

above

five

churches, with the three mentioned in the

next article in Domelday, to have been intended for the eight churches of the prefent eightparllbeswithin

hundred of Folkefione, and iubordinate to the paramount manor of it. After which, by the further wading of it by the fea, and other misfortunes, it was fo impoveriflied, that in Ibme meafure to prelerve its confequence, it was united before the reign of king Henry I. as a member to the town and port of Dover, the

one ot the cinque ports, by the

name of

the barons of

town of Folkeflotie ^ and it is held that king Edward 111. incorporated it, by the name of the mayor jurats^ and commonalty of the loivn of Folkefone. The year after whofe death, anno 13 8, the greater part of 7 it was burnt by the united forces of the torch and French j which, with the continual incroachments made on it by the fea, reduced it to a very low and inconfiderable date. Leland gives the following defeription of this place, as it was in king Henry VIII.’s the

time, in his Itin. vol. vii. p. 141,

FOLCHESTAN The ton

is

lord Clyn-

lord of the

towne of Fclkeitone.

The cliffes from Doyer welle toward Folkedone be al of chalk and afterup to hil of

Eimne

done that is and fuin

very hard

ys a v miles fro

Dover and be al gefl'e dondeth very diredlly apon Boleyn. There cummeth to the towne a pretty fmall ryvelet that ryfeth yn Folchdan parche longing to the lord Clynton or not far be yownd yt. The towne fhore be al lykelihod is mervelufly fore

waded with

the violens

of the fe ; yn fo much that there they lay that one paroche chyrch of

TOWN AND PARISH OF

iy2

our Lady and a nother of St. Paule ys dene deftroyed and etin colour. by the fe. Hard apon the fhore yn a place cawled the Caftel yarde, the which on the one fide ys dyked, and ther yn be greate mines of a folemne old nunnery, yn

be of a depe blew

'of

the walles whereofe yn divers places apere great and long Briton brikes ; and on the right bond of the quier a grave trunce of fquared ftone. The caftel yard hath bene a place of great burial ; yn fo much as wher the fe hath woren on the banke bones apere half ftykyng owt. The paroch chyrch is therby, made alfo of fuin newer worke of an abbay. Ther is St. Eanlwide buToried and a late therby was a vifage of a priory. ward a quarter of a myle owt of the towne is a chapel of S. Botulfe on a likelyhod of farther building fumtyme. Yn the towne ther is a mairej and this lord Clyntons grant father had there of a poore man a boote almoft ful of antiquities of pure gold and fylver.

the return of the furvey, made by order of queen Elizabeth, in her 8th year, of the feveral maritime places in this county; it appears that there were

By

town only one hundred and twenty houfes inhabited, one hundred and twenty men, of which ’feventy were fiibermen, and fliips and boats of all forts, only for filhing, twenty-five ; from which low ftate it was not, till after fome length of time, relieved by the induftry of the inhabitants, who, firft by eftablifhing a filhery, and afterwards by a lucrathen

in this

have made it of late years to thrive exceedingly, and it is become again both an opulent and well peopled town, and there are now in it about four hundred and fifty houfes, and about two thoufand inhabitants, and there are three meeting- houfes in it for the Baptifts, Quakers, and Methodifts. The town is built on the extremity of the quarry hills, which here overhang the fea, nearly oppofite to Bullein, in France, and reaches on the broken declivity of one of them down to the fea fhore, tive trade with France,

on

,

!

i

,

j

|

|

'

|

*

FOLKESTO^^E.

17^

on which veflels of a conliderable fize are continually built, and where it forms a kind of harbour for the lafety of them and the filhing craft. The ftreets arc lleep and narrow, and were till lately very ill paved, but this has been in fome meafure remedied by an a(5t which pafled in 1796, for the better paving and cleanf*= ing of the town ; the buildings of them very irregular, being inhabited in general by inferior tradefmen or fifhermen

;

but

this

is

only in the middle of the

town ; for in the outskirts of it there are numbers of handfome buildings lately eredled, which are pleafantly fitivted, and many of them inhabited by peribns of a genteel condition in life. The church ftands at the weft or upper end of the town, on the height of the cliff, at a very fmall diftance from the edge of it, which, from the yearly depredations the fea makes on will, notwithftanding the precautions which have been taken to prevent it, very foon occafion its ruin.

it,

Below the

on the

fhore, for fome length tolong ridge of funken rocks, occafioned by the fallen cliffs at different times. One of thefe rocks, furrounded by many others, and called

wards the

cliff,

fea, is a

the mooring rock,

is

a moll noted one, being

known

by that name time out of mind. At this veffels ufed to be moored, whilft they were loading with other rocks, which they took from hence for the piers of Dover and other places, and a very great quantity of them was fliipped in the time of Oliver’s ufurpation and carried to Dunkirk, for the fervice of that harbour.

the univerfal opinion of the inhabitants of this town and neighbourhood, that the hills here clofe above thefe rocks, flip or prefs forward from time to time towards the fea, and there are fome remaining near it, which, to all appearance, have fo done at a fmall diftance from the higher and yet firmer It is

cliff.

Thefe

confift of large

rugged ftones, mixed with fand, till near three feet, or at fome places more, of the bottom, where they confift of what is here called a cliffs

town and

parispi op

always wet. a flippery fort of clay, which is Upon this flipe at the bottom, it is thought, the heavy caules the whole preflure of the land and Hones above launch of tallowed to Hide forwards, as a flpip upon a ilipCy

i.

e.

planks, towards the fea.*

an adf pafled for the moic within the eafy and Ipeedy recovery of fmall debts, town and port of Folkeftone, and the parilh of Folkementioned in it. ftone, and other neighbouring ones rivulets, one of It is well watered by two different which rifes about three miles north-well from the town, near Fean farm, under the hills, and delceinds by Bredmer through the midft of the town of Folkeftone into the fea ; the other, called St. Eanlwith’s it rifes about half a mile water, is very remarkable weft of Caftle-hill, aud empties itfelf into the bail pond, within eight or ten rods of the top of the cliffs.

Anno 26 George

III.

;

This ftream is partly natural and partly artificial, which St. Eanfwith is faid to have conveyed to her monaftery here, diverting the water great part of the way, that is from Bredmer wood, by means of a brick aqueduct acrofs the low grounds into the bail pond, the current, It is or refervoir above-mentioned.

though erroneous opinion water actually afeends in

of the people here, that this its

courfe from_ the fpring

But into the bail pond, into which it empties itfelf. the poltlie principle of hydroftatics, will not admit luch an afeent, as there is no mill or engine to force it up; The filhery, fince the ftop put by the legiflature to the contraband trade with France, has within thefe, fibility of

few years greatly increafed ; and there are now eight or ten lugger-boats and cutters, employed chiefly in the herring and mackerel filheries, befides about thirty fmall boats employed in the fame, and in the catching *

See Philofophical Tranfadions, vol. xxix. No.

.XXXV.

No.

34-9.

Vol.

40!j.

of

,

-

.

.

1

1

j

'

,

FOLKESTONE, of

plaice, foies, whitings, Icate, and fuch kind in their proper reasons i which altogether do

of fidi,

not employ more than between two and three hundred men mid boys, who are under no regulation as a company.The fifh are conveyed to the London markets, either by boats, or by expeditious land carriage.

There was a Jingular ciijiom uled of long time by the hlhermen of this place They chofe eight of the largeft and beft whitings out of every boat when they :

came home from from the

that filhery,

and

fold

them apart

and out of the money arifingfrom them they made a feaft, every Chriflmas-eve, which they reft,

called a rumbald. this feaft for his

many

The mafter of each boat provided own company, fo that there were as

different

entertainments as there were boats. Thefe whitings, which are of a very large fize, and are fold all round the country as far as Canterbury, arc called rumbald whitings. This cuftom, which is now-

though many of the inhabitants ftill meet foon a Chriflmas-eve, and call it rumbald night,

left off,

cially

might have been antiently inftituted Rumbald, and the fifli defigned as an

in

honor of St!

offering to

him

for his protedion during the fifliery.

In order to prelerve the lo\ver part of this town, and the beach, on which the i^fliermen of it lay up, dry, and repair their boats, nets, and other craft,* from the raging of the fea, two large jettee heads, at the eaft and well end of the town, were made, which were kept in repair by them and other inhabitants,

by a voluntary

fubfcription. But thefe running to deand many unruccefsful fifhing leafons happenino-, the fifhermen became unable to continue the fuppoTt df them and the cliff, on which the church Bands, having been very confiderably wafliedaway within the fpace of a few years, they obtained in 1766 an ad to

cay,

;

enable them to raife a fufficicnt fum of money for the mpairing and fupporting the old, and ereding

new

jetteesand other works, for the prcfervation of^both,'

which

176

TOWN AND PARISH OF

coals,' which was done by a duty on every chaldron of" and brought into or through any part of this town, as will be afterwards to be applied to other purpofes, mentioned hereafter, Xhefe duties are under the management of the mayor, jurats, and commonalty. The earl of Radnor, as lord of the barony or hundred, appoints the colleftor, and the mayor, &c.

a treafurer of thefe duties.

The town and liberty of Folkestone, which extends two miles and an half from eaft to weft, and little more than a quarter of a mile in breadth from north to fouth, comprehends the whole diftri
other privileges, moftly the fame as the other corporations within the liberties of the cinque ports j but The feal of the it has no mace belonging to it.' mayoralty has on it the figure of St. Eanlwith, with

a coronet on her head, and holding in one hand two fifh on a half hoop, and in the other a paftoral ftaff. Jeffry Fitz Peter, in the 6th year of king John, procured a market to be held here weekly on a Thurfday, which was confirmed by William de Albrincis in the i6th year of that reign, and the fame grant '

See fome account of the origin of the five ports, vol.

Vi.

of

this hiilory, p, 339*

was

-

folkesto^te*

177

John de Segrave, with the addimarket weekly on a Tuefday, anno tion of another Edward III." and Sir John de Clinton obtained a grant from king Richard II. in his 3th year of a market, to be held weekly here on a Wednefday, and a The fair yearly on the vigil and day of St. Giles. markets on the Tuefday and Wednefday do not appear to have been ever ufed, and that on a Thurfday Was renewed to

Sir

1

is

fo little attended, that

it

may

in

to have been difufed for years pad.

a

manner be faid There are two

held yearly, one called the Bail fair, on the 28th and 29th of June; and the other, called Cow-ffreet fair, on the Thurfday in Eafter week, chiefly for toys and pedlary wares. The earl of Radnor, as lord of the hundred, barony, and royalty of Folkeftone, is fairs

cuftoms, tolls, rights, profits of fairs and markets, and harbour duties, within the jurifdiction of this royalty and manor. There is an eftablifhment of the cuftoms here, under the out-port of Dover, which is under the diredion of a fupervifor, furveyor, and other officers. On the chalk chffj at the weft end of the town, is a fort, and battery of fix entitled to

all

cannons.

John Salmon, bifhop of Norwich, chancellor of England, and ambalfador to France in 1325, falling and returning thence on that account^ died in this town on the 6th of July that year, and was carried to Norwich, and buried in his own cathedral there." Dr. William Harvey, that eminent phyfifick there,

who

difeovered the circulation of the blood, v/as born in this town in 1578, being the eldeft fon of Thomas Harvey, gent, of this place from two of whofe cian,

younger fons were defeended thole of Combe and of Chigwell, in Effiex. Dr. Harvey was educated firft at the grammar-fehool at Canterbury, and was thence “

"

Dugd. Bar. vol. i. p. 676 Wharton’s Ang. Sac. vol.

VOL. VIII*

Pat. ejiisan. tn. 14, pt. 2. i

N

p.

412.

removed

TOWN AND PARISH OP

178

removed to Cambridge to ftudy phyfic ; he afterwards travelled to Padua, and having taken his degree of M. D. became afterwards phyfician to king James and Charles I. warden of Merton college, and prelident of the college of phylicians, to which he was a liberal benefadlor. He died f.p. in 1657, and was buried in the family vault at Hemfted, in Effex, where there is his monument, with his buftin marble.’^

The circumftance

of his death,

little

known

I

believe

beyond his own family, was afeertained to the editor by the late Rev, Mr. Marihall, vicar of Charing, and once curate of Chinwell, who was aflured of the fad: by the late Eliab Plarvey, efq. barrifler at-law, a defendant of the dodor’s younger brother of that name. This was, that Dr. Harvey was ever afraid of becoming blind, and early one morning, for he always rofe early, his houfekeeper coming into his chamber to call him, opened the window Ih utters, and telling him the hour, aiked him if he would not rife, upon which he afked if (he had opened the (butters, (lie replied yes

then fhut

;

them

did fo ; then the effect was the fame to again,

(lie

open them again, but ftill him, for he had awaked ffone blind ; upon which he ordered her to fetch him a bottle, (which (lie herfelf had obferved on a flielf in the chamber for a long while) out of which he drank a large draught, and it being a ftrong poifon, which it is fuppofed he had long before prepared, and let there for the purpofe, he expired within three hours after. John Philipott, Somerfet herald, and defigned Norroy, was born in this town. He lived in king Charles the Ift.’s reign, and fuffered much for the royal caufe. He died in great obfeurity in 1645, and was buried within the precindts of Paul’s wharf, London. He See his ^

life

vol, u. p, 456.

Biog. Brit. vol. iv. p. 2547. Morant’s Eflex, Fafti, vol. ii, p, 6.

Wood’s

wrote

wrote feveral Hum, or Kent

FOLKESTONE. books, and among others, illuftrated

Some time

after

I79 Villare Cantia-

and furveyedd

Eadbald, king of Kent, had built

the caftle on the cliff clofc to the fea-lhore here, as has been already taken notice of before ; he founded A nunnery after the rule of St. Bennct, within the

which Tanner fuppofes to have been the firft founded in England,”= of which his daughter Eanfwithe afterwards became abbefs, flie was on her death buried in the church of it, dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, and on account of the miracles faid to be wrought by her was fainted. This nunnery being afterwards reduced to a heap of ruins by the continual ravages of the Danes, lay in that ftate till after the Norman conqueft, when Ni-

bail orprecindi: of

it,

de Muneville, then lord of Folkeflone, in 1095, founded on the feite of the old church and nunnery, a new priory of monks^ of the order likewife of St, Bennet, which he made an alien cell, fubjedl to the abbey of Lolley, in Normandy, and gave ample poffeflions here and in this neighbourhood, in pure and perpetual alms, for the fupport of it ; among which W'as the patronage of this church, and of all thofe of his lordfhip, and belonging to the honor of P'olkeflone, and certain dues which he pofTeffed in Folkeflone, which the abbot of Lolley releafed to the burgeffes of Folkeflone, on their making over to him and his monks there the taking tithe of all filh taken there by them, and he gave to it the tithes of his Jordfliip of Folkeflone, Terlingham, Walton, Northwode, Alkeham, and Standen, and of his woods, and gell

the third part of his tithes of Flete, and of the village mill. But not long after this, the depredations of the fea had fo far waflcd the cliff on which the priory flood, (being the feite of the antient nunnery See vol. fafti,

p. 36.

i,

of this hiftory, p. *

Tan. Mon.

N

4^ 9

'

Wood’s Ath.

vol.

ii.

praef. p. iv. p. 117.

a

which

l80

TOWN AND PARISH OF

which ftood but twenty-eight perches from the extremity of it next the fea), that it became in great danger of falling with it, which induced Sir William de Albrincis, then lord of Folkeftone, to confirm by his charter of itifpeximus^ the above grant of his anceflor, in which the tithes granted as above are very particularly fet forth, and are well worth obfervation, and at the end is a very remarkable anathema^ (though not

uncommon

at that time) againfl fuch as fliould dare

to infringe any part of the above gift/

And

be removed the monks, at their petition, to a new church, which he granted to them for that purpofe. This church flood on the fcite of the prefent church of Folkeftone, at alittle diftance eaftward from the caftle bail, and about as far north-eaft from the fcite of the old priory. On this ground, clofe on the fouth fide

of the new church, he built a new priory, which with the church was dedicated to St. Mary and Eanfwith,

and to which the body of St. Eanfwith was removed from the old ruinous church, where it then lay. Her ftone coffin in the north wall of the fouth ifte, difcovered about the middle of the laft century

was on ;

opening the coffin, the corps was found lying in its perfeft form, and by it on each fide an hour glafsand feveral medals, the letters on which were obliterated, and feveral locks of her hair which were taken away and kept by different perfons for the fandVity of it. In this new priory, when finiihed, the abbot of Lolley eftablifhed a ceil to his own abbey. This priory being one of that fort which was permitted to chufe its o\yn prior, and was an entire fociety within itfelf, receiving its own revenues to its own ufe, and paying a yearly penfion only as an acknowledgment to the foreign houfe j’’ and in this fituation the priory contiPiinted in

pugd. Mon.

vol.i. p. 560. See Prynne’s antlent

Records, vol. in. p. 104. ^ See vol. i. of this hiftory,

p. 516, vol, vi. p. 456.

nued

FOLKESTONE. imed

l8l

was freed from all fubjeftlon to the abbey of Lolley, and made denizen, fo that it efcaped the general fate of the alien priories throughout the kingdom, which were all fupprdfed in the 2d year of king Henry V/ and thus it continued till king Henry the Vlllth.’s reign, in the 27th year of which, on the general vifitation of religious houl'es, it was fo artfully managed by the king’s commiflioners, that many of the members of them were brought over to defire to leave their pofreffion and habit, and fome of them gave up their houfes, among which was the prior and convent of Folkeilone, who figned their refignation on Nov. If, that year, 1535, Thomas Batfett, or Barrett, being then prior of it, who had a penfion of ten pounds per annum. The original deed of which now remaining in the Augmentation-office, at is which time the revenues of it were valued at 41I. 15s. lod. per annum clear, and 63I. os. yd. total annual income, which with the fcite of the priory were confirmed to the king by the aft paffed in the March following. After which the king, in his 30th tlJJ it

year, granted the fcite of the priory, with the

manor

of it, and other pofleffions here, to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold in capite, and he, with Elizabeth his wife, that year paffed them away to Thomas, lord Cromwell, afterwards earl of Effiex,of whom they were afterwards purchafed by the crown, whence they were granted anno 4 Edward VI. to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, the former poffeffor of them after which they palled in manner as has been already noticed before from him to the Herdfons, and thence again to the Dixwells, who alienated them to Jacob Defbouverie, efq. in whofe family they have continued down to the right hon. Jacob, earl of Radnor, #

*

Tan. Mon.

the king ^

among



*.

p. 206. See the feveral leafes granted of it the inrolment of leafes in the Augtn. office.

Rot. Efch. ejusan.

pt. 5.

Augtn.

N

3

off.

-

by

Kent, box C. 34.

the

TOWN AND

102

PARISH OF

the pvefent owner of the fcitc and manor of this diffdved priory. A court baron is held for this manor. All that is remaining of this priory, for the king immediately after its being furrendered into his hands ordered great part of it to be pulled down and removed, is a Imall part of the foundations, and an arch in the wall of it, about three teet from the ground, which is turned with Roman or Britifli bricks, (of which there are feveral among the ruined foundations) and under that, one more modern, of hewn flone, feemingly for a door way. From thefe ruins, which are near the fouth-vveft corner of the church, where there is much uneven ground, from the rubbilh lying about it, there goes a la-ge fewer of hone mafonry, which runs underground louth-eaflward, large enough for a man eafily to creep through, the end of which appears flicking out of the edge of the broken cliff over the fhore, the fame as is mentioned by Leland. The priory appears to have flood only a few feet diftant from the fouth fide of the church, which by Ibme door ways, now filled up in the wall of it, appears to have been the conventual church of the priory, and to have had a communication with it. About a mile and an half weflward of the town, and within the liberty of it, is Sandgate castle, fituated at the foot of the hill, and on the fand of the fea fhore,

whence

have been a

it

caflle

takes

its

name.

There appears to

king Richard the lld.’s 2d year, diredled his caflle of Sandgate, to admit

here in

reign, for that prince,

in

writ to the captain of his

his 2

kinfman Henry de Lancafler, duke of Hereford, with his family, horfes, &c. into it, to tarry there for fix weeks to refrefli himfelf. The prelent caflle was built by king Henry VIII. as is reported from the ruins his

of the neighbouring fort on caflle '

See Harl.

No. 6867-19.

MSS. No. 1647

19. Cat.

hill,

about 1539,'

Oxford,

MSS.

tom.

at

T if

t

FOLKESTONE.

183

ercded feveral others of the like (ort in this county and in Sulfex, for the defence of the kingdom, all which he placed under the governat the time that he

warden, as maybefeen in the llatute of the 32d year of that reign ; it has like thofe others, lunettes of arched done, with feveral port-holes, and a battery tor great guns. In the middle is a round tower, which contains the apartments lor the lieutenant, a fofs encompaiTes the whole, and the entrance

ment

of the lord

by a drawbridge. The captain, lieutenant, ilorekeeper, and gunners, are appointed by the lord warden. William Evelyn, efq. is the pre'.ent captain of it. king It appears by the efeheat rolls of the 7th year of Edward VI. that the king granted to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, the callle and fort of Sandgate, to hold in capite by knight’s lervice, but it not long afterwards came again into the hands of the crown,

is

where

it

has remained ever fince.

CHARITIES. BELONGING TO THE TOWN AND LIBERTY OF

'

,

Folkestone. Sir Eliab Harvey, the eUleft fon of Eliab, a younger broschool in this ther of the Dolor’s, in 1674 founded a free which he gratis, taught be to children town, for twenty poor annum per let at 50J. w m Combe’s, endowed with a farm called and years, two for oh paid 1 is mafter in Limne, out of which the the of overplus it. The of produce every third year the yearly for 2I. and clerk, the to paid two years, after repairs, and il. tor boats of buving the to applied the truftees dinner, is to be

of Folkepoor fithermen, freemen, or freemens fons, inhabitants A fchool, apprentices. children llone, or to putting out poor given legacy a of out ereded and fchool-houfe for the mafter was menfuither^ be will as tiarvey, to the town by Dr. William children, the nominate The mavor and jurats tioned hereafter.

and they, with of

it.

The

feveral others, truftees, have the

management

mafter teaches Latin, Englith, arithmetic, and wn.?

annum. by will in 1569, leveral rents and profits to pieces of land, containing twelve acres, the

ting, hisfalary

is

on an average

William Jacob,

25I. per

late jurat,

gave,

at the difcretion be applied to the ufe of the poor of this town, Chriftmas Eve, and of the mayor and jurats, viz. 30s. 2d. on employed in putting home the fame on Good Friday ; 61. to be

N 4 I

pool*

TOWN AND PARISH OF

J84 poor boy or tributed

of this town apprentice, and the the poor.

girl

among

reft to

be

dil*

Dr. William Harvey gave to this town, where-he was born, 200I. part of which was laid out as before-mentioned, in the purchafe of thepremifes and building of the fchool, and for a tan-houfe for tanning the nets of fifliermen, inhabitants of the town.

Daniel Harvey, and his brother, gave tool, with which a perpetual annuity of 5I. 10s. per annum, was purchafed, to be laid out in good wheaten bread, two fliillings worth ofw'hich to be given every Sunday in the year lor ever, to tw elve poor houfeholders, inhabitants of Folkelfone, at the diferetion of the

and

mayor

jurats.

Mrs.

Ward

and Mrs,

Bennet Mitchell

gave 60I with of land, called Sandgate land, containing fix acres, wci'e purchafed, the rents to be applied by the mayor and jurats for providing waiflcoats, (now govvns^ every Chriftinas Eve, to twelve poor w'omen, inhabitants of the town, twenty -four of which arc at this time given aw'ay yearly.

which

in i6gi three pieces

CHJRITJES, BELONGING TO THE PARISH, W’lTHIN TH.E JURISDICTION OF THE COUNTY. iLLiAM Leach, of Dover, by will in 1623, devifed all his tenement in Folkeftone, together with all his lands, arable and pafture, with their appurtenamces in the parifh, containing three acres, to the ule of the pooreft inhabitants within it, not dwelling within the liberty of the town, 10 be let out and employed to the moft profit and benefit of the faid poor

people which fhould inhabit in the parifli, and not dwelling within the liberty. The poor confiantly relieved are about fifty, cafualiy forty. .

Folkestone

within the

ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocejs of Canterbury, and dcciyiTy of Dover. The church, which Is dedicated to St. Mary and is

St. Eanfwith, confifts of three ifles and three chancels, having a fejuare tower, with a beacon turret in the middle of it, in which there is a clock, and

a peal of

eight bells, put

up

in

1779. This church is built the high chancel, which has been lately ceiled, feems by far the moft antient part of it Under an arch in the north wall is a tomb, with the effigies of a man, having a dog at his feet, very an-

of fand-ftone

it

in

;

tient.

FOLKESTONE.

185

probably for one of the family of Flenes, conftables of Dover callle and wardens of the five ports ; tient,

and among many other monuments and

infcriptions,

within the altar-rails, are monuments for the Reades, of Folkeftone, arms, Azure, a griffin, or, quartering gules, a pheon between three leopards faces, or-, for William Langhorne, A. M. minifter, obt. 1772. In the

fouth chancel is a moft elegant monument, having the effigies of two men kneeling at two delks, and an infcriptionforj. Herdlbn,erq. who lies buried inHawkinge church, obt. i 622. In the fouth ifie a tomb for Pragell,efq.obt. 1676, arms, A caJUe triple towered, J.

'between

two

portcullijes

gauntled, hetiveen

on a chief, a fmider

two Jiirrups.

brafs plate for Joane,

wife of

ther of feven fons (one of

In the middle

hand ifle

a

Thomas Harvey, mo-

which was the phyfician)

and two daughters. In the north wall of the fouth ifle were depofited the remains of St. Eanfwith, in a (lone coffin ; and under that ifle is a large charnelhoufe, in which are depofited the great quantity of bones already taken notice of before. Philipotr, p. 96, fays, the Bakers, of Caldham, had a peculiar chancel belonging to them in this church, near the veflrydoor, over the charnel-houfe, which feems to have been that building mentioned by John Baker, of Folkeftone, who by his w’ill in 1464, ordered, that his executors ihould make a new work, called an ifle, W'ith a window in it, with the parifhioners advice ; which work fhould be built between the veftry there and the great window. John Tong, of Folkeftone, W'ho was buried in this church, by .will in 1534, ordered that certain men of the parilh fliould be enfeoffed in fix acres of land, called Mervyle, to the ufe of the mats of Jhefu, in this church. On Dec. 19, 1705, the weft end of this church, for the length of two arches out of the five, was blown the violence of the wind ; upon which the curate and parilh ioners petitioned archbilhop Tillot-

down by

fon.

,

TOWN AND PARISH OF

lS6

fon, for leave to fliorten the church, by rebuilding only one of the fallen ardies, which was granted. But

the church, which was before inlufficieni to contain the pari{hioners,is rendered much more inconvenient to them for that purpofe. By the ad pafled anno 6 George III. for the prelervation of the town

by

this,

and church from the ravages of the

lea as already no-

After fuch worics are fmilhed, &c. the rates are to be applied towards their repair, and to the keeping in repair, and the lupport and prelervation of ticed before.

this church.

This church was ville,

firfl

by Nigell de Munethe latter end of king

built

lord of Folkeftone at

Henry I. or the beginning of king Stephen’s reign, when he removed the priory from the precind of the cafUe to it in 137, and he gave this new church and the patronage of it to the monks of Lolley, in Normandy, for their eftablilbing a cell, or alien priory i

been already mentioned, to which this new church afterwards ferved as the conventual church of it. The profits of it were very early appropriated to the ufe of this priory, that is, before the 8th of king Richard II. anno 138-^, the duty of it being ferved by a vicar, whofe portion was fettled in 1448, here, as has

of lol. os. aid. to be paid by In the prior, in lieu of all other profits vvhatfoever. appropriation and vicarage remained which Hate this priory, in the furrendry of the year of 27th till the king Henry-Vlll. when they came, with the reft of the poffeffions of it, into the king’s hands, who in his 31ft year demi fed the vicarage and parifh church of Folkeftone, with all its rights, profits, and emoluments, for a term of years, to Thomas, lord Cromat the yearly penfion

who

Anthony Aucher, efq. but the fee of both remained in the crown till the 4th year of king Edward VI. when they were

well,

afligned his interefl in

it

to

granted, with the manor, priory, and other premifes here, to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold /a capiie

i

FOLKESTONE. cqpite

;

who

187

the next year conveyed

them back again

the crown, in exchange for other premiles,® where the patronage of the vicarage did' not remain long ; to'

for in 1558, anno 6 queen Mary, the queen it, among leveral others, to the archbiOiop.

granted

But the

church or parfonage appropriate of Folkeftone remained longer in the crown, and till queen Elizabeth, in her 3d year, granted it in exchange, among other premifes, to archbilhop Parker, being then in leafe to lord Clinton, at the rent of 57I. 2s, i id, at which rate it was valued to the archbilhop, in which manner it has continued to be leafed out ever fince, and it now, with the patronage of the vicarage, remains parcel of the pofl'eflions of the fee of Canterbury ; the family of Breams were formerly leflees of it, from

’whom

the intereft of the leafe

came

to the Taylors,

Rev, Edward of Bifrons, and was fold by Taylor, of Bifrons, to the right hon. Jacob, earl of Radnor, the prefent leflee of it. The vicarage is valued in the king’s books at lol. os. 2M. and the yearly tenths at il. os. old. being the portion paid to the vicar as before-mentioned,' the late

was increafed to twenty pounds by archbifhop Whitgift, who, on

in lieu of all profits whatfoever

;

this

the renewal of the leafe of the parfonage, bound the tenant to pay that additional fum. It was ftill further augmented by archbifhop Juxon, (which was confirmed by archbifhop Sheldon, in the 26th and 28th years of king Charles II.) with a further annual penfion of fixty pounds, to be paid by the tenant out of the parfonage. It feems to have been for many years

efteemed as a perpetual curacy, and is as fuch nominated to by the archbilhop. In 1588 here were communicants four hundred and thirty, which number has been fince greatly increafed. *

Augtn.

off.

box Kent, G.

34. Ibid. Inrolm. of leafes.

CHURCH



,

TOWN AND PARISH OF

iSS

CHURCH OF FOLKESTONE. PATRONS, Or

VICARS AND CURATES*

hy iL>hom prejented,

Trior of Folkejlone

fames

Ca/lhill, in

Gerard

6o i

1

Patthifoti, in

1605, Alexander Udney, in 1631. Peter Rogers, in 1638 and 1643.

Samuel PPells, about 1636.*' Baker, ejected 1662.' Nicholas Brett, in 1662, Miles Barnes, in 1666. Samuel Wtlls, in 1669. Samuel IKells, in 1687.“* Gervas Needham, 1 689. John Bradock, A. M. in 1691,

Tiie Archbijhop.

refigned 1699.'

John Sacket, A.

M. curate

obt. 1753.* William Langhorne, fter

1699,

A. M. mini-

1753, obt. Feb. 1772.*

M. May 2,

John Tims, A.

1772,

the preient curate.** fc

Walker’s

Suff.

of Clergy,

pt. ii.

P* 399 ; c Ejefled

He was reftor of Hawking, and 1732 was prefented to the vicarage of Weft Hylhe, both which he held with this curacy, and was likewife f

in

by the Bartholomew Aft. Calamy’s Life of Baxter, p. z86. d Mod probably the fame as is mentioned before, and afterwards reindated. c Afterwards vicar of St. Stephen’s, alias Hackington, in which church he lies buried.

nrafter of Eaftbridge hofpital. g Likewife reftor of Hawking. wrote feveral treatifes in defence of the

He

church of England, and

lies

burled in

the chancel of this church,

h

And reftor of Hawking,

CHERITON LIES

the next parifli weftward from Folkeftone, being written in antient records both Cheringtott and Ceriton.

It

Lip between

two ranges of the down and quarry hills, which here approach within two miles of each other j the former at the northern boundary, and the

the latter croffing the fouthern part of

it,

in rather a

wild

CHERITON.

l-8g

wild and unfrequented country, the profpeds from thefouthern hills towards the fea, and the breaks between them being in general exceedingly pleating. The lands in it are for the greateft part very poor and barren.

The church and

village

ftand very high,

where the foil is of a chalky nature. The vale between this and the down-hills is chiefly meadows, and is watered by feveral fprings, which unite in the larger one which rifes at Pean farm, under thofe hills, and flows through this vale towards Folkeftone. From the church, which ftands at the end of the high ground, on the fteep precipice of a hill, there is a fine opening between the quarry- hills towards the fea. Near it, down in the bottom, is the court lodge, an antient gothic building, where the foil is very landy, and eaftward from it, very poor and much coverecl with furze and brakes. A little further in the bottom, between the quarry-hills, is Horn-ftreet, where the ftream called the Seabrook, which rifes in the adjoining pariih of Newington, runs along the fide of it, and turns a paper and corn-mill, belonging to Mr. Pearce, which is curious, being worked at times both by wind and water and about half a mile further it turns another corn-mill, called Seabrook mill ; and thence crofling the high road from Hythe to Sandgate, under a bridge, it turns weflward, and finking into the beach and fand of the fea Ihore, lofes itfelf in it. The fea fliore here is the fouthern boundary of this parifli ; the above-mentioned road runs along it, dole at the foot of the high quarry-hills, on to the hamlet ;

of Sandgate, wdicre, almoft as far as the caflle and eaftward of it, all the houfes, being the greateft part of them, are within this parifli. The fmall ftream,

Enbrooke, which riles near the Oaks, about a mile and an half from hence, runs by Querling hi*ther, and then lofes itfelf among the lea beach. At Underhill, in this parifli, the duke of Richmond lay, called

as

he paired to and from king Charles

II.

when

in

exile.

FOLKESTONE Hl^NDRED. wood ftill called exile, in the day haunting that little Richmond’s ihave } whole then owner, Writtle, was^ on the

reftoration rewarded with the governorlhip ot

Upnor

caftle.

The

u j manor, of Cheriton was amientJy held .

i

i

r

ot

and was the barony of Averenches, or Folkellone, by held by knight’s lervice and ward to Dover callle, a family which took

their

name from

it.

Walerande

Ceritone appears to have held it in the 45th year of king Henry 111 as did his defeendant Odo de Ceritone in the beginning of the next reign of king Ed.

foon after which this name became extind here ; for I find it next in the poffeffion of Roger de Mereworth, who held it in like manner ; and in right of his manor of Ceryton, (perhaps Chartons, in Farningham, held by him of the archbilhop) claimed and \vas*^allowed the office of carver at the archbifhop’s in-

ward

I.^

thronization, and the fee belonging thereto, which was, the knives ufed at his table ; and in the 8th year of that reign had a charter of free-zvarren for all his

demefne lands in this parifh ; at which time William de Brockhull feems to have had fomc joint intereft with him in this manor, and certainly afterwards became poffielfed of the whole of it ; from him it palfed to the family of Valoyns, and Henry de Valoyns poffefled it in the reign of king Edward III. in the 14th year of which he was ffieriffi, and that year had a charter of free-warren for all his lands and manors in it. His defeendant Waretius de Valoyns left two daughters his coheirs, and on the partition of their inheritance, the manor of Cheriton was allotted to the youngeft, married to Sir Francis Fogge, who died poffefled of it in that reign, and was buried in this church. His effigies was on his tomb, lying crols-legged and habited in armour, with his arms on his furcoat, imRadigund, cart. 425 ad cart. 428, and Book of Knights Fees in Remembrancer’s oflice, Exchequer. *

Reglft.

Abb.

Sci

paling

CHERITON.

191

paling thofe of Valoigns, of which, though remaining in Philipott’s time, about the middle of the laft cen-

nothing now to be feen. His defcendant Sir John Fogge, of Repton, anno 31 Henry VIll. by the a6t palled that year procured his lands in this county to be difgavelled. His Ton Edward Fogge, efq. dying/, p. anno 20 Elizabeth, it came to his uncle George Fogg, elq. of Braborne, who fold molt of the antient patrimony of his family in this county, as he did this manor, to Mr. FTenry Brockman, afterwards of Beachborough, whole defcendant James Brockman, efq. of Beachborough, died polfelied of it in 1767, unmarried, being the laft heir male of this Fimily, and by will devifed this manor, with the reft of his eftates, to the Rev. Ralph Drake, who took the name of Brockman, and his eldeft fon James Drake Brockman, efq. now of Beachborough, is the prefent poffelfor of it. A court baron is held for this manor. tury, there

is

SwETTON,

Is a manor in the middle of this parilh, which was part of the barony of Averenches, or Folkeftone, being reputed as a member of the manor of Tirlingham ; accordingly it palfed, in like manner with it, in marriage from the Crevequers to Criol, and thence again to Rokelley,

formerly called S-wedon,

and afterwards to Poynings ; and Irom thence again by another female heir to Henry, lord Percy, afterwards earl of Northumberland, who died pollefted of it /. p. anno 29 Henry VIII. having before his death granted the reverfion of

other manors and eftates, to the king, in cafe he died without male iflue. After which it was granted to Thomas this, as well as his

Cromwell, earl of Eflex, and after his attainder, to Edward, lord Clinton and Sayc, who alienated it to Mr. Henry Herdfon, citizen and alderman of Lon-, don, one of whofe ciefeendants paffed it away to Mr, ^

Sec Repton, in Afnford, vol.

vii. p.

532.

Henry



TOWN AND PARISH OF

igl

Henry Brockman Beechborough.

above-mentioned, afterwards of Since which it has defcehded, as the

manor of Cheriton ubove-defcribed, to James Drake Brockman, efq. of Beechborough, the prefent owner

A

court baron is held for this manor. Enbrooke is a manor in this parilh, fituated about half a mile eaflward from the church, which takes its name from the adjoining fpring or brook fo called. It w'as part of the antient barony of Folkeflone, and was held of that manor by knight’s fervice, and by inclofing eighteen perches of Folkeftone park, and ward to Dover caftle. In the reign of Henry II. this manor was held by a family, who, having ere^fled a manfion upon the demefnes of it, afterwards took their furname from it. Walter de Elnefbroc held it as above-mentioned in the reign of king Henry II. as did his defcendant Walter in that ot king Henry III. foon after which, the abbot of Langdon became poffeffed of a third part of this eftate, which then be* came a feparate manor} an account of which will be

of

it.

further mentioned hereafter.

But

the other part of

ity

manor and manfton of Einejhrooke were included, continued in the family of Einetbrooke one of whom, Michael Enbrooke, was a good benefadtor to the church of Cheriton in king Richard II. ’s reign, by building the north chancel in it, Bill belonging to this manor ; and in this chancel are two very antient tombs, now much decayed by time ; on one, within an arch in the wall, lies the effigies in Bone, of a man habited in robes, or long veBments ; on the other, in

which

the

;

which is on the pavement at a very fmall diBance from it and the wall, is that of a woman, having on her a head-drefs, and a wimple under her chin; thefe being the

moB

antient

monuments of the kind

have yet feen in this county. Philipott faj^s, they probably belonged to two of this family of Enbroke. His fon J

Book of

knights fees held of

Dover

that

I

caftle.

John

.

CHERITON.

193

John Eiibroke, in the next reign of Henry IV. alienated this manor to Peter Alkham, who again palled it away to Thorold, or Toroid, and Walter Toroid conveyed

it

to Nicholas Evering, of Evering, in

Alk-

ham, afterwards knighted j in whofe defcendants it remained till John Evering, efq. in the reign of queen Elizabeth, alienated it to John Honywood, efq. of Elmfted,

whofe defcendants, of Evington, in that parifli, baronets, it has continued down to Sir John Honywood, bart. now of Evington, the prefent owner of

in

it.

The manor

of

iifually called the Oaks,

Enbroore, now

Bishops which

lies

at a (mall diftance

weftward from that laft-defcribed, of which, as has been already mentioned, it was once a part, being feparated from it foon after king Henry III.’s reign, when it was become part of the polfeffion of the abbot and convent of eft Langdon, who held it by knight’s fervice of the manor of Folkeftone, and ward to Dover caftle. After which this manor, for fo it was then reputed, continued part of the pofleflions of that ab' bey till the furrendry of it, in the 27th year of king

W

when coming into the granted by him that year, with

Henry w'as

VIII.

king’s hands, it

and the exchange to

the fcite

reft of the pofleflions of the abbey, in archbilhop Cranmer ; whence, and to diftinguflh it from the other manor of the fame name, it acquired the name of BifJjops Enhrooke ; the archbilhop, within a very fmall time afterwards, conveyed it back again to the crown, where the fee of it lay, till queen Elizabeth, in her 4zd year, granted it to Sir Edwyn Sandys,of Northbornc, whofe eldeft fon Henry Sandys, efq. dying/, p. it became the property of his younger and only furviving brothers, Edwyn,. Richard, and Robert, of whom colonel Ricliard Sandys, having before purchafed of John Marfliam, efq. a fubfiiling term granted by the queen in this manor, bought of •

his

two brothers VOL. VIII.

their

interefts

o

in

it,

and

fo

became entitled

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

194

whole fee as well as the pofleflion of it, which his grandlon Jordan Sandys, elq. of Downe,® afterwards alienated to William Glanvill, efq. oflghtham, whofe fon William Glanvill Evelyn, efq. a few years fince pafTed it away by fale to Mr. Henry Cock,

entitled to the

of Folkeftone,

who

died in 1792, and his heirs are the

prefent polfeflbrs of

Caseborne

it.

likewifeamanor in the wefternpart of this parilh, which was held of the manor and barony of Folkeflone by knight’s fervice, and ward to Dover caftle, by a family of the fame name, who had. a caftellated manfion on it, the ruins of which, though overgrown with wood, are vifible even at this time. Galfridusde Cafeborne, Ion of Galfridus, was pofl'dfed of it at the latter end of king Henry lll.’s reign, and in his del'cendants it continued dowm to Thomas dc Cafeborne, who is reported to have lived here in much ftate about king Richard II. ’s reign, and to have been buried in the chapel belonging to this manfion ; but leaving no male ifl'ue, Catherine, his only daughter and heir, carried it in marriage to William de Honywood, of Henewood, in PofUing, in whofe defeendants, baronets, and refiding at Evington, in Elmhed, in this county, this manor has continued down to Sir John

now of Evington, the prefent pofcourt baron is held for this manor. Arden is another fmall manor here, which

Honywood, felTor

of

it.

Sweet now

is

bart.

A

funk into obfeurity as to be hardly known. It was antiently held of the manor and barony of Folkeflone by knight’s fervice. In the reign of king Edward I. as 1 find by the book of Dover caftle, it was held by William de Brockhull and his coparceners, and after that by William de Swyt Arden, fome time after which it came into the polieflion of Horne, and continued there fome time ; but in the reign of king Henry VIII. James Man, of Cheriton, was become poflefled of it, and he fold it, by two difis

fo far

“ See vol,

ii.

p. 56,

and Norbourne hereafter. ferent

GHERITON,

195

ferent feoffments, anno 37 Henry VIII. and anno 3 Edward VI. by the defcription of his farm apud le Bankcy with rents of affife, and lands called Sweet ylrdetiy and certain caftle-guard rents, to J. Aucher, gent, of Cheriton, whole defcendant Anthony Aucher,

of Bilhoplborne, in 1691, conveyed thefe premifes to Richard Topcliffe, of Cheriton, who at times purchafed of the Chapmans, of this parifh, other lands adjoining, called lihewife Arden ; all which his fon Godwin Topcliffe, of Hythe, alienated In 1619 to Robert Broadnax, gent, of Cheriton, and his heirs

Robert Hobday, ot Hope-houfe, in Folkehone, and in this name of Hobday this eftate continued for lome time, till at length by two daughters and coheirs it was carried in marriage to William Rolfe, of the Uphill of Folkeftone, and Richard Thomas, of Alkham ; and on a partition of their eftates, this at Cheriton was allotted to the former, who furviving her hutband left it to her three daughters, one of whom died before her, and her third part defcended to her two brothers, Nicholas and Thomas Rolfe, the former of whom deviled Lis intereft in it to Mr. Richard Marfh, who now poffeffes it. The lecond daughter, by her will, devifed her third part to Mr. Lott Eaton, of Hythe, who is now entitled to it; and alienated

it

to

the third daughter died leaving Mr. Thomas Rolfe, above-mentioned, her heir-at-law, who died in 1794, poffeffed of her third part, as well as the fixth part ot this eftate called the Bank-hoitfe farm^ with the lands called Szveet Arden, as above-mentioned, which he left by will to Mr. Reynolds, attorney at law, Folkeftone,

who now

poffeffes

Ackhanger

it.

which

is

an

appendage to that of Tirlingham, in Folkeftone, the defcription bf which a full account of it, and

in

fucceffive owners,

is

a

manor

may be

in this parilli,

its

l'een,down to the right hon.

of Radnor, the prefent owner of it. Here are x\o parochial chai iiies. The poor conftantly relieved are about thirty, cafually twenty.

Jacob,

earl

o X

Cheriton?



FOLKESTONE HUNDRED. Cheriton is Within the ecclesiastical juris-

ip6

diction of

the diocefe of Canterbury,

and deanry of

Dover. dedicated to St. Martin, is built of fand-flone, and confifts of two ifles and two chancels, having a tower fteeple at the weft end, in

The

church, which

is

which are four bells. This church has always been efteemed

appendant to the manor of Cheriton, the fucceeding owners of which have been from time to time owners and patrons of it, and it is now as fuch in the patronage of James Drake Brockman, efq. of Beechborough. It is a redtory, and is valued in the king’s books at as

and the yearly tenths at il. 13s. 3d. In 1588 it was valued at one hundred pounds, communicants one hundred and feventy. In 1640 at eighty pounds, communicants one hundred and feventeen. 12S. 6d.

1 61 .

1771, united to the vicarage of the adjoining parilh of Newington, both churches having It was, in the year

the fame patron.

CHURCH OF CHERITON. PATRONS, Or

by

RECTORS.

whom prefented.

William Brockman f gent,

Thomas BlJhoJtJiyltlzrzh.2tl^ l6o2, obt. 1630.

A. B. Dec. 8, 1630, obt. 1644. John Reading, A. M. July 8, 1644, fequeftered and re-

John S trout,

ftored

May

1660, obt. Oft.

26, 1667.'’

James Brcchnan,

efq^.

n He was in 1660 prefcntcd to the re£tory of Chartham, which he held with this of Cheriton, and was prebendary of Canterbury.

See Charihant

Jonathan Dry den, April li, 1668, refigned 1676. James Brome, A. M. June 9, 1679, obt. 1719.“ o

He was chaplain

to the five ports,

and vicar of Newington. He publlfhed Somner’sTrealife of the Roman Pons.

before.

PATRONS,

CIIERITON. PATRONS,

197 RECTORS.

&’f.

A. M, July 3, April 10, 1743. 1719, obt. Edmund Parker, May 27, 1743, 1770.P obt. Feb.

JKilliam Brockman, efq,

Henry

Ja?nes Brockman, efq

Bilton,

17,

George Lynch, A, obt.

1

M.

July

John B. Backhoufe, 1789, I

1

770,

789.*^ refig.

793.

Julius- Drake Brockman,

1793,

the prefent rcdor.'' P Likewlfe vicar of Newington.

Ing the

Alfo vicar of Newington, which In 1771 wasunited tothis rcflory. In

1770 a difpenfation paffcd

for his

latter

with the vicarage of

Limne. r Younger brother of the patron,

<1

hold-

NEWINGTON LIES

the next parifli eafl ward, belngufually called

Newington near Hythe,

to

diftinguilh

it

from the

other parilh of this name near Sittingborne. It is written in Domefday, Neventone, and it is probable

took its name from fome more antient town, which had been before built in the near neighbourhood of it. This parish extends in length from the fea fliore northward to the hamlet of Arpinge, which having a ftreet fo called, is fituated at the northern extremity of this pariHi, near Padlefworth. Part of it is within the manor of Newington Belhoufe, and part within the manor of Tirlingham, in Folkeftone, to which it is an appendage. Mr. Brockman owns the principal farm in it. It lies about half a mile beyond the ridge of chalk or down hills, which crofs this parifli on that fide, as the quarry or fand hills do on the fouthern The whole parilh, like thole fide, near the fea fliore. adjoining, confifhs of romantic high hill and dale, the foil of which is much the fame as that of Cheriton laft defcribed. The church Bands on high ground, with o 3

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

19^

with the village clofe on the north fide of if. In the north-weft part of it, clofe under the down-hills, is the leat of Beachborough, having on the hill dole to it, an odagon lummer-houfe, with a cupola roof,

from whence

a moft; extenfive profped over the neighbouring country, to all which it is a diftinguilhed is

objed, and beyond it over the fca to the coaft of Fiance. Adjoining to the park grounds of Beachborough eaftward, there is much coppice wood. This parifti is well watered by two ftreams, one of which comes from Beechborough-hill, and having fupplied the large balon belonging to that feat, runs ibuthward under Salt wood caftle, to the eaft end of the town of Hythe, three houfes of which, as well as the mill wliich

turns there, are within this parifh, thisftream being the boundary betw'een the two parifhes, and thence to the Tea ihore ; the other, called the Seabrook, rifes under the down hills at the north-weft it

bounds of

this

parilh,

called Lintwel],

whence

near Eching-hill, at a place it takes its courfe fouthw'ard

Milkey-down through Beechborough

at the

foot of

woods

to the hamlet of Frogwell,

where it turns a and running thence betw'een the village of Newington and the hamlet of Bargrave, it goes to Hornmill,

ftreet, in the parifh

of Cheriton, and thence to the fea where it lofes itfelf among the beach. Bargrave formerly had owners of its own name, as appears by a Ihore,

charter of the reign of king Henry III. in the regifter of the abbey of St. Radigund, wherein the fons of John de Beregrave, of this parifti, conveyed lands here to Bertram de Criol. It now belongs to Mr.

Brock-

man, of Beechborough.

At Pean farm,

in this parifh,

under the down-hills, the ftream rifes, which foon enters the parifti of Cheriton, and runs thence through the town of Folkeftone into the fea there, both which have been already noticed in the defeription of thofe parifties. clofe

Dr

:

Dr. Gale, rary,

fays,

in his

Roman

NEWINGTON. Comment on

I99

Antoninus’s Itinemonies has been dug up in this

village.

In 1760, fome

men being

work on the highway grubbing up a hedge, at Milkey-down, in this parilh, in order to widen the road, they found a humaa Ikeleton, which appeared perfed, except the fkull, which leemed to have been fractured or much bruifed. The body of it feemed not to have been laid at length,. No remains of any hair, linen, or woollen garments were found, nor any marks of there having been a coffin ; but about the place where the neck lay, were at

in

various forts of beads, of different fizes, lhapes, and colours, all with holes through them, as if ft rung for

a necklace, and fome of thena were in the ihape of drops for ear-rings, and thought to be agate ; fome of the l.effer ones were pebbles, others glafs, coral, or red earthen ware ; fmall wire was found with them ; but too much decayed to preferve. Near the fame place,

two more fkeletons were dug up a few days alter; with one were found fome fmall beads, the lame as with the former ; but thefe had the appearance of having been laid in coffins, which were however quite decayed, and the handles on moving them crumbled away

to duft.

The manor

of New'^ington, called afterwards from the poffeffors of it, the manor of Newington Belhouse, was, at the time of taking thefurvey of Domefday, part of the poffeffions of Hugo de Montfort ; accordingly it is thus defcribed in that record, under the general title of his pofleffions, as follows

Hugo

himfelf holds Neventone.

Edivardy and

it

was taxed at

at one^ becauje the other

is

Ederic held

tzvo /hillings then^

without his divifwn.

it

of king

and now Ehe ara»

ble land is

two carucates^ and there they are in demefne, a church and twenjy-one borderers^ and three Servants with three carucates. There are three mills ^ and 7here

is

o

4

an

^

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

200

an half of one hundred and five fijillings. the time of king founds.,

Edward

and afterwards

the Confeffor^

The whole^ in was worth twelve

three pounds^ noiv tzvelve pounds

which Hugc^has within his divifton. I'he other filling, mentioned above, as being without the divifion of Hugo de Montfort, is thus defcribed under thegeneral title of thebilhop of Baieux’s pofleflions, as being held of

him

:

Hugo

de Montfort holds of the bifhop one filing of wafie land without his divifion, and it adjoins to Neuen^ tone manor, zvhich he has within his divifion, and there

he has one borderer.

It is

and was

zvorth Jeparately fixty

fijillings.

On

the voluntary exile of

grandfon of king Henry feffions,

Hugh I.

came

this

Robert de Montfort,

above-mentioned, manor, among the

into the king’s hands.

the reign of reft of his pofin

How

it

pafied

from thence, I have not found ; but in the reign of king John, it was in the pofleffion of Baldwin, earl of Guifnes, of whom it was then purchafed by that eminent man Hugo de Burgh, earl of Kent, and afterwards chief juftice of England, who in the i2th year of king Henry lll.’s reign, had the king’s confirmation of it, who, after he had experienced the vicilTitudes of good and bad fortune oftener than any other perlon perhaps within thecompals of our Englifh annals, was afterwards fuffered to enjoy thofe pofiefiions in peace which the king had left him, among which W'as this manor, and died in the 27th year of that reign. His eldeft Ion John de Burgo, who neverthelefs

did not enjoy the

of Kent, was found to be his father’s next heir, and accordingly on his mother’s death, in the 44th year of that reign, fuccteded to it, and that year obtained a charter of free-' title of earl

warren for this manor among others. He pafied it away, in the 55th year of that reign, to his coufingerman Sir 7 homas de Belhus, delcended originally of Cambiidgefiiire,

and made fenelchal of Ponthieu.

NEWINGTON. thieu.

He afterwards

refided at Stanway, in Eflex, ia

the 13th year of which reign

whom

hereafter

;

he had a grant of free-

He

zvarren within this manor.

of

201

left

three Tons, John,

Nicholas, whofe grand-daughter

Alice, coheir of her father

Thomas, married John

Barrett, anceftor of the Barretts, of

Avely, in Effex, Thomas Barrett Leonard, lord Dacre ; and William. 'I he family of Belhoufe bore for their arms. Argent, three Hons rampant, gules to which the younger branch, fituated at Alvcly, added three crojs-

and of the late

•,

crojlets, fitchee, gules.

Sir John Belhous, the cldeft Ton,

was of Stanway, and a knight- banneret.

His defendant Sir Thomas Belhoufe, fucceeded to it,’ on whofe death, about the 48th year of king Edward III. Joane his daughter and heir entitled her hufband, Robert Knevett, efq. to this manor, which from this family had then acquired the name of Newington Belhoufe. He was fecond fon of Sir John Knevett, lord chancellor, and afterwards refided at Stanway, which he pofTeffed in her right, and anno 7 Henry IV. had a confirmation of the grant of free~warren within this manor made as above-mentioned. He bore for his arms. Argent, a hend, zvithin a bordure engrailed, fable, an annulet for His grandfon Edward Knevet, efq. at difference. length fucceeded to this manor, and died anno 16 king Henry VII. holding it in capite by knight’s fervice, leaving Elizabeth his only daughter and heir, who married Sir

John Rainsford

but

died in 1507, f. p. devolved to Elizabeth, then the wife of

After which it John Clopton, efq.

;

flie

her next heir, who was defended from Walter de Clopton, who lived in the next reign of king Henry I. They bore for their arms. as

bend ermine, between two cotizes, danceite, or. In the 27th year of Henry VIII. anno 1535, he alie-^ natedit to Thomas, lord Cromwell, afterwards earl of Elfex, before whofe attainder, which happened in the Sable, a

*

vol.

MSS. ii,

pedigree of Belhoufe. Morant’s Eflex, vol.

p. 190.

i.

p. 78,

202

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

J2d year of that

came, by the king’s purchaie of the crown, with its appendages in Brenfet and in Dimchurch, where it continued till the ift year of queen Mary, when it was granted to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold in capites who the next year palled it away to Mr. Henry Herdfon, citizen and alderman of London,' whofe grandfon Mr. Francis Herdfon alienated it, in king James I.’s reign, to Mr. Henry Brockman, of Newington, in whole de-

of

it,

reign,

it

into the hands

down to James Brockman, efq. of Beechborough, who by his will gave it to the Rev. Ralph Drake, who afterwards took the name of Brockman, and his eldcll fon James Drake Brockman, efq. now of Beechborough, is the prefent owner of it. A court baron is held for this manor. Bertram’s, now' ufualJy called Newington Bertram^ is another manor, lying adjoining to the former one of Newington Belhoufe, and feems to have been antiently a part of the barony of Averenches, or Folkellone, and an appendage to the manor of Tirlingham, in Folkeftone, parcel of it. From the family of Averenches, or Albrincis, it palfed, in like manner with that of Tirlingham above-mentioned, till the ill year of queen Mary, when it was granted, w'ith the adjoining manor fcendants

it

continued

of Ne-wington Belhoufe, and other ellates in this neighbourhood, to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold

who

next year fold them to Mr. Henry Herdfon, fince ^yhich they have palfed in like manner as has

in capite,

been mentioned above down to Jame Drake Brockefq. now of Beechborough, the prefent poflelfor of them.

man,

Beechborough,

antiently written Bilcheboroughj

is

a feat in the north- weft part of this parilh, clofe at the foot of the down or chalk hills, which once belonged to the family of Valoigns, in which it continued till

Waretius dc Valoigns dying without male See Rot. Efch, an. a and 3 Philip and Mary, 20EI1Z. pt. 5,

ilfue,

Sir

e ^ Eliz.

and



Francij

NEWINGTON. Francis Fogge,

who

married

203

daughter and coheir, became entitled to it. He died in the reign of king Edward III. and was buried in the chancel of Cheriton church, where his figure remained on his monument in Philipott’s time, crofs-legged, having his arms impaled with thofc of Valoigns. In his deicendants Beechborough continued till the latter end of queen Elizabeth, when George Fogge, efq. of Braborne, paired it away by fale to Mr. Henry Brockman, a his

younger fon of the Brockmans, of Witham, in ElTex,“ who moft probably rebuilt this feat, in which he, as well as his defeendants, afterwards refidcd, and, as appears by their wills, were buried in the chance] in this

His defeendant Sir William Brockman, was of Beechborough, and (herifF anno i8 Charles 1 he fjgnalized himfelf greatly on the king’s behalf, efpecially in the brave defence he made in 1648 of the town of Maidftone, when it was attacked by General Fairfax, the parliamentary general, with his whole church.

.

ffrength, being one of the fharpeft conflids that hap-

pened during the war. efq.

From him down

this feat,

with his

James Brockman, who was of Beechborough, where he died unmar-

other eftates, defeended

to

ried in 1767, and was buried at Newington, being the By his will laft heir male of this branch of this family.

with the reft of his eftates, to the Rev. Ralph Drake, of St. John’s college, Oxford, S. T. B. with an injunction for him to take the name

he devifed

this feat,

and arms of Brockman, which he was authorized to do by an aCl palTed next year. He made great additions and improvements to this feat, infomuch that he may be faid to be the rebuilder of it, and new laid out the adjoining grounds in the modern tafte. He died in Novemb^er, 178 1, having married Caroline, youngeft daughter of Henry Brockman, gent, of Cheriton, of a younger branch of the Beechborough family, by whom he left two fons, James, hisfucceflbr here, and Julius, “

See Morant’s Eflex, vol.

ii-

p. 108,

now

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

204

rector of this parifli, with Cheriton confolldated,, Thomas; and four daughters, Anne, married to Lock, efq. Elizabeth, to Mr. John Fofter, gent, of

now

Wm.

the Inner Temple; Mary, to William Hony wood,,, James Brockman, the* efq. of Sibeton, and Sarah. here, and is now of father eldeft fon, fucceeded his

Beechboroiigh, efq. In 1786 he married Catherine Elizabeth, daughter and foie heirefs of W. I'atton, „ D. D. prebendary of Canterbury, by whom he has had ilTue five fons, James, William, Henry, Tatton, and Edward ; and two daughters, Catherine and Caroline. Mr. Brockman bears for his arms. Or, a pattee-jitcheey fable^ on a chief of the jecond^ three fleurs de Hs, or ; which coat was granted and confirmed byi •

.

,|

.

,,j

William Camden, clarencieux, in 1606, to William Brockman, of Beechborough ; to which this family added a fecond coat, likewile of Brockman, being Parted per fefs, dancette^ argent and fible^ three martbut the prefent Mr. Brockman lets count er change d i

bears the

firfi:

coat of

Brockman

i|

.|

i|

only, quartered withij

Bunce, Glydd, and Drake.

Sene, now called Singe-farm, lies upon the hill,, about half a mile northward from the town of Hythe. It was formerly of fome note, as having been part of the pofieffions of the eminent family of Valoigns be-fore-mentioned, in which it continued till a daughter and coheir of Waretins de Valoigns carried it in mar-riage to Sir Francis Fogge, in whofe defeendants it con-tinned till the reign of king Henry VIII. when it came into the pofiTefTion of John Hony wood, efq. who refidedll here, and died pofieOed of it in 1557, anno 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, and was buried in Canterbury cathe--i dral. By his will he gave this manfion of Sene, with all the ornaments pertaining to his chapel there, and his lands in Newington, Cheriton, and Saltwood, to

|

.|

f|

•'

his

eldeft Ion

"1

homas Honywood,

Thomas Honywood,

efq. the fon,

Sene, and died there in

1

efq.

in tail male.

likewife refided

580, without male

.1

at.,

ifluej upon.,

which

NEWINGTON.

205

which it devolved by the above entail to John Honywood, efq. his younger brother, who was of Evington, which from that time became the refidence of hisdefcendantsof the eldeft branch of this family, afterwards baronets, Sir

whom

in

this eftate

John Honywood,

fent polTcfTor

of

Blackwose,

bart.

has continued

now of Evington,

down

to

the pre-

it."

alias

Canons-court,

is

manor ad-

a

joining to Sene farm, in this parifli, which had the latter

name from

nons, of the

its

having been a religious houfe for ca-

Premonftratenfian order.

cated to St. Nicholas, and was a

cell

It

was dedi-

to the priory of

Lavendene, in Buckinghamfhire but the revenues cf it being very inlufficient for the fupport of the members of it, who deferring their abode here, wandered about the count)', to the fcandal of their order ; which induced the chapter of it, at the inftance of the barons, that is the free biirgeffes, of Hythe, to unite this cell to the abbey of St. Radigund, of the fame order, with the liberty of continuing it, or of converting it into a grange or farm, which latter the abbot of St. Radigund’s did, removing the canons and other members of it to his own abbey. In which (late it continued, among the pofTefTions of the abbey, 27th year of king Henry VIII. when it was till the fupprefled by the a6t of that year, as not being of the clear yearly value of two hundred pounds. Thus coming into the hands of the crown, the king granted this manor, among the reft of the pofleftions of the abbey, that order, at

j

29th year, to the archbilhop, who not long afterwards again exchanged it with the king, who granted aleafe of it to Thomas Honywood, efq. whofe youngeft fon John Honywood, efq. of Elmfted, feems to have obtained a grant of the fee of it, in whofe defendants, feaied at Evington, afterwards baronets, this in his

*

See a

full

account of the

Honywoods under

Elmfled.

manor

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

»06

J

has continued down to Sir John Honywood, court bare, of Evington, the prefent owner of it. baron is held for this manor. Combe is another manor in the northern part of this parilh, which was antiently part of the poflefllons of

manor

,

A

Bertram de

Crioll,

who

held

it

in the

'

reign of king

Henry III. and gave it, by the defeription of his land of Cumbe, with the confent of his fons and his heirs, in and perpetual alms, together with his body, to the abbot and convent of St. Radigund,* for the maintenance of five canons, there to celebrate for the fouls of himfelf, his anceftors, and fucceffors, which was confirmed in 1256 by Margaret, countefs of Kent, as being of her fee. After which it continued among the poffcflions of the abbey till the fuppreflion of it in the 27th year of king Henry Vlll. two years after which the king granted this manor, among the reft of the eftates of the abbey, to the archbifliop, and he not long afterwards exchanged the greateft part of them again with the king but this manor was referved with fome others out of this exchange. Since which it has continued part of the pofTeffions of the fee of Canterbury to the prefent time, having been from time to time demifed on a beneficial leafe, Mr. William Rigden, of Echinghill, in Liminge, being the prefent leffee of it. The woods called Combe woods^ parcel of this manor, are held of the archbifhop by a feparate leafe, by James Drake Brockman, efq. of Beechborough. free

.

1

*

..

,

;

i

I

j

|

CHARITIES.

Thomas Harvey, feiiior, of Newington, by Ihs will in 1460, in the Prerogative office, Canterbury, gave his two tenenients ami gardens, with their appurtenances, to the ufe, maintaining, and feeding of fuch as were adlually inhabitants, and poor, faithful Chriftians, and in the greateft need, and wanting 'hofpitality, for ever.

X Regift, Sci Radig. cart. 35a, Dugd.

Mon.

vol.

iii.

p.

71.

William

I

i

i

I

i



William Rolfe

NEWINGTON. gave, as

20;

fuppofed, about eighty years fince, a fum of money to the churchwardens, for the benefit of poor perfons not receiving other affiRance from the parifli, the annual produce of which is 2I. 5s. The poor conftantly relieved are about eighteen, cafually as is

many.

This parish is within thcEccLEsiASTiCAL jurisdiction of the dtoccje of Canterbury, and dcanvy of Dover.

The

church, which is dedicated to St. Nicholas, confifts of two ifles, the northern one being both fmall and low, and two chancels, having a wooden pointed turret fet

on the roof

at the weft end, in

which hang

five bells.

In the chancels, as well as other parts of this church, are feveral monuments, and numbers of graveftones, fome with brafles, of the family of Brock-

man, who

buried in a vault in the chancel, and among others a ftone, with two figures in brafs for Thomas Chylton, obt. 1 501, andThomafine his wife; with the figures of three children. In the north ifle a lie

A

brafs for J ohn Clarke, vicar, obt. 1501. monument for Thomas Booth, pnftor of this parifli, obt. 1650. ftone with a braft plate for Chriftopher Raittinge,

A

M. D. an Hungarian, for feven years chief phyfician to the emperor of Ruffia, buried here in 1612. The cafe of the font is of oak, moft curioufly carved, and worth obfervation. In the church porch are feveral antient ftones, on one of which, coffin fafhion, is a crofs botonyy having the like at the lower part of it, only of a fmaller fize.

The church of Newington antiently belonged to the abbey of Guynes, in the county of Artois, in Flanders, to which it was appropriated before the 8th year of king Richard II. ^ and it remained part of the polfeffions of it till the reign of king Henry V. when it came into the king’s hands by ekheat, on the death of Katherine, then late abbefs of it, and remained in the See Stev,

Moa,

vol.

i.

p. 41.

crown

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED.

2o3 crown,

till

king Henry VI.

in his

17th ypr, granted

church, with the advowfon of the vicarage, and the lands belonging to the abbey in Newington, to John Kempe, archbilbop of York, with licence for him to fettle the fame on his newYounded college of this

pure and perpetual alms, and to appropriate the fame to the members of it and their fucceffors for ever.* In which fituation it remained till the

Wye,

in free,

fupprelTion of that college in the 36th year of king Henry VIII. when it was, with all its ponTcfllons, fur-

rendered into the king’s hands, who that year granted this church, with the prefentation of the vicarage, among other premifes, to Walter Bucler, efq. to hold in capite, and with certain provifoes for the maintenance of the curates and fchoolmafler of Wye. Which grant, on his non-performance of thofe conditions, became forfeited, and king Charles I. in his 2d and 5th years, granted them, with the provifo for the

payment

of certain ftipends to the above-mentioned curates and fchoolmafler, to

Rob; Maxwell, from whofe

heirs this

redlory, with the advowfon of the vicarage of Newington, was afterwards fold to Sir William Brockman, of Beechborough, whence it has defeended down to James Drake Brockman, efq. now of Beechborough, the prefent owner of the impropriate redtory of this church, with the advowfon of the vicarage of it. The

llipend to be paid to the curate and fchoolmafler of

Wye,

in

Robert Maxwell’s grant, was

fifty

pounds to

the former, and fixteen pounds per annum to the latter, out of the parfonages of Newington, Brenfet, and

Boughton Aluph,and the vicarage appropriate of Wye then granted ; which being now in different hands, the portion of thofe flipends allotted from the par*

Dugd. Mon.

vol. ii. pt. ii. p. 193. See in Harleian MSS. 52-27 ; Propoficio ad probandiim diutinam polleflioneni (Sc. incaufa ventilata) coram Joh. Arch. Cant, occafione Eccl. de Newentone inter alias contra Abb.& Conv.de GuUnes, f. loS.**

No.

fonages

NEWINGTON.

209

fonages ofNewington and Brenfet is twenty-one pounds per annum, which continues to be paid at this time/ The vicarage of Newington is valued in the king’s books at 7I. 12s. 6d. and the yearly tenths at 15s. 3d.

was valued at forty pounds, communicants one hundred and feventy-five. It is now of the clear In 1588

yearly

1771

it

In the year

value of 48I. 17s. 3d.

certified

this vicarage

to the reftory of Cheri-

was united

ton, both being in the prefentation'of the fame patron. Within this parifh, but fo near the town of Hythe,

by many it was thought to be part of it, flood a chapel by the fea fhore, dedicated to St. Nicholas, where the fifhermen, after any deliverance from danger at fea, ufed Co offer their thanks, and one or more of This chatheir befl fiflies, in gratitude to that faint. and even to decay, fell pel, foon after the reformation, the ruins of it have not been vifible for a great length of time.^ that

CHURCH OF HEMHNGTON. PATRONS, Or

vie a

by 'vchom prefented.

William Brockman, gent,

Thomas Baivnes, A. B. Sept. 19,

Henry Brockman, gent,

Thomas Sandford, A.

1587, obt. 1615.

The King, hac

...

M. Dec.

20, 1615. The fame, fecond induilion, July

vice, ......

I, 1629 John Parkhurji,

S.

T.

B. obt.

1635.=

yames Brockman,

Chailes Harflcet, obt. 1672. £t. 8, Thomas Hayes, A. M.

0

efq.

1672, rdigiietl 1674.

James

JBrome,

A. M.

in

1677,

obt. 1719.'*

William Brockman,

Francis Inman, clerk, June 6, 1719, religned 172.5.

efq.

iiigand piety, and vigilant in the go-

a See vol. vli. p, 357.

b Prefented

Ryrn. c

1

by the

'a‘d. vol. xix. p-

Lewis

VOL,

keeper.

145.

he was vaar of this

fays,

church, being a

lord

man

VIII.

vernment of Baliol college, of which he was maftcr, and became chaplain to archbilhop Abbot, nbt.xt. 74 *

<1

of lingular Jearri-

P

And

vicar of Clieriton,

PATROb'S,

— 210

.

FOLKESTONE HUNDRED. PATRONS',

^antes Brockman

VICARS.

(jfc.

Thomas Caulty^ A. M. Jan. 25^, 1725, rdigned 1726. John Bunce, A. B. Sept. 10,

ejq

^

1726, refigned 1737.*

Richard Hujband, A M. March 22, 1738, rdigned 1739. Edmund Parker^ A. M. Nov. 9, 1739, Rev, James Drake Brockman

.

...

George Lynchy A.

*7> 1770.^ 1770, obt.

M.

1789.'*

J, H. Backhou/e^A.lA, refigned J793Julius Drake Brockman, A 1793, the prefent vicar. e He was then rcftor of Brenfet, which he rcligiied with this vicarage in 1737, and was then prefented to the redlory of Snargate, and of Chinkford, in

f

And

M.

of Cheriton. of Cheriton, in whofe time that reftory was united t» this vicarage of Newington, re<£lor

Z Likewife

re<£lor

£^ex.

THE HUNDRED OF HEANE LIES

the next eaftward from that of Folkeftone,

being written in Domefelay, Hen^ but in the 7th year of king Edward I. it was fpelt as it is at prefent, the archbifhop of Canterbury being then lord of it, IT

CONTAINS WITHIN ITS BOUNDS THE PARISHES OF 2. Saltwood. I. PosTLiNG ; and ||

And the churches of thofe pariflies, and likewife a fmall part of the parifli of Limne, the church of which is in another hundred.



POSTLING IS the next parifli from that of Newington eaftward, being written in Domefday, PoJHingeSy and in‘later records botli Pojllinge and Pojiling,

The

;

POSTLING.

The

parish ofPoftling

2II iinpleafant

Jies

and unfre-

foot of the ridge of down or chalk The village, its northern boundaries.

quented, at the hills, which are having the church on the

fide of

it,

no great very wet and

though

at

from the foot of them, lies Iwampy, from the numbers of fprings in and about it. At a fmall diftance from it is a farm, called the Pent and lower down another, called Shrine ; both belongdiftance

Edward Knatchbull,

In the eaftern part is Poftling-lees, being a grafs- common of about The inhabitants of all the houfes in tins fixty acres. ing to Sir

bart.

Pent and Poftiing-court, are entitled to pafturage on this common, at the proportion of one cow to an acre and an half. Round the upper part of it are feveral houfes, one of which is the parfonage ; and at the lower corner of it are Poftling-vents, where there is much coppice wood. The parifli is about three miles each w'ay j the I'oil in the upper or northern part is chalky, but the reft of it is a Under ftiff panny clay, and at molt times very wet. the hills, above the church, rife thofe fprings, which form the head of that branch of the river Stour, called, to diftinguilh it from the other which riles at Lenham, the Old Stour, the principal one of which riles dole to the church here, under the foot of that hill which has a fingle yew-tree on it. This fpring, which comes out of the rock, at five or fix fpout-holes, big enough to receive a man’s hand, is, though there are five or fix others within half a mile of it, and all of them contained within the fame finns, what is commonly called the river head, and is a conftant fountain, which never Hence it flows through this fails in the drieft feafons. parifti to Stanford, and thence under a bridge acrofs the road to Weftenhanger, and lo on to Alhford and Canterbury. When Lam barde wrote his Perambulation, in 1570, here was a parki but it has been long fince parilh, except thofe of the

di (parked.

p z

The

HEANE HUTrORED. The manor of Postling was, at

212

the time of taking the furvey of Doniefday, part of the pofleflions of

Hugo

de Montfort, under the general title of whole lands it is thus entered in that record : In Hen hundred^ Roger holds of Hugo., Pojllinges, Sbernbiga held it. It was taxed at two Julings and an half The arable land is thirteen carucates. In demefne there are three, and Jixteen villeins, with /even borderers

,

\

'

.

having Jeven carucates.

i

There are two /mail churches,

and two mills of Jix Jhillings, and forty acres of meadow.

Wwd

for the pannage offorty hogs.

Edivard

the Confejjor

it

was worth

In the time of king ten pounds,

and af-

ierwards one hundred fhillings, nozv fourteen pounds. Of this manor Ralph de Cur befpine holds three dennes,

which are without the

divifion,

and are worth

fifteen

fhillings.

The fame Hugo

holds half a filing, which Aldred bot held of king Edward without a halimote. It was taxed at half a filing. The arable land is three carucates.

There

one villein, with four borderers. Tl here is no car neat e remaining, one mill of tzventy-five pence, and five acres of meadozv. is

On

the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort, his grandfon, in the reign of king Henry I. this manor,

among the rdl of his

polTeflions, came into the kino's hands, whence it was, not long afterwards, granted ^to Philip de Columbers, or de Columbariis, as the name was then written in Latin, a family of eminent reputation, defeended from Ranulph de Colufnbels, who is feveral times mentioned in Domefday, as holding lands in this county. Philip de Columbers, grandfon of Philip above mentioned, in the 3 2d year of Henry IIL obtained licence for free-vrarren within his manor here, the church of which he gave to the canons of St. Radigimd. His fon of the fame name, confirmed the above gift to that abbey, and at the lame time granted to It befides the tithes of feventeen acres of land, which he had taken into his park here, and dying

anno 5 king

'

POSTLING.

213

king Edward I. left his brother John his heir, who held it by knight’s fervice of Dover caftle, being part of thofe fees which made up the barony called the He died anno 34 of that reign, having Conftabularie. received fummons to parliament among the barons of His Ton Philip de Columbers died in the this realm. 16th year of king Edward III.'' ponfelTed inter alia of this manor, jointly with Eleanor his wife, who thea fucceeded to it, and died pofTelTed of it next year, when it was found by the inquilition, that James de Audeley was her next heir. He paflTed it away to John de Delves, of Delves-hall, in Staffordfliire, who was one of the retinue, and an efquire to the above-mentioned James de Audeley, baron of Heleigh, and attended him in the wars in France. He was a perfon of eminent account, and in regard to his fignal fervices at the battle of Poidiers, in France, added a part of the lord Audley’s arms to his own, which were Argent, a chevron, gules, between three delves, or turves, fable, altering the plain chevron, gules, to fretty, or, in alluhon to the lord Audley’s arms, which was. Gules, a fret, or.

He

was likcwife one of the efquires of the body to Edward III. and was knighted and made one of thejuftices of the king’s bench, and died anno 43 Edward III. to have veiled this manor /. />.' He fceins at his death by his will in truftees, who that fame year fold it to Sir John Fitzalan de Arundel, who was ufually called Sir John Arundel, and bore for his arms, Gules, a lion rampant, or. He. was third fon of Richard, fecond earl of Arundel, by Eleanor his fecond wife, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, earl of Lancafter, and became lord Maltravers. He was drowned on fhipboard, near the coaft of Ireland, in the 3d year of Richard II. His grandfon John Fitzalan, lord Maltravers, in the 3d year of king Henry V. by the death of his kinfmaii ’’

i

See Cotton’s Records, p. 3, 6, and 7,6. See Baronettage, edit. 1720, vol, ii. p. 294.

p

3

Thomas,

214 Thomas,

heane hundred.

of Arundel, fucceeded to that title as neareft heir male to him, and it was confirmed to him by parliament ; in whofe defcendants, earls of Arundel, this manor continued down to Henry, earl of Arundel, who in the 38th year of king Henry VIII. alienated it to Sir Anthony Aucher, of Otterden, who died anno 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, and was fucceeded by John Aucher, efq. of Otterden -place, his eldeft fon, who leaving by his firft wife an only daughter and heir Anne, fhe entitled her hufband Sir Humphry Gilbert, earl

to the potreffion ot it,‘‘ He fold this manor in the 2 ift year of queen Elizabeth to Thomas Smith, efq. of

Weftenhanger, commonly called the ('uftomer, whole grandfon Sir Thomas Smithe, K. B. was in 1628 created vifcount Strangford, of the kingdom of Ireland. His fon Philip, vifcount Strangford, conveyed this manor, among his other eflates, to truftees, for the payment of his debts, and they, at the latter end of king Charles Ik’s reign, alienated it to I’homas Gomeldon, efq. of Sellindge, whofe fon Richard dying/, p. Meliora his filler became entitled to it, and fhe carried it marriage to

Thomas

Stanley, efq. of Lancafhire, on whofe attainder for treafon in 1 7 1 5, it became forfeited in

to the

crown during

their joint lives,

and was by the

commiflioners of forfeited eflates fold, for that term, to Sir William Smith. On their death the poflefiion and inheritance of it returned to their fon Richard Stanley, efq. who being infane, a commifTion of lunacy

was granted, and William Dicconfon, who had married his fifter Meliora, was appointed committee for this purpofe, who, on account of this manor and other etfates being heavily incumbered with debts, obtained anadf in 1750 to fell fome part of them, to difeharge the fame ; in confequence of which, this manor of Poltling was that year alienated to the truftees of Sir Wind-

ham “

Knatchbull, bare, then a minor.

He died pofreffed

See an account of her vol. vi. of this hillory, p. 476.

of

!

^

!

POSTLING.

.

215

763, unmarried, and was fucceeded in title and cftates by his uncle and heir Sir Edward Knatchbull, bart. of Hatch, whofe fon of the fame name, andM. P. for this county, is the prefent proprietor of this manor. Henewood, now called the Honywoo'd faTniy is an

of

it

in

1

cftate in the fouthern part of this parilh,

which was

for-

merly accounted a manor. It was in very early times the property and refidence of the family of Honywood, antiently written Henewood, which name they aflumed from it ; and it appears by the leiger book of Horton de Henewood, who then relided here, was a liberal benefador to it ; but they afterwards quitted this place for their feat ot Sene, in New-

Edmund

priory, that

At

ington, near Hythc.

John Honywood, efq.

length

and having married twice, devifed this eftate to his eldeft fon by his fecond wife, Robert Honywood, efq. of Poftling, in whofe of Sene, became poflefled of

it,

continued down to John Le Mot Honywood, efq. of MarkHiall, in Effex, who dying/. ./). in defcendants

it

kinfman Robert Honywood, efq. afterwards of Markfhall, whofe grandfon Richard dying an infant, in 1758, the poflTeffion of it 1693, by

came

his will devifed

it

to his

to his only furviving uncle Philip

Honywood, efq.

of Markfhall, and general of his Majefty’s forces, &c.' who dying in 1785, without furviving ilTue, gave it by Filmer Honywood,

his relation

will to

Markfhall, in Effex,

There

no

arc

parochial

ftantly relieved are

is

now of

the prefent owner of

charities.

it.

The poor con-

about twenty, cafually

forty.

within the ecclesiastical jurisof the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of

PosTLiNG diction Eleham.

who

efq.

is

church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is very chancel, having antient, and confiffs of one ifle and one which hang a low pointed tower at the welf end, in chancel, three bells. At the north-eall corner of the

The

account of the defcent of of Honywood, in vol, v. p. 437. '

See a

full



p

.



this

manor

in the family

within

2i6 within the fcription

heane hundred. altar- rails, is an antient tomb without any

on

it.

No

part of the

church

the chancel, againft the north wall,

is

is

ceiled.

in-

In

a fmall ftone fixed

with an infcription in old capitals, denoting, that on the 19th cal. Sept, on the day of St. Eufebius, confeflbr of the Roman church, this church was dedicated in honor of St. Mary. This Kennet takes notice of, in

it,

in his Parochial Antiquities, p.

609, for, fays he, in the form firft of conlecrating churches in England which we meet with, at a fynod held at Calchyth, under Wulfred, archbifliop, anno 816, it was decreed, that when a church was built, care Ihould be taken by the diocefan that the faint, to whom it was dedicated, fhould be pidlured on the wall, on a tablet, or on the altar j and Dugdale had an old tranfcript of a decree made by archbifhop Winchelfea, who died anno i J13, and confirmed by archbifhop Reynolds his fuccefTor, by which the parilhes throughout his province were to provide, that the image of the faint, to whofe memory the church was dedicated, Ihould be carefully preferved in the chancel of every parifh church.

The

church of PofUing was antiently appendant to the manor, and continued fo till Philip de Columbers, the third lord of it of that name, in the reign of king Henry III. gave it to the abbot and convent of St. Radigund, which gift was confirmed anno 1260 by that king, by his charter of infpeximusy and by his fuccefTor Philip de Columbers. This church was appropriated to the above abbey before the 8th year of Richard II. in which flate it remained, together with the advowfon of the vicarage, till the diflblution of the abbey in the 2,7th year of king Henry VIII. when it came into the king’s hands, who granted the fcite of it, with all its pofTefTions, that year, to the archbifhop, in

for other lands,'"

exchange

who

fbon afterwards conveyed them back again to the crown j but in the deed of it, among ” Augmentation-office inrolm. Kent,

box A.

21.

Other

POSTLING.

217

Other exceptions, was that of all churches and advovvfons of vicarages; by virtue of which, the appropriation of the church of Poftling, together with the advowfon of the vicarage, remained part of the poflef-

of the

of Canterbury, as they do at this time, his grace the archbifliop being now entitled to the inheritance of this appropriation, as well as to the advowfon of the vicarage. In the valuation of fpiritualities and temporalities, in the diocefe of Canterbury, anno 8 Richard 11. 1384, among fmall benefices not taxed to the tenth, was this of Poftling, then valued at four pounds. fions

fee

books at 61 8s. ild. and the yearly tenths at 12s. 9ld. In 1588 it was valued at forty pounds, communicants fixty-fix. In 1640 it was valued at fifty pounds, communicants as before. Archbifliop Sancroft, in 1688, for the improvement of this vicarage, upon the near expiration of the leafe of the parfonage, granted a new leafe of it for twentyone years, determinable with the incumbency without any fine, at the fmall improved rent of four pounds per annum, to anfwer the profits of the future fine to the revenues of his fee, for the foie benefit of the vicar and his fucceftbrs ; by which means this vicarage was augmented to double its former value ; fo that now the vicar pays ten pounds rent yearly to the archbifliop, as well for yearly rent as in lieu of fines, and the leafe is in courfe renewed to each incumbent vicar. It

was valued

in the king’s

.

CHURCH OF POSTLING. patrons Or

hy

whom

vicars.

prefented.

The Archbijhop.

TFHliam Hawkins,

Abraham

Ireland,

refig.

1588.

March

1588, obt, 1608." Alexander Lmnfden, A.

M.

3,

July

22, 1608, obt. 1625. »

He

exchanged the vicarage of

Waltham with

his predcceflbr for this of

Poftling.

PATRONS,

HEANE HUNDRED.

8

PATRONS, Tie

VICARS.

C^C.

Robert Udney^ A. M. 1625, obt. 1627.

Archhl/hojt

Edward

E?n/ttage,

6, 1627, and James Kaye, Ofl.

May

17,

A. M. June

in 1643.

1662, re-

7,

figned 1668.°

Auguft

Bajil Kennet,

7,

1668,

obt 1686.'* John Turnery clerk, Feb. 26, i686.'>

Robert Payne, obt.

John

Jones,

0

(?V.

174**'^

A. M. March 26,

1742, obt. Dec. I 750.® Feb. 12, I 7 S''»

Silas Drayton,

obt,

I

767.^

John A. Stock, A. M. March 7, 1767, obt. 792.“ Rich. Blackett Dechair, L. L. B. I

1792, the prefent vicar.* o

He

refigned tbis vicarage for that

of Newendcn, p He held this vicarage with the He was fareftory of Dimchurch. ther to White Kennet, bilhop of Peterborough. See Wood’s Ath. Oxott. vol.

ii.

p.

408,

1

131.

q He rebuilt the houfe of this vicarage. r Likcwlfe reilor of Saltwood, • The profits of this vicarage had

been fcqueftered feme months before his death, for nt-gle£l of duty. t He refigned the reifVory of Crundal for this vicarage, and was buried

Crundal church.

in

•J

He wa

preferred in Gloucefter-

and was alfo one of the fix preachers of Canterbury cathedral. * And vicar of Shebbertfwell, with Coldred. fliire,

SALT WOOD LIES

the next pariih

weftward from Newington,

being called antiently in Latin, De Bofeo Salfo, or the Saltwood, from its near neighbourhood to the fea. In the time of the Saxons it was written Sealtvi'de j in the Book of Domefday, Salteode ; and in other writings foon afterwards, both Saltwode and Saltwood, as at prefent.

having a fine opening between the hills fouthward towards the fea. There The are about forty houfes difperfed throughout it. It

is

fituated very healthy,

village

SALTWOOD.

219

middle of it, on Saltwood-green, and the church and parfonage at a fmall diftance from it, and die caftle about a quarter of a mile from them, the ruins of which are very fpacious and magnificent. The outward walls are partly remaining, being of an oval form, within which is a very broad and deep moat, now dry. The inner gatehoufe, which has but lately been madeufe of as a farm-houfe, is very ftatcly, having two fine circular towers one on each fide, and the infide finely vaulted, and arched in every part with alhlar ftone. Over the moat to it was formerly a drawbridge, and over the arch of the gateway is a hollow, where the portcullis ufed to be let down. It was, the greatefl part of it, rebuilt by archbifliop Courtenay, in the reign of king Richard II. whofe arms being, 'Three bezants^ wi'h a label of three points-^ are on one fide, as they are, impaled with thofe of the fee of Canterbury ^ on the other. On the inner fide of the moat is a very high and flrong inner wall, with towers and baftions at diftances throughout it. Within the fpace of it are very {lately ruins, particularly of the chapel, finely vaulted underneath ; the great hall, the great dining-room, and other apartments of diftindlion, and many inferior offices about them ; and at a fmall diftance a large

village {lands in the

fquare well, fteined with quarry-ftone. Gale, in his Comment on Antoninus’s Itinerary, fuppofesthat here flood a caftle, built by the Romans, to defend the port

of Hythe, which had come into ufe in lieu of the Por~ tus LemaniSy and that it was one of thofe forts necefTary for the defence of Britain in the time ot the early Saxons. To this caftle, he fays, there was a pratorian wajy which led from Durolevum, and another from Durovernumy or Canterbury, which went on to Stutfall caftle, and cut the former one at the village of Leming. This paved way is ftill to be feen, up the hill from Hythe towards the caftle and about a mile further on toward the Stone-ftreet, near the road to which, on the hill behind Beechborough, are the remains of a Roman camp, ;

HEANE HUNDRED.

220 camp, and

feveral tumuli.

In

1580 an earthquake

happened, which threw down much of this cartle. The weftern part of this parifh is very fandy, much covered with coppice wood, and the grounds exceedingly parkifli, having formerly been part both of Weftenhangcr and Saltwood parks, the park-houfe of the former being hill remaining there, near which is an eftate called Great handling., which has for fome time paft belonged to the family of Deedes, and now to William Deedes, efq. of Hythe, who is building for his refidence a manfion on a part of this eftate, under the diredion of Bonomi, the architedl. The parifli is well watered by two ftreams ; one of which, the Slabrook, rifes from different fprings near Poflling vents, and under the hills near Brockhuli bufhes, and after having at a fmall diftance united,

it

flows acrofs this parifli, and

thence into the fea weft of Hythe, at the north eafl: end of the extremity of the great bank of fea beach, which there lines the fliore, two miles long and a quar-

of a mile broad ; the other, called the Saltwood brook, comes from under Beechborough hill down under Saltwood caftlcjthe extenfive moat of which, though now dry, it formerly fupplied, and runs thence foutheaftward, on the other fide of Hythe, into the fea with The furface of this parifh is very hilly the former. and uneven, efpccially the fouthern part of it, at the boundary of which the quarry or land hills crofs it from eaft to weft, a very fmall part of the town of Hythe, fituated on them, being within the bounds of About one hundred years ago, an anchor was it. ploughed up in the valley between Saltwood caftle and Hythe, which makes it probable that the fea flowed up nearer to it than it does at prefent. family named Eftday, refided at Saltwood in the reigns of queen Elizabeth and king James I. who bore Azure a griffin Jegreant^ argent ^ a chief of the fecond i ter

A

y

See Packe’s Explanation of his Chart, p, 79,

:

SALTWOOD. as appears

by their pedigree

221

in the Vifitation

of Kent,

anno 1619.

In this parifh was formerly a manor, called Kellovvs, the fituation of which has been long

unknown.

Saltwood was

given in the year 1036, together with Hethe, to Chrift-church, in Canterbury, in the prefence of king Cnute, by one of the prince's of England, named Haldene. In Dugdale’s Monafticon he is ftiled Princeps Anglorum ; in Decern. Script. Searpa, and in Leland he is called Halfden, which feems his more proper namc.^ At the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, anno loSo, this place was held of the archbifhop by knight’s fervice, by Hugo de Montfort ; accordingly it is entered in that record, under the general title of P?rra Militum Archiepi, i. e. lands held ,of the archbilhop by knight’s fervice, as follows In Hen hundred^ Hugo de Montfon holds of the archblfhop^ Salteode. It was taxed at jeven fillings. In the time of king

Edward the

Confejfor,

and now for three

The arable land is fifteen carucates. In demefne there are tzvo carucates^ and thirty -three villeins^ with iivelve borderers having nine caruiates and an half. There is a church and two fervantSy and nine mills of izventy JhillingSy and thirty-three acres of meadow. Wood fufficient for the pannage of tzventy hogs. To this manor belong two hundred and tzventyfive burgeffes in the borough of Hede. Between the borough and the manor in fillings.

y

the time of king

fixteen pounds

^

Edward

the

ConfeU'oVy it zvas zvorth

zvhen he received

the whole twenty nine pounds

it

eight pounds y nozo in

and fix fhillings and four-

fence.

Hugode Montford

repaired the caftle of Saltwood, which is faid to have been fiifb built by Efcus, or Oifc, king of Kent, whofucceeded his father Hengilt in the year 488 j but Robert de Montfort, grandfon of Hugh

f

Diigd.

Mon.

vol.

Itin. vol. vii. p. 132,

i.

p. 21.

and

vol.

Dec, Script, p.400.

col. 2223. Leland's

iii.

l)ffore-

'

HEANE HUNDRED.

222

before-mentioned, favouring the title of Robert Currhofe, in oppofition to king Henry I. to avoid the confequences of it, fubmitted to a voluntary exile, and all After which it his ellates came into the king’s hands. appears to have come into the polTeHion of Henry dc Elfcx, baron of Ralegh, in Ellex, his chief leat, conftable

of England, as well

as the king’s Itandard bearer,

and at times refided at it, he being appointed lord warden, pro tembut by his cowardly milbehaviour in a fkirmifli pore in Wales, he forfeited all his pofielTions, which the

by inheritance, who

kingfeized into

This, fo

among

far

his

rebuilt this caftle,

own

hands, as efeheats to the crown.*"

as related to the

manor and

caftle,

was

thofe complaints, which archbiftiop Becket ac-

cufed the king of, as having in fo doing violated the privileges of his fee, by feizing on a fief belonging to

and although in the year 1 170, anno 17 Henry II. a compromife was entered into between them, and the king ilfued his writ for the reftitution of all fuch lands and fees as had been taken from the archbilhop yet this manor and caftle remained in the hands of the crown, till king John, in his firft year, reftored the pofieirion of it to the fee of Canterbury, to be held of From which time it became one of the Ifim in capite. palaces for the archbifliops refidence, and they appointed a conftable for the chief government of it under them. And 1 find by the patent-rolls, that king Edward II. in his 19th year, was lodged in this caftle. Archbiibop Courtenay, who came to the fee in the 5th year of king Richard II. beautified and enlarged it at a very confiderable expence, and inclofed a park round it, making it his ufual refidence; and archbiibop Chicheley refided here anno 4 Henry V. as did at times

it

;

;

feveral of his

the 2 2d year of king ’

till archbiftiop Warham, in Henry VIII. demifed it for a

fucceflbrs,

See a fuller account of him under Braborne. Morant’s Efi, p. 272,

fex, vol.

term

,

SALTWOOD.

223

term to Sir Edward Nevil. But the magnificence and grandeur of it was afterwards the occafion of its lofs to the church

;

for archbifliop

Cranmer,

in

that reign,

obferving the murmurs and envy that his pofiefiion'^of this and other fumptuous houfes brought on him, found himfelf obliged to part with moft of them and ac; cordingly, in the 31ft year of that reign, he conveyed this manor and caftle, with the park, lands, and appurtenances belonging to them, inter alia,\n exchange to the king; whence they were that year granted to Tho-

mas Cromwell,

earl of Ellex,

on whofe

attainder, the year afterwards, they reverted again to the crown, where they remained till the ift year of Edward when they were granted to John Dudley, earl of Warwick, to hold in capitCy^- who, in the 3d year of that reign, joined with Joane his wife in the re- conveyance

VE

of them to the king, in exchange for others in other who the next year granted them to Edward Fynes, lord Clinton, to hold by the like fervice; and he, the year afterwards, conveyed this manor, callle, counties,

and park back again to the crown, and in the ift year of queen Mary, had a grant of them again ; but he not long afterwards pafled them away to Mr. Thomas Broadnax, of Hythe,in whofe time the park here feems to have been difparked, and he alienated them to Richard Monins, who refided here, being the eldeft fon of Edward Monins, of Walderlhare. He died anno 3 Elizabeth, and then they were alienated to Mr. Rem_ nald Knatchbull, third fon of John Knatchbull,^of IVlei fham, and he, in the iSth year of queen Elizabeth's reign, fold

them

to Crifpe, wlio again inveffed

them by

Knatchbull j for in the 31E year of that reioii Reginald Knatchbull conveyed them to \Villia7 ii

fale in

Mr.

Gibbon, gent, of Welfdiff, and he in the 37th year of it parted with them to Norton Knatchbull, cfq. of

He was afterwards created duke of Northumberland. more of him, vol. iii. of tins hiftory, u. 68. ^

Sec

Me-'-fiiam,

y

HEANE HUNDRED. Merfham, afterwards knighted, who four

;

224

years after-

wards difpofed of his intereft in them by fale to Robert Cranmer, efq. of Chevening, and he died poflTeffed of them in 1619, leaving Anne his foie daughter and heir, who carried them in marriage to Sir Arthur Herrys, of Crixey, in ElTex,* whofe eldeft fon Cranmer Herrys, alienated them, in king Charles I.’s reign, to Sir William Boteler, who refided at Saltwood caftle during the life of his eldeft brother Sir John Boteler, ofTefton, on whofe death /. p. in 1634, becoming his heir, he removed thither, and being a man of exemplary loy-

was by king Charles I. in 1641, created a baronet, whofe grandfon Sir Philip Boteler, bart. of 1 efton,in 1712 fold this manor and caftle, with the Grange farm, and other lands belonging to them, to Brook Bridges, efq. of Goodnefton, auditor of the impreft, whole fon of the fame name was created a baronet, and his great-grandfon Sir Brook Bridges, bart. now of Goodnefton, is the prefent owner of them. A court ieet and court baron is held for the manor

alty,

of Saltwood.

Brockhull,

alias

Thorne,

is

a

manor and man-

fion here, the venerable ruins of which, built of ftone, are ftill vifible on the knoll of a hill, clofe to the road,

fouth-weftward from the church j and though there is but little remaining of them now, yet what is left fufhciently fhews both the antiquity and great extent of this manfion, which was once the reftdence of an antientand knightly famil)'’, who took their furname from it j their arms being. Gules, a crofs en^ ^railed, between tzvelve crojs-crojlets, jitcheey argent are on the roof of the cloifters of Canterbury cathedral and they w'ere in the church of Afti, impaled with thofe of St. Nicholas j one of whom, Sir Warren de Brockhull, was feated here in the reign of king Edward I. at a fmall diftance



See moreof theCranmers and Herrys’s, vol.

tory, p.

1

iii.

of this hif*

iS.

Elis

SALTWOOD.

22C^

an eminent man in king Edward III.’s reign, being fheriff, and knight of the (hire in feveral different years of it, and a confervator of the peace, an office of no fmall confequence and reputation in thofe times, when only three or four of the principal nobility and gentry were entrufted with it. He left two fons, John, of Brockhull, and Thomas, of Calehill, under which a further account of him and Sir John de Brockhull, his defcendants may be feen. the eldeft, kept his fhrievalty here in the 42d year of king Edward III. His fon William had two fons, Ni-

His grandfbn

cholas,

Sir

who was

Thomas was

of Aldington, in Thurnham, where

remained for feveral' defccnts ; and Thomas, the younger fon, who inherited Brockhull, and dying in 1437, was buried in the north ifle of this church, which had been built by his mother, leaving an only daughter and heir Elizabeth, who carried it in marriage to Richard Sellyng, who afterwards refided here ; but his fon John Sellpg leaving a foie daughter his pofterity

and heir Joane, (he carried it in marriage, in 1498, to John Tournay, fon of John Torney, merchant of the ftaple at Calais, defcended from a younger brother of this name in Lincolnfliire, who was afterwards of Brockhull. In confequence of which marriage, the Tournays have fince quartered the arms of Selling, being Verty a chevron^ between three griffins heads, erafed, or, with their own. His defcendant Thomas Tournay, of Brockhull, died in 1592, and was buried in this

church, leaving a numerous

iffue.

By

his will

he dcvifed this manor to Thomas Tournay, hisfecond fon, and to Thomas his nephew, fon of his eldeft fon John; after which, in 1608, Thomas Tournay the nephew, and Thomas, fon of Thomas his uncle, made a divifion of this manor and other lands, devifed as above-mentioned ; on which the manor and manlion of Brockhull, then written Brockwcll, with part of the and other parts of lands, was allotted to the former the lands fouthward from the manfion, on which was ;

VOL, VIII.

erc(fted

*

HEANE HUNDRED.

az 6

crefted a feat called

Nezv

Buildings, as will be further

mentioned hereafter, were allotted to the latter. Thomas Tournay before mentioned, fon of John, afterwards refided at Brockhull, which he died poffelTed of in 1637, and was buried in the north ifle of this church, belonging to this manor, which hisgrandfon John afterwards alienated to James Brockman, efq. of Beechborough, whofe grandfon James Brockman, efq. gave it by will, with his other eftates, to the Rev. Ralph Drake, who afterwards took the name of Brockman. He pulled down much of the remains of this antient manfion, and removed the materials, which were made ufe of to build the bailiff's houfe, near Beechborough, which is built of ftone, in the gothic tafte j and afterwards, in 1768, exchanged the fcite of it with Mr. Robert Tournay, of Hythe, for other lands upon the hills, near to his feat of Beechborough, parcel of Brockhull bujhes, and formerly part of this manor before the the manor itfelf, which divifion of it } but ht he died poffe (fed of in 1781, and his fon James Drake Brockman, efq. is the prefcnt owner of it. Mr. Robert Tournay, of Hythe, above-mentioned, died in 1789, poffelTed of the fcite and remains of the antient manfion of Brockhull, with the demefnes adjoining to it, and his heirs are now entitled to them. Mention has been made above, thatThomas Tournay, fecond fon of Thomas, poffeffed by his father’s will, anno 1592, a moiety of the manor of Brockhull, and that Thomas, his eldeft fon, made a divifion of the manor and lands belonging to it afterwards ; in which a portion of the demefne lands fouthward of the antient manfion of Brockhull, was allotted to him, as his (hare of it. On thefe in 1611 he built himfelf a feat, called

New

Buildings,

alias

New Brockhull,

where he afterwards refided, and died in 1661, leaving one fon Thomas Tournay, who w'as of New Buildings and of Hythe, where he died in 1712; and from him the feat and eftate of New Buildings defeended

-

227

SALTWOOD.

fccnded down to Mr. RobertTournay, gent, of Hythe, who died in 1789, leaving five fons and two daughters, viz. Thomas, gent, of Hythe, who married Amey, daughter of John Forfter, D. D. re6tor of Elton, in

Huntingdonfhire ; Robert, gent, of Sakwood, who married Chriftian, daughter of Claudius Clare, clerk, of Hythe ; William, a clergyman ; Edward, and Ifaac, He attornies at law, of Hythe j Martha, and Sarah. bore for his arms, the antient coat armour of Tournay, being Argent y n chevroHy between three bullsy JablCy quartered with thofe of Sellyng, Brockhull, and Keriel. Radbrooks and Pedling are two fmall manors at which the weftern boundary of this parifh; the latter of leading from Hj^the is fituated clofe to the high road pofiefiions to Alhford, which were formerly part of the of the family of Browne, of Beechworth caftle, and continued fo till by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas

Browne, of that place, in king James I.’s reign, they went in marriage to Robert Honywood, efq. of Chafecond wife ihe ring, and Markfhall, in Efiex, whofe wa°. Their eldeft fon Thomas fucceeded to thefe maThomas nors, after whofe death in 1666, his two fons, and John Le Mot Honywood, became fucceflively owners of them ; but both dying f, p. the latter dewho was vifed them to his kinfman Robert Honywood, afterwards of Maikfhall, and they have fince defeended down in like manner as that feat to Filmer Honywood, efq. now of Marklhall, and late knight of the owner of them* Ihire for this county, who is the prefent Courts baron are held for both thefe manors;

CHARITIES. bite, to the of los. was given by one to bc-longing farm, ufe of the poor, to be paid out of Oxenden William Evelyn, efq. and occupied by Hampton. A PIECE OF LAND, Called Church land, containing twentywas given by a perfon unknown, now let at i3l.per

The yearly sum

two acres, annum, which

is

applied,

5s.

towards the pooi

s

rate,

and the

le-

niainder towards the church rate.

A HOUSE

;

228

A

HEANE HUNDRED. HOUSE AND LARGE GARDEN was given by

knowm, which riflt

is

a perfon unappropriated to the ufe of the clerk of the pa-

tolivein.

is a free school, endowed by the will of the Rev. Barnfley, who devifed 150I. for the purpole of educating poor children in the knowledge and pracEHce of the Chriftian

There

George

With which money an annum was purchafed, payable out

religion.

annuity of five guineas per of land in Merftiam, now vefted in the reftor of this parifli, and has been conftantly received by the redors and curates of it, and paid to a miftrefs for teaching fuch poor children. Laurence Weller, of Hythe, by will in 1663, left a fum of money, and a piece of land in this parifti, for the ufe of the poor of the parifh of Hythe, to put out poor children thereof apprentices ; and if the churchwardens and overfeers of Hythe fliould negleft or refufeto perform his will in that behalf, then he devifed the fame to the poor of this parifli, till the parifli officers of Hythe fliould perform the fame.'^ T/ie antient hofjtital of St. Bartholoview^ founded by Hamo de Hythe, bifliop of Rochefter, in 1336, is mentioned as having been firfl: fituated within this parifli, and is faid to have been long fince removed to the adjoining parifli of Hythe, where a

further defcription will be given of

Saltwood

is

diction oi tht

Paul,

is

ecclesiastical jurisof Canterbury, and ^ of

within the diocefe

Elham.

The

it.

church, which

Is

dedicated to St. Peter and St.

handfome and well

built, confifting of two ifles and a chancel. The fouthern ifle is very wide and Ipaclous, having a very fine fpan roof of timber over it the northern one is very low and narrow. At the weft end is a fquare tower, having a tiled ridge roof on it, which disfigures the reft of the building much. There

are four bells in it. In the chancel, which is ceiled, are feveral graveftones for the family of Tournay, the inferiptions of feveral of them obliterated and underj neath is a vault, in which many of them are depofited.

A

brafs plate for

dame Anne Myfton,

A

obt. 1496,

and

three Ihields of arms ; one, chevron^ between three greyhounds heads, erafed 3 the fecond, a chevron, be-^

Wills, Prerogative-office, Canterbury,

tween

SALTWOOD# tween three [words

;

229

the third, three

croJfeSy fiory^

A

memorial for Robert Payne, reftor thirty-two years, obt. 1741* A brafs plate, having the half-figure of a prieft, and under an infcription for John Verien, once Near it is a re(5tor of Sandherft, but without date. large (tone, once finely inlaid with brafs, having had the effigies of a man on it, but the whole of it is tom off. The north ifle was built by Margaret, wife of William Brockhull, fays Philipott, for the burial-place of the future poffeflbrs of her manor of Brockhull, and that in the eall window was her legend, long fince deftroyed, in antient charailers, denoting the fame 5 many of the fame name, as well as of the Tournays, lie buried in it ; but their memorials are all obliterated, excepting one round a ftone in brafs, for Thomas figures of himfelf Brokhill, efq. who died 1437, and wife are likewife remaining on it, and one Ihield of ,

arms, being Brokhill impaling Fineux, three others are gone. There is a very curious cafe of carved work, of oak, which inclofes the font, much like that in fome of the neighbouring churches, of which mention has already been made. The church of Saltwood, with the chapel of Hythe annexed, being exempt from the jurifdi6lion of the archdeacon, was ever appurtenant to the manor of Saltwood, until the exchange was made, as has been above related, in the reign of king Henry VIII. by which that manor was granted by the archbifhop to the king, but all prefentations and advowfons being exempted out of it, the patronage of this church conti* nued parcel of the pofleffions of the fee of Canterbuiy, as it does at this time, his grace the archbifhop being the prefent patron of it. endowed here in It feems that there was a vicarage king John’s reign, and again in the time of archbifhop Peckham, anno 1280, being the 9th of king Edward 1. ^

*



.

See Ducarell’s Repertory, p. 100.

0.3

but

.

HEANB HUNDRED.

230 but

never took place j for this church continued a redtory, as it has done ever fince, to this time. It is valued in the king’s books, with the chapel of Hythe annexed, at thirty-four pounds, and the yearly tenths it

at 3I. 8s. od.

There

are feventy-one acres of glebe

land.

In 1588 here were communicants one hundred and forty, and it was, with Hythe, valued at one hundred and twenty pounds. In 1640 it was valued at one hun-

dred and forty pounds, communicants one hundred ; and in 1742 it was valued at one hundred and fixty pounds per annum. The parfonage Hands at a fmall diftance weftward from the church. It was a very antient gothic building; but Mr. Randolph, the prefent reftor, has entirely modernized it, and made it, at no fmall expence, a very commodious and handfome houfe, in which he refides one half of the year. It is fituated on the knoll of a fmall hill, having a pleafant view of the fea between the hills over the intermediate country.

CHURCH OF SALTWOOD,

with the

CHAPEL OF HYTHE

annexed,

PATRONS, Or

hy

R

whom jirejented.

The Archbijhop

ECTOR S.

Nicholas Harjtsjield, o Stephen

Kevinfon, 1580.'

The Queen, hac

vice.

Archbi/hoji .......

< Archdeacon of Canterbury, and deprived of all his preferments in the beginning of queen Elizabeth’s reign, for not acknowledging her fuprcmacy. Eatt. Somn. pt. ii. p. 1^9. Wood’s

LL. D.

in

obt.

John Coldwell, inftituted Nov. 1580, vacated 1592.^ Ralph Talboyes, S. T. P. ind.

Aug. 1592, obt. The

LL. D.

I

596.

John Seller, S T, E. induced Auguft 1596. e Likewife chancellor of Norwich, and prebendary of Canterbury f He vacated this reflory on being made bilhop of Salilbury.

Atb. vol.i.col. J71,

PATRONS,

231

SALTWOOD. PATRONS,

RECTORS.

Cs’f.

Thomas Carter^ in 1663, obt.

The Archbyhop

1674. Francis

Fed, induced June

1674, obt. 706. yohn Lewis, in l “Jo6, refigned 1

in

March

i

709.*

Robert Payne, A. Odt. 1741*''

John Chapman,

M.

S.

i/° 9 >

T. P. 1741,

refigned i 744.' Jerejniah Milles, A. M. 1746.'^ 1744, refigned Thomas Randolph, S. 1 P. .

refigned 1769.' Thomas Randolph,

cember,

1769,

Dec. 1

74 ^»

A. M. Deprefent

the

reiflor."’

refigned this reftory on being See collated to Winfter, in Thaiiet. col. 4927. v. vol. Brit. his life, Biog. h Likewlfe vicar of PolUing. being i He religned this rcftory on

5

He

prefented to

Merlham, where

fee

more

of him. k Afterwards dean of Exeter, *nd prefidcnl «f »he Antiquarian Society. ,

with Likewife vicar of Petham was He difpenfation. by Waltham, Chnlh prefident of Corpus profeffor Oxford, lady Margaret’s prebend ot that univerfity, with the archdeacon and annexed, Worceftcr of Oxford. m Son of the former, and vicar ol diipenfaPetham with Waltham, by 1

_

m

tion, in

1783 >

THE TOWN AND PARISH OF HYIHE. time within the h* THE pariQi of Plythe, at this the corporation ot the

berty of the Cinque Ports, and part of the paulli ot town of Hythe was antiently, with own Hythe, within an hundred of its

Weft

^

m

antient records, It is ^called in fome to Leland, in Latin, Domefday, Hede, and according m^e Saxon, Portus dthims ; Hithe fignitying Halden, 01 Hal . hour or haven." In the year 1036,

Lamb. Peramb.

Spelman’s GlotT. p. a 77 p. 184.

Q-4

den,

^

TOWN AND PARISH

C-SZ

OF

den, as he is fometimes, and perhaps more properly written, one of the Saxon thanes, gave Hethe and Saltwood, to Chrift-church, in Canterbur)'. After which they appear to have been held of the archbifhop by knight’s fervice, by earl Godwin and after the Norman conqueft, in like manner by Hugo de Montfort, one of thofe who had accompanied William the Conqueror hither, at which time it was accounted only as a

borough appurtenant

to the manor of Saltwood, as appears by the book ol Domefday, taken in the year 1080, where, under the title of lands held of the archbilhop by knight’s fervice, at the latter end of the defcription of that manor, it is faid :

manor (viz. Saltwood belong two hundred j and twenty -five burgejjes in the borough of He de. Between the borough and the manor^ in the time of king Edward the Confieffor^ it was worth fixteen pounds when he received it eight pounds, and now in the whole twenty-nine pounds and fix fhillings and four-pence. Befides which, there appears in the defcription of the archbifhop s manor of Liminge, in the fame record, to have been fix burgeffes in Hede belonging to that manor, Hythe being thus appurtenant to Saltw’ood, this

was within

the bailiwick of the archbifliop, who annually appointed a bailiff, to a6l jointly for the go-

vernment of this town and liberty, which feems to have been made a principal cinque port by the Conqueror, on the decay and in the room of the ftill more antient port of Well Hythe, before which it had always been accounted within the liberty of thofe ports, which had been enfranchifed with feveral privileges and cuftoms, though of what antiquity they were, or when firft

enfranchifed, has not been as yet, with any cerand therefore they are held to en;

tainty, difcoveied

joy

all

their earlieft liberties

of mind by prefeription. !

Bandy’s Soroncr,

and privileges, as time out The quota which the port

pt,

i,

appendix, p. 49,

of

'

HYTHE.

233 Hythe v/as allotted to furnifh towards the mutual armament of the ports, being five fliips, and one hundred and five men, and five boys, called gromets.P of

The

archbifhop continued in this manner to appoint his bailiffi, who adted jointly with the jurats and commonalty of the town and port of Hythe, the fenior jurat on the bench always fitting as prefident, till the 31ft year of king Henry VIII. when the archbifhop exchanged the manor of Saltwood, together with the bailiwick of Hythe, with the king for other eftates elfewhere. After which a bailiff conti-

nued to be appointed yearly by the crown,

till

queen

Elizabeth, in her 17th year, granted them a particular charter of incorporation, by the name of mayor, jurats, and commonalty of the town and port of Hythe, under which they continue to be governed at this

time; and

flie

likewife granted to the mayor and her bailiwick of Hythe, toge-

his fucceflbrs, all that

ther with other premifes here, to hold by the yearly fee farm of three pounds, by which they are held by the corporation at this time.

The

of the town and fort of Hythe extends over the whole of this parifli, and part of diat of Weft Hythe, which indeed before the harbour of it failed, was the antient cinque port itfelf, and to which great part of what has been faid above of the antient ftate of liberty

Hythe

likewife relates, but not over the fcite of that church. The corporation confifts of a mayor and twelve jurats, of which he is one, and twenty-four

common

councilmen, together with two chamberlains and a town-clerk. The mayor, who is coroner by virtue of his office, is chofen, as well as the other officers of the corporation, on Feb. 2d yearly, and, together with the jurats, who are juftices within this liberty exclufive of all others, hold a court of general feffions of the peace and gaol delivery, together with f Jeakc’s

Charters of the Cinque Ports, p. 23.

a court

PAP.ISH OF

TOWN AND

234

has a court of record, the fame as at Dover ; and it corporaother privileges, moftly the fame as the other It has the lions within the liberties of the five ports. corpoprivileges of two maces. The charters of this were ration, as well as thole of the other cinque ports, to in 1685, by the king’s command, lurrendered up colonel Strode, then governor of Dover caftle, and were never returned again. Hythe has no coat of arms ; but the corporation mail, two feal reprefents an antique veffel, with one

men

in

it,

one blowing a horn

;

and two men lying on

the yard-arm.

The present town

of

Hythe

is

fuppofed to

of the antient ports of Limne and Weft Hythe, fucceffively, the harbours of which being rendered ufelefs, by the withdrawing of the fea, and their being banked up with land, oc-

owe

its

origin to the decay

to be frequented in their ftead, and it continued a fafe and commodious harbour for confiderable length of time, till the fame fate befel it

cafioned this of

and rendered

likewife,

ever, as

Hythe

Lambarde

it

wholly

ufelefs

j

and who-

truly obferves, confiders either the

and the alterations which in times paft, and even now, it works on the coafts of this kingdom, will not be furprized that towns bordering upon the fea, and fupported bytraffic arifing from it, are fubjedl in a fliort time to decay, and become in a manner of little or no confe-

viciffitude of the fea in different places,

water either flows or forfakes them, fo they muft of neceffity ftourifh or decay, flowing and ebbing, as it were, with the fea itfelf.^ Thus after the fea had retired from the town of Weft Hythe and its haven, the former fell to decay, and became but afmall village of no refort, and the prefent town of Hythe, at two miles diftance, to which it was continued by a number of llraggling houfes all

qiience

for as the

;

^

See Lambarde’s Perambulation, p. 187.

along

,

HYTHE.

235 and

along the fhore between them, rofe to profperlty, harbour became equally noted and frequented in the room of it ; fo that in a fliort time the houfes

its

and inhabitants increafed here fo greatly, that Leland fays there was once a fair abbey in it, and four pariflies and their churches, one of which was that of our Lady of Weflhithe, which fhews that Weft Hythe was once accounted a part of the town itfelf. But this mufl have been in very early times ; for long before king Richard II. ’s reign, I find it accounted but as one fingle parifh. The town and harbour of Hythe were by their fituation always liable to depredation from enemies; in particular, earl Godwin, when exiled, returned in 1052, and ravaging this coaft, took away feveral veflels lying at anchor in this haven, and Romney ; and in king Edward I.’s reign, anno 1293, the French (hewed themfelves with a great fleet before Hythe, and one of their fhips, having two hundred foldiers on board, landed their men in the haven, which they had no fooner done, but the tovvnfmcn came upon them and flew every one of them ; upon which the reft of the fleet hoifted fail, and made no further attempt. In the latter part of king Richard the lld.’s reign, a dreadful calamity happened to it, when more than two hundred houfes of it were burnt down in one day and five of their fhips were loft, and one hundred men drowned, by which misfortunes the inhabitants were fo much impoverilhed and difpirited, that they had thoughts of abandoning the place, and building themfelves a town elfewhere ; but king Henry IV. by his timely interpofition, prevented this, and by charter releafed them from their quota of

The following is Leland’s wrote in king Henry VJII.’s defeription of it, who reign, “ Hythe hath bene a very great towne yn lenght and conteyned iiii paroches, that now be clcne de(hipping for feveral turns.

I

See Leland’s Itinerary, vol.

vi. p.

1

1,

ftroied.

TOWN AND PARISH OF

236 flroied, that

is

to fay, S. Nicholas paroche, our

Lady Weft

paroche, S. Michael paroche, and our Lady of Hithe, the which ys with yn lefs than half a myle of' Lymne hill. And yt may be well fuppoled that after

the haven of

Lymne and

the great old towne ther

fayled that Hithe ftrayt therby encrefed and was yn price. Finally to cownt fro Wefthythe to the place

wher the fubftan of the towne ys now ys ii good myles yn lenght al along on the Ihore ta which the fe cam ful fumtym, but now by banking of woofe and great cafting up of Ihyngel the fe is lumtyme a quarter, dim, a myle fro the old fliore. In the tyrae of king Edw** 1 ther were burned by cafuelte xviii fcor^ houfes and mo, and ftrayt followed a great peftilens, and thes ii thinges minilhed the towne. Ther remayn yet the It eviruines of the chyrehes and chyrch yardes. dently appereth that wher the paroch chirch is now was fumtyme a fayr abbey, &c. In the top of the chirch yard is a fayr fpring and therby ruines of howfes of office of the abbey. The havyn is a prety rode and yt croliith meatly ftrayt for paffage owt of Boleyn keth yn fo by the fliore a long and is lb bakked fro the mayne fe with cafting of Ihingil that fmaul fliippes may cum up a large myle towards Folkeftan as in a

1

>

\



'

.

1

:

I



;

fure gut.*’

Though Leland

calls it

a pretty road, yet

it then feems to have been in great meafure deftroyed by the fands and beach caft up on this fhore, by the defertion of the fea, for he deferibes it as being at that time as only a fmall channel or gut left, which ran within fhore for more than a mile eaftward from Hythe towards Folkeftone, that fmall veffels could come up it with fafety ; and the ft ate of the town and trade of it in queen Elizabeth’s time, may be feen by a furvey made by her order in her 8th year, of the maritime parts of this county, in which it was returned, that there were here, a cuftomer, controller,

and

fearcher,

their authority feveral; houfes inha-

bited, 1225 perfons lacking habitation,

10

j

creeks

and

:

!

l

1

1

!

,

I

HYTHE.

237 and landing places two; th’on called the Haven, within the liberties ; th’other called the Stade, without the liberties. It had of Ihipping, 17 tramellersof rive tunne, feven fhoters of 15 ; three crayers of 30, four crayers of 40; perfons belonging to thefe crayers

and other boats, ing,* 1

for the

mod: part occupied

in fifh-

60.

Soon

after this,

even the fmall channel within land,

above-mentioned, which ferved as the only remainintJharbour, became likewife fwarved up and loft, though it had the advantage of the Seabrook, and other

which came down from the down hills, as a back water, to keep it fcowered and open ; and though feveral attempts were from time to time afterwards made, at no fmall expence and trouble, to open it again, yet it never could be effected ; and the abovementioned ftreams, for want of this channel, flow now towards the beach on the fliore, and lofe themfelves ftreams,

imperceptibly

The

among

it.

Hythe, which is wholly within the of the corporation, extends from the fea fhore, the fouthern bounds of it, northward up the hill a very little way beyond the church, which is about half a mile, and from the bridge at the eafl: end of the town weft ward,’about half way up the hill towards Newingreen, being more than a mile and an half. The town, which contains about two hundred houfes, is fituated exceedingly pleafant and healthy, on the fide as well as at the foot of the quarry-hill, where the principal ftreet is, which is of a handfome breadth, and from the bridges at the extremities of it, about half a mile in length. It has been lately new paved, and otherwife much improved. The court-hall and market place are near the middle of it, the latter was parifh of

liberty

by Philip, vifcount Strangford, who reprcfented port in parliament anno 12 Charles II. His arms thofe of the five ports ; of Boteler and of Amhurft, built

this

;

who

ferved likewdre in parliament for

it,

and repaired this

.

town and parish OF

2^5

this building, are

on the

pillars

of

it.

There are two St John s hol-

end of it good inns ; and near the eall wheie the Higher up on the fide of the hill, pital. fuppoled once to have flood, old town of Hythe is of which are very plea* are parallel flreets, the houfes them are handfome houles, faiitly fituated ; feveral of good account, the occupied by genteel families of principal one of

them has been the

ieat

of the family

of Deedes for feveral generations. eltiThis family have refided at Hythe, in good hundred years; the fiift matiori, for upwards of two Thomas Deedes, who of them that 1 meet with being Glover, elq. by Elizabeth his wife, fifter of Robert Somerfet herald, a moft learned and judicious anti_

youngeft quary, had one fon Julius Deedes, whofe arms confirmed to him, foil Robert had a grant of and Julius his nephew and their heirs, by Byfhe, clarencieux, in 1653, Perfefs, nebulee, gules and argent, have been borne three martlets, counter changed, which by the different branches of this family ever fince.

William, the youngeft fon but one,

left

WilHythe.

a fon

appears to have refided at He died in 1653, and was buried in this church, which has ever lince remained the burial place of this liam, the

firft

who

had one only fon Julius Deedes’, efq. who was of Hythe, for which he was chofen in three feveral parliaments, and died in 1692, having had three fons, of whom William, the eldeft, was anceftor to the Deedes’s, of Hythe, and of St. Stephen’s, as will be mentioned hereafter ; Henry, the lecond fon, was of' Hythe, gent, whofe eldeft fon Julius, was of Hythe>, efq. and died without furviving iffue, upon which 'this feat, among the reft of his eftates, came by theemail in his will, to his aunt Margaret Deedes, who dying unmarried, they came, by the fame entail, to her coufm William Deedes, efq. late of Hythe, and of St. Stephen’s, being delcended from William, Julius, who died in 1692, and was a the eldeft fon family.

He

,

^

phyfician

|

I

HYTHE. phyfician at Canterbury, whofe Ton Julius

2 ^^

was pre-

bendary of Canterbury, and left one fon William, of whom hereafter ; and Dorothy, married to Sir John Filmer, bart. of Eafl; Sutton, by whom (he had no ilfue. William Deedes, efq. the only furviving fon before-mentioned, of Hythe and St. Stephen’s, pof-

Hythe, with feveral other eftates in this neighbourhood, by the above entail. He married Mary, daughter of Thomas Bramllon, efq. of Skreens, in Efl'ex, and died in 1793, leaving furviving two fons, William, of whom hereafter; John, who married Sophia, daughter of Gen. Forbes, and one daughter Mary, unmarried. William Deedes, efq. the eldeft fon, is now of Hythe, and married Sophia, fecond daughter of Sir Brook Bridges, bart. by whom he has two fons and three daughters. Further weftward is St. Bartholomew’s hofpital. Oppofite Mr. Deedes’s houfe, but ftill higher up, fefled this feat at

with a fteep afcent, is the church, the hill reaching much above it northw^ard. On the upper part of this hill, are feveral fprings, which gufli out of the rock, and run into the dreams which flow at each end of the town. All the houfes fituated on the fide of the hill, have an uninterrupted view of the fea fouthward, Romney Marlh, and the adjoining country. The houfes throughout it are molUy modern built, and the whole has a neat andchearful appearance. There is a boarding- fchool kept in the town for young ladies, and on the beach there are bathing machines for the accommodation of invalids. There was formerly a market on a Saturday, which has been long fince difeontinued, though the farmers have for fome time held a meeting here on a Thurfday, for the purpole of felling their corn and two fairs yearly, formerly held on the feafts of St. Peter and St, Edmund the King, now, on July loth and December iff, for horfes and cattle, very few of which are brought, and ;

Ihoes and pedlary.

Here

TOWN AND PARISH OF 240 Here is a fmall fort, of fix guns, for the protedlon till lately belonged to of the town and fifhery, which by government, the town, of which it was bought diftance from the but now rendered ufelefs, by its to gain upon it ; the fea, from the land continuing guns have therefore been taken out. Soon after the of the war, three new forts, of eight guns each, were creeled, at the diftance of a mile Moncrief-, Sutherland, from each other, viz. they contain barracks for 100 men each. Every

commencement

the prefent war a park of royal artillery has been eftablifhed on the beech between the forts and the town, for the pradice of guns and mortars j and here is a branch of the cuftoms, fubThis town is ordinate to the out-port of Dover. watered by two ftreams ; one at the eaft end of it,

fummer during

being the boundary between this parifli and Newington ; and the other at the weft end, called the Slabrooke, which comes from Saltwood, and runs from hence, by a channel lately made for that pur-

which has now

town fomewhat more than half a mile, much the fame diftance

pofe, into the fea,

left this

being entirely beach and fliingle-ftones, (the great bank of which lines this fliore for upwards of two miles in length) on which, at places, feveral houfes and buildings have been eredted, and Ibme parts have been incloled, with much expence, and madepafture ground of, part of which is claimed by different perfons, and the reft by the corporation as their property. The cinque ports, as well as their two antient towns of Rye and Winchelfea, have each of them the privilege of returning members, ufually ftiled barons to parliament ; the firft returns of which, that are mentioned for any of them, are in the 42ft year of king Edward III. as in Leland’s time, the intermediate fpace

The following

is a lift of fuch returns of the barons which have been returned to parliament for the port of Elythc, from the beginning of Elizabeth’s reign.

IN

HVtHE. IN

THE TIME OF QUEEN ELIZABETH.

Years of the Reign,

Cs’c.

At IVeJlmin-

ift.

241

Jlsr

Barnes of

the

Barons in Parliament.

William Raddel, Ralph Hafilherfl:.

Edward Popham,

5th.

gent.

13th.

John Bridgman, gent. William Cromer, efq. John Stephens, gent.

14th.

Thomas Honywood,

efq.

John Bridgman, gent. Chriftopher

27th.

Honywood,

genti

George Moreton.

John Smith, William Dalmington,

28 th.

gent.

John Smith, gent. John Collins, gent. Henry Fane, efq. John Collins, gent. Chriftopher Honywood,

31a.

35‘'’-

39th.

Chriftopher Toldervy, efqrs.

William Knight, mayor,

43<^-

Chriftopher Toldervy, efq^

IN

THE TIME OF KING JAMES

I.

John Smith*

I2th.



i8th.

Chriftopher Toldervy, ^

Peter

Heyman,

Richard Zouch,

The *

See an account of him in

VOL. VIII.

efqrs;-

LL. D,

lame. Wood’s Ath. F

vol.

ii.

coL 25

IN

TOWN AND PARISH OF

2^2

IN THE REIGN OF KING CHARLES Yfars of the Reign,

Names of the Barons

Ctfc.

in Parliament,

Edward Dering, knt. Edward Clarke, elq. Peter Heyman, knt.

At Wejimin-

I ft.

I.

fier ift.

BafiU DixweJl, efq.

3d

Heyman, Edward Scot, knts. Henry Heyman, Peter

.

13th.

1

John Wansford,



6 th.

efqrs.

Henry Heyman, hart. John Harvey, elq.“

IN THE TIME OF KING CHARLES 1660.

12th.

II.*

Philip, vifcount Strangford,

Phineas Andrews, efq. 13th.

1661.

John Harvey, Pliincas

31ft.

efq.

Andrews,

Edward Dering,

1678.

efq.* '

hart.

Julius Deedes. 31ft.

Edward Dering, bart. Edward Hales, efq.

p.

IN

THE TIME OF KING JAMES

II.

Hon. Heneage Finch,

1685.

Julius Deedes, efq.^ “

On 1

his death Thomas Weftrow, efq. was chofen. he year before the reftoration, Sir Robert

Hales, knieh

Kenrick, efq. were chofen by a

writ

was ordered

in the

Mr. Hales

J^efoived

himfelf himlelf, refolved reflln

Sir

>-^f^rred.

;or!f ”l.w68c

room of

,’his

lenkmsis duly

TT^ by

the houfe of

ptr

Henn Jour

referred

elefted. Journals, ibid

niayor

commons,

had returnee

that

Mr.

Julius

HYTHE. IN

"

243

THE TIME OF KING WILLIAM AND

Years of the Reign, ^c. ift.

2d.

At Wejimin-





1688. 1690.

Names of the Barons

in

Q.

MARY.

Parliament.

Edward Hales, Julius Deedes, efqrs. Philip Boteler, bart.

William Brockman,

efq. I

IN 7th.

THE TIME OF KING WILLIAM* 1695.

-

Philip Boteler, bart.

Jacob Defbouverie, 10th.

-

—~

12th.

1698.

The

1700.

Philip Boteler, bart.

fame.

John 13th.

1701.

*

IN ift.



The

Boteler, efq*

fame.

THE TIME OF QUEEN ANNE. 1702.

Philip Boteler, bart.

John 4th. 7 th.

1

—^



efq*

Boteler, efq.

1705.

The

1708.

Hon. John Fane,* John Boteler, efq.

fame.

»

9th,

^

1710.

Richard, vifcount Shannon Hon. John Fane.*

2th.

-

1713.

Jacob Defbouverie,

John

Boteler, efq.

not duly eleaed. New writ ordered in his Journals, vol. ix. Willlanl Shaw, d'q. was chofeil in his

Deedes, the mayor, ftead.

efq.

is

room. * Afterwards earl of Weflmoreland. * They were declared unduly eleaed by the houfe of commons, on the petition of William Berners and John Boteler, efq. who were declared duly eleded in their ftead. Journals, vol.xvi. On William Berners’s death in 1 712, Richard, vifcouutShannon, was elected in his room. P-.

a

IN

TOWN AND PARISH OP

44

IN

THE TIME OF KING GEORGE

Years of the Reign,

Names

?sfc.



Samuel Leonard, bart. Jacob Defbouverie, efq. Sir Samuel Leonard, barr.

1714.



of the Barons in Parliament,

Sir

i^.AtlVeJiminJier^

7th.

I.

1722.

.Hercules Baker, efq.

IN

THE TIME OF KING GEORGE

Lennard, knt. and Hercules Baker, efq.

jft.

1727.

Sir S.

7 th.

I734»

Hercules Baker,

William Glanville, 14th.

2lft.

^

747

efqrs.

William Glanville,

efqrs.

William Glanville,

efq.

,

Thomas The fame.

Sir

28 th.

1754.

Hales, bare.

IN THE TIME OF KING GEORGE I ft.

7th.

14th.

1761.

——

William Glanville, efq.** Lord George Sackville.

1768.

John Sawbridge,

——

Wm. i

774

Glanville Evelyn, efqrs.

Sir Charles Farnaby, bart.



William Evelyn, 20th. 24th.

He

1780. 1784.



died in 1728,

his

room.

lus

room#

He

III.

—— -

bart.‘

Hercules Baker,'

1741.

'

II.

The The

efq.

fame.

fame.

and William Glanville,

efq.

was chofen in



died in 1744, and

Thomas

ther of-Jeffry, lord Amherft)

Hales, efq. was chofen in

Amherft, (youngeft bro^

was chofen in

his

room.

30th.

HYTIIE. Names of the Barons

Years of the Reign, ^c.

30th. At Weftnnnfter,

1790.

36th.

The

1796*

245 Parliament.

in

Farnaby, bart. William Evelyn, eiq. Sir Charles

The

fame.''

was determined by the houfe of commons in 1710, at which time the number of the eledois were fifty, is in the mayor, jurats, common council, and freemen, making together in number at prelent in all about one hundred and thirty fix, that is mayor and jurats twelve, commoners twenty four, freenten one hundred and feventy-three,of which altogether there are onlytw'enty-

two

right of election,

as

relidems.

barons, or freemen of the cinque ports, and their two antient towns, have, time out of mind, been allowed to carry the canopy over the king and queen

The

and afterwards to have the lame, with their appurtenances, as their accuflomed fees ; and alfo to fit the fame day at the principal table, at the right fide of the hall. Thefe lees of the canopies and bells, the barons divide equally among themfelves.*^ This is called, in the charter of Edward I. their honors at court, to perform which they formerly received fummons, but they have long fince been ufed to put in their claim by petition, and at the time of a coronation, a fpecial eleflion is made by each port, of thirty- two of their refpeflive barons to ferve for at their coronations,

purpofe ; the number for two for each canopy. this

Hythe being

There are two hospitals the maintenance of the poor

lomewfy and the other

St.

;

John

in this parifh, for

one called s.

ufually

The

St.

Bartho-

former,

now

Farnaby, bart. who had taken the name of Radcliffe, died in 1798, and the hon. Charles Marlham, eldefi fon of lord Romney, was chofen in his room. See Jeake’s Charters of the Cinque Ports, p. 129. [ '

Sir Charles

R

3

called

TOWN AND PARISH OF

246 called St.

Bartholomew’s hospital,

feerns to

firft intended to be have been that which was at bilhop of Rochefter, founded in this pariih by Hamo, where he and his anceftors had in 1 '’36, on the fpot by him to St. Antheir origin, and was dedicated of his church of drew the ApoRle, the patron faint Rocheder. When it firft changed its name to St. Bartholomew, I have not found, but I have not met in the with the name of St. Andrew any where but how he came afbilhop’s charter of foundation, nor terwards to alter his intention, and to found it in the apparidi ofSaltwood inftead of Hythe, but fo it

pears he did, for

it is

univerfally defcribed as the hof-

of St. Bartholomew of Saltwood, from whence the year 1685, to its preit was not removed till after Although the foundation fent fituation in Hythe. was to have by the king’s licence, xiii poor in it, yet the biQiop, by his charter for that purpoie, as may be feen hereafter, placed in it at firft only^ ten brethren

pital

and fifter5,who were to be chofen efpecially from fuch of this pariih who had fallen from affluence to pobe clothed uniformly in ruiiet gowns, and to have four-pence each a week alms for They were to attend divine fervice in their food. their own chapel, if they had one, or otherwife in this pariffl church, and the reft of the day employ themfelves in ufeful and honeft occupations ; and if the revenues fliould at any time be increaled, the number of poor and their ftipends, with the authority of the diocefan, fliould be augmented likewife which feems to have happened afterwards, and the full number of xiii, mentioned above, to have been admitted, and continued in it for fome length of time. In the 26th year of king Henry VIII. the revenues of it

verty,

who were

to

This charter is fealed by the biftiop, and by the community of the port of Hethe, with their common feal, anno loth Edward III. See Reg. RofF. p. 413. Dugd. Mon. vol. ii. p. 468. Rot. Pat. 10 Edward III. p, i, m. 14. Tan. Mon. p, 225. «

were

;

HYTHE.

247

were valued in the king’s books at4l. 6s. per annum and in the 5th year of queen Elizabeth, anno 1562, as appears by the return of archbilhop Parker, at eight pounds per

annum, with

the charges

;

at

which

time there were xiii poor, according to the founda7'his hofpital tion, who were relieved by alms in it. is now fifuated in this parilh of Hythe, at no great diftance (outh-weftward from the church. There are ten poor perfons in it, five men and five women, who have each about nine pounds per annum in money, with an apartment, coals, and other emoluments. There are about one hundred acres of land belonging to it, which lie near it, of the yearly value of about

one hundred and twenty pounds per annum. It is under the management of three trufiees, now called wardens, chofen by the mayor and corporation. The owner of the manor of Poftling has a nomination of one of the poor perfons in this hofpital, as is fuppofed from his having been at fome time a benefaftor to it. Mrs. Margaret Deedes, of Hythe, by will in 1762, left five pounds per annum to this holpital, payable out of land now in Mr. Deedes’s poffefrion.

The other hospital at the eafl

of St. John,

end of the town.

The

foundation,

it,

as

unknown, above-men-

totally

its

further than that

appears by the charter

it

fituated

founder of

well as the time of

is

is

Hamo,

bifhop of Rochefter, in 1336, to have exifted at that time, and to have been founded efpecially for the relief of lepers, excepting that Henry Skinner of Hythe, by will anno 1461, gave to the alms houfe of St. John Baptift, of Hythe, a piece of land lying at St. Nicholas, and Richard Cromp, of tioned, of

anno 1 580 in that reign, gave to the alms-houfe of Hythe, and to the perpetual reHythe, mercer, by

will

of the poor members of Chrift there entertained, ten acres of land lying in Biddenden, both which I fuppofe were intended for this hofpital, from which time till the reign of queen Elizabeth, I meet with nothing R 4 lief

TOWN AND PARISH

248

OF

nothing more concerning it but in the account given by archbifhop Parker, in the 5th year of it, anno 1562, of the ftate of the hofpitals in his diocefe, by order of the queen, he returned, that the hofpital of St. ]ohn of Hythe was founded, ordered, and charitably only maintained by the jurats and commonalty of the faid town ; and that there were kept daily and maintained eight beds, for the needy poor people, and :

fuch as were maimed in the wars, and further, that the hofpital was endowed with lands amounting to lix pounds per annum, but that it was not taxed to The revenues of it at prefent confift of the tenths. fifty-four acres ofland, of the value of 57 1. i6s. per annum. It is under the management of truflees, who are in general members of the corporation, and when their number is reduced to two, they are to chufe as many more as they think proper. The number and qualifications of the poor relieved is at the diferetion of the truftees, and there are fix apartments in it for their

accommodation.

of the high

on the fouth fide the front of it has an old gothic ; entrance, and over it a window of the like It is fituated

fireet

arch for its form. Near this, eaftward, was another ftone building, of like fafiiion, belonging to it, which has been lately pulled

down, and the

icite

and materials con-

verted into a tanner’s barn.

CHARITIES.

Thomas Walton,

of Hythe by will anno 1508, ordered his feoffees to enfeoffe the churchwardens of Hythe, in his piece of land called the Kowleeze, lying at Damyco’tt, to the ufe reparation of the church for ever ; which land is pieces, which are let together at 2I. 6s. per annum.

William Languon,

now

in

and two

of Hythe, by will anno 1581, gave

I2d. yearly to the reparation of the church here, to be raifed out of his then dwelling houfe here forever; and 6d. yearly out of his fliop, called the Fordge and 6d. likewife yearly forever ; out of a garden, called Hopis-hall. k Strype’s Life of arehbilhop Packer,

p.

114,

Laurence

;

HYTHE.

249

Laurence Weller, of Hythe, tanner, by will anno 1663, gave to the poor of Hythe 3I. to be diftributed on the day of his funeral ; and he gave to the poor of this parifli a parcel of meadow and pafture land, lying in Saltwood, containing two acres. And the I'uin of Sol. which he direded that the churchwardens, with the confent of the mayor and jurats, fliould lay out and fecure in lands, the yearly profit to remain for ever, to be from time to time employed towards putting out apprentices, one or more poor children, whofe fathers or mothers were dead, or whofe mothers were widows; and in default of fuch poor children, whofe parents were no ways able to provide for them and on the churchwardens or overfeers negleding to obferve his will in this behalf, then he wills the benefit of it to the life of the poor of Saltwood, till fuch time as the parilh officers of Hythe The annual produce of which befhould perform the fame. quefl is now 12I. 2s, 6d. per annum. John Brown gave by will 20I. the interefi: of it tobediftri. buted among the poor of this parifli on every Eafter-day. There is a chenhy fchool in this parifli, fupported by voluntary contributions, to which Dr. Tenifon, bifiiop of Oflbry, gave a piece of land at Kennington, held by leafe from the dean and chapter of Canterbury, now let for il. 7s, per annum. There have been feveral fcarce plants obferved in and about this parifh, and among others Papaver cornutum jiore liiieOy yellow horned poppy ; plentifully on the beach along the fea fhore here. Behen Jiore albo elegantiori all along upon the beach between this place and Romney.* j

The parish

of

Hythe is

within the ecclesias-

tical JURISDICTION of the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of Eleham. The church, which is dedicated to St. Leonard, is a fine handfome building, confiding of three ifles, a north and fouth crofs, and three chancels, with a tower fteeple at the weft end, in which are fix bells and a clock. The church ftands on the fide of a high and fteep hill,aconfiderable height above any of the town, having a very large church-yard adjoining, moftly on the weft and north fides, in the middle ot which is a p, 142, 252, 337, 375, 423. Pinax, p, 14. Merrett’s p. 186, lOjy 405. ‘

See RaiiSynopfis,

Hudfon, large

TOWN AND PARISH OF

2^0

quarry open well of water, ’tiider a cove of Hone. There is a very handfome flight of many done fleps up to the church, given by William Glanville, reprefentative in 1729. The room over the porch at the entrance, is the town-hall, where the mayor and lai-f^e

other built

members of it are yearly chofen. The tower, in the room of the old one, which fuddenly fell

1748, was rebuilt, and the church repaired, by a brief. It is a very fine one, of excellent mafonry of quarry ftone, with aflilar quoins and ornaments,

down

in

on the top. The middle ifle has, not long fince, been paved with Portland ftone, and new pewed. There are two galleries ; one built at the charge of the panfli, in 750 ; the other by Hercules Baker and VVilliam Glanville, reprcfentatives, in 1734. In the middle hangs a handfome biafs branch. This ifle has a row of fmall upper windows on each fide, being an upper flory in the choir fafhion. The the time the tower was new built, and fouth crofs, at the church repaired, was taken down by the family of Deedes and rebuilt by them, with a vault of its full lize underneath, for their burial, which was finiflied in 175J, at their own charge; for this, and for appropriating to themfelves and fervants four pews in this ifle, they obtained a faculty. This crofs ifle or chancel is paved with Portland ftone, and is feparated from the fouth ifle by an iron railing. In it are feveral monuments of the Deedes family. On the weft fide of the north crofs, there appears on the outfide to have been an antient door-way, the arch over it being circular, with zig zag ornaments, &c. The ground on

and has four

turrets

1

up to the fpring of the arch, and there are no appearances of it on the infide. The three chancels are very antient indeed, much more fo than the ifles, from which there is an afcent to each ; the pillars in them are incluftered with fmall ones of

the outfide

is

nearly

Betherfderi marble,

and both the arches and windows The middle or high chancel

\ery beautiful and lofty.

has

HYTHE.

251

has a grand approach, having eight fleps to it from the middle ifle, and three more towards the altar. The windows are very light and lofty, efpecially the three at the ealt end, which are remarkably elegant. There are, round the upper part of it and on the

fouth

(mall double arches

fide,

and Betherfden

pil-

to thofe on the fides of the choir in Canterbury cathedral. The whole is new paved with Portland (lone. The north chancel, which, as well as the oppofite one, has a rife of fleps from the ifle, has lars, fimilar

no

infcription in

The

of both thel'e chancels have an unufually large bafe, of near three feet high, and about five feet fquare, upon the furface of it.

pillars

the pavement. The redor formerly repaired the high chancel ; but on account of the fmallnefs of his living, the parilh took upon themfelves the repair of it,

and in lieu aflefled him to a fmall portion of the church rate. In this church are numbers of monuments and memorials ; among others, for the family of Deedes, for the Mailer’s and Collins’s. Memorials for Ifaac Rutton, lieutenant of Dover caflle, obt. 1683 ; for Henry Eflday, gent. obt. 1610 ; for Robert Kelvvay, A. M. retflor of Hope, &c. obt. 1759. An infcription on brafs for John Bredgman, the laft bailiff and the firll mayor of Hythe, obt. 24 Elizabeth, 3581. For feveral of the Knights, arms, A chevron^ hetiveen three birds ; and a monument for Robinfon Bean, gent, ten times mayor here, &c. &c, Leland fays, as has been already mentioned before, that it evidently appeared, where the church now is was once an abbey, and the ruins of the offices belonging to

were

time to be feen, near the but there have been no ; traces of any fuch buildings for a long time, nor any mention made of fuch foundation by any other writer. In the-cript or vault under the eaft end of the middle chancel, is piled up that vail quantity of hum^m fculls and bones, fo often mentioned in this hiftory, the pile of them being twenty-eight feet in fpring in

it

in his

the church-yard

lenpth.

;

TOWN AND PARISH OF

252

length, and eight feet in height and breadth.

They

are by the mo(t probable conjectures fiippofed to have been the remains ot the Britons, llain in a bloody battle, fought on the Ihore between this place and Folkeftone, with the retreating Saxons, in the year 456, and to have attained their whitenefs by lying for lome length of time expofcd on the fea fhore. Several of the fculls have deep cuts in them, as if made by feme heavy weapon, moffc likely of the Saxons. Leland’s authority has been mentioned for there having been four parifh churches, viz. Sr. Nicholas,

Our Lady,

St.

Michael, and

at the time this

town was

Our Lady of Wefthithe,

in

its

greateft profpeiity,

which were then clean deftroyed, as he exprdies it and that there remained the ruins of them and the church-yards in his time. And though I meet with no other mention of them by other writers, yet there are probable circumftances, to think there were once more parilhes and their churches here than the prefent parifli and church of St. Leonard ; for it appears by the map of the hofpital lands, made in 1685, that there is a field about half a mile weflward from Hythc church, called St. Nicholas’s church-yard, with foine ruins of a building at the fouth-weft corner of it. Upon the fide of the quarry- hills, between Hvthe

town and Well Hythe,

is another field, called St. Michael’s Alh, probably from that church having been once near it. This will account for two of thefe churches. Our Lady of Weft Hythe is the third, and

the fourth which he calls Our Lady, I (hould think means the prefent church, which might perhaps in early times be fo called. However, I find the prefent

one of St. Leonard, mentioned as the only parifli church of Hythc as early as the 8th of Richard II. feveral years before the dreadful conflagration abovementioned happened, which is laid to have been the rum of the town of Hythe. This church of St. Leonard being exempt from the jurifdiaion of the archdeacon,

;

HYTHE.

255

deacon, has always been accounted as a chapel of eafe to the adjoining church of Saltwood, to the manor of which this borough of Hythe was ever appurtenant accordingly it is, with that redlory, in the patronage of the archbilhop, the redtor of Saltwood being collated and indudled to the redtory of Saltwood, with the chapel of Hythe appurtenant to it. It is included in the king’s books in the valuation of the redlory of Saltwood. In 1^88 here were communicants five hundred and fixty.

There was formerly a chantry in this church, which was fupprefied with others of the fame kind anno i and '2 Edward VI. when the incumbent William Decon, had a yearly penfion of fix pounds.''.

THE HUNDRED OF WORTH, WRITTEN in Domefday, Werde^ the

next In the 20th

is

hundred fouth-weftward from Hythe. year of king

III.

CONTAINS WITHIN

IT

West Hythe

1.

Burmarsh. Dimchurch.

2. 3.

And

Edward

ITS

in part,

it

w'as written as at prefent.

BOUNDS the parishes OF 4. Orgarswike. 5. Blackman ST ONE; and 6. Eastbridge.

the churches of thofe pariflies

of Limne and in other hundreds.

riflies

;

and likewife part of the pathe churches of which are

Newchurch,

^This hundred, excepting that part of the parifh of Weft Hythe within the bounds of it, lies wholly in the diftri(ft of Romney Marlb, and within the liberties and jurifdidion of the Juftices of the fame. It was intended to have deferibed all the pariflies lying on the quarry-hills above the marfli firft, and «

^ Willis’s

Mitred Abbeys, vol.

ii.

p. 105.

then

WORTH HUNDRED.

254

then thofe In the marfh altogether, in order to prevent the frequent change from the marih to the upland country and back again, in the defcriptions of them ; but the hundreds remaining undefcribed in this lath extending promifcuoutly over parilhes both on the hills and in the marih, has entirely prevented that method being purfued.

WEST HYTHE LIES

the next adjoining parifh fouth-wellward from the townihipand parifh of Hythe,laft-defcribed. It was at firll called fimply Hythe, and in after times

Old Hythe,'

comparifon of the new and more profperoLis town which rofe out of its ruins, but more ufually Weft Hythe, from its fituation weftward of it. Great part of this parifh is a member of the town and port of Hythe, and within the jurifdidion of the juftices of it, the liberty of which and of the cinque ports claim over fo much of it; the refidue, being the north-weft part, in which the church flood, is within the hundred of Worth, and jurifdidion of thejuftices of the county. The manor of Wye extends over a in

fmall part of this parilh. This place feems to have been but of fmall confequence, whilft the neighbouring harbour of Limne

remained in a flourifliing ftace ; but when that was deferted by the fea, and the Ihips by that means hindered from coming to it, this haven of Weft Hythe fucceeded in turn, and became the ufual refort for fliipplng in its ftead, and the town here increafed in proportion as that of Limne decayed. But this was of no long duration, for the lea continuing to decreafe from this coaft, after no great length of time, left J

See Leland’s Itinerary, vol. vi, p, ii. this

;

WEST HYTHE. this

haven

iand, that

likewife

fo

255 choaked up with beach and

became

entirely ufelefs, and the fliipping were neceflltated to ftop eaftward at Hythe, the haven of which then became the ufual refort in the room of it ; but the fame inconflancy of that fluftuating element prevailed after fome time there too, and deftroyed that harbour in like manner, by withdrawing its waters from it, fo that now the lea does not flow near it for the fpace of near half a mile, nor to this place for three times that diRance. The particular times of the deRrucfion of thefe havens, by the lea deferting them, has never been afcertained. That of Limne was after the Romans had left this ifland, and it muft have been during the time of the Saxons, perhaps in their earlield time here ; for in the reign of king Edward the Confeflbr, this of Well Hythe was become of fuch refort and confequence, that it was elleemed as one of the cinque ports. From which time the town is laid to have greatly increafed, infomuch that Leland feems to infer that it in fome meafure reached all along the Ihore, to where the fubftance of Hythe now is, as one of the lame town, in which there w'ere three churches befides this of Our Lady of Well Hythe, the ruins of which, as well as the church-yards, remained in his time and although there is great probability of the truth of thefe circumllances, yet there is no mention of them by any one elfe, any more than there is, that this town of Weft Hythe, where the ruins of the church then remained, was more particularly that which was burnt along the fhore in the reign of Richard JI. as has been already fully related before. When this haven of Weft Hythe w'as rendered ufelefs, and that of it

Flythe, eaftward of it, reforted to in its Head, has only been conjeclured ; but moft: probably it was not long before thelMorman conqueft,at which time lordCoke

Hythe

w'as added to the other ports, which I Ihould apprehend means the prcfentport, in the room

fays,

of

WORTH

2^6

HUNDRED.'

which thenceforward of the oia one of Weft Hyihe,

new one. Some place Portm Lemams, at Welt the Roman port, called among the latter is Hvthe, and others at Hythe ; became only a member

to the

from the derivation Baxter, forming their conjectures thefe places are ot lulliof the name but neither of however the dent antiquity for this purpofe, and port was, they in gelearned may dilagree where that either of thefe neral agree, that it was not at fand hills, The°parilh lies on the ridge of quarry or far as Botolphs and extends below them wellward as Butters bridge, the two bridoe, now vulgarly called bounds of it, and houfes near which are within the quite to the fea (bore between the parilhes ;

fouthward is no village ; but of Hythe and Dimchurch. There houfes, and the rums there are about fifteen draggling hill, clofe to the of the church, at the foot of the grow near marlh grounds. Several large thriving elms a of the hill, going down to the church j the foot

place. tree very rare indeed near this

ecclesiastical jurisdiction of Limne. of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry The church, which was dedicated to the bleffed it appears Vii^in Mary, has been long fince in ruins ; of one Imall to have been very fmall, and confided chancel. The wed, north, and ifle, and a dill fmaller The arch bepart of the fouth walls are danding. the tween the ifle and chancel is gothic, as is that of door at the wed end, over which is an arch of Rornan It

is

within the

there is a brick, but not the work of that people j with fmall window likewife in the fouth wall, turned

probably the fame brick, but of modern work. It end of king Henry VII. fell to decay at the very latter the or beginning of king Henry VIlI.’s reign ; for in lyth^-ear of the former, Robert Beverlye, vicar, was buried in the choir of it ; and when Leland wrote,

about the middle of the latter reign, about forty years afterwards, he rcprefents it as then in ruins. This

i

!.

i

4

>rm:

\

t

WEST HYTHE

257

This church is a vicarage, in the patronage of the archdeacon of Canterbury, who has likewife the ap* year of propriation of the great tithes. In the 8th four king Richard II. this vicarage was valued at pounds, and on account of the Imallnefs of its income, valued in the king’s books at 81. 14s. 4id. and the yearly tenths at fifty17s. 5id. In 1588 here were communicants three ; in 1640, forty ; and it was valued at fortyfour pounds. Before the civil wars of king Char.es I. not taxed to the tenth.

It

is

vicar for there was paid twelve-pence an acre to the marfii-land in this pariQi ; but the incumbent, to in-

twogratiate himfelf with the parifliioners, abated pence per acre ; fo that there has been only tenpence paid ever

The

fince.

and other oc-

chriftenings, marriages, burials,

for cafional duties, are performed at Limne church, which the vicar pays to the vicar of Limne an annual

acknowledgment. This vicarage is now of about twenty-feven pounds clear annual income.

CHURCH OF

IFEST HYTHE,

PATRONS,

VICARS. IFilliam 1

Merrkhy

595, obt.

1

Sept.

*3,

610."*

Hyrjl, A. M. May 29, 1610, refigned 1615. Barnaby Pownally Dec. zo, 1615, refigned 1629. William Kennct, A. M. July 25, 1629, obt. 1633.

James

Stejihe 7i Sacketty

A. M. Nov. 9,

1633, obt. 1679. William Coleman, clerk,

May lO,

1679. See Harklan

roL. vin.-

MSS. No. 6997.

patrons,

WORTH HUNDRED.

25^ PATRONS, Archdeacon

VICARS.

Csr’f.

Canterbury.

William Keivton,

March

12,

1719, refigned 1732."

John Sackett, A.

M. June

16,

1732, obt. 1753.“

* Likewife curate of Wingham.

He

wrote the Antiquities of Maidftone. He refigned tins vicarage on being

William Howdell, A. theprefent vicar.

M.

prefeiitcd to the redlory of

Gillingham,

in Dorfetfhire. ° See Folkeftone,

1753,

of which parifh

he was likewife cnraie.

B

M

U R

THEnextparinifouth lies

m

A R

S

vveftward from Weft

Romney MarHi, and within

rifdi
of the juftices of

This parish

lies

H,

the liberty

Hy the, and

ju-

it.

within the level of

Romney

Marlh, throughout the whole of which both the and water make dreadful havoc on the health

air

of the inhabitants of this lickly and contagious country, a characftei fufficiently corroborated by their pallid countenances and (liort lives. The village, havinothe church in it, confifts of only four or five houfes, fituated

among many

thriving elms, an unufual fight in this part of the marfti. It is nearly in the middle

of the pariHi, which

is

about two miles acrofs each

profpeift

of the country here is very different from that heretofore deferibed, being an entire llat tor man)^ miles, over a great extent of marftiJand, fome little of which, at different places throughout It, IS ploughed up for agriculture. The roads, yvhich are wide and exceedingly

crooked and wind-

ing, are in general nothing more than the deep black foil of the marfli having in fome places beach and ftingle lard on them. There are very few hedges, either on the (ides of the roads, or to part the property of different perfons, deep and wide ditches or dikes,

with

BURMARSH*

250

with poft and rail fencing, being every where made ufe of ; fo that there is an uninterrupted view over the whole marfli, a very few houfes with (lacks of hay and corn thinly fcattered about, and a low tree or pollard of willow or alh growing at long dillances here and there, with the cattle grazing over the whole, fill up the profpe<5t as far as the eye can fee. There is a great deal of marlh ploughed up in this parilh, where the land is very fertile and rich. In the reign of king Ethelwolf, about the year 848, Edbald his grandlbn, for the fum of four thoufand pence, gave this manor to his friend Wynemund, who again gave it, with the land of Wyk, to themonaftery of St. Augufline,P as free as his lord had given it to him, where he had cholen for himfelf a place of

After which it remained part ofthepoffeflions of the monallery, and accordingly it is thus entered in the record of Domelday, under the general title of the land of the church of St. Auguftine : In the marfh of Romeneh the abbot himfelf holds Bur»

fepulture.

warmarefc. ‘The arable

It

land

was taxed is

at

two filings and

tivelve cariicates.

three yoke.

In dcmefne there

arefour., and forty-four villeins, with five borderers having ten carucates. In the time of king Edward the Conand afterwards ten fejfor it was worth izventy pounds,

now thirty denefmere was St.

pounds,

ward

the Confeftbr,

The fhire

pounds.

tefiifies

that

Be-

Edabbot fhall have of him who

Auguftine' s in the time of king

and

the

fac andfoe. In the 8th year of king Richard IT. the abbot’s pofieffions in this parilh, as appears by the admea-

[hall hold

it

furement, were two hundred and four acres, one rood and an half. In the iter of H. de Stanton and his fociates, juflices itinerant,

upon

a

cpio

ties in this

anno

7

Edward

warranto, was allowed,

manor, /i'i’i? ivarren p

Dec. Script,

a

the abbot

among

in all

other liberhis dcmefne lands

col. 1776, 1777? S

II.

2239.

of

26o

WORTH HUNDRED.

.

and view of frank pledge and all belonging it, in conlequence of the grants and confirmations o‘ them by the king and his predeceflbrs, and the allowance of them in the lafi: iter of J. de Berewick and his fociates, to him ; and king Edward III. by infpeximus^ and king Henry VI. likewife confirmed the fame at which period the great length of time which to it the abbot had poflefled this manor, had gained the

of

it,

j**

court lodge of

which

it

the

name of Abbots court, by

manor of Burmarjh, 'with Abbots-courty remained part of the pofieffions of St. Augufline’s monaflery till its difiTolution, in the 30th 3 ear ol king Henry VIII. when this great abbey, with all its pofieffions, was furrendered into the king’s hands, uho next year granted this manor, with Abbots court, to Walter Hendley, efq. and he feems very foon afterwards to have conveyed it back again to the crown, for I find a grant of this manor, with its appurtenances, to Sir William Finch, of the Moat, near Canterbury, and his heirs male, by Katherine his it

is

called at this time.

T'he

then wife, to hold He died in 1552, leaving by her, who was his fecond wife, tw'o Tons, Erafmus and Vincent, who fucceffively became pofiTefled of it by the limitation in the above grant ; during which time their half brother Sir Thomas Finch, of Eaftwell, who was their father’s eldefi: furviving fon, by Elizabeth his firfl wife, in the 5th year of queen Elizabeth, obtained a grant of the reverfion of it, in cafe of failure of their iffue. Both Erafmus and Vincent Finch died f. p. but when, I have not found, but that the pofi'effion of it came at length afterwards to his grandfon Sir Thomas Finch, of Eafiwell, and earl

of Winchelfea on Charles **

*

this

I.’s

reign, pafled

Rot Cart, ab See a

his mother’s death,"

an. \mo.

7ijq,

account of the hiftory, p. 403. full

it

I*

away

to Sir

an vicej/imum.

inch’s,

who,

in

king

Ralph Whit-

N.

11.

under Eafiwell,

vol. vii.

of

field.

BURMARSH.

261

whofe Ton Sir Herbert Whitfield, at the latter end of king Charles ll.’s reign, alienated it, by the name of the manor of Burmarlh, alias Abbots-court, to Sir Edward Dering, bart. of Surrenden, and in his defcendants it has continued down to Sir Edvvard field

;

A

Dering, bart. who is the prefent proprietor of it. court baron is held for this manor. Tri ENSTONE is a manor in this parifii, though now it has only the name of having been one, winch was in king Henry III.’s reign held of Dover caftle, as appears by the book of the tenures belonging to it, being a part of thofe fees which made up the barony called the Conjiabularie^ by the performance of ward for the defence of it ; and by the book of knights fees, taken from divers inquifitions ex officio in king Edward I *s reign, and remaining in the king’s remembrancer’s office in the exchequer, it appears that the mafter of the hofpital,or MaifonDieu, in O pringe, then held it of the king’s gift, in capite, as of the honor of Peverel, and it continued among the polielfions of the hofpital till king Edward IV.’s reign, when this hofpital, with all its pofleffions, efcheated to the crown, as was found by inquilition in the 20th year of that reign. After which the king granted the cuftody or guardianfhip of it to fecular perlbns; in which ftate it continued till the yth year of Henry VIII. when John Filher, bilhop of Rochefier, obtained a grant of the hofpital and all its revenues, among which was this manor ofTrienfione, for the better endowment of St. John’s college, in Cambridge, part of the pofleffions of which it remains at this time. It

Mr. William Pepper, of Folkeftone, and Mr. Robert Hunt, is let

by the college on a

beneficial leafe to

of Dover. The family of Broadnax had a manfion and efiate here, flill called Broadnax, as early as the reign of

king Henry VIII. when William Broadnax refided at it.

The

ellate

now

belongs to David Papillon, efq. s 3

And

WORTH HUNDRED.

262

And

Brockmans, of Newington and Chenton, had likevvife poffeflions here full as early as that, which are now the properry of James Drake Brockman, efq. the

|

of Beech borough. parochial char flies.

The poor conllantly

-

about four, cafually fix. Burmarsh is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of

relieved are

Limne. I'he church, which is dedicated to All Saints, is handfome, confifting of one ifle and a chancel, having a tower at the weft end, wdiich, as well as the ifle, In it are three bells. It is kept very is embattled. clean and near. There are no memorials in it. This redtory was always appendant to the manor of Burmarlh, till the dififolution of the abbey of St. Auguftine, in the 30th year of king Henry VIII. when it came into the hands of the crown, where it has remained ever fince, the king being now the patron of it. It is valued in the king’s books at 20I. los. icd. and the yearly tenths at 2I. is. id. In 1588 it was valued at fixty pounds, communicants thirty-fix. In

1640

was valued at eighty pounds, communicants the fame. It is now, owing to the increafe of arable lands in it, of the value of one hundred and fifty pounds per annum. In the year 1635, anno 1 1 Charles I. there was a it

petition of the

poor clergy, beneficed in

Romney

Marlh, to the king, among which was the redlor of Burmarlh, letting forth, that in times theretofore, and till very lately, the owmers and occupiers ot land had either paid tithes in kind, or compounded,- fome after one rate and fome after another ; but that they had lately let on foot acujiom of two-pence an acre, in lieu of tithe-wool and pafturage, being the main profit accruing from the marlli-land, and to that end had obtained prohibitions to ftop proceedings in decirharie caufes

i

BURMARSH.

263

caufes In the ecclefiaftical court, which, if it fliould take place, would tend to render the beft benefice in

and contagious part of the county ftarcely fufficient for apoor curate’s (Upend, much lels to maintain them and their families. Upon which the matter was heard before the lords of the council, in the Star Chamber, where divers modes were fuggefted by them, for the fettling this difference between the clergy and landholders, and two meetings were appointed at Maidftone in the fpring of the next year, 1636, at which both parties appeared ; when all the parilhes in Romney Marlh agreed in ihecullom of two pence an acre for pafturage and wool, which’is called lometimes, the tithe of dry cattle, excepting Warehorne, which was c^d and Old Romney, of which nothing was then found and it was then agreed on all (ides, that no man had ever heard or known wool in this marfh to have been ever paid in fpecie, the other tithes being paid or compounded for, and as to this pariOi in particular, the cuftom had been proved by depofitions in the fpiritual court, and by a fentence given in it according to this cuftom in 1602, in a fuit between Lane, parfon, and Cheefeman ; and Sir John Honywood, on behalf of himlelf and others, owners and occupiers in this parilh, claimed a cuftom of two-pence an acre for pafturage and wool, three -pence for the caft of a colt, one penny for a calf, and one halfpenny for a lamb j all which was then acquiefced in, and has been fubmitted to as a cuftom ever fince.’ There is a modus of one (hilling an acre on the grafs land in this fickly

;

this parifti,

taken from the breviate and other papers of Sergeant Twyfden, (afterwards one of the judges of the king’s bench,) who was one of the council retained in the caufe. ’

This

is

S

4

CHURCH

t

WORTH HUNDRED

264

BURMARSH.

CHURCH FATRQNS, Or

RECTORS,

hy luhom firejented.

Nov.

Tho7nas Lane^

The Kin^

obt. 1623. Anthony Foxton^

A.

13,

M.

1595 *

Dec.

1623. obt. 1631. Thomas Heylin, A. M. Feb. 28, 1631, obt. 1632.'

March

Arthur Coytkmore^ 1632.

2,

Jasnes Burnett, obt. 1640.“

Alexander Burnett^ clerk, Nov. 23, 1640." James W'attSy A. M. Sept, II, 1661, obt. 1662.

John Hurt

A. M.

Sept, ii,

1662. Geotge Jones, A. B. May 21, 1673, obt 1705. Nov, Samuel IVighfwick, 28, I 705, obt. 1 706. Nov. 20, John Honyiuood, A. 1706, obt. Sept. 16, 1737.* John Head, A. M. Nov. 21, i 737 » obt. June 1754'' Richard Smith, A. M. Oft. 18,

M

1734. obt. 1772.*

William Wing Foivle, A. B. Dec. 22, 1772, the prefen^ reftor.*

y z

Rym, FcbJ. vol. xix. p. 350. u Ibid. vol. XX. p. 451.

*

w

Ibid. p.

453.

» Alfo reAor of Kingfnoth by

di

D

Brir. vol.vi. p. 3725. » In 177a, by difpenfatlon, reftor

I

M

C

next adjoining

H U R C parifli

is

H.

fonthward upon the

Dimchurch, (written Dem^cherche) lying in the fame

fea ihore,

vicar of Sellinge. vicar of Alkham. See Blog.

of Snargate.

penfatloD*

THE

And And

in antient records,

level of

Romney Mardi,

DIMCHURCH, MarQi, and within the jullices of

and jurifdidlon of the

it.

This parish

Romney Mar(h, which

liberty

265

fituated

wholly in the level of adjoining loutluvard to the fea, from is

defended by an artificial wall ot great ftrength, being the foie barrier which prevents the lea from overflowing the whole extent of the Marfli. it

is

This wall is ufually known by the name of Dimchurch ’Wdllf and IS about three miles in length, extending'' from Brockman’s barn, eaffward of this place, as far weftward as Wallend, about a mile and an half from

New Romney. As

it

for the

is

common

fafety, fo it

fupported by fcots levied over the whole marfli, and the yearly expence of it is very great indeed, to the amount of ..^oool, as the fea has lately increaled with unulual force againfl it, infomuch as to call for every exertion for its prefervation. It is more than is

twenty

feet in height,

and

as

much

in

width at the

top, the high road from

Hythe by Dimchurch to New Romney being along the fummit for the greateft part of the length of it, and at the bale it may be faid to extend upwards of three hundred feet, being defended outward, down the floping bank of it towards the fea. by a continued raddle-work of overlaths and faggots, faftened to rows of piles in ranges of three feet w^th parallel with the wall, one above the other, fora confiderable way ; and acrofs contrariwife by numbers of jettees, knocks, and groins, from the wall towards the fea, at proper diftances, along the whole of it, to weaken the force of the waves, and at the fame time flop the beach and fliingle ftones, which arc continually thrown up, and to lodge them among the works, on the fides of the wall, as an additional covering and flrength to it Through the wall are three grand fluices, at proper parts of it, for the general fewing of the Marfh. .

At

a very fmall diftance below the wall, lies the ftraggling village of Dimchurch, containing about forty

WORTH HUNDRED.

266

forty hoiifes, with the church and parfonage ; a fmall diftancefroni which is a houfe called Newhall, built

beginning of queen Elizabeth’s reign, in which the courts, called the Lath, are held by the lords of the Marlh, and likewife by the corporation of it, who meet here and hold a general lath once a year, on Whit Thurlday, to regulate all differences, and to take care that the Marfii laws are duly obferved and executed, in the

and make new ones for that purpofe, and to fee to the management and repair of the walls, fewers, and drainage of the Marfli, and to levy fcots for the expence of a full account of which, as well as of the hiftory, charters, and conftitution of the Marfli, will be given hereafter, at the clofe of the defeription of the

them;

pariflies within

it.

The high road to Burmarfl-i,and likewife to Buttersbridge, and fo on to Weft Hythe hill and the upland country, goes through this village, and is, as well as moft of tlie roads hereabout, tolerably good, owing to the convenience of their being mended with the beach and fliingle-ftones. The inhabitants of it are of the

of the Marfh, are moftly fuch as are employed in the occupations and management of the level, ora kind of fcafaring men, who follow an illicit trade, as well by land as water. The country here looks very open, for there is fcarcely a tree within the bounds of it, and for fome miles further. The lands are chiefly grafs, and towards the eaft there are great quantities of beach and fhingle ftones lying bare, with a very uneven furface, interfperl'ed among the paftures, and continue fo for a confiderable breadth, as far as the town of Hythe, plainly Ihewing that the whole of it, as far as the foot of Weft Hythe-hill, was once covered by the fea, and in courfe of time, and by degrees, deferted by it. The manor of Eastbridge claims over great part of this parifli, and the manor of Burmarlh over fome of it, but the principal one in it is lower

fort,

and, like others dwelling in

tlie reft

The

DIMCHURCH. The manor of Newington-fee, church, which extends Jikevvile beyond of

267

Dim-

alias

the bounds

into feyeral others, and

it

Icems to have been fo liaving been accounted a limb of the

from its ot Newington Bclhoufe, near Hythe, as fuch it moft probably had always the lame owners ; however that be, it appears, in the reign of king Henry VIII. to have been part of the pofielTions of Thomas, lord Cromwell and earl of Effex, before whole attainder, which happened in the ^2d year of that reign, it came by purchafe from him into the king’s hands, together called

manor

with the manor of Newington Belhoufe, to which this of Newington fee, as well as Brenfet, feem then to have been accounted appendages,\and it continued in the crown with them, till the ift year of queen Mary, when it w'as granted to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold in capite, who the next year palled it away to

,

Mr. Henry Herdfon, alderman of London, whofc grandfon Mr. Francis Herdfon alienated it, in king James I.’s reign, to Mr. Henry Brockman, of Newington, in whofe defeendants it continued down to James Brockman, efq. of Beechborough, who dying in 1767, without male ilTue, bequeathed it by his wilfto the Rev. Mr. Ralph Drake, who afterwards took the name of Brockman, and his eldeft fon James Drake Brockman, efq. now^ of Beechborough, is the prefent owner of it. A court leet and court baron is held for this manor.

CHJRITIES,

Captain Timothy Bedingfielo, by all his

lands in St. Maries,

will in 1693,

rave

Woodchurch, and Liminge, towards

the education of fuch poor male children, of fuch poor parents alms of this parifli, or out of any parifli-ftock, and whofe parents were of the church of England and that fuch ; children be kept to learning, and fent to one of the univerfities if capable, or put out to trade to be taken out of the pariflies of ; as did not receive

Dimchurch, Liminge, and Smeeth •>

;

and

5s. a

piece to

See Newington Belhoufe before. Rot. Efch. an. 7 Edward an I Marlae, pt. 10.

two poor

VI,

pt. S,

woraca

WORTH HUNDRED.

5»68

yeaily, of thofe pariflies, on the 2^th day of December Which lands are veiled after they had received the facrament. and churchwardens miniller are, the whom of in truflees, three time being. of Dimchurch for the ^ other John Fxnch, gent, of Limne, by will in i 707, among marfliof acres 160 of part charitable legacies, deviled his lixth Limne and Eaftland in Eallbridge, to the minillers, &c. of Limne Hiould bridge, and their fuccelTors, in trull, that they of as is thereinfarue, difpofe of two third parts of the rents of the diL mentioned, and that the miniller, See. of Eallbridge, lliould eldeft and pofe of the other third part to three of the poorell people of Eallbridge, which have been good, honell and labouring people, who have never received alms or relief

women

j

*

j

^

j

,

:

j

trious

poor of that or any other parill),in cafe there Ihould be fo many fo Dimchurch, of poor the of many to fo not, found there if ;

qualified,

which

make up

lliould

the conllant

number

of three j

half-yearly for ever.

The poor conllantly

relieved

by

this

and Blackman Hone con-

twenty. folidated, as to this purpofe, are about twelve, cafually

Dimchurch

is

within the

ecclesiastical juris^

diction of the Limne.

c^ioceje

of Canterbury, and deanry of

church, which is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, confifts of one ifle and one chancel, having a low pointed fteeple at the weft end, in which hang five bells. At the bottom of the tower of the fteeple is an antient The ,ifle is deled, the circular arch, ornamented.

The

chancel not.

In the latter, within the rails, Raifback, A. B. obt. 1787.

John the rails a memorial

for

church, obt. 1753.

In the

rial for

monument for Mary his wife, who

is

a

John Fowle,

rnemoWithout

a

gent, of

Dim-

againft thefouth wall,

Bedingfield, and buried near it. He died in

Capt. lie

ifte,

is

Timothy

1693, arms, ErminCy an eagky gideSy impaling argent, a lion rampant guar danty crowned, fable. This church, which is a redory, was part of the pofleftions of the monaftery of St. Auguftine, and continued fo till the diflblution of it in the 30th year of

king Henry VIII. where it has remained ever the king being the prefent patron of it.

fince,

It

DIMCHURCH. It is

a 6g

valued in the king’s books at

7I. 2s.

8id.

and

There is a parfonage houfe and three acres of glebe. In 1 588 it was valued at fixty pounds, communicants feventy-three. In 1640, the like. It is now of the value of about eighty pounds per annum. In the petition of the clergy, beneficed in Romney the yearly tenths at 14s. 3|d.

Mardi, in 1635, for the fetting afide the cuftom of two-pence an acre, in lieu of tithe-wool and pafturage, a full account of the proceedings in which has been already given before under Burmarfh, upon which it was then agreed on all fides, that wool in the Marfh had never been known to have been paid in Ipecie, the other tithes being paid or compounded for ; and as to this parifli in particular, that the cuftom of two-pence an acre, as before-mentioned, for pafture and wool, which is fometimes called the tithe of dry cattle, had been proved by an indenture made between Richard Hudfon, parfon of Dimchurch, and Thomas Honywood, in the 43d year of queen Elizabeth. There is a modus of one fhilling an acre on all grals land in this parifh.

CHURCH OF DIMCHURCH. PATRONS, Or

RECTORS

by 'whom ^''^efented.

Vie King

George Hudfon^ A. M. June 13, 1599, refigned 1605.*^ Robert Elye, A, M. Nov. 24, 1605, refigned 16 19.'*

Henry Hills, A. B. April 30, 1619. Richard Burton, A. M. Nov. 13, 1625.' Bajil Kennet,

A. M. April 13,

1676, obt. 1686.* c Sec before, where he iscailrd Richard. d He refigned this reflory for Smar-

f He held this reAory with the vicarage of Poflling. He was father of W'hitc Kemiet, bilhop of Peterbo-

den, and died in 1644. * Rym. Feed. vol. xviii. p. 647, He continued rcdlor likewife in 1635.

p.

Wood’s Ath. Oxon. vol. 408, 1131. See PolUiiig.

rough.

it.

PATRONS,

WORTH inrNDRED. rectors.

PATRONS,

.

William Smith, A. M. Dec. 3, 1686, obt 1713. Richard Bowes, LL. D. i 7 3 »

The King,

*

refigned 1718.* Julius Decdes, A. M. Feb. 3, »7 i 8, obt. April ig, 1752,“ Claudius Clare, LL. B. June il^

1752, obt. Dec. 1764-* John Rayjback, A. B. Augilft 3 » 1765, obt. Feb. It;, 1787.“" William Wehjier, 1787* the prefent reiflor.

rcfigned this reflory for

Eaf-

He

Itng, and was afterwards vicar of

New

1

g He

k

Romney, h Likewife prebendary of CanterMongeham. liui y, and tcAor of Great

lies

buried in Hythe church. vicarof Limne. lies buried in the chancel,

And He

^vhhln the

altar rails.

ORGARSWIKE, USUALLY called

Argafwike, lies the next parlrti northward from Dimchiirch, wholly in the level of Romney Marfh, and within the liberty and jiirifdiftion of the juftices of

it.

In antient writings

Ordgarefivicei and probably took

its

it

is

written

name from fome

Saxon owner of it. There is nothing worthy of notice in thispariOi, the lands of which are an entire fiat of marfli-grounds, without a hedge or tree among them. There is but one houfe in the parifh, which is the court lodge, confequently it has a miferable and forlorn afpedt, notwithlUnding which, the number of fheep and cattle interfperfed over it, cannot fail to bring to mind the inbrings to the occupiers of it. Near the above-mentioned houfe are a few ftones, being the only remains left of the church. creafe of wealth

The manor king of Mercia,

it

of

Orgarswike was

given by Offa, church, and itfeems

791, to Chrifi; afterwards to have continued without interruption parin

cel

,

ORGARSWIlCE.

271

of the poficfllonsof it. This manor appears, Ibmetime before the reign of king Edward I. to have had, among other liberties, that of free 'warren granted to It. bor in the 7th year of that reign, the prior claimed It tor this manor, when it was allowed him, for though he had never made life of it, yet by his charters of hbertics tie had a right to it. And king Edward II. in his 10th year, confirmed to the prior and convent, free wairen in all their demefne lands inOrgarifwick, amonoother places. Jn which (fate it afterwards continued^ till the difiblution of the priory in the 3 (1 year of kin^ cel

1

Henry VIII. when

fettled

it

came

into the king’s hands, who by his dotation charter, in his 33d year, on it

his new-ei ebbed

dean and chapter of Canterbury, part whofe pofTefilonsit Hill remains. The demefne lands have been from time to time demifedon a beneficial leafe, the intereft of which was formerly in the Manwood’s, afterwards of the Groves’s, and is now of William Jemmett, cfq. ofAfliford! 7 here is no court held for it. The dean and chapter of Canterbury are likewife pofTelfed of a marlh in this parilh, called Orgarjwick of-

marjh, containing eighty-eight acres, which before belonged to the priory of Chrift-church, (ad hofuthmi)

which

is demifed by them on a beneficial leafe.^ There arc no pai ochial charities, and there is not more than one perfon relieved in a twelvemonth.

Orgarswike

within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Limne. The church, which has been long fince ruinated, is

ecc/^a defirutla, is a redory, which in the 8th year of king Richard 11. anno 1384, was valued at four pounds, and on occafion of its poverty w'as not taxed tenth.

It is

valued

in

to the the king’s books at three pounds,

and the yearly tenths at fix fhillings. It is now of the yearly value of about twenty pounds. There is one acre of glebe.

cmdRcii

8

.

« 72

WORTH HUNDRED* -

CHURCH OF ORGARSWIKE. PATRONS, Or

hy

The King, by

Dean and

rectors.

whom ^reJentecL

M. June

Daniel Bolkn. A.

lajije

1

,

1631.*

Sept, The fame, fecond induAion,

Cha/iter of Canterbury.

6, 1633, refigned 1635. Tunjlall, December 12,

William

1615. William 168

clerk,

Jordan^

obt.

1

William Culling, clerk, July 23, 1681, obt 1709 David Jones, A. M. May 31, " 1-09 obt. Aug 20, 1750 John Aitfon, A. M. March 18, *” obt. Dec. 1 3 1 7 ^ 7 1 7 5 prefented M. Martin Ben/on, A. '-“ Dec. 787, refigned 79 M. 1791, refig. J. Todd, A. <

1

I

i

I

H

I

792.*’

John Francis, A.

M.

the

prefent redtor.'’

\

Rvm.Fosd.

of reaory on being collated to that

vol.xix. p. 359 -

a Anarcaorof

Upper Hardfcs.^

a LikeWife reaor of Paulas au.l vicar of St.

St.

Martin

churches,

s,

m

the minor caCanterbury, and one of nons of that cathedral. the chapel of o He was chaplain to tefisned this Tunbridge Wells, and .

B

Medham, in SurryP He refigned this reAcry vicarage

of

Milton.

See

tor the vol. vi,

Wlllefborough, q Likewife vicar of and under mafter of the king's fchool, Canterbury.

^

lackmanstone.

north*eaftward fromOrgarfwikc, IS the next parifh Marlh, and within the Ivineinthe level of Romney of the juaices of it. In Domefliberty and jurifdiaion woR Blachemenejione, which name it dav it is written baxon owner ot it. from one Blacheman, the eftate or territory. fignifying in Saxon, an Ihe. houle within it. It IS very fmall, having no many years, a looker s court-lodge has been down for

we

.

BLACKMANSTONE.

273

of it. The hut being all that remains on the fcite of the road church was fituated clofe on the other fide two or three ftones reto it, of which there are only fome of maining, The lands of it are moftly marfli, the are ploughed up, and the whole of it much

which fame as fifh

that of

aflefled,

is

Orgarfwike, laft-defcribed. This pawith that of Dimchurch, to the relief

of the poor, in which latter, whenever there are any, they are kept and maintained. The manor of Black.manstone, at the time of conqueft, was wrefted from the Saxon other eftates proprietor of it, and given, with many de Montand manors in this neighbourhood, to Hugo

Norman

the

Of him

fort.

manor was held by one Hervey, as furvey of Domefday, taken in the 5th

this

appears by the under the geyear of the Conqueror’s reign, in which, de Montfort, aboveneral title of the lands of Hugo mentioned, it is thus entered Blacheman Hugo, Blachemenejlon holds 1

:

7

Herveus

held

it

'e .

of

in the time of king

Edward

the Confeffor,

The arable land is and three are

was taxed for half a piling.

In demefne there with ten borderers with one carucate. and one fervant. In the time of king

rucates.

fcjjor it

There

is

Edward

and it two ca-

villeins,

a church the Con-

pounds, and afteiwaids three

was worth four

pounds, nozv fix pounds-, * r On the volunta'-y exile of Robert de Montfort, the orandfon of Hugo, in the reign of king Henry I. poflefof his feicrnory of this manor, among the reO: ^

fions,

came

•,

into the king’s hands',, of

whom

>r

was afMarinis, one of it

terwards held by a family named De whom, Albericus de Marinis, held it in capite by years of king knight’s fervice, in the 12th and 13th being part of John, holding it of the caftle of Dover,

barony called the thofe knights fees which made up the pofTcfred Conftabularie there. Roger de Maryns died III. when it was of it in the 1 6th year of king Edward In the 20th found that Henry Haiit was his next heir.

voi*.

VIII.

T

WORTH HUNDRED.

^74

year of which reign, Joane, widow of Roger de Maryns held a third part of this manor in dower, on whofe death three years afterwards, f-lenry Haut became pof-

of the entire fee of it, together with the advowfon of the church/ His defcendant Sir William Haut, of Bifhopfborne, left two daughters his coheirs; of whom Jane, the youngeft, marrying Sir Tho. Wyatt, of Allington, he in her right became entitled to this iefied

manor, with the advowlbn of the church, which, in the 33d year of king Henry Vlll. an aff having pafled for that purpofe, he exchanged with the king for other prcmifes, and it remained in the crown till queen Elizabeth, in the

29th year of her reign, granted it to efq. one of her pages, who not long afterwards conveyed it by fale to Sir William Hall, of Eibrooke, in Kennington, whole eldcft fon NevillHall,

Roger Parker,

efq. alienated

it,

in

the 6th year of king Charles

I.

anno

1630, to Sir Edward Hales, knight and baronet, of Tunflall, in whofe defccndants it continued down to Sir

Edward Hales,

pafied

away

bart.

now of

St. Stephen’s,

who

1788 to George Gipps, efq. as he did to John Shoefmith, efq. whofe heirs are now entitled to it. I'here is no court held for this manor. There are no parochial charities. Bl AC K M A NSTONE is Within the ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION of the of Canterbury, and of Limiie. The church has been in ruins for a long time pad, and was fo in the 26th year of king Henry VIII. as appears by the valuation of it in the king’s books taken it

in

that year. a redlory,

and was formerly appendant to the manor, and continued fo till coming into the hands of the crown from Sir Thomas Wyatt, by exchange in the 33d year of king Henry VIII. the king granted it next It

is

Rot. Efch. anno 23 Edward III. See der Biflioplborne and Waltham.

more of

the Hants un-

year

BLACKMANSTONE*

^ year to archblfliop Cranmer, and it has remained parcel ol the fee of Canterbury ever fince, his grace the

archbilhop being the prefent patron of it. It is valued in the king’s books at four pounds, and the yearly tenths In 1588 it was valued at fixteen at eight Ihillings.’ pounds, communicants none.

CHURCH OF BLACKMANSTONE. PATRONS, Or

RECTORS,

ly ivhom prefented.

yohn Spencer^ S T P. ob. 1 6 1 4, Jolm S and/ord^ A. M. June 15, 1614. Jonas Ratcliffe^ obt. 1626.

The Archbijhop

.

.

Chrijlopher Collard, J5, 1626, obt.

M, SepN

A.

1630.

Samuel Kinaftone^ A. M. Nov. 20, 1630, obt. 1637. William King^ A, M. Sept. II, 1637. George Jones, A. B. April 19, 1667. Sa?nuel IVirner, obt. 1721.

John-Henry Otte, J uly 14, 1721, obt. 1743.^

John Kirkby, Nov. obt.

ig,

1743,

May

21 , 1754.“ Charles Saunders, hh. B. June 8,

1754, obt. 1735."' Robert Greenall, A. B,

May

2,

1755, obt. Dec. 16, 1770.* Bladen Do’tvning, A. B. Feb. g, 1771, refigiied 1778.'’ John Bearblock, April 1778, ob.

May

1

784.

Henry Dimock, A.

M. May 1784,

the prefent re£l;or.“ *

Blackman a one Lib Regis, p.

con’s t

He was

Ba36.

prebendary of the church

of Litchfield. u

and in 1777 was collated to the reftory of Ivechurch, which re£fory he has fince rtfigned. He is now reAor of Quainton, Bucks.

* Likewife vicar of Waldcrfharc, and in r '64 was collated to the curacy of Nonington with Wimlinfwold. T Likewife vicar of VValdcrIharc,

And vicar of Weft clifFtf. He was collated at the fame time the reeftory of St. Edmund the King

^

Litewife vicars of Waldcr-

a

(hare.

to

London, and

is

now (1798)

a domeftic

chaplain, and librarian to his Grace the Archbilhop of Canterbury.

EASTBRIDGE

WORTH HUNDRED.

276

EASTBRIDGE from Blackmanftone, in Romney Marfh likewife, and within the liberty and jurif-

LIES next northward

diftion of the juftices of

day, EJlbrige

;

in

it.

It

is

written in

Domef-

other records, Eftbruge.

It has nothing worth mention in it, the whole of it being much the fame as the adjoining parilhes defcribed before, only it is fituated rather upon higher ground. In the northern part of the parifh is an eftate, formerly belonging to the family of Monins, afterwards Napleton’s, then Butler’s, of which name it was purchafed by Denne, of Lyd, whofe heirs now pofTefs it. And above that, near Eaft bridge church, is an eftate, once part of the demefnes of the manor, formerly Tw'yfden’s, which now belongs to Charles Lowndes, efq. and the truftees of Mr. John Finch’s charity, of



Limne.

Eastbridge was, before

the

Norman

conqueft, part

Godwin, earl of Kent, and w'as afterwards given by the Conqueror to Hugo de MontHe appears to have held the manor of Eastfort. of the

pofleffions of

bridge it is

own

hands, in demefney and accordingly thus entered in the record of Domefday, under the in his

general title of his lands : In IVerde hundred, Hugo himfelf holds EJlbridge in demefne. Alfi held it of earl Godzvin, and it was taxed at one fiding. The arable land is fx carucates. In de-

mejne there are three carucates, and two villeins, with thirty -fix

borderers having four carucates.

7here

are

eight faltpts, with the third part

of a ninth faitpit, of twenty /hillings. Half a fifhery of eight pence. Wood for three hogs for pannage. There are two churches. In the time of king Edward the Conjejj'or, and afterwards, it

was worth

ten pounds,

now fifteen

pounds.

On

On

EASTBRIDGE. 277 the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort,

Hugh

above-mentioned, in king Henry I.’s reign, this manor, among the reft of his eftates, came into the king’s hands as efcheats, and it continued fo, as appears by the Tejia de Nevih in the beginning of king Henry III. ’s reign, when it was valued at twelve pounds, and held by Stephen de Heringod, but it feems that he held it only at will, for afterwards that king, in his 13th year, granted this manor, with its appurtenanances, to that eminent man Hubert de Burgh, earl of Kent, and chief juftice of Englandj^" with liberty to give or aflign it to whomever he would, to a religious houfe or otherwife, to hold by the rent of one fore fparhawk yearly, in lieu of all fervices. Not long after which, he appears to have fettled this manor, together with the advowfon of the church, on the hofpital of St. Mary in Dover, afterwards called the Maifon Dieu,‘ then lately founded by him, part of the revenues of which it continued till the reign of king Henry VIII. when, on the Ibpprefllon of the hofpital, this manor and advowfon, came into the king’s hands, where the manor itfelf remained till the 5th year of grandfon of

queen Elizabeth, who granted it, with all its demefne lands to Cuthbert Vaughan, efq. and Elizabeth his with remainder to her heirs for ever. She was daughter and coheir of Thomas RoyIhe afterwards married Sir don, of Eaft Peckham Thomas Golding, and dying in 595, was buried at wife, in fpecial

tail,

;

i

Eaft Peckham. On their deceafe, /. p. this manor, with that of Honychild, in the adjoining parilhof St. Maries, came to her two children by William Twyfden, elq. of Chelmington, her firft hufband, viz. Roger Tvvyfden, efq. and Margaret his lifter, whofe

hufband Richard Dcring, efq. of Surrenden, whole feI

See more of him, vol. i. of this hilfory, among the earls of Kent. ® The deed of it is in the Surrenden library. Cart, 12 Edward 111, N. 5 , pro maner. de EJlbrig^ &c. ’’

-

T

3

cond

WORTH HUNDRED..

2^8 cond wife fhe

w'as,

became

in her right poflclTed

of this

manor of Eaftbridge, in whofe defeendants, baronets, of Siirrenden, it has come down to the prefent proprietor, Sir Edward Dering, bart. now of that place. There is no court held for this manor. CHARITIES. gent, of Limne, by will anno 1707, devifed his fixth part of 160 acres of marfli-land in this parifh, to the minifters, churchwardens, and overfeers of Limne and Eaff-. bridge, in triift, that they of Limne ftionlci difpofe of two third

John Finch,

parts of the rents thereof to poor people, as therein-mentioned ; and that they of Eaflbridge fhould difpofe of the other third part of the rent to three ot the pooreft and eldeft people of this pa-

who have been

good, honeft and induftrious people, and of and converfation, who have never received alms or relief of this parifli or any other, and in cafe there fhould not be fo many found there, then to fo many of the poor of Dimchurch,

rifli,

civil life

1

|

j

number of three half yearly for ever, one payment to be made on the Sunday after Chriftmas-dav, and the other upon the yearly day of his fo qualified,

which

is

make up

the conftant

j

The

annual produce is q1. 15s. 6|d. than one poor perfon relieved h^re yearly on not more

burial for ever.

There

fliould

|

an average.

Easter I DGE is within the ecclesiastical jurisdeanry of DICTION oi i\\Q dioceje of Canterbury,

>

1

Limne. church has been for many years in ruins. It Icems to have been a handfome building, .and being fituated on a fmall rife, makes a very coiifpicuous objedl over the whole marfli, having the appearance of a ftately well-built tower, with pinnacles at the top of it. There remain only fome fmall part of the fide w'alls and the ealt wail of the fteeple. It appears to have confifted of one ifle and one chancel, and' to have been built of the quany-fione. This church was an appendage to the manor of Eaftbridge, and was given with it by Hubert de Burgh, in king Henry II I. ’s reign, to the hofpital of St. Mary, alias the Maifon Dieu, in Dover, as has been already mentioned, part ot the poffeflions of which it continued till the fuppreffion of the

The

hofpital

i

|

|

i

|

!

I

eastbridge. hofpical in the reign of king Henry VIII. into the king’s hands, whence this

when

it

279 came

reftory was after-

wards granted

to

attorney-genera],

Sir

John Baker, of

SifTinghurtt, his

who conveyed

it back again to the crown, where it remained tiJl king Edward VJ. in his 1 ft year, granted it, among other premifes, to archbilhop Cranmer.** Since which it has continued parcel or the po^lfions of the fee of Canterbury, his grace the archbifhop being the prefent patron of it. This re(ftory is valued in the king’s books at 5I. 6s. 8d. and the yearly tenths at los. 8d. In 1588 it was valued at twenty-five pounds, and there were no communicants, and in 1726 it was of the like

value.

Edward Dering’s lands in this parifti, being the demefne lands of this manor of Eaftbridge, claim at this time an exemption from the payment of tithes. Sir

CHURCH OF EJSTBRIDGE. PATRONS, Or

RECTORS.

by lahom Jirefcnted,

TJ{e Arckbijhop

Edras,

alias

September

Thomas

Simp/on,

i6, 1596, refigned

1604.

Thomas Simpfon, A. B Feb. 27, 1604, obt. i6i2. Richard Sheldon, Aug 5, 1612. Drugo Boivde,S. T. B. Feb. i8, 1625.

The King, fede vac.

Edward

Tuke,

A. M. June

4,

1646,

The Archbijhop

Samuel Smith, obt. 1671. yohn Hunt, A. M. May 31, 1671, obt. 1673. Francis Peck, A. B. Dec. 2, 1673, obt. 1706.' yohn Lewis, A. M. 1706, obt.

Jan. 16, 1747.^ Augtn. off. deeds of purch. and exch, Kent, box F. 33.

reAorof Saltwood, Salcwood before.

e Likewife f See

PATRONS,

WORTH hundred.

j8o PATKONS, The Archbijhop

Sayer

rectors. Rudd, M. D. Feb. 26 ,

. 747 , obt. 1757 obt. Samuel Fcjler, June 1757 ,



,

The King, Jede vac The

Archbijliop

Aiiguft Alexlnder James Smith,

February 8 , 17 , 1765 , obt.

1784

.*'

miUarn

Gunjley Ayerjl,

1784, refigned 1790* William Tournay, A. M.

A n/r M. A.

I

79 ®»

the prefent re£tor.‘

Weftw^U, g LH^ewife vknr of slnuT. V\ of cura'e _ h He refigned this re£tory tn 1701, of it granted and had the Jequtftration wjhich he held till his death. 10

bim>

under See the rcafoo of his fo doing,

Alkhatn. i Alfo redtor of Hope; reaor of Denton.

.

likcwif*

THE HUNDRED OF STREET.

Th

adjoining to that of Worth northward. It is written in the record of Domefday, EJiraites, and in others of later times, Slrete, taking

IS hundred

lies

name from the ftreet, or viajirata of the Romans, near it, now ufually called Stone-ftreet, which led from Canterbury to Limne and Stutfal caftle, within the bounds of it, of which further mention will be made its

hereafter.

CONTAINS WITHIN

IT I, 2..

3.

Limne in part. Sellindge in paii, Aldington

BOUNDS THE PARISHES OF 4. 5.

Hurst, and Bonnington.

churches of thofe pariflies ; and likewife that part of the of Stanford which contains Westenhanger, formerly

And the parifli ^

ITS

STREET HUNDRED.

282

merly a parldi of itfelf, though now united to have jurildii^tion over it.

There

is

a court

leet held

it.

T'-xo

conjahks

yearly for the upper half

hundred of Street, which is appendant to the manor of Aldington, and is held alternately at Aldington, and at Newin-green, and there is another court-leet for the lower half hundred, the king being lord of it. There are no rents or profits belonging to it. The conftable, for the time being, holds it, and is at the expence of a fteward, &c. the only bufinefs of it being to appoint a fucceeding conftable in his room.

L

I

M

N

E

LIES

the next parifh northward from Burmarlh, It is for the moft part on the quarry or fand hill. written in antient records Limne, Limpne^ and Limeney

taking

its

name from

ran once below

it,

the antient river Limene, which

at the foot

of the

hill,

where, and

probably fome way higher, the tide of the fea once flowed, through a fufficient channel for the paftage of forming here a commodious haven or port, fliips called by the Romans Portus Lemanisy but for w'ant of a fufficient force of the frefh waters to repel the fand and beach, continually driven up hither by the fea, not only this haven was choaked up, but the channel of the river Limene itfelf, which afterwards diredted the whole courfe of its waters another way, and this port, as well as the channel through which it once flowed, even to its entrance or mouth next the fea, has been for fome hundred years found land, and pafturage for the cattle grazing on it. That part of this parifh, in which the church and village are fituated, lies within the hundred of Street, the fouth-eaft parts in the hundred of Worth, and the remainder, being the northern part of it, in that of Heane. The lower or fouthern part is within the level of Romney Marlh, where it is within the liberty and jurifdidlion of the juftices of it. ;

This

LIMNE.

This place

is

acknowledged by moft

283 writers to

have been that ftation of the Romans mentioned in Ptolemy’s geography/ by the name ot aimhn, and in the feveral copies of Antoninus’s Itinerary, by that of Portus Lenianis^ a port which was at that time of very eminent account. The river Limene, now called the Rother, or at leafl: a principal branch of it, once flowed from Apledore hither, by the foot of the hills, the cliffs of which flill appear to have been waflied and worn away by it. The channel where it ran is flill vifible, and the grounds along the courfe of it are now lower than in any other part of the marfh near it, the ditches remaining full here, w-hen thofe higher, about Dimchurch and other places, are fo dry, that there arc no waters left to few from them/ For want of the channel of this river to few the grounds, there are many hundred acres of marfh lands, through which it once flowed, extending from Apledore and Ruckinge quite acrofs to Fairfield and Snargate, which are become a fwamp, and great part of them under water for the greatefl: part of the year.* On this river, at the foot of Limne-hill, the Romans had the above-mentioned famous port, the only one they had on this fouthern (bore of Kent, to which the fea flowed up at that time from the mouth of it, which probably was not far diflant from Hythe weflward, to defend which they had a ftrong fort about midway down the hill, in which, in the latter part of the Roman empire in Britain, was Rationed a detachment of foldiers, called 'Pwnacences, i. e. of Tournay, in Flanders, under their commander, and at the general difpofition of the count of the Saxon fhore in Britain. Befides this, at the fummit of the hill, where the caftle, or archdeacon’s houfe now is, was Book ii. See Camd. Brit. p. 256. Burt. Anton, p. 193, and PanciroUi Notitia. See Somner’s reafons for placing this port at Romney, in his Roman Ports, p. 37, 100. See Apledore, vol. vii. of this hiftory, p, 251. [ '

mofl

street hundred.

284

watch tower, one of thole five which the Romans, under Thcodofius the younger, as Gildas tells us, built upon the fouthern coaft of Britain, at certain diftances, to watch the motions of the Saxons, and difcover the approach of thofe pirates, whole invafions the fort below was of fufficient ftrength to

moft probably

a

repel.

To

this place

from the Ration of Durovernum, or

Canterbury, was a

Roman

military road orllreet,

now

and confpicuous for fome The diRance from one of thefe miles at this time. Rations to the other, in Antoninus, being marked ad poRTUM Lemanis, m. p. XVI. fixteen miles, which is anfwerable to much about the prefent diRance of it. The fragments remaining of the fort above-mentioned, now called Stutfall castle, Riew the walls of it to have been of a prodigious thicknefs. They are compofed of rubble-Rone, with a mortar mixed with fmall pebbles, the facings of them, excepting of one piece, being entirely gone. Thofe of them moR entire throughout it, Riew double rows of Roman tiles, fifteen and fixteen inches long, laid at about five feet diftance apart, with their extremities curved down to clench one into the other, after the manner of thofe at Richborough caRle. On the eaR and weR fides are large fragments all down the hill. On the upper fide of it are the moR of them, feemingly in two lines about twenty-five feet diRance from each other. At the upper north-weR corner is part of a circular tower faced with fquared Rone, the infide filled up entirely folid. On the low'er fide next the marfh, there are no remains, perhaps the river, which ran befide it, might be a fufcalled Stone-Rreet, lying Rralt

ficient

defence without any further addition. contains near ten acres of ground.

The

area

of it The fragments remaining feem by length of time, the Reepnefs of the hill, and what is more perhaps by their being Rripped of their furface, to have been overthrown, and to have Ripped from their original places. So that there

:

LIMNE.

285

no afcertaining the exa6t form of this fort, but by what can at prefent be conje6lured, it was of a fqiiare form, with the upper corners a little rounded off. This fort mod: probably continued of ufe only fo long But the as the harbour and port clofe to it remained. time when it was deferred by the lea, and rendered ulelefs by being choaked up with beach and fand, and the river Limene’s courfe hither by that means fwerved up, and dire6ted wholly into another channel, has never been afcertained, though it was probably very foon For it feems to after the Romans had left this ifland. have been very early after the coming of the Saxons, that the port of Welt Fdythe became of note, in the room of this decayed haven and port. Whilft the pore and haven here was in a flourifning ftate, there is no doubt but the town of Limne was equally fo. Leland calls it the great old towne, and fays, it failed with its haven, and that thereby Weft Hythe ftrait increafed and was in price, the following is his account ol it “ Lymme hille, or Lyme, was fumtyme a famofe haven and good for fhyppes that The old caftH of Lyme myght cum to the foote of longed to Rich. Knight the hille. The place ys yet cawled Shypway and Old of Hyve, late decefid. Haven. Farther at this day portes kepeth his principal cowrt a the lord of the I'her remayneth at this day lytle by eft fro Lymmehil. the ruines of a ftronge fortrefte of the Britons hangging there

is

V

on the hil and cummyng down to the very fote. The cumpafe of the forterefle femeth to be a x acres and be lykelyhood yt had fum walle bcfide that ftrecchid up to the very top of the hille wher now is the paroch chirche and the archidiacon’s howfe of Canterbury. The old walks of the cartel made of Britons brikes, very large and great flynt fet togythcr almoft indiflTofmaule pybble. The walks be very thikke and yn the weft end of the caftel appereth the bafe of an old towre. Abowt this caftel

lubely with morters

made

of

vn

STREET HUNDRED.

286

yn time of mind were fowncl antiquites of mony of the Romeynes. Ther as the chirch is now was fumtyme withowt fayle an abbay. The graves yet appere yn the chirch and of the lodging of the abbay be now converted ynto the archidiacon’s howfe, the which ys made lyke a caftelet embatelyd. Ther went from Lymmc to Cantorbury a ftreate fayr paved, wherof at this day

Y

cawled Stony ftreat. t is the ftraiteft that ever I iawe and towards Cantorbury ward the pavement conTher cummeth at tinually appereth a iiii or v myles. thorough Lymme caflel a litle rylle and other this day prcty waters relbrt to the places abowt Lymmehil ; but wher the ryver Limene fhowld be I can not tel except yt fhowld be that that cummeth above Appledore . myles of, and that ys cours ys now chaunged iii . and renneth a nerer way ynto the fe by the encrefing of Rumeney marfch that was fumtyme al fc.”'" Notwith{landing its former fize, it is now only a fmall inconfidcrable village, fituated on the fummit of the quarryhill, having the church and the archdeacon’s houfe at the corner of it. The latter, formerly called the caflle, but now the court-lodge, is probably built on the fcite of the anticnt Roman watch tower above-mentioned, on the edge of the almoft perpendicular fummit of it. It is a fine lofty caflcllated manfion, commanding an extenfive view over the Marfli and adjoining ocean Ibuthward, from all which it is a moftdillinguilhed objedl. Several fprings rife here out of the rock, one of which runs through the wall of the caflle, and thence down the hill towards the marfhes. The centre of the parifh is along the ridge of thefe hills, which are here an entire furface of flone, on each fide of which it extends, as well into the Marfh fouthward, to Botolphs, now called Butters bridge, which is fuppofed to have been the molt antiem ftone bridge in England. It has lately been repaired with a new work of brick, fo that yt

is

.

.

.

.

“ Itinerary, vol.

vii, p.

141.

there

there

nothing of the ancient mafonry of It to be feen, as it does above the hills northward to Newin-green, and the high road from Flythe to Afliford. Upon the point of a hill between Hythe and Limne cattle, a new battery of four guns has been eredted, which Is

commands

the adjacent coaft, and is intended as a covering to the three new forts defcribcd under Hythe.

About is

half a mile eatlward

from the church of Limne which

a place called in old records Shepway-crofs^

was formerly fo confide rable as to give name to the whole lath, which from hence was called the lath of Shepway. At this place in former times were held pleas and great aflemblies relating to the cinque ports, and here only in early times did ihe Limenarcha^ or

lord warden of the cinque ports receive his oath, at his firft entry into his office.

Prince Edward, fon of king FJenry III. being then lord warden, received from the barons of the cinque ports, their oaths of fidelity to his father, againft thofc who were fupporters of the barons in their wars againft him.

There has been mention made

before. In the de-

Icription of Folkeftone, of

tlie opinion of that town and neighbourhood, that the hills there, being part of the fame ridge of find or quarry hills on which Limne is

or prefs forward at times towards the truth of which is in fome meafure corrobo-

fituated, flip

lea.

The

rated by a fimilar inftance on thefe hills here, in the auof the year 1726, in confequence of a very wet

tumn

when the brow on the fouth fide of the hill towards the marffi funk between forty and fifty feet, and raifed the lower parts of it nearly as much, which w'as not perceived by the farmer’s family, who inhabited the houfe on it, till they found the change in the morning, by their door-cafes not fuffering their doors to open. The houfe vvas firangely rent by this accident, and had it not been built of timber, muft have fallen] feafon,

STREET HUNDRED.

288

which was built of of the earth went through ftone, for on? great crack large kitchen chimney from the middle of it, and fplit a

near as a very large barn

top to bottom.” fketch of it

it

did,



o r L given on p. 281, before, wherein A The profile of the land. the references zxt a b c d <3 1 he flat fea. a The flat of the land towards the rocky. + The fcite of land at top, ftiff ground and not only funk down the farm afterwards, which had moved fomefrom d forty or fifty feet, but was alfo ,

is

The lower part raifed to d. The manor of Aldington claims over part

what towards

b

a.

ot

Limne, together bounds of it, and with the church, being within the appendage to that the manor of Wellop being an this parifli

;

the

town and

village of

...

manor.'^

,

Berwick, is a manor here, Limne which lies about half a mile northward of Newin-green. It church, in the valley between it and king was mven before the Norman conqueft, by gave Knut?, toEadfy, aprieft, who in the year 1032 Chrift-church, in Canterbury. it to the monaftery of The copy of the grant of it may be feen in Somner’s Roman Ports, a curious fpecimenof the manner of the of the donations of that time; among other revenues

Berewick, now

called

^

of whom it priory it was allotted to the archbifliop, was afterwards held by knight’s fervice, and continued Accordingly it is conqueft. fo till after the Norman general entered in the record of Domefday, under that follows

title, as

:

holds of the In Efiraites hundred^ Wills de Eddejham It was taxed at half archbiJJjopy Bereztic as one manor. In demefne a fuling. Ehe arable land is three carucates. there are two^

"

and nine

villeins^

with nine borderers hav*

See Phil. Tranf. vol. xxxv. No. 405, p. 551, See Augmentation-office, box Kent A. 14^



ittg

oH€ carucate

and an

28^

LIMNE. half.

‘I

here are eighteen acres

of meadow y and zvood for the pannage of twenty hogs. In the time of king Edzvard the Confeffor it zvas worth fixty /hillings^ and afterzvards twenty Jhi dings y now feven

pounds y and yet it yields eleven pounds. After which this manor appears to have come into the pofiTefTion of the family of Auberville, in which it remained till Joane, daughter and heir of William de Auberville, marrying Nicholas de Criol, entitled him to it as part of her inheritance. At length his defeendant Bertram de Criol dying /. p. Joane his filter carried it in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokefie, whofe daughter and coheir Joane, about the middle of king Edward II. ’s reign, marrying Thomas de Poynings, he became in her right pofielfed of it, and in his de« feendants it continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, of Weftenhanger, on whofe death in the 14th year of

king Henry VIII. without legitimate

ifiue,

and even

without any collateral kindred, who could make claim efto his eftates, this manor, among the reft of them, cheated to the crown, whence it was, by the king’s bounty, foon afterwards conferred on his eldcft natural fon Sir Thomas Poynings, created Baron Poynings, of Oftenhanger. But in the 3 2d year of it, he, with Catherine his wife, exchanged this manor, with Weften* hanger, and other premifes, with the king, for other manor coneftates in other counties. Alter which this tinued, in the fame owners as \Vcftenhanger, down to the family of Champneis, in which it is now veiled, in Mifs the fame proportions as that is, one fixth part in

Frances Champneis, and the two fons of John Burt, part in the Rev. Wilcfq. deceafed j and the remaining liam-Henry Burt Champneis. There is not any court held for

it.®

foraccount of the family of Champneis and the mer owners of this manor, under Weitenhanger, p. 75* *

See a

VOL,

full

vm.

w

Otter-

STREET HUNDRED.

290

Otterpoole,

iifually caiJed Afterpoole^ is a

manor

of this parifti, which, at the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, in the 15th year of the Conqueror’s reign, was part of the pofleflions of Hugo de Montfort, accordingly it is thus entered in that record, under the general title of his lands Heryem holds of Hugo, Obtrepole. Alrebot held it of king Edward and it was taxed for one fuling, The arain the north-weft part

:

y

ble

land

fix carncates. In demefne there is one^ eleven villeins with tzvo carucateSy and one fervanty is

and and

ten acres of meadow y and wood paying five pence for pannage. In the time of king Edward the Confejfory it was

worth

fifty flnllirigs^

now four

On

and afterwards twenty

fiAllingSy

pounds.

the voluntary exile of Robert, grandfon of Hugo

above-mentioned, in king Henry L’s reign, the feignory of this manor, among the reft of his eftates, came into the king s hands, of whom it was afterwards held by the faniily of De Marinis, one of whom, Albericus de Marinis, held it in the 12th and 13th years of king John’s reign, as appears by the inquifitions then returned into the treafury,° in capite by knight’s fervice, and by payment yearly to the ward of Dover' caftle! After which it pafled in like manner as Blackmanftone, above-deferibed, from his defendants into the family of Haut, and thence again by the marriage of Jane the youngeft daughter of Sir Wm. Haut, of Biflmplborne, to Sir Thornas Wyatt, of Allington, whojn her right became entitled to this manor, which in the 33d year of king Henry yill. he pafled away, among other premifs, to the king, in exchange for other manors and lands therein mentioned, purfuant to an aft pafled for that purpofe the year before. After which the king granted it by fale to James Hales, fergeant-at-law, a£ terwardsa juftice of the common pleas, to hold in ca-

pile.

.

LIMNE.

291

and his grandfon Sir James Hales* of the Dungeon, alienated it, in the 21ft year of queen Elizabeth, to Thomas Smith, efq. of Weftenhanger, commonly called the Cuftomcr, whofe grandfon I homas was created vifcount Strangford. Since which it has continued, in the fame defcentof owneriliipas the manor of Weftenhanger, down to the family of Champnels, in which it now remains, in the fame proportions as that manor and Berewick before defcribed, Mifs Frances Champneis and the two fons of John Burt, efq. being owners of one fixth parr, and the Rev. William- Henry Burt Champneis, the eldeft of the Ions of John Burt, efq. above-mentioned, being owner of the remaining court baron is held for this part of this manor. manor. Bellaview, or Bellavtie, fo called from the beautiful view from it, is fituated in this parifli, near a mile ibuth-weftvvard from the church of Limne, being an antient moated feat, which in very early times belonged to the family of Criol, before they removed to Oftenhanger. Bertram de Criol, who was owner of it in king Henry III. ’s reign, being conftable of Dover He left two caftle and warden of the cinque ports. fons, Nicholas, vvho married Joane, daughter of Sir William de Auberville, and John, whofe inheritance came to Rokefley and the Poynings’s, by female heirs. From Nicholas Criol, the eklcft fon above-mentioned, defeended John Kyryel, gent, for fo he fpelt his name, whorefided here, and died poftefted of this feat ofBellavow anno 1504, the 20th of Henry VII. and was buried in St. Radigund’s church, near Dover, next to Batreham Kyriell there, as his will in the prerogativeFie left one fon John, office, Canterbury, exprelTcs it. who afterwards fold it to Richard Bernys, efq. who not long afterwards alienated it to Thomas Wombwell, of Northfleet, and he in the 25th year of the fame reign of king Henry Vlll. conveyed it to Peter Heyman, efq. of Sellindge, from whom it w'cntby fale again not long u

pitCt

A

?,

STREET HUryDRED.

292

defccnded from thofe of Oxboroiigh, in Norfolk, in whofe dcfcendants, who bore for their arms, Ermine^ an eagle dijplayed, pdeSy a crejcent within a crefcent^ for difference,^ it continued as cotill it became the inheritance of feveral brothers, heirs in gavelkind, who joined together in the fale of

loncy afterwards to Bedingfield,

about the end of king James I.’s reign, to Sir Edward Hales, knight and baronet, of Tunftall, in whole dcfcendants it continued till it was at length alienated to Green, and George Green afterwards fold it to William Glanvill, efq. of their refpedtive interefts in

it,

Ightham,* on whofe death in 1766 it came to his fon William Glanvill Evelyn, efq. of that place, the prefent owner of it. Street is an eminent manor, fituated at the weftern bounds of this parilh, near the foot of the fame ridge of hills, within the liberty of Romney Marfh. It is written in Domefday, EJiraites, and afterwards ufually Court- at -Jlreet, but vulgarly Courtup-Jireet, taking its name from the court or manor of it, and its fituation near the ftreet, or via Jirata of the Romans. It was ‘fituated clofe to a town or hamlet once here, which was antiently called Billerika, as appears by the efeheatrolls of the reigns of king Edward III. and Richard II. the ruins of which may in fome meafurc be dill traced out, efpecially near thole of the chapel, which are more than midway down the hill, and was built for the ule of the inhabitants of it, for the common report has been, that the town here had been once very large, though now there remains only a cottage near the chapel, and a houfe or two near the fummit of the hill. Leland, in his Itinerary, vol. vii. p. 142, fays, “ Billirica is a bowte a myle fro Lymme hille and at this day yt is a membre of Lymme paroche. Howbeyt there is achaple for the howfes ther tliat now remayne and this is P

There

Kent, anno

is 1

a pedigree of

them in

the Heraldic

Vifitation of

5 74.

the

LIMNE.

Billirica,

293 the chaple commnnelycawllcd Our Lady of Cowrt upStreate, wher the nunne of

M.

Cantorbiry wrought

Cowrt

up-Strcate, alias

longeth to one Coluyle Knight.

fals

miracles.

all

Hard by

chaple apcre the old mines of a caftelet wherbi yt

her ttiis

may

be thowght that the place and the towne ther was cawled Bellirica as who ihowld Giy in Latyne, Bellocaflruniy and that the new name of Cowrt-up-Streate began by reafon of the place or court that the lord of the foyle kept ther. The commune voyce is ther that the towne hath bene large, and they fhoe now ther Signa Pratorianay that

is

to fay a

home

garni fhed with

But the likelyhod ys that they longed to Lymme fumtyme a notable towne and haven.’* In the time of the Saxons, one Godwin had polfeffions here, as appears in Somner’s Treatife on Gavelkind, where there is a curious contraft of marriage made in thofe times, being a chirograph remaining among the archives of ChrilTchurch, in Canterbury, bralle

and a mace.

which Godwin made with Byrthric, when he wooed his daughter ; in which he gave her one pound weight of gold if (he confented, and thofe lands at Strete and Burwaremerfh,with oxen, cows, horfcs, and bondfmen, the longeft liver of them to take all, the contradb was king Cnute, in the prefence of archbilhop Living, the convents of Chrilt church and St. Auguftine, iEthelvvines the fheriff, and many others. And when the maiden was fetched away to Brightling, in SufTex, there went with her, as fureties, a number of perfons ; and the writing threefold was

made

at Kingfton, before

convent of Chrift-church, ami in that ofSt. Auguftine, and the third Byrthric had himfelf. After the Norman conqueft, this manor was part of the pofAccordingly it is thus fcflions of Hugo de Montfort.

kept

in the

entered, under the general tide ot his lands, in the re-

cord of Domefday,

u

3

In



STREET HUNDRED. In EJlraites hundred^ Hugo de Manevik holds of Hugo,

2^4

Ulnod held it of king Edzvard. It zvas taxed I he arable land is fight carucates. In at tivq [tilings demefie there are two^ and eleven villeins^ zvith twentyfive borderers having five carucates. There is a church, and feveii (ervants^ and thirty acres of meadow. In the time of king Edward the Confejfor it was worth ten fhillingSy and afterwards fotir JhillingSy noiv eight pounds. Attsfrtd holds of Hugo one yoke^ which one Sochman held in the fame hundred of king Edward^ and it zvas taxed at one yoke. The arable land is one carucate. There is that, with one villein, and two borderers, and one mill of twenty fix pence, and eifot acres of meadow. In the time of king Edzvard the ConfeU'or, and now, it is EJlraites.

.

and

zvas zvorth forty Jhillings.

Robert Coc holds of Hugo one yoke, zvhich one Sochman held, and it zvas taxed at as much. There is one carucate, zvith one borderer, and four acres of meadozv. In the time of king

Edward

the Confejfor,

and

nozv,

it

vjas

and is

zvorth thirty jhillings.

Of thefe three deferiptions, the firH; by Hugo de Mannevile, is certainly

of them, held

however doubtful the other two may be as parts of it, which was afterwards called the manor of Streete, the feignory of which, on the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort, that,

Hugh

above-mentioned, in Henry l.’s reign, came into the hands of the crown, as an efeheat to it. After which it appears to have conie into the poUefllon of the family of Handelo, or Hadlow, who are mentioned in antient records of very high afeent, as lords of this manor, feveralof whom were men of eminence in thofe times, their arms being, Tzvo chevrons, grandfon of

on a canton a crefient, in imitation of thofe of Criol, who bore the fame without the crefeent j** one of whom,

Nicholas de Hadloe, in the 41ft year of Henry III. had a charter oS. free-warren for all his demefne lands ^

See Camden’s Remains, p. 212.

in

limn£.

^95

county, and the grant of a market, and a fair yearly, at his manor of Court-at-fl:rcet, holding it in capite of the king, as ot his caftle of Dover, by knight’s in this

of thofe which made up the barony, called the Conftabularie, there. In the ioth year of king Edward II. John de Hadloe had licence to fortify and embattle his houfe here, among others belonging to him. At length Nicholas de HaJloe, in the next reign of king Edward III. dying without ilfue male, his daughters and coheirs became entitled to this manor ; by which means, before the 20th year of that reign, it became feparated, and in the hands of different owners. After which, one moiety of it appears to have come into the polTeirion of John Colvile, who had married Alice, one of the daughters and coheirs of Nicholas de Hadloe. And in his delcendants it continued down to Francis Colvyle, who feems to have died poflelTed of the whole of this manor in the 8th year of king Henry VII. the other moiety of it having in the mean time defcended in the names of Lifle, St. Laurence, and Spicer,’ till at length the whole of it, by purchafe or fome other means, became vefted in FranBut his defcendant Jefcis Colvile above-mentioned. fry Colvile, in the 35th year of king Henry VIII. alienated this manor to Edward Thwayts, whofe grandfon Edward Thwayts, in the i ith year of queen Elizabeth, paffcd it away to Edward Jackman, citizen and aiderman of London, who died that year, on which it defcended to his fon John Jackman, who alienated it to William Hewett, efq. whofe grandfon Sir William Hewett, of Brickies, in Norfolk, by willin 1662, devifed it to truftces, to be fold, which It afterwards was, to Mr. George Lovejoy, clerk, whofe widow Mrs. Frances Lovejoy died poffefTed of it in 1694, and her heirs afterwards alienated it to Sir William Honywood, fervice, being part

See the efcheat-rolls, an. 22, 35 and chard II. and 2 Henry V.

u

4

36

Edward

III.

10 Ri-

bart.

STREET HUNDRED.

Hg6

'

bart. of

wood, it.

A

Evington, whofe defcendant Sir John Hony-

bart.

now

of that place,

court baron

The CHAPEL

is

is

the prefent

held for this manor.

here, of which

fome notice has been

already taken before, ufually called

Lady of

owner of

/i’e

{:Jhape/

of Our

from its being dedicated to the blelied Virgin Mary, was bulk for the ufe of the inhabitants of the adjoining hamlet ; and when that fell to decay, this chapel moft probably became negledfed, infomuch, that in king Henry VIII.'s reign, it feeras to have been moflly ufed for a hermit to dwell in ; when, Court- at freeii

to hinder

its

total ruin, as well

as

to ferve other pur-

Maker, parfon of the adjoining parifli of Aldington, encouraged a young woman, named Eli-

pofes, Richard

zabeth Barton,

who was

troubled with fits, to counterfeit the prophetcTs of divine infpiration, and to make this chapel a place of note by her frequent refort to it, and miraculous conferences with our Lady of Court-at-

of it. The commencement of this happened in the 17th year of Henry VIII. anno 1525, and fhe continued her divinations and prophecies for fome months, mean while her fame fpread far and near, and coming to the ears of archbifhop Warham, he granted a commifilonto Dr. Booking and others, to examine into it, who, to fhew their entire approbation of her condiuk, accompanied her to this chapel, attended by many gentlemen and ladies, and near 3cooof the common people. Soon after this flie was, by the archbifhop, appointed a nun in St. Sepulchre s priory, where Ihe continued, as ufual, working her miracles and prophefying, and crying out conti* nually on the advantages of performing vows and pilgrimages to this chapel, as by infpiration, being held in great eflimation and reverence by perlons of all ranks throughout the county, fo that fhe acquired the name and chara6ler of the Holy Maid of Kent and in this Rate flic continued for feveral years, till the queffion of the king s marriage came to be moved, when fhe was

flreet, the patronefs

tranfadlion

;

perfuaded

LIMNE.

297

perfuaded to prophecy on ftate affairs, efpccially on that fubjed, feigning to underftand by revelation, that if the king proceeded in his divorce, he fhould not con* tinue king for one month after. Upon which he, who had looked on this matter as unworthy his notice, commanded that file and her accomplices fiiould be brought before the Scar Chamber, where in 1533, they confeffed the

of the

whole to be

a cheat, before a great afiembly

Upon

which, they were fentenced to make their public confelTion, after fermon, at St. Paul’s; and being imprifoned afterwards in the Tower, the matter being brought before the Houfe, an ad palled lords.

anno 2 5 Henry VIII.‘ And accordingly, Elizabeth Barton herfelf, Richard Mailer, parfon of Aldington, Edward Bocking, D. D. and Richard Dering, monks of Chrift-church, in Canterbury; Henry Golde, clerk, parfon of Aldermanbury ; and Richard Rilby, gent, were executed at Tyburn that year, and their heads fet up in different parts of the town. John Fifiier, bifiiop of Rochefter, and feveral others, were found guilty of mifprifion or concealment of treafon, and to forfeit their goods and chattels, and be imprifoned during pleafure.* In the conclufion of the ad above-mentioned, all others who had been con-

for their attainder,

cerned in thefe impoftures, were, at the carneft requeft of queen Anne, pardoned. To RETURN now to the remainder of the defeription of this parilh, Wellop, or Wylhope^ is a manor in the fouth-weft part of this parifii, lying below the hill, within the liberties of Romney Marfh, which was part of the ancient pofleflions of the fee of Canterbury, and feems to have been an appendage to the archbiIhop’s manor of Aldington, adjoining to it, and in the record of Domefday, in the defeription of that manor, See an account of him under St. Peter’s, in Thanet. See an account of Elizabeth Barton and her tranfadlons, in Sopm. Cant. p. 37. Lamb. Peramb. p. 197. *

*

under

:

STREET HUNDRED. under the general is this

title

of the archbilliop’s lands, there

entry

manor of Aldinton^ there lien in Limes half a yoke and half a virgate. dhe archbijhop holds it in demefnCy and has there one earn cate and one villein^ zvith eighteen borderers having one carucate and an half. Lhere are [even priejis who pay feven pounds and five

Of the

It is and Ihe arable land is t wo carucates. was worth tzvelve pounds^ and it yet yields fifteen pounds. The above defeription contained all the reft of the

fhillings.

archbiftiop’s eftates in this parifh, as well as the

manor

ofWellop, which afterwards continued parcel of the of the fee of Canterbury till the reign of king Henry VIII. in the 32 d year of which, archbifliop Cranmer exchanged the manors of Aldington and poirefllons

Wyllop, among other premifes, with the king, for other eftates elfewhere. Immediately after which, the king granted the feite and demelne lands of this manor to Mr. John Knatchbull, to hold for eighty years, as

king James 1. in his 8th year, did to Eldrcd and Whitmore, for fixty years, after w-hich king Charles I. granted them, together with the manor itlelf, in fee to Sir Edward Hales, knight and baronet," in whofe defeendants it continued down, till at length it was fold to Green, and Mr. George Green alienated it to William Glanvill, efq. of Ightham, fince whofe death the inheritance of it is become vefted in his fon William Glanvill Evelyn, efq. now of Ightham. A court baron is held for this manor.

There

is

an eftate called

Combe,

in this parifh,

which formerly belonged to the Dennes, of Dennehill, and was afterwards purchafed by the executors of the will of Dr. William Hajvey, of Folkeftone, who conveyed it to the truftees of the fchool and charity founded by the Do6lor, in Folkeftone, in whom it

now

continues vefted. “

Rolls temp, interregni, Augtn.

off. rot,

54,

N.

1

73.

There

LIMNE.

299

of good acwho had eftates here and

There were formerly

feveral families

count rcfiding in this parifli, Among others, the Knatch-r in this neighbourhood. bulls, Knights, Fagges, Kyryells, and Finches, as appears by their wills remaining in the Prerogative-office, in Canterbury.

CHARITIES. William Fordred, by will in 1550,

gave to

this parifli,

of 25 acres of land in St, Mary’s parifh, in Romney Marfh the portion of which to this pariih is of the annual produce of 4I. 12s. ofd. to be dilfributed annually on Chriftmas day to the poor, and veiled intrullees. William Pantry, by will, gave to the poor an annuity of

among

others, a portion of the rents ;

los. to

be paid yearly out of lands in Limne, at Lady-day. will about the year 1614, gave an anof lands in Limne and Saltwood, to

Valentine Nott, by nuity of 8s. per annum out be always paid

at

Shrove

John White, of

I

tide.

1616, devifed to the poor the yearly

in

fum

os.

Mr. William Heyman, by

deed anno 22 James

I.

1624,

27 acres of marfli-land in Waregave of Limne and Sellinge, to be houfliolders poor three home to the common law, or if fuch at male heir next his nominated by feoffees of this charity, to be the by then found, could not be be quarterly, for might if it rather or yearly, half paid to them which fliould parifli of that always be to Two of them ever. il. los. per and 3I. produces It poor. with be mod burthened the lixth part of the rent of

annum

alternately.

Mr. Thomas Gomeldon, by

will about the year

1703,

gave 81 . to be put out for the benefit of the poor. Mr. Richard Spain, of Poflling, by will in 1704, gave to the poor of Lympne 30I. the interefl to be diflributed for ever

on

his birth-day, being the ift of January.

the two lafl-mentioned there is no account which 746, fince wills was regularly paid till is it known in nor paid, in the parifl°-books of its having been

The

interefl of the

money given by 1

whom

money Finch, John the

is

veiled.

gent, of Limpne, by will in 1707, gave all to the his 6th part of 160 acres of marfh-land in Eaflbridge, Limne of pariflies minifler, churchwardens, and overfeers of the and Eaflbridge, in trufl, that they of Limne fliould difpofe of two third parts of the rents thereof, now of the annual produce of 14I. 8s 4d. to fix of the pooreft and eldefl people of this parelief, one half upon the rifli, who have never received alms or yearly day after Chriflmas-day, and the other upon the

Sunday

STREET HUltDRED.

3CO

of his burial (which was Feb. 7th), and he gave his three fifth parts of 43 acres of land, in Eaftbridge and Newchurch ; and all his three five-aiid-twentieth parts, the whole in 25 parts to be divided, of two parcels of frefli marfti, called Cowlands, in

!

Newchurch, to the minifter, &c. of I.imne and Newchurch, upon truft, that the minifter, &c. of Limne ftiould difpofe of two parts out of three of the rents and profits of the faid land,

now of the annual produce of 13I. i6s. i id. to eight perfons, of the like defcription as thofe above-mentioned, on the faid days And he further devifed to the minifter, &c. of Limne, for ever. all that his fourth part of one fixth part of 160 acres of marftiland in Eaftbridge, upon truft, that the faid minifter ftiould preach a fermon yearly, in i.imne church, on the day of his burial, for which he ftiould be allowed out of the rents yearly 20s. And that the remaining part of the profits of the rents, now of the annual produce of 5I. 8s. i|d. ftiould be difpofed of then by the faid minifter, &c. to five poor people of this parifli, as before-deferibed, upon the faid days for ever. The poor conftantly relieved are about thirty-five, cafually

.

,

i

twenty-five.

Limne tion of

is

within the ecclesiastical

the dioceje

own name. The church,

dedicated to St. Stephen, (lands on the

edge of the rock lage.

jurisdicof Canterbury, and deanry of its

at the

louth-caft corner of the vil-

of two

It is a fine ancient building,

ifles

and a

high chancel, having a fquare tower, which ftands in the middle of the fouth ille, and feparates it from the chancel.

There

are five bells in

monument and

In the chancel

it.

'

is

memorials for the Bridgets, tenants of the court lodge j arms, Argent^ a chevron, fable, between three crabs, gules. In the north ifle is a memorial for Henry Bagnal, vicar of Limne, who left one fon Henry, reftor of Frittendcn, obt. 1748. On a flone, coffin fafhion, a crofs, having at the top a quaterfoil, and at bottom a ctofs formee. The north iflc only is ceiled. In the north wall of it is an ancient tomb, with a low pointed arch, and a memorial for Capt. Ilaac Batchelour, obt. 1681 arms, On a bend, three feurs de Its, between three wings. There are two ftones, coffin-fhaped, with crofies on them, very ana

:

feveral

;

tient,

l

i

j

i

>

!

i

LIMNE.

301 tient, which are placed as two ftcps from the porch The church-yard, which is wholly into the church. on the north and call Tides, is remarkably large. There are fevera! very antient tombs in It, but the inferiptions are illegible.

church of Limne was part of the antient poffelTions of the archbilhopric,and continued fo till archbifliop Lanfranc gave it to the archdeaconry, at which time, or very Toon afterwards, it Teems to have been appropriated to it, being the firfl pofielTions it ever had. The parfonage-houfe, fince called the court-lodge, or Limne caftle, is iltuated on the edge of the hill, dofe

The

to the weft end of the church.

It

is

a large antient caf-

manfion, with gothic arched windows and doors, and embattled at the top, having a femicirailar tower at the weft end. It Teems to have been formerly much larger. The offices belonging to it in the outer •court, or farm-yard, are likewile built of ftone, with arched doors and windows, and the whole indofed with walls of the like fort, all fcemingly very antient. The lower part, near the foundation Southward, aptellated

pears to be much more antient than its fuperftrudure, which is believed to have been great part ofit built out

of the ruins brought from thofe of Stutfall caftle, for feveral Roman or Bricifli bricks appear difperfed in different parts of it. Leland fays, there was once an abbey in it, and by the defeription of the archbiftiop’s manor of Aldington, in Domefday, to which Limne Teems to have been an appendage, it appears to have had an ecdefiaftical community in it, for it is there faid to have had at that time feven priefts, who paid a rent But of what eftablKhment thefe to the archbifhop. priefts were, is uncertain, for I find no mention made of them cllewhere, and it is moft likely their community was diftblvcd, and they were difpofteffed ofit, at Since the time of this gift ofit to the archdeaconry. which this parlbnage, with the court-lodge, tithes, and glebe lands appropriate, together with the advovvfon of

STREET HUNDRED.

302

the vicarage of the church of Limne, has continued to

time part of the polTeflions of the archdeaconry of Canterbury. The parfonage, with its appurtenances before-mentioned, confiding of the houfe, yards, &c. the great tithes of this parifh and Weft Hythe, with 112 acres of arable and pafture, and forty acres of woodland in Limne, with other land in Weft Hythe and Stanford, is demifed in a leafe for three lives, to William Gianvill Evelyn, efq. but the prefentation to the vicarage the archdeacon retains in his own hands. In the 8th year of king Richard II, anno 1384, this vicarage, on account of its poverty, was not taxed to this

.

the tenth.

I

!

1

,

.

]

1

i

1

1

valued in the king’s books at 7I. i6s. 8d. but it is now adifeharged living, of the clear yearly certified value of thirty-four pounds. In 1588 here were It

>

is

communicants one hundred and eighty-one, and valued at thirty pounds per annum.

it

was

CHURCH OF LIMNE, PATRONS, Or

VICARS.

by •whom prefented.

The Archdeacon,

William Mericke, A. B. March 16, 1584, obt. 1610.'* John Francis^ A. M. June 20,

1610, refigned 1616.* Thomas Martyn^ A. B. Dec.

7,

1616.

Thomas Chejle^ obt. 1620. Thomas Kingfmill, A. M. Sept. 23, 1620. Richard Jaggar, A.

M. in

163

7.^^

SEQUESTRATORS. Peter Bonny, obt. 1676,*

He lies buried In this church. Refore his time, this vicarage had been held for a long time by fequeftrations. * And reftor of Bilhoptborne with

y

He

continued

was obliged

till

to leave

when he through the

1644, it

confulion of the times. » He was buried in this church.

Barham,

PATRONS,

|

1

I

1

'

^

limne. PATRONS,

303 SEQUESTRATORS.

Ca’c.

The Archdeacon,

George

Gijifis,

refigned

1679,*

^bdia Morris, obt. 1680. Jq/ttua Barton, obt. 1702.'’

TheK ing,

viCaks. hac

vice.

Henry Bagnal, A. M. 1702, and •was afterwards induHed as vicar, on July 25, 1723, ob. Nov. 23,1 748. Claudius Clare, LL. B. Dec. 14, 1748, obt. Dec. 1764,*= George Lynch, A. M. Jan. 28, 1765, obt. Nov. 19, 1789.'* Stephen Tucker, A. M. i789,re-

The Archdeacon.

iigned 1 794 Anthony Hamsnofut, M. A. 1794, the prefen t vicar. ® Afterwards perpetual curate of of Brcnfct, and curate of

VV''ye, vicar

Palrfield. •> He and his predeceffbr were vicars of Sellindge. c Likewlfc re£lor of Dlmchurch.

his holding the confolidated reftory of Chcriton and vicarage of Newington, with this vicarage.

e

He

refigned this vicarage for that

of Linficd. I

And

reftorof lyechurch.

In 1770 a difpenfatioii paffed for

SELLINDGE. NEXT of

to Liranc, north-weftward, lies the parifli Sellindge, written in Doniefday, Sedlinges, and in

later records as

Undge.

it is

at prefent,

both

^ellinge

and SeU

The church

and. village are within the hundred of Street, being the greater part of it, and the remainder, being the northern part of it, within the hundred of Stewtino-. O ,

^

1 HIS PARISH lies about fix miles from Afliford, great part of it on high ground, and from the views over the neighbouring countr}^ is not an unpleafant fituation in dry w'eather. It is two miles and an half long, and more than a mile and an half broad, and is lyatered by three flreams, one of which riles at Pofl-

and is called the Old Stou)’, and being here joined by the two other ftreams from Stowting and ling,

Braborne,

STREET HUNDRED.

204

Braborne, then flows on towards Afhford . In the centre of theparifli, the Alhford road towards Hythe, leads acrofs it over a common, called Sellindge-Iees, having a number of houfes built round it, Somerfield-hall llanding on the fide of it. About a quarter of a mile from the lees {lands the church, upon the knoll of a

with the vicarage dole to it, and a little farther on the other fide of the ftream, a hamlet of houfes, called Stonehill. The foil of this parilh is in general very wet and fwampy. In the fouthern part it is moftly quarry flone, the middle a deep fand, and the reft a very lliif clay. The whole of it is very hilly, and the grounds in it moftly pafture. There is but very little coppice wood in it. There are two fairs held here an-

bill,

nually,

on

May

21ft

and

Od.

i

ith, for horfes, cattle,

and pedlary. There is a part of this parifh, which lies in Romney Marfli and hundred of Worth, at a diftancefrom the reft of

it, is ftill

called Tattenham^ being fituated

between Dimchurch and Blackmanftone, in both which parifhes likewife part of it lies. It formerly belonged to the Scots, ofScots-hall, afterwards to Smith, whence it paffed to Hales, and Sir Edward Hales, bart. of St. Stephen’s, fome years fince fold it to Geo. Gipps, efq. now M. P. for Canterbury. William Tylle^ alias SellingCj a man of great reputation both for learning and wifdom, though Selling near Faveriham has had the univerfal credit of his birth, was undoubtedly born in this parifh, and moft probably at Somerfield, where his parents then refided. He became a monk at Chrift church, in Canterbury, on which, as was ufual, he delertcd his family name and took that of his birth-place. He was afterwards prior there, being eleded in 1472, and died in 1495, after having been employed by king Henry VIII. in feveral embaflies abroad.' •

See Biog. Brit, vol, v. p.2971.

The

SELLINDGE.

305

The manor

of Sellindge was, at the time ot taking the lurvey of Domefday, anno 1080, part of the pofleffions of Hugo de Montfort, to whom William the Conqueror had given it, among many other eftates, for his fervices on his expedition hither. Accordingly

it is

thus entered in that record, under the

of his pofleffions In EJiraites hundred, Herveus holds of Hugo, Sedlinges. Ofuuard held it of king Edward, It was taxed at one fuling. The arable land is {even carucates. In degeneral

title

:

mefne there are three carucates, and eight villeins, withtwenty~five borderers having four carucates. There are

and one mill of thirty pence, and thirty fix acres of meadow, and wood for the pannage of fix hogs. In the time of king Edward the Confefjor it was worth eight pounds, and afterwards one hundred /hillings, now

two

churches,

feven pounds. On the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort, grandfon of Hugh above-mentioned, in Henry I. s reign, this manor, among the reft of his eftates, came After which it 'into the king’s hands as an efcheat. appears to have been granted to William de Planers, a Norman, whofe eftates having been feized on by the king as efeheats, king John, in his 6th year, granted this manor to GeofFry his naturijil fon,** who died at Rochell, f. p. Upon which it was granted to William de Putot, who was fucceeded in it by Hugh de Vinon, and in the 21ft year of king Edward I. he claimed this manor before the juftices itinerant, holding it by knight’s fervice, of Dover caftle, this being one of thofe fees which

made up

ftabularie, there.

Soon

the barony, called the

after

which

to have been divided into moieties,

Con-

manor feems one of which

this

was held by Peter Fitz-Reginald, who held it in ca-t pite by knight’s fervice, at his death anno 16 king Edward II. After which it pafled into the family of Rot. Pat. de

VOL. VIII.

terr,

Normannorurt datis,

X

N.

179*

Fitz-

street HUNDREDi^ Fitz- Roger, as appears by the Book of Aid levied anno 20 Edward 111 Sir Roger Fitz Roger died

306

.

poflelled of a moiety of this

manor

26th year of the above reign, holding it in capite^ but his defcendant Thomas Fitz-Roger dying f. p. in the 5th year of king Richard II. Elizabeth his fider entitled her hufband John Bonneville to it ; and on her death anno 2, Henry V. their fon William Bonneville fuccceded to it. in the



7 HE OTHER MOIETY of

manor,

king Edward II. ’s reign, appears by the inquifitions taken of all the lands held by knight’s fervice, to have been in the pofleflion of Cicele de Beauchamp, and in the 17th year of the next reign of king Edward III. Sir John Beauchamp, of Hacche, in Somerfe till ire, died poflefl'ed of it, leaving John his fon an infant, who died f. p. upon which, Cicele his fUfer, married to Turberville, and John Merrett, the fon of Eleanor his other fifter, fliared his inheritance, and upon the partition of it, this moiety of Sellynge manor was allotted to the former, who held it in like manner as the other moiety was held by the Fitz-Rogers.' After which it paired' into the family of Tiptoft, and anno 1 1 king Edward IV. it was found by inquifttion, that John Tiptoft, earl of Worcefter, who had been beheaded the year before, for his adherence to the houfe of York, king Henry being at that time reftored to his power, was poflefled of it at his death. He left a fon Edward, then an infant, w'ho on king Edward’s regaining the crown, was reftored to his father’s titles, but he^died anno 3 Richard III. f. p. leaving his three aunts his heirs, of whom Joane, the fecond, married to Sir this

in

Edmund

Inglethorpe, on the partition of their inheentitled to his moiety of this manor, and likewife to the other moiety afterwards by purchafe from the heirs of Bonneville, and died poflefled

ritance,

became

[

See Dugdale’s Baronetage, vol.

i.

p. 253.

of

SELLINDGE.

3O7

of the whole of it. After which it patled into the name of Morton, for I find Agnes Morton died poiI'effed of this manor in the 9th year of Henry Vlil. but in the aotli year of that reign Dorothy Filoll was become poifeired of it, who that year affigned it over to truflees, and they fold it to VV’‘ilIoughbye, in which name it continued down to Sir Francis VV illoughbye, who fold it to Ralph Heyman, efq. afterwards of Somerfield, in this parilh, whofe defeendant Sir Peter Heyman, bart. at the latter end of king Charles II. ’s reign, fold this manor, with his feat of Somerfield, and the reft of his elfates in this parilh and neighbourhood, to Thomas Gomeldon, efq. afterwards of

After which this manor pafied in like fucceflion as that feat, as will be further related hereafter, to VVilliam Dicconfon, efq. and Meliora his wife, whofe truflees, an ad having palled for the piarpofe, about the year 1776, fold this manor, with Somerfieid, Haringe, and Wilmington, manors fuborSomerfield.

dinate to

it,

in this pariQi

and Limne, toThomas Hay-

gent, afterwards of Somerfield, the prefent poffeflbr of it. -A court baron is held for this manor. Harin GE is a manor, lying at the fouthern boun-

man,

daries of this parifh, next to Limne, which Teems to have been included in the defeription of the eftate of

de Moiufort, in the record of Domefday tranferibed above, on the exile of whofe grandfon, and his eflates being feized on by the crown as elcheats, in king Henry I. ’s reign, it was immediately afterwards granted to Hugh de Gurney, or Gournay, defeended from him of the lame name who is in the lift of thofe who attended William the Conqueror in his expedition from Normandy hither. After that name was extind here, the family of De Sharfled held it, one of whom, Robert de Sharfled, lived in the reigns of king

Hugo

and III. and his heirs paid aid for it in the 20th year of king Edward Hi. one of whom was Henry Brockhull, of the lamily of Bi'ockhull,in Saltwood, X 2

Edward

II.

street hundred.

3o8

wood, who llkewife polTefl'ed fome mington and Somerfield manors, in

Wilparifh, and

intereft In

this

in this name the property of it continued till the latter end of king Henry VI. ’s reign, when it was conveyed to Sir Edmund Inglethorp, owner of Sellindge manor as before mentioned, fince

manner down field,

to

Thomas

the prefent owner of

which

has paffed in like Hay man, gent, of Somerit

it.

The manors of Wilmington and Somerfield, formerly

called Somerville^

were antiently the

property of a family of the name of Wilmington, who refided at the manfion of Somerville-court, one of

whom, Stephen de Wilmington, held them in the reign of Edward I. by knight’s fervicc, of the caftle of Dover, being part of thofe which made up the barony, called the Conftabularie, there. Roger de Wilmington died pofielfed of them anno lo Edward III. leaving four daughters his coheirs, who married Orderne, Brockhull, Browning, and St. Laurence, and they lhared thefe manors, then called the manor of

Great Wilmington, (to

diftinguifli

it

from another,

Wilmington, in Limne, which has always had the fame owners) and Somerville between them. After which, on a partition made of their eftates, thefe manors and this feat were allotted to Sr. Laurence. At length Katherine, daughter and foie heir of Thomas de St. Laurence, carried them in marriage to Sir William Apulderfield, who about the latter end of king Henry VI. ’s reign conveyed them t(j Afliburnham and Tylle, the latter of whom afterwards became by purchafe pofiefled of the whole of it, of which Richard Tylle died pofiefled in the laft year of king Richard III. anno 14S5, and he by will called Little

devifed his place in Sellynge, with the lands called Wilmington among others, to his eldeft fon William Tylle, whofe grandfon of the fame name leaving one

daughter and heir Elizabeth, flie carried thefe manors and eftates, about the middle of Henry VIII.’s foie

reign.

SELLINDGE. reign,

anno 1527J

in

309 marriage to Peter Heyman,efq.

afterwards of Somerfield, whofe lands were difgavelled by the aft of 2 and 3 Edward VI, His defcendant Henry Hey man, efq. of Somerfield, was created a ba-

anno 17 Charles I. being defcended from Peter Heyman, one of the gentlemen of the bedchamber to king Edward VI. they bore for ronet on April

12, 1641,

their arms. Argent^ on a chevron engraHe^d^ azure^ three

His fon Sir Peter Heyman, bart. at the latter end of king Charles II. ’s reign, alienated this feat of Somerfield, with the manors of Sellindge, Wilmington, and Hacinquefoils, or,

ringe, to

betiveen three martlets, fabled

Thomas Gomeldon,

efq. of

London, before

which Sir Edward Walker, garter, had in 1662 granted arms and crell (with an augmentation) to William Gomeldon and Richard Gomeldon, both of London, (the former being afterwards flieriff of London anno 1670, 22 Charles II.) Tons of Roger Gomeldon, merchant, fuppofed to be of the antient family of Gomeldon, which arms were, Or, on a fejs zvavy, gtdes, three mullets of the field', to which was added the augmentation of

On

a canton, azure, a

fieiir

de

Its, or.

He

674, and afterwards began to rebuild this feat of Somerfield court, which he never lived to finifli. In relation to which I have been aflured, that Mr. Gomeldon, with Mr. Morris, of Horton, and Mr, Duncombe of the Weft, were private treafurers and managers to that unfortunate prince king James II. in his mercantile capacity, for not only whilft he was duke of York, but after he came to the ferved the office of Iberiff in

1

crown, he carried on a confiderable traffic as a merchant. When the king fled to France, it is faid, they had a large balance in hand, which he foon afterwards demanded of them, but they fet him at defiance for the recovery of it, lb that it remained with them; and “

Pedigrees of

in Collins’s

Heyman,

Viftn. co. Kent, 1574 and i6ig, and

and Kimber’s Baronetage.

X

3

out

STREET HUNDRED. out of this money Morris paid for Horton manor, and built Mount Morris, as Gomeldon did Somerfield, and the third, who had by far the largeft proportion

510

added greatly to that accumulation of property, which the Duncombes afterwards pofleffed in the Weft of England. He died in 1703, leaving two (bns, VViiliam and Richard, and a daughter Meliora, who on the deaths of botft her brothers, /. 7). became, by the entail ot her lather’s will, entitled to thefe manors and eftates, and entitled her hufband, for

liis

Otare,

Thomas

Stanley, efq. of Prefton, in Lancartiire, to

them, but he having been attainted for treafon in became forfeited to the crown during their 17^ 5» joint lives, and vefted in the commiflioners of forfeited eftates, wdio fold their intereft in them to Sir William Smith. Richard Stanley their Ton, in whom the inheritance of thefe eftates remained, became on his father’s death entitled to them, but being adjudged infane, he became fubjetft to a commiffion of lunacy, in which ftate they continued till his death, [. p. when William Dicconfon, efq. and Meliora his wife, became entitled to them, and they procured an a
Hodiford, now ^

ulually called Great Hodifordy to

from an eftate adjoining to it, called Little Hodifordy once part of the lame, is a manor lituated at the north-weft boundary of this parifh. It was antiently written Hodiwordey asappears by fome charters in the regifter of Horton priory, and it once gave name to a family who relided here, one of whom was John de Hodiford. They were lucceeded here by the Cardens, who were for fome time polielfed of it, and continued fo till it was at length alienated, in queen diftinguifli

it

SELLINDGE. queen Elizabeth’s reign, by John Carden

3II to

James

Cobbes, gent, of Aldington, who died in 1587. His kingCharles the Ift.’s reign, grandfon James Cobbe,

m

fold this

manor to

Thomas

Godfrey,

efq. w'ho after-

W'ards refided here, being the Ion ot T homas Godfrey, efq. of Lid, by his fecond wife ; from whofe firft wife

defcended the Godfreys, of Heppington, and from his third wife thofe of Wye.* He died potletfed of it in 1664; his grandfon Thomas Godfrey, efq. likewiie refided here, and died polfetfed of it in 1699, f. p. After which felTing

it

Am) e

became divided.

one part of

it,

his filter pol-

called Little Hodifovd^

now

in

the poiIefiTion of her defcendant William Hugefl'en, efq. of Stodmarlh), and his firft coufin Peter God-

of Woodford, pofiTelfing the other part of it, called Great Hodiford^ in which the manor and feat were included. On his death, on the divifion of his frey, efq.

eftates, his eldeft fon

tled to this of

Thomas Godfrey became

Great Hodilord, which he by

enti-

will in

has fince 1772, devifed to Mr. David Gravier, who taken the name of Godfrey, and is the prefent owner of it.

CHARITIES.

William Fordred, by

will

in

1550, gave to

this parilh,

among others, a proportion of the rents of 25 acres in St. Maris of the annual rie’s parifh, in Romney Marfli, which portion annually to the pooi,and diftributed produce of 61 . i8s.8d.to be vefted in certain truftees.

1624, gave the fixth part of now of the annual pro27 acres of marfli-land in Warehorne, duce of 4I. los. to three poor houlehelders and lettled inhabito be notants, of honeft behaviour, of this parifn and Limne, if fuch or law, minated by his next heir male at the common Two charity. this could not be found, then by the feoffees of burmoft parifli of the poor houfeholders to be always of that

William Heyman, by

deed

in

thened with poor. r r r j There are given by perfons unknown, to the rebel of the

poor of this parilh, fix acres of Land, four of which are known a by the name of Roysfield, lying near the church. Likewife t

See

more

of this family under Lid Hereafter.

X 4

houfe,

STREET HUNDRED houfe, called the Sw'an houfe, with two acres of land. Alfo two pieces of land, containing 13 acres and an half, called Great Knoll, Little Knoll, and Little Barrington. All which are veiled in the churchwardens and overfeers, and are of the annual pro-

duce of

20I.

Valentine Knight,

gent, in 1614, gave by will 8s. to be paid yearly out of a farm, called the Finn, in Bonnington, for the relief of the poor ; which is veiled in the churchwardens and overfeers.

Mrs. Sarah Godfrey, of Hammerfmith, by deed in 1636, gave to the poor a houle, called Pyfyng’s cottage, and one acre of land, veiled in the churchwardens and overfeers, of the annual value of

il.

Mrs. Elizabeth Ludwell, widow, by

.

her will in 1765, gave the yearly fum of il. 6s. out of a tenement, to be diltributed to the poor of this parilh yearly on Chrillmas-day, veiled in the churchwardens and overfeers. Thomas Godfrey, esq., of London, who was a great benefaflor to the poor in his life-time, by paying yearly 40I. for placing four boys apprentices, and for putting twelve poor children to fchool, left by will in 1769 the fum of 5I. per annum, charged on his perfonal ellate, to be diflributed yearly to ten poor men and women of this parifli, who do not receive alms, which is veiled in the churchwardens and overfeers, and his reprefentative William Godfrey, efq. of London, Hill continues to pay §1. per annum for 12 poor childrens’ fchooling ; which fum was lately veiled in Mrs. Elizabeth Lynch, formerly of Heyton, but fince deceafed. The poor conllantly relieved are about twenty-live, cafually fifteen.

The parish diction of Limne.

The tains

is

within the

ecclesiastical juris-

the diocele of Canterbury, and deanry of

church, which

two

ifles

is dedicated to St. Mary, conand two chancels, having a pointed tur-

ret at the weft end.

In the fouth chancel

liaving on

with an infeription

it

figures,

is

a ftone,

in brafs,

for

John Bernys and Joane his wife, He died in 1440. Near it is a monument for Peter Heyman and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of William Till having both their effigies kneeling thereon, with their

ftone, but the colours gone.

memorial

for

Thomas

arms cut in

In the high chancel a Godfrey, only Ion of Peter

SELLINDGE. Godfrey,

of Hodiford, obt./. p. in 1699. A mufor Thomas Godfrey, efq. of Hodiford, wlio had twelve Ions and four daughters. He ral

late

monument

lived forty-feven years in this parilh, obt. 1664. The gallery was built in 1630, at the coft of

Wal-

Mantell, efq. of Horton priory, who had married Anne, daughter of Henry Hart, gent, of this parifh. On the front is carved in wood, the coat of Mantel], with fix quarterings. Thefe Harts of Sellindge bore for their arms, Three harts heads, cabofhedd^ ter

The church of Sellindge

feems to have been given king Henry lll.’s reign, to

by Hubert de Burgh, in the hofpital of St. Mary, afterwards foil Dieu, then lately founded by him

called the

Mai-

Dover. Notwithflanding which, in the 8th year of Richard JI. it ‘was become part of the pofTeflions of the abbot of Pontiniac, to whom it was then appropriated, the vicarage not being taxed to the tenth, on account of the fmallnefs of its income. How it came back acrain to the Maifbn Dieu, does not appear, but it continued part of the pofTefTions of that hofpital till the difiblution of it in king Henry VIII.’s reign, when it came into the hands of the crown, where the redory or parfonage of this church remained till the 3d year of queen Elizabeth, who exchanged it, among other premifes, with archbilhop Parkier, at which time it was valued to the archbifhop at eight pounds per annum beyond reprifes, except a yearly penfion of fiv^ 'fliillings to the archdeacon, in which Rate it continues at this time, being now part of the pofTeflions of his grace the archbifliop. But the advowfon of the vicarage feems to have remained in the crown to this time, the king being Rill the patron of it.,. This vicarage is valued in the king’s books at 7I. 4s; 3d. It is now a difeharged living, of the clear There

is

marked D. 18,

in

a pedigree of the Harts in the Herald’s office, f.

122.

yearly

STREET HUNDRED.

^14

In 1588 here:

yearly certified value of fifty pounds.

were communicants one hundred and forty-five. In 1645 it was valued at fifty pounds, communicants one hundred and eighty-eight. There is a vicarage- houfe and twenty acres of glebe.

CHURCH OF SELLINDGE, PATRONS, Or Tfie

vicars.

hy Tvhom lirefented.

Richard Barnes, A. M. Od. 2,’., 1612, and in 1629. Richard Burton, A. M. April 9, 1638, obt. 1676. Abdie Morris, A. B. June 8 , 1676, obt. 1680.

Crown.

,

1

,

0 £t.

25,;,

Laud Cade, LL..B. June

23^]

Jojhua Barton, clerk, 1

I

080, obt, 1705. 705, obt. June

1

731.

John Head, A. M. Auguft 9,., 1731, obt. June 1754.“ John Edward Wilfon, A. 6j. I

754, obt.

1

761.

John Dawfon,'l\s\^ 6 , i76i,ob.5j July 1772. Charles Moore, A. M. Auguft,’, I

772, refigned 1778.“

A. M. March,

^0^;

1

7781':

the prel'ent vicar.** o In T737 he w«s prefented to the reftory of Burmarlb, which he held •with this vicarage hy difpenfation. o He was likewife reftor of Cookftone, dioc. Roffen. which he held with

This vicarage by difpenfation. He re£gned this vicarage on being prclented

of Boughton Blean, which h< t holds with the reftory of CooluJ ftone. Alfo a fix pteacher of Canter*

to that

now

|

bury Cathedral. P ter’s,

He

holds the reftory of St.

Sandwich, with this reftory

1

bj

difpenfation.

ALDINGTON, USUALLX

called

Allington,

is

the next parifl

fouth-weflward from Sellindge, being written in the carlieft records Ealdintme, which name implies the antiquity of it. The greatefl part of it, is in the hundret

ALDINGTON. idred of Street,

and the remainder of

315 it,

including the

Ichurch, in that of Birchoit Franchife.'^

The parish

of Aldington

exceedingly pleafant and healthy. The great ridge of quarry or fand hills crofs it in length about two miles and an half, and it extends northward into the vale beyond them as far as the Old Stour, and on the other fide fouthward into Romney Marfh, in all about two miles. On the ridge is

of quarry-hills is the village of Aldington, through which the road leads from Limne to Smeeth and Alhford, having the church on the north eaft fide of it,

and the court-lodge and parfonage-houfe on the op-

from whence there is an extenfive profpeft over Romney Marfh and the Tea on one fide, and the inland country on the other. There are feveral hamlets in it, as at Aldington-corner, Stone-flreet-green, which lies in the vale near the river, and at Claphill, where the quarry-hills end, and you defeend from it into the clays towards Merfham. pofite fides of the church-yard,

further weftward is Aldington-Fright, corruptly fo called for the Frith, which was once a chace, for deer and wild beads, belonging to the archbifhop’s Still

manor of Aldington, where they ranged

at large as in

This is now a large heath, of a veiy uneven furface, about two miles in length, and near as wide, but it is feparated into two parts by fome cottages and lands inclofed round them, which have been purloined from it. Round the whole of the Fright, there are numbers of houfes and cottages, at different didances from each other. At the entrance of it, at the fouthead corner, is a large old timbered manfion, being the court-lodge of the manor of Poulton Stanjied, belonging a fored.

Since the printing of the former part of this work, I find, rotwithftanding all printed authorities are to the contrary, that the church of Aldington, (conformable to the account of it in Domefday) is within that part of this parifli within the hundred of Birchoit Franchife, in the defeription of which it ought there^

fore to

have been

infer ted.

to

STREET HUNDRED.

^l6

to the archbifhop, and leafed out for many years paft to the family of Gilbert, now held by Donald Macdonald, efq. About three quarters of a mile north-

weft from Aldington Fright,

a very remarkable hill, believe is juft within the is

which I pariih of Merfliam, and belongs to Sir Edw. Knatchbull, bart. It is high and ftands fingle, being ofaconic form, and what is worthy of note here, though it may be no uncommon thing in other places, it has at the very top of it, a large pond, which does not give rife to any of the fprings below, nor communicate with them, except when the water in it is very flufh and runs over ; nor has it ever been dry, when by a very dry fpringand fummeralmoft all the fprings and ponds below roLintl the country have been fo for a confiderable time, during which the furface of this pond has been generally of large extent, and has had a conliderable depth of water in it/ The corn-land in this pariih is very fertile. There is fome hop-ground, and but little wood, moft of which lies to the fouthward of the village, on a height, in which is a very confpicuous toll of trees, called Aldington-knoll ; and at no great diftance from thence an eftate called Af^rwhich formerly belonged to the Huzvoody or gefl'ens, of Provender, and now to Sir Jofeph Banks, and Sir Edward Knatchbull, barts. The ridge of clay-hills begins here, and as they go on widening their diftance from the quarry-hills, the courfe of which is north-weft, continue weft fouth-weft along the edge of Romney Marfh, of which they are the boundary, and fo on by Bonnington and Ruckinge to Warehorne, where they end. called Colliers hill,

A younger

branch of the family of Cobhe, or CobbeSy as they were originally called, was fettled at this place in king Edward IV.’s reign, in the perfon of Thomas

Cobbes, the youngeft fon of John Cobbes, ofCobbes[

See Pack’s Explanation to

bis

Chart, p. 87.

place.

,

;

«

.

I

I

!

|

i

I

aldington.

2,iy

Newchurch, their manfion here being fituated not far from the church, and was called Goldwell. Thomas, fon of Thomas above-mentioned, died here place, in

1528, from whom defcended thofe of this place, Bilfington, Chilham, and other parts. They bore for their arms. Argent, a chevron between three cocks, gules, combed and gilled, or Ac length one of then? in

fold

White, fmee which it has become but of account, and is at this time divided into lhares,

this eftateto little

the property of at leaft twelve different perfons.

The MANOR

OF Aldington was given

by queen Ediva, mother of king

Edred,by

Edmund and

name of Ealdintune, among

the

Chrift-church,

in

961, king

others, to

Canterbury, free from all fecular fervice, except the repairing of bridges, and the building of fortifications. After which it remained till archbifliop Lanfranc, in the Conqueror’s reio'n, on the partition of the poflefijons of that church between the monks and himfelf, for before that time their revenues were enjoyed as one common flock, this manor was allotted to the latter. Accordingly in the furvey of Domefday it is thus entered, under the general title of the archbifliop’s lands : In Limo IVart left, inBelicolt hundred, the archbi/hop in

^

himfelf holds Aldintone in demefne. It was taxed at tzventy one fulings in the time of king Edzvard the Con-

and now for fifteen fulings.

The arable land is one hundred carucates. In demefne there are thirteen camcat es, and two himdred villeins all but ten, with fifty borderers having fevenly carucates. There is a church,

fefthr,

and and

thirteen fervants,

and

three mills of fixteen Jhillin^rs, three fifheries of twenty- one pence. There are one hundred and Jeventy acres of meadow. IVoodfor the pan-

nage of fitxty hogs. In its zvhole value in the time of king Edward the Confejorit zvas worthJixty -Hvo pounds, and ‘

Pedigree of

Cobbe

in Heraldic V'^ifitation,

anno 1619.

STREET HUNDRED. ^ig now yields as much when he received it. It

one hundred

pounds and twenty jhillings. the ville called St. MarT:he archbithop himfelf holds lies in that hundred, it belongs to EJiurfete, and

and ‘I’he arable and // was taxed for one fuling and an half carucates, and land is .... In demefne there are two

tirCs,

.

To

thirtv-ftx borderers.

this

land there belong feven bur-

and four-pence. gefes in Canterbury, paying eight flnllings There are five mills of twenty fhillings, and a jmallwood. the archbiIn this ville Radulphus holds half a fuling of and there he has two carucates and an half. In the

floop,

Edward

the Confejfor the half fuling of St. Martin was worth feven pounds, and the other halffuling was worth four pounds. In Romenel there are as many

time of king

and five burgefies which belong to Aldint : the archbilhofs manor and they were and are now zvorth to as tiventy

the lord fix pounds. Then follows in the fame record, a defcrlption of 'the lands belonging likewife to this manor in Limne

and Stowting, both which have been already tran-



feribed above, in the account of thofe parilhes ; all which plainly fhew how great and extenfive it was at that time. The manfion of it afterwards became the refidence of the archbifliops, who had a large park here, and a chafe for bealls of the foreft, adjoining to pleafantnefs it, which, with the healthinefs as well as

of the fituation, probably induced archbiHiop Morton, in king Henry VII.’s reign, to add much to the buildings of this houfe, which, as well as the manor, continued in this ftate till archbiQiop Cranmer’s time, who finding himfelf unable to refill the torrent, was obliged to give up this, among the reft of his befl manors and palaces, moft of them theantient poffelTions of his fee, by a forced exchange to king Henry VIII. in the 31ft year of that reign, who for feme time ‘

*

Augtii. off.

box C.

10.

box Kent A.

Box Kent,

14,

and

ib. 14’".

See alfo ibid.

off.

E. 75.

kept

ALDINGTON.

31^

kept the manfion and park of it iii his own pofleflion, and purchaicd lands of different perfons to add to it,

and make the park more complete, and it remained in the crown till king Edward VI. in his firft year, granted this manor, with all its members and appurtenances, to John Dudley, earl of Warwick, to hold in capitCy who in the 3d year of that reign, joined with Joane his wife in the reconveyance of it to the king, exchange for other premifes el le where. After whidi it continued in the crown till the reign of Charles I, when the king, by his letters patent, granted the manor itfelf, with its appurtenances and rents of affife in Southre, Northfture above and beneath, Wald, Sibberfnoth, Newchurch, and Oxney, (the fcite and demefnes of the manor having been granted to others, as will be mentioned hereafter) to Nicholas Siddenham, efq. and Edward Smith, gent, to hold in fee, at in

the yearly rent of 260I. 17s. 4^d. After which it paired by lale into the family of Randolph, of Bid-

denden, and Herbert Randolph, efq. recorder of Canterbury, died polfelfed of it in 1724, having been twice married, whofe iflue by his firft wife, has been already mentioned under Biddenden.“ By his fecond wife he had eight children, Thomas, D. D. prefident of Corpus Chrifti college, Oxford ; Grace, who died unmarried in 1775; George, of Briftol, M. D. Dorothy, married to Roger Huggett, clerk, of Eaton ; Charles, bred to the law ; Francis, D. D. principal

of Alban-hall,

Oxford ; Elizabeth, married to Thomas Dimmock ; and Anne, to James Bannifter, both of Briftol. By his will he gave this manor to the leven younger children of his fecond marriage abovein

mentioned, who about thirty years ago joined in the faleof it to Mr. John Mafcall, of Alhford, who died poflefted of it in 1769, and his fon Robert Mafcall, ^ .

See vol,

vii,

of this hillory, p. 13;.

efq.

STREET HUNDRED*

^20

efq. of Afliford, has lately fold

it

William Deedcs,

to

efq. of Hytlie, the prefent owner of it. The fee-farm rent before-mentioned of 2601. 17s. 4d. which is fllll paid for this manor, has been for many

years vefted in the family of in

James Drake Brockman,

Brockman, and

is

now

efq.*"

court leet and court baron is held for this manor. About ninety years ago the owner, Mr. Randolph, required the tenants to appear and make perfonal fer-

A

vlceat this court, or in lieu to

make compofition

for

which brought a confiderable profit, but has been wholly refufed by the tenants for a con-

their default, this

iiderable time paft.

and demejnes of the manor of A Idingion, which had remained in the crown from the reign of king Edward VI. were firft granted by James I. anno 1610, to John Eldredand James Whitmore, for a term of years," and then by king Charles I. by letters

But

the [cite

patent in his 5th year, among other premiles, to Sir Edward Hales, knight and baronet, to hold of his manor of Eaft Greenwich by fealty only, in free and common focage, and not in capite, or by knight’s fer-

ferme for ever, but he was only a truftee for Sir Dudley Diggs, into whofe pofleffion they then came, and in his defeendants they continued down to Thomas Digges, efq. of Chilham caftle, who in 1724 palled them away by fale to Mr. James Colebrooke, of London, whofe ion Robert Colebrooke, efq. alie^^e authority of an aft to nated them in 1775, Thomas Heron, eiq. of Newark-upon-Trent, afterwards of Chilham caftle, and he that fame year fold them to William Deedes, efq. of St Stephen’s, whofe fon of the fame name is the prefent owner of them. vice, in fee

.

* See a decree in the Exchequer anno 1705, concerning the proportion of the land-tax to be allowed from this rent, and appeal to the houfe of lords in 1706, when the decree was affirmed, in Brown’s Cafes in Parliament, vol. i. p. 131.

Shrym-

aldington.

The

court* lodge (lands clofe

321

on the north

fide

of

the church-yard', being the remains of the archbifliop’s manfion. It is built of the quarry-ftone, with adilar door and window cafes, &c. The chapel is entire,

and

is

now made

Shrympenden

'

is

a

ufe of as part of the houfe.^

manor here,which was

in

king

Charles I.’s reign, part of the pofl'ellions of the family of Kingfley,* and William Kingdey, archdeacon of Canterbury, died polfelfed of it in 1647, on which it defcended to his elded fon George Kingdey, of Canterbury, whofe grandfon Capt. William Kingdey left

one fon William,

a lieutenant-general, and

two daugh-

married to Stephen Otway, gent, of Maiddone, and Caroline. At his death he deviled this manor to his two daughters, who in 1741 joined in the fale of it to Mr. James Colebrooke, of London, whole ters, Alice,

fon Robert Colebrooke, efq. in I 775 alienated it with the Chilham edate toT. homas Heron, efq. who that fame year fold it, with other edates as abovementioned, to William Deedes, clq. of St. Stephen s, whofe fon of the fame name is the prefent owner of it. Ruffin’s hill, is an anticnt manfion here, on the >

a fmall di dance from the church, which took its name from a family, who were the early polfedbrs of it, one of whom, Robert Ruftyn, as appears by the regiderof St. Radigund’s abbey, was in very early hill, at

.times con dable ofSaltwood cadle, in this neighbourhood. After this name was extind here, the Godfreys, owners of the adjoining manor of Hurd, under which a farther account of them will be given, became

pofleded of it, in which it continued down to Thomas Godfrey, who died in 1490, anno 6 Henry Vlf. and was buried in this church, leaving two Ions, Thomas and Humphr}% who both dying /. p. their two liders fucceeded to their inheritance, Agnes, married to William Blechenden, of

Merlham, and Rabege,

See more of the KingHeys, vol, vH. p. 55 **

VOL.

VIII.

Y

to

STREET HUl^DREO,

322

to John Cleikci gent, of this parifh, and on the divifion of their eflates, the latter had Copherft, in this parifh, and the former had this feat of Ruffin’s hill,’'’

defendants it remained down to Humphry Blechenden, efq. defended from Nicholas de Blechenden, of Merfliam, in king Edward the Ift.’s reign.

and

in his

They

bore for their arms, Azurey a fejs. nebuleey argent, between three lions heads erajed, argent, collared, gules. rebuilt this manfion, and died polfefTed of it in 1639, leaving feveral children, of whom the eldeft, Thomas Blechynden, prebendary of Canterbury, fucceeded him in it, and refided moftly here. He died poireffed of it in 1663, and was buried at the upper

He

end of the

little

this church.^

chancel, at the feet of his father, in

His fon of the fame name,

in the year

Deedes, efq. of Hythe, defendant William Deedes, efq. of Hythe, is the prefent owner of it. Si MN ELLS, or Simnolds, as it is fometimes fpelt, is an antient feat in this parifh, about a mile from the church, which had formerly owners, who gave name to it, one of whom, Robert Simnell, as 1 find by a will in the Prerogative-office, in Canterbury, was poffdfed of it as late as the reign of king Henry VI. and then fold it to Thomas Crofby, of Aldington, who died poffieffed of it in 1460, and left it to his fon Thomas. After which it pafled into the pofleffion of the Godfreys, and in king Henry VII. ’s reign, Agnes, daughter of Thomas Godfrey, and coheir of her brothers, entitled her hufband VVilliam Blechenden to the pofleffion of it. How long it coniinucd in his defendants does not appear, but before the refloration of king Charles II. it was become the property of John Cafon, efq. of Woodnefborough, who in 1663 alienated it to Thomas Blechynden, gent, of Alding1677, alienated

it

to Julius

vvhofe

^

There

is

His will

a pedigree of is

them in Viftn.

in the Prerogative*office,

co, Kent, anno 1574. Canterbury.

ton.

ALDINGTON. ton, \vho afterwards refided here.

chynden

323

His fon John Ble-

who

Anne: his wife furviving, and (he joined with her eldeft fon Thomas, gent, of New Romney, in 171 in the fale of thiseftace to Stephen Haffenden, clerk, of Egerton, whole grandfon Stephen Greenhill, his daughter’s fon^ fucceeded him in it, and his grandfon of the fame likewife relided at Simnells,

now entitled to it. CoPTHALL, or Gophall^

name

left

is

is

an eflate

in this parilh,

the valley, at no great diftance weftward from Ruffin’s hill. It was formerly the property of lituated in

the family of Knight,

who had

refided here

from the

Henry VIII. and in whom it continued Henry Knight, gent, of Cophall, who died

reign of king

down

to

1687, leaving one daughter Katherine, but by his will he devifed his houle and land here to James Symons, of Aldington, his executor, who fold it to Hogben, whence it paffied in 1681 to Mr. John Baker, who in 1702 fold it to Laud Cade^ clerk, and he in 1728 paffied it away to William Stanley, who by will in 1734 deviled it to his four daughters, one of whom marrying Mr. John Franklyn, of Littleborne,hein her right became poffieffed of a fourth part of it, and afterwards purchafed the remaining parts of the other three fillers, and in 1777 alienated the whole of it to William DeedeSj efq. of St. Stephen’s, whofe fon of the fame name is the prelent owmer of it. CopHURST is an efate in the foutherri part of this parifli, and partly down the hill, which was antiently the property of the family of Godfrey, owners likejrft, in which it continued down to Thomas wife of Godfrey, w'ho refided here, and dying poffieffed of it in the 6th year of king Henry VII. was buried in this church, as has been mentioned before, at which time He gave it was called Cophurft, otherwife Ballard. poffeffied

of

it

in

H

it

by

two fons Thomas and Humphry, lucremainder to his two daughters, Agnes and Rabege. Y 2

will to his

ceffively,

STREET HUNDRED.

324 Rabege.

Agnes, the former, married William Blechenden, and Rabege married John Clerke, and they, on the deaths of their two brothers, f. p. became entitled to this eftate,

among

the reft of their inheri-

tance, and on the divifion of

the latter, in right of his wife, became poflefled of Cophurft. From the Clerkes it pafied into the name of White, one of whofc defcendants alienated it to Flonywood, in which family it has continued down to Sir John Honywood, it,

bait, of Evington, the prefent poffeffor of

it.

CHJRITIES,

William Fordred,

of Sellindge, by will in gaveto the poor of this parifh, among others, a portion of the rents of twenty-five acres of land in St. Maries’ parifli, in Romney Marfli, the proportion of which to this parifti is 4.I. 12s. 4jd. to be diftributed annually on Chriftmas-day, and veiled in certain tru flees.

William Pantry, by will in 1587, gave to the poor, an annuity of los. to be paid yearly out of lands, called Cabbin lands, in Limne, to be dillributed yearly at Lady-day, by the xninifler and churchwardens. Thomas White, D. D. bifhop of Peterborough, gave by his will, 240I. to be laid out in good lecurity, and lol. of the interefl of it to be dillributed yearly among twenty poor houfeholders j but it has been for many years loll through a millake, and has not been fince recoverable.

Thomas PIogben, late of Aldington, by will in 1712, gav'e to twenty poor families one llfilling each, out of a piece of nfarfli land, called Shrowlbury, in Bilfington. The poor

conllantly relieved arc about forty, cafually 25.

Aldington diction of the Limne,

The

is

within the

diocejc of

church, which

ecclesiastical jurisCanterbury, and dcunry of

dedicated to St. Martin, is conlifts of two ifles and two chancels, having at the weft end a handfome tower iteeple, well and ftrongly built, the top of it being covered with lead, flat and without battlements,

large

Is

and handfbme, and

feemThis fteeple was begun about the year 1507, and went on fo flowly, moft probably for want of money, that it was not finiftied in 1 557,

mgly

as if unfiniflied.

as

aldington.

225

as appears by the legacies left towards the work of it, in feveral wills in the Prerogative-office, Canterbury.

Xhere

are fix bells in

about twenty-four years chancel, dedicated to St. Mary, belongs to the two eftates of Ruffin’s hill and Simnells. In it is a memorial for William Deedes, M. D. obt. ago.

it,

calt

The fouth

1738. Memorials for Mary, daughter of Metcalf, widow of Henry Gregory, obt. for

Edward

1707

Humphry

^

and

Blechinden, efq. of Ruffin’s hill, obt. 1639. monument for John Blechynden, efq. of Sirnnells, who died an immature death, being then married to his fecond wife, and father of a numerous ifllie. He lived the latter part of his life at Monkton, in Thanet, obt. 1607, arms, Blechynden impaling <2 lion rampant, gules. In the north chancel a ftone, having in brafs the figures of a man and woman, under his feet a dog, and below them three Tons and two daughters, and an infcription for John Weddeol, gent,

A

and a

Maud his

tomb

now

for

wife, obt.

1475.

the fouth

James Godfrey and Katherine

defaced.

ifie

was

his wife,

On

the outfide, at the fouth-eaft corner of the church, there appears to have been an adjoining chancel or chantry, but there is no account re-

maining of it. The church of Aldington, with the chapel of Smeeth annexed, being exempt from the jurifdidtion of the archdeacon, was appurtenant to the manor of Aldington until the exchange made by the archbifhop with king Henry VIII. as has been above related, in which, though the manor was granted to the king, yet all prefentations and advowfons being excepted out of it, the patronage of this church continued parof the pofleffions of the fee of Canterbury, as it does at this time, his grace the archbifhop being the prefent patron of it. There was a vicarage endowed in this church in the 24th year of king Edward I. anno 1295, which continued fo in the 5th year of king Edward IV. in which cel

Y

3

year

STREET HUNDRED.

«26 year William

Pope died

vicar of

will in the Prerogative-office,

as appears

it,

Canterbury, but

by

his

find

I

nothing of it afterwards. This reftory of Aldington, with the chapel of Smeeth, is valued in the king’s books at 3 81 6s. 8d. and the yearly tenths at 3I. j6s. 8d. In 1588 it was valued at one hundred and fixty pounds, communi.

_

.

In 1648 here

cants one hundred and ninety-feven.

were communicants two hundred and fifty-fix, and in Smeeth one hundred and eighty. There are about fourteen acres of glebe land belonging to this redory. the grass'I here is a modus of nine-pence per acre on land here, except when fown with corn, grain, flax, or planted with hops, in lieu of all tithes whatever; to break through which, there was a fuit in i 754 between Dr. Chapman, then redor, and Smith, who »

was an occupier ofjuch lands here, in which the rector was caft.* The redor fnpports voluntarily a fchool here, for reading Englifh and writing.

CHURCH OF j^LDJNGTON, luith the CHAP El, OF SMEETH annexed^ PATRONS, Or The

hy

whom

RECTORS

Jirejented.

Thomas Linacre, M. D. in 1 509.** Erafmus Roteroda?nus, March 22, 1 5 1, refigned the fame year.' John Thornton^ D. D.** Richard Majiers, A. M. Nov.

Archbijhojt

1

18, *

a See Vexey’s Reports, vol.

5*6. b

c

ii.

p.

And reftor of Merfham. He refigned it foon afterwards, on

condition of a penfion of 20I. per anbeing paid out of it by Dr. John Thornton, who was collated to it in

535

I

5

i



oht.

April 21,

-“

e Afterwards D. D. Erafmus fays, he was a young man well (killed in divinity, but being a principal encourager of Elizabeth Barton, the Holy Maid of Kent, he w'as attainted and

num

executed at Tyburn. See before, under

his room. d Suffragan, bifhop of Dover.

p.

Limne, and Wood’s Ath.

vol.

i. fafti,

21.

Sec

Dncaicl’s Repert. p. 119.

PATRON 8 #

I

ALDINGTON. PATRONS,

327 RECTORS.

Cifc.

Caldwell, M. vacated 1592.^

The King, jure preg

John

The

Charles Pother bye, S.

Archhijhopi

1592, obt.

D. 1558,

T. B.

May

March

John Simpfon,

29, 1619.® D. D. indll6ted

April 1619, obt. 1630.'“ Robert Aujlin, D. D. in 1636. Elias Juxon, A. M. induiEted April 1661.

Alban Bales, A.

M.

indu£led

May

1665. George Screven, A. M. inducted June 1670. Herbert Richards, A. M. April 1671, obt. 167S. John Brazier, I). D. indufted

1678, obt. 1679.

William Cade, A. M. indufled March 30, 1680, obt. 1706.' John Ibbut, indu£led 1706, rcfigned

I

708.

James Janeway, indudled June 1708, obt. 17 39.'^

John Chaptnan, D. D. induced

Auguft 1739, obt.

0 £V.

14,

1784.^

David

Ball,

LL. B.

1784, the

prefent redlor.”

Dean of Rochefter, and vacated on being made bilhop of Salifbury. See Wood’s Ath. fafti, vol. i. p. 1 to, 124. g Dean of Canterbury, and lies bu-

I

f

ried in that cathedral.

h Prebendary of Canterbury, and was buried in the nave of that catheIn 1626, by difpenfation,re(Ror likewife of Sandhurft. Rym. Feed. vol.

dral.

jtviii.

217.

k

See

Wood’s Ath.

vol.

ii.

fafti,

p.

He lies buried in this church. And rtftor of Wotton by difpen-

fation. 1 Likewife re£lor of Saltwood, which he refigned on being prefented to that of Merlham, which he held with this reAoty by difpenfation. Sec more of him before under Merlham.

in

p. 87.;

Before vicar of Chiftclet.

HURST, ANTIENTLY

called Falconers Hurfl,

from a

fa-

mily who were once the pofleflors of it, lies the next parilh fouthward, near the foot of the clay- hills, being

y 4

partly

street hundred.

J28

Romney

Marfli, and the liberty and jurifdi(5lion of the juitices of it, and partly within that of the county.

partly within the level of

Hurst

is

a

p'arifli

but

little

known, and of as

little

account, lying near the foot of the clay-hills, next to the level of the Marfh, in which the lower or fouthern part of it is, but the upper or northern part is without that jurifdidtion, and within that of the juftices of the

county. There are but two houfes in it, nor is there any thing worth further mention in it. The manor of Hurst, was given by Henry II. to William, fon of Balderic, to hold in fergeantry^ by thefervice of keeping one hawk, for the king and his fucceflbrs, at their pleafure, whofc defcendant Godfrey le Huton, afterwards furnamed Le Falconer, from his tenure of this manfion, podeded it in the 43d year of king Henry III. From which circumftances likewife it gained the name of Falconers Hurft, and as fometimes knights fervice W'as annexed to a fergeantry, fo this manor was held likewife by the lervice of the 6oth part of a knight’s fee." died pof-

He

feded of

manor, held as above-mentioned in capite^ in the 7th year of king Edward 1 His fon Robert le Fauconer, in the aid year of that reign, was allowed free-warren, view of frank-pledge, adize of bread and beer, and other liberties within this manor j and from him it defeended to John Fauconer, who, in the 17th year of king Richard II. was found to die podeded of this manor of Herd Fauconer, with the advowfon of the church, held as above-mentioned, this

.

bearing for his arms, in allufion to their tenure here, ^tarterly, argent and azure ^ a falcon volant^ or. He

two

left

fons,

chelgrove, in

who

retained

Henry, who from his refidence at MiSudex, had taken that name, and John, the

name

chelgrove, the elded fon, fucceeded :

Mag. Rot. 34 Hen.

III.

m.

Henry Mihim in this ma-

of Fauconer.

Madox’s Excheq.

p. 433.

nor

HURST.

329

nor and advowfon, and died the next year, as did John his fon, three years afterwards, an infant, and in wardihip to the king. On which John Jds uncle, who had taken the name of Michelgrove, fucceedcd liiin here, as did his defcendant of the fame name in the I ft year of king Henry IV leaving an only daughter and heir Elizabeth, who afterwards carried this eftate, as well as the I'eat of Michelgrove, in marriage to John .

Shelley, efq. afterwards of Michelgrove, in whofe defcendants it continued down to the right hon. Sir John Shelley, bart. who alienated this manor, with

the advowfon of the church, to George Carter, eftp of Kennington, whofe only fon the Rev. George Carter, now of Kennington, is the prefent owner of it.°

Falconhurst,

alias

Goldenhurst,

is

a capital

mefluage and eftate here, which formerly was part of the manor of Hurft above-mentioned, from which it

was alienated

who

it

How

it

pafted af-

have not found, but in king Edward VI. ’s was in the pofleffion of Thomas Colepeper,

terwards, reign

in very early times.

I

alienated

it

to

May j

afterwards, in Charles

II. ’s

was the property of Nathaniel Wall, gent, of Middlefex, who in the year 1675 fuffered a recovery of it. After which it was alienated to a family named Le Marchant, who had been fettled in the parifii of Aldington ever fince queen fllizabeth’s reign, and afterwards refided in the illand of Guernfey, from whom it was fold to George Gipps, efq. of Canterbury, and he pafted it away again to William Deedes, efq. of St. Stephen’s, whofe fon of the fame name is the prefent owner of it. There are uoparochial charities. Thepoorconftantly relieved are not more than one or two, cafually five. This parish is within the ecclesiastical jurismiCTioN of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of reign,

it

Limne. •

See Kennington before, vol.

vii.

p. 546,

The

t

STREET HUNDRED.

2^0

church, which was dedicated to St. Leonard, nor is has been ruinated ever fince the year 1 530, which once there a ftone remaining of it, a dry ditch, encompafled it, being all that difcovers the fciteof it, which was clofe to the manor-houfe. It is a redtory, and has always been appendant to the manor of Hurfl, as fuch, it is now of the patronage of the Rev. George Carter, the prefent lord of

The

8th year of Richard II. anno 1384, it was valued at 4I. and on account of It is vaits Imall income, was not taxed to the tenth. the manor.

In the

lued in the king’s books at 4I. i8s. 4d. and the yearly tenths at 9s. rod. In 1588 it was valued at twenty pounds, communicants fix. In 1640 it was valued at forty pounds.

The

parifliioners refort for divine fervice to the

church of Aldington, where the chriftenings, marriages, burials, and other occafional duties, are performed.

CHURCH OF HURST. PATRONS, Or

by luhom prefented.

RECTORS,

The (^cen

JuJiinian Evans^ July 3, 1596, refigned 1601.P

fohn Napp, of London^ hac vice... William Willard,gent. of London

William Daunton, A. M. June 18, 1601, obt. 1605. Rufus RogerSt A. M. Nov, 16,

Sir Charles Shelley, bart.

1603, refigned Reginald Caremot A.

Gtiffith

John

M. June 6,

1663, obt. 1683. John Jfynne, A. M. June 3, 1683. Henry Hughes June 13, 1684,

Bodurden

Shelley.

obt. 1704.

Sir

fohn

Shelley, baft

P In the inftrument

he

is

called Zacharius,

of rtfignailon

Henry Bagnall, Sept. I, I/O4, refigned 1726. William Gurney, A. M. May 2}, 1726, obt. 1756.'* S Prefented to the vicarage of Weftwell in 1730,

PATRONS,

HURST, PATRONS,

RECTORS. John MyOften, March

65’f.

Sir yohn Shelley ^ hart, •.••••t..,.,

George Carter^

*

efq^,

obt. 1779. George Carter, A.

il, 1756,

M.

inducted Jan. 10, 1780, the prefent reflor/

of Kennington,

Onlyfonof the

33 ^

patron, and

now

the

patpn of this

reftory.

BONNINGTON, USUALLY

called Bmnington, lies the next parilh

Ibuth-weftward, upon the clajr hills, extending fouthward into the level of Romnej^ Marlh, which part of it is within the liberty and jurifdidlion of the juftices of it. It is a very lonely and unfrequented place, the fituation cannot but be unpleafant, for the foil is a deep clay, the roads confequently are very miry and bad, the north-weft part of the parifli is moftly woodThe village, ufually called Bennington- crofs, land.

Bands on high ground, on the clay-hills, at no great diftance'from which is the church, nearly down the the foot of which, only one

hill, at

ing,

is

Romney MarQi.

A

little

meadow

interven-

way from the

crofs

a fmall forftal, with feveral houfes round it, one of which, on the fouth fide, is the Pinn-houfe. Northis

ward

is

a large

common,

called

Bonnington-common,

over which the road leads to Aldington-corner, at the north-eaft end of which the quarry-ftone begins. The fouthern part of this parilh is within the level of Romney Marfh, the bounds of which are at the foot of the hill juft below the church. There ufed to be a court leet holden here for the boroughs of Bonnington and Hamme, at which the borlholders of thole boroughs were eledled, but it had been difeontinued ever lince about the middle of queen Elizabeth’s reign, only the memory of it remained, by a great old oak Banding in the highway where it ufed to be held,

and

:

STREET HUNDRED. 332 and from thence called the law- day oak .* This feems to be that which is flill held, being the king’s court, appointed and held by the conftable of the lower half hundred of

made

Street, of

^

which mention has already been

before.

The manor

of Bonnington feems

to have

been, foon after the Norman conqueft, part of the pofleflions of Hugo de Montfort. Accordingly it is entered, under the general title of his lands, in the record of Domefday, as follows

IViUiam^ fon of Grojfe^ holds of Hugh^ Bonintone. doorman held it of king Edward^ and it was taxed at one fuling. T'he arable land is four carucates. In demefne there is one^ and nine villeins^ with four borderers having two carucates. There is a church and eight fer-

and wood for the pannage of

^vants^

eight hogs.

time of king Edward the Confejfor it pounds^ and afterwards three pounds ^

In the

was worth four now one hundred

JJjillings.

On

the voluntary exile of Robert de Montfort,

grandfon of Hugh above-mentioned, in Henry I.’s reign, this manor, among the reft of his eftates, came into the king’s hands as an efeheat. After which it appears to have become part of the pofleflions of the knights hofpitallers of St. John of Jerufalem, the prior of which held it by knight’s fervice of the caftie of Dover, being part of thole lands which made up the barony called the Conftabularie there, but before the 2oth of king Edward III. this manor was divided into two parts, one of which acquired the name of Bonnington^ alias Singleton^ and was held of the prior, as will be further mentioned hereafter; and the other,

which retained its name of the manor of Bonnington^ remained with the prior of the hofpital. In which continued till the diflTolution of the hofpital, in the 32d year of king Henry VIII. when it came,

ftate

if

*

See Kilburne’s Surveys, p, 132.

with I

BONNINGTON. with the reft of the pofleffions of it, into the king’s^ hands, whence it was granted, among other prcmifes, to John illiams, to hold capite, wlio alienated it

Thomas Moyle, and

that year to^ Sir

wards fold it to whole grandlbn

Sir Sir

he foon after-

James Hales, of the Dungeon, James Hales, of the fame place,

in the reign of

queen Elizabeth, exchanged it, togewith the advowfon of the church of Bennington, with Sir Chriftopher Mann, of Canterbury, from one of whole defeendants it paffed in 1695 to Thomas Turner, efq. of Lincoln’s-Inn. His fon John Turner died about 1 74^, whole daughter married Sir Thomas ther.

Lombe, alderman into this

London, who had introduced kingdom from Savoy, a moft curious maworking Italian organzine filk, for which he of

chine for obtained a patent in 1718, and in 1732 had a reward of 14000I. granted by parliament. He died in 1739. His two daughters and coheirs afterwards became entitled to

The eldeft

whom

was married in 1740 Robert Clifton, bart. and the youngeft Mary, to James Maitland, earl of Lauderdale, fo that the latter, in right of his wife, and Sir Gervas Clifton, bart. fon of Sir Robert, in right of his mother, became it.

of

to Sir

poflefled of

ton fold Acrife,

it

in

undivided moieties. Sir Gervas Clifto David Papillon, efq. of

his ihare in 17(80

who likewife fome

years afterwards purchafed

of the earl of Lauderdale his intereft in is

now become

it,

fo that

he

the proprietor of the whole of this

manor.

The manor

of Bonnington,

alias

Kennetts,

formerly called the manor of Bonnington, alias Singleton, was antiently a part of that eftate in this pariOi, which belonged to the hofpital of St. John of Jerufalem, from which it was leparated as early as the reign of king Edward II. being then held of.the prior of that

by a family called De Bonnington, from their pofleffions here. After which it became divided again between two brothers Nicholas and John de Bonhofpital,

nington,

STREET HUN15RED. nington, the former of whom had the manor of Bon^ ningtoHy alias Singleton., and the latter had a parcel of the lands adjoining, afterwards called Kennetts ; but

feem to have paffed from this name before the 20th of king Edward III. in which year Peter Bafant was become poflelfed of the former j as jR^ichard de Otford was of the latter. T find no other mention made of the name of Bafant, and in the beginning of king Henry VI. ’s reign, the above manor was become the property of Roger Bregland, or Brefiand, as the name was fometimes .fpelt, who had good eflates in Eaft Kent, who had married Dionilia, daughter and heir of Bonnington, of this parilh, by whom he had one fon Roger, and three daughters. She furvived him, and afterwards married John Cobbes, of Newchurch, and entitled him to the lands of her inheritance in this parilh, of which this manor does not feem to have been a part, but to have been purchafed by him before, mod probably of her former hufband Roger Bregland. They both thefe

ellates

afterwards bore for their arms, Argent, a chevron, three cocks, gules, which coat probably they in fome meafure took, as being defcended from the female heir of

Bonnington, who bore Sable, three cocks, argent. He died polfefled of it in the 13th year of Edward IV." and it continued in his defendants, till Edw. Cobbe, leaving an only daughter and heir Anne, or Alice, for Ihe is called by both names ; Ihe carried it in marShe riage, firft, to Sir John Norton, of Northwood. afterwards married John Cobham, alias Brooke, third fon of George, lord Cobham, and dying in 1580, was buried in Newington church by Sittingborne by her former hufband Ihe had a fon Thomas, whofe grandfon Sir Thomas Norton, of Northwood, in the beginning of king^ James I.’s reign, alienated it to White, whofe fon feems to have purchafed of the heirs of •,

^

His

will

is ill

the Prerogative-office, Canterbury.

Valentine

BONNINGTOI^. Valentine Knight, gent, of Scllindge, Ton of Thomas Knight, of that place, thofe lands in this parilh mentioned before, as having been heldin Edward thellld.’s reign by Richard de Oiforcl, which afterwards came into the poflelnon of a family named Kennett, in

which they remained

for

they at length gained the

fomc time, infomneh that

name

of

from whom

they pafled to the Knights, defeended from thofe of Aldington, and from them to White as before-mentioned, who becoming thuspoflelfed of the manor of

Bonnington, and the eftate of Kennetts likewife, the whole of it aflumed the name of the manor of Bon^ nmgton^ alias Kennetts^ and the houfe of that the Finn farm^ or Bonnington Fin^ as it is fometimes called, fituated on the Kennetts eftate, became reputed the manor-houfe. In the name of White this manor and eftate continued down to Thomas White, gent, who in 1690 married Grace, After of John Lynch, efq. of Groves, by whom he had a fon Thomas, and three daughters, married to Goddard, Beakc, and Hawkins. On his death it defeended, one moiety to the fon, and the other to the three daughters.

Thomas White

the fon, alienated his moiety to Goddard, who afterwards purchafing the remainder of the other moiety of the children of Beakeand Hawkins, both deceafed, became poft'efl'ed of the whole of it, which he afterwards

nephew Mr. Samuel Goddard, of Merfliam, the prefent owner of it. fold to his

CHARITIES. of Sellinge, by will in 1614, gnve the annual fum of 8s. to the poor, out of his farm called the Finn, and the manor of Bonnington, yearly at Chrilfmas. The poor conftantly reHeved are about ten, calually five,

Valentine Knight,

Bonnington is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction oi Limne.

diocefe

of Canterbury, and deanry ot



The

STREET HUNDRED.

Rumwold, church, which is dedicated to St. an ifle and chancel. It has no is fmall, conftftingof raifed on the roof at the lleeple, but a pointed tuiret and near. There are weft end. It is kept very clean memorials in it, but Ibme fmall remains of painted

The

jio

of the reftory of this church pafled of Bonnington till the as an appendage to the manor Jerufalem, diflblution of the holpital of St. John of when it came in the 3id year of king Henry VIII.

The advowfan

was two years afterwards granted by the king to Arthur Stringer, from whofe defcendant it palled into the name of Kempe, and Sir Thomas Kempe, of Ollantigh, was owner of it in the 21ft year of queen Elizabeth’s reign, from whom it pafled to Sir James Hales, of the Dungeon, owner of the manor, with which the advowfon lias continued in the fame chain of ownerfliip down to

into the hands of the crown,

.

whence

it

the prefent proprietor of it, the patronage of it being now vefted in David Papillon, efq. late of Acrile. This redlory is valued in the king's books at lol. I2S. 8id.

and the yearly tenths

at il. is. 3id.

It

is now of the clear 3'early certified value of52l. 13s. ild. In 1588 it was valued at fifty -eight pounds, commu-

was valued at fifty pounds per annum, communicants forty, and in 1742 it was valued at feventy pounds per annum, and has about twenty-fix acres of glebe. There is a modus of one {hilling an acre on the marfh land in this parifli. John Knight, of Aldington, by will in 1547, ordered that one parcel ofland, fometime belonging to the churches of Aldington and Bonnington, fhould after his death remain to the ufe of thofe churches, in fuch manner and form as it had in times paft.

nicants thirty-nine.

In 16^0

it

CHURCH

I

BONNINGTON

337

CHURCH OF BONNINGTON. PATRONS, ‘

Or

RECTORS,

by 'whom prefented.

The King, hac

Wtllia?n Stacye, refigned 1615.

vice

Thomas Cox,

A. M.

July iz

1615.

Thomas Swinnerton, refigned in 1643-

Mann,

Sir William

Joyner Brooke,

A. M. Nov.

'

9,

1643, obt. 1669.

Samuel Atwood, A. B. July 30, William Mann,

efq. ...............

1669, refigned 1680. Jonathan Bernard, A, M.

March

ro, 1688, refigned 1701.“ John Turner, A. M. Nov. i; 1701, refigned i 709.

yohn Turner, gent

Turrter, A.M. Oft. 31, 1709, obt. Auguft 1742.

Thomas Curteis

Wightwkk, A. M. Nov.

26, 742, obt. 1753." Matthias Unwin, refigned I

I 753. George Adams, A, M. Nov. 2, •7S3» refigned 1757. Robert Tournay, A. M. Auguft 23, 1757, obt. June i, 1785.*

George Mapleloft, gent

Mrs, Hannah Turner.

David

Papillon, efq,

Philip

Papillon,

A. M. June

1715, the prefent reftor.^ o

He

refigned

on being prefented to

Throwley.

^ And vicar of St. in Canterbury.

-

-

Mary

Bredin,

* In 1765, by difpenfation, rcftoF of Newchurch. y And rc£tor of Eythorne by difpenfacion.

• -

THE HUNDRED OF NEWCHURCH IS the next fouth-weftward from that of Street, iaft-defcribed, being written in Domefday both Nevvecerce and Neucerce. In the 7th year of Edward I. the king and the arclibilliop were lords of this hundred. VOL. viir

Z

XT

MEWCHURCH HUNDRED.

338 IT

CONTAINS WITHIN

ITS

BOUNDS PART OF THE PA-

RISHES OF 1.

Newchurch.

2.

Bilsington, and

3.

Ruckinge.

And

the churches of thofe parifhes, and likewlfe part of thepariflies of St. Maries and Snave, the churches of which are in One conjiable has jurifdicfion over it. other hundreds.

NEWCHURCH LIES

the next parilh

fouth- weft ward from

Ben-

nington, in the level of Romney Marfh, and within the liberty and jurifditftion of the juftices of it. Part of it, with the church, is in the hundred of Newchurch, part in the hundred of Aloefbridge, another part in the hundred of St. JVTartin, and the refidue in that of

Worth.

The whole

of this parifh

is an entire flat of marfli grounds, with hardly a tree or hedge among them, much the fame as the adjoining pariflies of Eaftbridgc and Blackmanftonc, already deferibed. It is about

three miles acrofs each way ; the village confifts of only a few ftraggling houfes near the church. There IS not any thing further worth mention in it, excepting that a fair is held here on June 12, yearly, for toys ‘ ^

and pedlary.

The manor over the greateft

of Aldington claims paramount part of this parifh, which has always

been accounted an appendage to it. Although there is no mention of this parifh by

name

in the

record of Domefday, yet there are three kveral defcripiions of lands within the hundred of Newchurch, which can hardly relate to thofe in any ot ler parifli,

m

and yet as there are no names mentioned them, what particular ones they belong to, cannot

now

ut

y guefs be afeertained.

They

are entered,

under

NEWCHURCH. under

the general

fort, as follows

In

339

of the lands of

title

Hugo de Mont-

:

Limowart

Nevvecerce hundred^ the fame Hugo holds in the marjh of Romenel one yoke. The arable land is ... Tzvo fochmen held a moiety of this leji^

in

.

and

There are now four vilhaving one carucate. This land was and is worth twelve [hillings. The fame Hugo holds half a yoke^ which one fochman held. There are two borderers now. This land was rated in Titentone, (Tinton in IVarehome J becaitfe it is there tilled with the carucates of the demefne. The hundred and the burgeffes of Dovrcy and landy

tzvo villeins the other.

leins

the tenants of the abbot of St. Augufiine and EJlrea left tefiify thisy that the land of EJiretoney which the canons

Martin of Dovre claimed againfi Hugo de Mont^ forty that Uluuile Wilde held it in fee fmple, in the time of king Edward the Confeffory and it was taxed at one yokcy and there he has one carucate in demefne, and five borderers zvith one carucate, and one mill of twenty /hillings. It is and was zvorth ten pounds. And again below, under the lame general title of

St.

:

Nevvecerce hundred, Hugo himfelf holds one parcel of land, which azor Rot held of king Edzvard without a halimote. It was taxed at one fuling. The arable land is five carucates. There are eight villeins, with three borderers having tzvo carucates. In the time of king In

Edzvard the

Confefjbr,

eight pounds,

now

and

afterivards,

nine pounds.

Hugo

it

zvas worth

himfelf holds half

a Juling in the marfh of Romenel, and it zvas taxed at as much. The arable land is four carucates. Twelve fochmen held and do hold it, having four carucates. It is and was worth fixly fijiUings.

Packmanstone

is

a

manor

in this parifh,

which

was anciently the patrimony of the eminent family of Criol, from whom it palTed in the reign of Henry IIT. to that ofLeyborne,in which it continued till Juliana, daughter of Thomas de Leyborne, ufually ftiled the z a Infanta

NEWCHURCH HUNDRED.

^40

infanta of Kent, died poffefled of it in the 41ft year of king Edward III. when it efrheated to the crow'n for

want of heirs. After which this manor continued in the crown till king Richard II. in his 1 ith and 2 2d years, fettled it on the priory of Canons, alias Chiltern Langlev, in Hcrtfordlhire,"' where it remained till the diffoiiJtion of that houi'e, anno 30 Henry VIII. when this manor, among the other poUcflions of it, came into the king’s hands,

who

the next year granted

it,

with

feite

of the priory, and other lands and eflates belonging to it, to Richard, fuffragan bifhop of Dover, to hold for his life, or until he Ihould be promoted to fome ecclcfiaflical benefice or dignity, of the yearly value of one hundred pounds, upon which this grant was to be

This certainly liappened before the 36th year of that reign, for the king then granted it to Sir Thomas IVloile, to hold in capite^ who gave it in marriage with his youngeft daughter and coheir Amy to Sir Thomas Kempe, of Oilantigh, and he in queen Elizabeth’s reign alienated it to Thomas Smith, efq. of Weftenhanger, commonly called the CuftomeV, who at his death in 1591 deviled it to his fourth fon Sir Richard Smith, whofe only fon Sir John Smith dying f.p. in 1632, his two filters became his coheirs, of whom Mary, the eldelt, entitled her fecond hulband Maurice Barrow, elq. of Suftblk, to the polfelTion of it, and he continued owner of it after the reftoration. After which it pafled by fale to the Godfreys, of Hodiford, in Sellinge, with which family it continued in like manner down to Peter Godfrey, efq. of Woodford, whole fecond furviving fon Peter Godfrey became poffelfed of it on his father’s death. He died unmarried in 1769, and by will gave this manor to William Mackenzie, efq. of \\ oodford, who has fince taken the name of Godfrey, and is the prefent owner of it. void.

*

anno ii Rich. II. p. 2, m. Tan. Mon. p. 18S and 226,

Pat.

15.

i,

and 22 Rich.

II. p. 3,

SiLWELL,

NEWCHURCH.

34I

SiLWELL, or Silloivjbregt as it was antlently called, was a manor here, which was once polTci'lccl by a family of that name, one of whom, William de Sillowlbreg, held it in king Edward II. ’s reign, by knight’s lervice of Dover cadle, being part of thole lands which made

up the barony

there, called the Conftabularie, but be-

Edward

III. it was become an efeheat to the crown, for that year the fheriff of Kent accounted for the capital melTuage which William de Sylefbregge once held in Syldl^regge, which had come to the king by efeheat, and the abbot of Boxley, and the priorefs of St. Sepulchre, accounted

fore the 20th year of king

for other parts ol

That

it.

part of this eftate which was in the pofleHion

of the abbot of Boxley, afterwards acquired tlie name of the manor of SyloivelL or 5//« e//,and remained among the revenues of the abbey till the didblution of it in the 29th year of king

Henry VIII. when

it

came

into

the hands of the crown,“ it was, not long afterwards, granted to Sir Thomas V- yatt, of Allington, who exchanged it with the king, and king Edward VI. in his firft year, granted it to Sir Walter Hendley, who left three daughters his coheirs, of whom Anne, married to Richard Covert, efq. of Slaugham, in Sufiex, entitled her hufband to this manor, and in ,his defeendants it continued down till king Charles II.’s reign ; but who have been the owners fince, and even where it is ficuated,

I

have not, with the

mod

diligent enquiries,

been

able to learn.

formerly held land in Newchurch by knight’s fervice, of the archbilhop, which was again held of him by Richard deOrganer, whence it gained the name of the manor of Organer^, and in king Edward IV. 's reign was in the pofl'eirion of the family

Ralph Fitzbernard

of Cobbes, whole feat in this parilh was called Cobbes-' placet one of whom, John Cobbes, of Cobbes-place, *

Philipott, p, 247.

SeeAugtn.

z

3

off.

box Kent C. 20.

died

newchurch hundred.

J42,

The Icite of died poflefled of it anno 1 3 Edward IV. and the manthe manor of Organers is not now known, years fince pulled fion of Cobbes-place has been many down, the feite of which afterwards came Into the pofHertfordfhire, fetlion of James Blackmore, efq. of whofe heirs now poffefs it. The college of All

Souls,

in

Oxford, are

owners of a manor in this parilh, called Googie-hall, with lands belonging to it, commonly called Cobbs, or the Lodge-land, which manor and land is demifed by the college on a beneficial leafe, theprefent lefiec being Mr. Benjamin Cobbe, of New Romney,

CHARITIES. gent, of Limpne, by will in 1707, devifed, other charities, his three fifth parts of 43 acres, with their appurtenances, in Eaftbridge and this parifli ; and his three five and twentieth parts, the w’hole in 25 parts to be divided, of two

John Finch,

among

parcels of frefh marfli, called

Cowlands,

in

this parifli,

to the

minifler, churchwardens, and overfeers of Limne, and of this parifli, for ever, in tnifl:, that they of this parifli fliould difpofe of one third part of the rents and profits to fix of the pooreft and

who had never received alms or reany other, if fo many fliould be found here, lief of upon of the difpofed Sunday after Chriftmas-day, and the to be day of his burial, from year to year for ever, with feveral provifoes and direftions, as may be feen more at large in the account of Limne before. The annual produce to this parifli is 61. i8s. The poor annually relieved are about four. eldeft people of this parifli, this parifli or

Newchurch

within the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Limne. The church, which is dedicated to St. Peter and St. is

handfome building, confifting of three ides and a chancel, having a tower with a beacon turret at the weft end, in which are five bells. The pillars between the ifles are beautiful. The altar piece was Paul,

is

a large

The font is of ftone, an oftagon, having two Ihiclds of arms, one, iCwo key^ Jaltiet in \ crefted in 1775*

the other,

A Jwotd ereEiy

the point upwards.

There are

NEWCHURCH.

34J tomb at

are no memorials in it. There is an antient the end of the foiith ide, but without infcription, and another at the end of the north iflc, feemingiy very an-

The

tower is far from upright, leaning much to the weftward. The church is exempt from the jurirdicElion of the archdeacon. I'here is both a redory and a vicarage endowed in it. The redory is a finecure, and the vicar performs the whole duty of the cure, though they both receive collation and indudion. The patronage of both redory and vicarage have been long part of the poflefTionsof the fee of Canterbury, his grace the archbifhop being the prefent patron of both. The vicarage was firft endowed by archbifhop Winchelfea in 1297, and there was a new endowment of it by archbidiop Arundel in 1404. In 1384, anno 8 Richard II. this vicarage was valued at four pounds, and on account of tient,

its

and

flender

in

ruins.

income was not taxed to the

tenth.

The

redory and vicarage are valued feparately in the king’s books ; the former at 81 4s. 2d. and the yearly tenths at 16s. 5d. being endowed with two, formerly four and and the latter at 19I. i6s. oid, a half, acres of glebe and the yearly tenths at il. 19s. jid. In 1636 it was valued at eighty pounds, communicants eight. In 1742 the redory and vicarage were valued together at one hundred and forty pounds. .

j*

In the petition of the clergy, beneficed In Romney Marih, in 1635, for fetting afide the cuflom of twopence an acre in lieu of tithe-wool and pafturage, a

account of which has been given before, under Burmarfli, feveral acquittances were proved to have been given in the years 1620, 1621, 1624 and 1625, by the vicar of Newchurch, mentioning his having refull

ceived two-pence an acre in fatisfadion of thofe tithes, according to the cuftom. There is a modus of eight-pence per acre on all grafs lands in this parilh.

Z 4

CHURCH

NEWCHURCH HUNDRED.

344

CHURCH OF NEPFCHURCH, patrons. Or

by

HECTORS AND VICARS.

whom jirejented.

Paul Knell, A.

The Crown. The Archbijhop

Edward

M. May 1662. A. M. ind.

Sleighion,

1672, obt. 1686.

A. M. induced

yolin Pomfret, •

September 1686,

obt.

Junes,

1712.*’

yofiah Woodward, D. D. in 1 7 1 2, obt. Auguft 6, 17 1 2.® Samuel Weller, LL- B. Sept. 1712, obt. 1731.^

William Wilfon, indu£led 1731, obt. 1738. Arthur Kite, A. M. 1738, obt.

1

0

(^V.

July

765.

Robert Tourney, A. M. September 18, 1765, cbt. June i, 1785.' Charles Stoddart, 1785, the prefent reftor and vicar h He lies buried in Eiddenden church .yard. e See aa account of him in Newton’s Hiftory of Maidftone, p. 69,

^ Likewife reftor of Sundridge, and curate of Maidflonc. See

perpetual

Newton

ibid.

« In 1765 by difpenfation likewife rector of Bonnir.gton. '

BILSINGTON. THE

remaining parifhes in this hundred lie for the moft part on the clay-hills above the Marfh. The next of which, adjoining to Newchurch northward,

is

Bilfington, called in

Domefday,

Biljvitone.

The upper

on the hill, together vith the church, is within the junfdiaion of the juftices of the county ; and the lower or fouihern part, which is below the hill, with'in the level of Romney Marfli, and the liberty and iurif^ didtion of the juftices of it. part of

it

This

BILSINGTON.

This parish

345 hills, on

is moftly ficuated on the clay which the road leads from Limne through Bonnington hither, and fo on to Ruckinge and Warehome. The village (lands on it, at a place called Bilfington-crofs, below which Ibuthward there is near half a mile plough-land down to the Marfh, a very litdc diltance from which, near the foot of the hill, is the church. Clofe to the weft end of the church-yard is the court lodge of Bilfington inferior manor, having a deep moat round it, filled with water. The remains of the priory are near half a mile northward of the above road, pleafantly fituated, having a fine view over the Marfh fouthward. The houfe of the farm is formed out of the ruins of the priory. There is the ftone work of a large window over the porch at the weft end, and another at the eaft end, and two more on the Ibuth fide. At the fouth-eaft corner is a higher building, of three ftories, with very fmall windows, and a circular ftone ftair cafe. Adjoining to it there feem to have been other buildings contiguous on the north fide, and many foundations have been dug up thereabout. Near it there is a piece of land, called the church-yard, but there are no bones, nor any figns of a burial place. It is all built of ftone. Mr. Blechindcn, the tenant, who lives in it, is defeended from thofe ofAldington, where feveral of his family lie buried. If the church (lands due eaft and weft, the priory houfe ftands feemingly fouth-fouth eaft and north-north-weft, I (hould otherwife think the prefent houfe was the chapel of the priory. There is much wood northward above the priory, belonging to that eftate, and more eaftward nearer to Bonnington. The foil is in general a very ftiff clay, but towards Bonnington there is fome little

che fide of

fand at different places.

From

Bilfington-crofs north-

ward by Broadoak and Merfham,

is

the high frequented

road, and the only tolerable one from thence and this part of the county to Albford. The upper or fouthcni part of this parifh

is

in the diftrifl

of the Weald.

A fair

y

newchurch hundred.

34D

A

kept here yearly on July 5, which, before the alteration of the ftile, was on Midfummer-day. Jt was formerly called Woodcock fair. Bilsington, at the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, in 1080, was part of the polTeflions of Odo, the great bidiop of Baieux, the Conqueror’s half-brother, under the general title of which it is entered there, fair is

as follows

:

In Limowart

in Neucerccy the hijhop

of Baieux holds in demefne Bilfviturie. It was taxed at four fulings, I he arable land is fifteen carucates. In demefne there are five, and forty f.ven villeins y with twenty feven borderers having fourteen carucates. There is a churchy and ten lejl,

fa!tpits of one hundred pence y and ten acres of

meadow

H^ood for the pannage of fifty hogSy and two fijheries of five pence.

was worth fifty

Cilt

In the lime of king

Edward

the Confejfor

it

ten pounds and afterwards thirty pounds now y pounds y and yet yields offerme feventy pounds. Alnod held it. In this manor the bifhep has alienate. d three y

which remained without

dennesy

the divifion

of the Earl

of Ewe.

Four

years after the taking of the above furvey, the of Baieux was difgraccd, and all his poflclTions were confifeated to the crown. After which this manor ^

bifliop

appears to have come into the family of Albcni. William de Albeni, fon of W’^illiam, who had come over with the Conqueror, and vvas furnamed Pincernuy from his being chief butler to

held

it

was

earl

king Henry

I.

leems to have

fergeantry in that reign, by the fervice of performing that office at the king’s coronation. He in

of Arundel and Suflex,*^ in whole delcendants it continued down to Hugh, eail of Arundel and SufIcx, who died in the pritLc of his youth in 1243, in the 43d year of king Henry III. f p. and his great inheritance was difperfed

Maud,

among his

the eldeft, married

four

Robert de

fifters,

of whom

I'Etteffial

Sec MUIcb’s Catal. of Honor, p, 638 et

;

Ifa-

fe
bell

BILSINGTON. 347 Ofwaltre ; NIbell to John Fltzalan, lord of Clun and choka, to Roger de Somery and Cicely, to Roger de ;

Montholt.

Upon

the divifion of dieir

inheritance,

of Clun and Ofwaltre, had two his parts of the manor of Bilfington in right of Ifabcl his wife, and Roger de Somery, in right of Nicholea part, and wife, (two of the filters) had the other third further alienated it to John Manfell, clerk, as will be mentioned hereafter, and being thus feparated, it be-

John

Fitzalan, lord

came two manors the former, in the polTelhon of manor John Fitzalan, being from its fituation called the ;

court -lodge, irom of Bilfngton inferior, alias Bilfington the antient manlion of its comprehending the Icite of of Roger de Soit; and the latter, in the pofleffion

manor of Bilfington fuperior, alias aboveBilfngton priory. The whole being held as mentioned, in fergeantry, by the fervice of being chief

mery, being

called the

butler to the king at his coronation.

of Bilsington inferior continued of John Fitzalan, in the poffeffion of the defendants down to his great-grandfon Richard Fitzalan, who was by king Edward 1. in 1289, made Earl of Arundel. His grandfon Richard, earl of Arundel, in king Ed-

The manor

ward

III.’s reign, alienated

it

to

Edmund

Staplegate,

46th year of that reign, holding it in fergeantry, by the fervice of prefenting was three maple cups at the king s coronation. He fucceeded in it by his fon of the fame name, then a minor, between whom and Richard, earl of Arundel,

who died poffeflcd

of

it

in the

manor, there arofe a II. great contcft at the coronation of king Richard who fliould perform the office of chief butler at it, but merits as there was not then time to examine into the of it, it was ordered that the carl ffiould perform it at of Stathat time, with a faving however to the right

whofe father had alienated

plegate, and

f

See

all

Lamb.

others.^

this

In the

name of Staplegate

Per. p. 206. Harl.

MSS. No.

this

1309-13.

manor

NEWCHURCH HUNDRED.

348

manor continued

of Henry VI. ’s was fold to Sir reign, John Cheney, of Shurland, who died anno 7 Fdward IV. holding it in captCy together with the manor and lands called Cockride, lying in the Marfh, but within this parifli and Ruckinge, formerly parcel of the manor of Kennardington, held in like manner. In his defcendants it continued down to Sir T. Cheney, lord warden, &c. whofe fon, H. Cheney, in the very beginning of Fdizabcth’s reign, conveyed it to Francis Barnham, efq. then of London, but afterwards of HoHingborne.’' His grandfon Robert Barnham, efq. of Boughton Monchenfie, held it at the time of the coronation of king Charles II. by the fervice of carrying the laft difh of the fecond courfe to the king’s table, and prefenting him with the three maple cups, which he performed by his deput)^ and three years afterwards he was created a baronet.‘ At length his grandfon Sir Robeit Barnham, bart. leaving an only daughter and heir Philadelphia, fhe carried this manor in marriage to Thomas Rider, efq. whofe fon Sir Barnham Rider, died poflelfed of it in 1728. His fon Thomas Rider, efq. performed the above fervice for this manor at the coronation of kinoGeorge III. when, as had been ufual at others before, the king, on receiving the maple cups from the lord of this manor, turned to the mayor of Oxford, who flood at his right hand, and having received from him, for his tenure of that city, a gold cup and cover, gave him thele cups in return. He was fome time afterwards knighted, and died unmarried in 786, and this manor, among the reft of his eftates in this county, came by his will to his fecond coufin, and

when

till

the beginning

it

1

neareft

heir male,

the fon of

Ingram Rider,

W Ilham,

efq.

of Lambeth, being

Rider, of Burfton, the youn^efl, but next furviving brother of Sir Barnham Rider^cEfch. 3 Eliz pt. 3, and anno 10 Ellz, and thp Lhene)s, vol. vi. of this the hiftory, p. 248. See more of the Barnhams, vol. v. , p. 340.

more of

fore-



BILSINGTON.

349

fore-mentioned. He married Margaret, daughter of Ralph Carr, efq. of Durham, by whom he has leveral children. He is now of Houghton Monchenfie, and is the prefent poflelTor of this

it.

A

court baron

is

held for

manor.

The manor

of Bilsington priory, otherwifc called Biljington fuperior^ and Eajl BUJington^ which, as has been mentioned before, was feparated from the other part of BiHington manor, by the divifion of it among the coheirs and fillers of Hugh Fitzalan, earl of Arundel, in king Henry Ill.’s reign, was fold by Roger de Somery to John Manfell, clerk,a man of much note in that time, for his great courage, wifdom, and abilities, who was in fuch favour with the king that he firll made him his chaplain, and then his chief counfellor, and keeper of his feal, and heaped fuch continual preferments and offices on him befides, that at lall his income amounted to more than 4000 marcs per annum, infomuch that there' w’as not a dcrk found fo wealthy as himfclf, and as ah inftance of it, Matthew Paris fays, that he entertained at dinner the kings of England and Scotland, a multitude of nobles and prelates, and fuch a number of guells', that feven hundred dilhes were fcarcely fufficient for the

firfl:

courfe.’'

Some years

be-

of Beverley, he founded here a priory for canons regular, of the ortler of St. Augultine, and gave this part of the fore his death, about f253, being then provolt

manor of

Bilfington,

foundation and

amongother premifes, towards the

endowment of it,

to hold in free, pure,

and perpetual alms, and he ordered that it fhould be free, and not fubjefl to any other houfe whatfoever. The priory of Bilsington thus founded, was built on the north-eall part of this manor, on the height of the clay hills, among the woods. I'he priors of it, who were cholln by the convent, and prefented to the patron lor his confirmation, and were inltalicd by the See Matt. Paris, p. 590, 598, 616, 859 and 931.

archdeacon.

2^0

NEWCHURCH HUNDRED. who

had the liberty of (laying at the priory two nights and a day, and receiving both vidluals and drink there during the time, but and in the 3d year of Edward I, the nothing further prior was adjudged to hold a certain part of a fergeantry, being this part of Bilfington manor, by ferving the king with his cup on Whit-Sunday and the whole of the poflcflions of it were confirmed to it by letters of infpeximm in the 5th year of king Edward I V. In which fituation it continued till the 27th year of Henry VIII. when, on the general vifitation of religious houfes, it was lb managed by the commifiioners, that many of the religious defired to leave their poflefiions and habit, and fome of them gave up their houfes, among which was the prior and convent of Bilfington, who figned their refignation on the 28th of February that year, anno 1535.' It was then valued at 69I. 8s. per annum clear, and archdeacon,

for his perquifite

;

;

81I. IS. 6d. total annual revenue.

John

Tvloyfe, alias

Tenterden, thelafi: prior, on the furrendry of penfion of ten pounds per annum'.'

it,

had a

Two

years after the furrendry of this priory, the king granted a leafe of the feite of it, with the lands

and polTefiions belonging to it, and the redory of the church of Bilfington, to Anthony St. Leger, efq. of Ulcombe ; and afterwards, in his 29th year, he granted the feite of the priory, with the lands and appurtenances belonging to it, parcel of the above premifes, excepting the advowfons of churches, to archbifhopCranmer, in exchange for other premiies elfewhere. In which fituation they have continued to this time, being now parcel of the poflelTions of the fee of Canterbury, the poflefibrs of the manor of Bilfington having conllantly

been the leflees. lefTee of it.

Ingram Rider,

e(q«

is

the prelent

Tan. Alon. praf. p. xxxvH. The original deed of the is in the Augmentation. oHice.

fur-

rendry

But

BILSINGTON.

But

35X

manor of Biljington /upertor^ alias priory\ with the church of Bilfington, feems not to have been included In this grant to the archbifhop, but to have remained in the crown, and to have been granted afterwards

the

in fee to

Anthony

Leger, whofe defeendanc Warham St. Leger fold it, in the loth year of queen Elizabeth, to Francis Barnham, efq. of London. Since which this manor, with the church of Bilfington, has palled, together with the manor of Bilfington, alias St.

Lower Bilfington, in the like fucceffion of ownerfliip, down to Ingram Rider, efq. the prefent proprietor of both of them.

There

are

no parochial

ftantly relieved are

Bilsington risdiction of of Limiie.

The Paul, cel,

is

is

The poor

charities.

con-

about twenty, cafually thirty. within the ecclesiastical

the diocefe of Canterbury,

church, which

ju-

and deanry

dedicated to St. Peter and St. a fmall building, of but one ille and one chanis

having a low pointed wooden turret on the roof at

the weft end, in which are

two

bells.

There

are

no

memorials in it. In the chancel there are four ftalls, two on each fide at the weft entrance of it. The church of Bilfington was antienrly an appendage to the manor, and feems to have pafied with that part of it which was fold by the heirs of Hugh de Albini to John Manfell, and fettled by him on the priory of Bilfington, to v^hich it was appropriated by the cbnfent of archbifhop Iflip, about the middle of Edward III.’s reign with which it remained, together with the advowfon, till the lupprelfion of the priory in the reign of king Henry VIII. when it came into the hands of the crown, whence it was afterwards, with all its appurtenances, granted with the manor, to Anthony St. Leger, efq. and has fince pafied with it in like manner, down to

Ingram Rider,

efq. the prefent impropriator of

" BatteJ/’s Somn. p. 134. Pat. 31 Edvv.

III. p. 2,

m.

it.

6.

There

t

hundred.

newchurch 2^2 There does not feem to have been ever any vicarage probably was endowed in this church, but it mod ot the prior and caferved by a curate at the pleafure the priory it has nons here. Since the fuppreffion of in the patronage been edeemed as a perpetual curacy,

Rider, efq. of the owners of the impropriation, Ingram being the prefenc patron of it. certified value of thirty It is now of the clear yearly pounds. In 1640 here were fixty-eight communipari fli pays cants. Great part of the wood land in this no tithe, as lying within the bounds of the Weald. ^

CHURCH OF BILSINGTON. Curates. Richard Hujbatid^ A.

M.

refig,

1770. Jofe/ih 1

Hardy LL. B. i 77®5

786."

James Bond^ A.

M.

1787, thC

prefent curate. * LIkewife vicar of Hedcorne,

rucking LIES the next paridi wedward from Bllfington, for It is written in the mod part upon the clay-hills. Domefday, Roebinges, and now ufually called and written Ruckinge. Part of it, in which the church dands, is in the hundred of Newchurch, and another part in the hundred of Ham. That part of it which is below the hill fouthward is in the level of Romney Marfh, and within the liberty and jurifdidion of the judices of it, and the refidue is within that of the judices of the county, and within the didrid of the Weald. The parish lies fo obfeurely as to be but little

known,

it

is

a dreary unpleafant place, the roads are

very

RUCKING.

353 Weald, the very narrow and foil being a deep miry clay; that from Limne, through Bilfington, Ham-ftreet, and Warehorne, crolTcs this miry, as

bad

as any in the

parifh on the fide of the clay-hill, inclining nearer to The church ftands on the fide of the hill, the Marfh. overlooking the Marfh, which lies at the foot of it

fouthward. The upper or northern fide of it is moftly coppice wood. It contains about 930 acres of upland, and as many of marfh-land. There is no village, the houfcs being difperfed about the parifii, and are moftly inhabited by poorer fort of people. In the year 791 king Offa gave to Chrift-Church,

Canterbury, fifteen plough-lands in Kent, among which was this eftate of Roching, together with fevebut it ral dennes, for the feed of hogs, in the Weald was afterwards wreftcd from the church, during the Danifii wars, and it continued in lay hands at the time of the conqueft, foon after which it appears to have in

been

in thepoflefiion of

Hugo

deMontfort, from whom

archbilhop Lanfranc recovered it again to his church, in the folemn aflembly, held on this occafion by the king’s command, at Pinenden-heath, in the year 1076. This eftate coming thus into the hands of the church, on the divifion made of the revenues of it between the archbifhop and his monks, was allotted by him to the

m

them and the polfelTion of it was confirmed by king Henry I. and II. In Somner s Gavelkind, is a tranfcript of a releafe anno j 7 Edward I. of tlie bafe

latter,

fervicesof feveral of the tenants of this

kind men J

who bought them

manor (gavel-

out, and conlec[uently

it

was a mere change from fervice into money, by the mutual confent of lord and tenant. King Edward II. loth year, granted to the prior and convent of Chrift-church, free-zvatren in all their demefne lands In which ftate^ this in Rucking, among other places. manor continued till the iupprefiion of the priory,

in his

°

Dec. Script,

VOL. VIII.

col.

2219. Dugd. Mon. vol.

A

a

i.

p. 19.

anno

:

NEWCHURCH HUNDRED.

^^4

anno 31 Henry VIII. when it came into the king's hands, where it did not remain long, for the king fettled it by his dotation charter, in his 33d year, on his new-erefted dean and chapter of Canterbury, part of whofe poflefllons it ftill remains. The heirs of the Rev. Dr. James Andrews, lately deceafed, are now enThere is no court held for this titled to the leafe of it. manor.

The other part

of this parijh^ not included in the above grant of king Olfa, feerns to be that which Cuthred, king of Kent, in the year 805, with the con-

and leave of Coenulf, king of Mercia, gave to Aldbertht his fervant, and Seledrythc the abbot, being two plough lands in Hrocing, fituated on both fides of^ fent

the river

Limene,

to hold in perpetual inheritance, free

Soon after the Norman conquefl: Hugode A'lontfort was become pofieficd of lands in this parifh, fome of which weic iholc which from

all

regal

tribute,

&c.p

had been given by kingOfFa, as above-mentioned, to the priory of Chrirt-church, which were again recovered from him by archbifliop Lanfranc, at the great meeting held at Pinenden. The refidue continued in his pofleflion, and are accordingly entered in the furvey of Domefday, under the general title of the lands of ugo de Montfort Ralph, Jon of Richard, holds of Hugo half a fuling in

H

Rochinges, uchich Leuret held of king Edward, It was taxed at half a fulhig. ^Ihe arable land is tzvo carucates,

There are now twelve half.

king

villeins having one carucate and an the pannage for one hog. In the time of the Confejjor it zvas worth fifty fhillings,

Of wood Edward

and afterwards thirty fbillings, now fifty fljillings. In this part was the manor of Westberies, alias Rokingesy which feems to have been once accounted as a moiety of the manor of Rucking. The former of thefe names it appears to have taken from **

S(*xonum Codicelh

ill

Bibl. Deringoruin. tlie

Rucking.

^55

name was extindt here, which was before the reign of king Henry IV. this manor was come into the name of Prifot, and in the 2ift year of king Henry VI. was owned by John Prifot, who was that year made a fergeant-at-law, and in the 27th year of it knighted, and made chief juftice the arltlent owners of

it.

After

this

of the common pleas, in whole defcendants it continued till the 8th year of king Henry VIII. when Tho-

mas

Prifot palled

which name

it

it

away by

continued

till

fale

the

George Hount, in 9th year of queen Elito

zabeth, when it was fold to Reginald Stroiighill,ufually called Struggle, who was in the commiffion of the peace in king Edward VI.’s reign, a name of antient extraction in Romney Marlh, where there were lands fo called, and there they continued in good efteem at Lyd^ of which town they were jurats, and polfelfed lands lor

many

years afterwards.

From

this

name

this

manor

of Weftberies, alias Rokinges, went by fale to Pearfe, and anno 23 Elizabeth John Pearle, alienated it, being held in capite, to Richard Guildford and Bennet his wife, but he being indifled for not taking the oath of fupremacy, they fled the realm, and were attainted of treafon, and his lands became forfeited to the crown, where this manor feems to have remained till the death of the latter in 1597, anno 39 Elizabeth, when the queen granted the fee of it to Walter Moyle, gent, who fold it foon afterwards to Francis Bourne, efq. of SharIted, and his grandfon James Bourne owned it at the latterendof king Charles L’s reign^ and in his defcendants

it

continued

till it

was'at length fold to Parker, in

remained till John Parker, of London, alienated it in 1706 to Edward Andrews, of Hinxhill, and his daughter Sufanna^who married George Panns, of this parilh, and left a daughter of her own name, who afterwards married firft John Gray, M. D. of

which name

it

Canterbury, and fecondly Tho. Ibbott, clerk,and entit^

See Dugd. Orig. Chron. p 63, 64.

A

a i

tied

NEWCHURCH HUNDRED.

2^0

refpedHvely to the her death without ifluc,

led each of her hufbands in turn

On

poflelhon of this manor.

her heirs on her mother’s fide became entitled to it, and in them, to the number of more than thirty, the inheritance of it is at this time vefted. The manor of Bardinden, or Barbodindenne, was likewife moft probably fituated in this part of

Rucking, and was anticntly fo called from a family of the fame name, who were poffeflbrs of it, one of whom, William de Barbodindenne, held it at his death, which was in the 9th year of king Edward III. and in his decontinued till at length it was alienated to Sir Robert Belknap, chiefjaftice of the common pleas, w^ho being attainted and banifhed in the i ith year of feendants

it

king Richard II. his eftates became forfeited to the crown. Notwithftanding which, the king, who confidered him as a martyr to his intereft, granted him his eftates again, and among others this manor, which he died potfelled of in the 2d year of king Henry IV. His grandfon John Belknap, in the beginning of kinoHenry VI.’s^ reign, alienated it to Engham, in which name it continued till king Henry VIII. ’s reign, when it was fold to Sir Matthew Browne, of Beechworth, who held it in capite at his death, anno 4 and 5 Philip and Mary. His grandfon Sir Thomas Browne pafled k away by fale, in the 7th year of queen Elizabeth, to Thomas Lovelace, efq. whofe coufin and heir William Lovelace, of Betherfden, fergeant-at-law, fucceeded him in the pofieftion of it, which afterwards defeended down to Col. Richard Lovelace, who, foon after the death of king Charles I. alienated it, with his eftates at Betherfden, toMr. Richard Hulfe, afterwards of Lovelace’ place, in that parifh, is

prccifely fituated,

or

but whereabouts

this

manor

who have been

the proprieof it fince, 1 have not as yet been able to gain any ^ difeovery of. ,

tors-

PouNDHURST is a manor, fituated about a mile north-weft ftom the church. It belonged in 16 ci to Rich-

RUCKING^

357 from which Richard Watts, who fold it to Gadfley, who pafled Read, name it pafied to Hatch, and then to of Afhford, and Grace Clarke it away to Clarke, carried it in marriage to the Rev. Thomas Gelli1782, gave it by will to her fon the Rev. Jofeph Gcliibrand, of Edmonton, the brand, and at her death

prefent poflcflbr ol

in

it.

of More was antiently held by owners of the fame name, one of whom, Matthew at More, held it by knight’s fervice in the 20th year of king Edward III. after which this manor of More came into the polfelTion of the family of Brent, who were

The manor

king Henry V II. ’s reign. At length Thomas Brent, efq. of Wiliborough, dying in 1612, his nephew Richard y. p. by his will gave-this manor to Dering, efq. of Plucklcy, in whofe defendants it continued down to Sir Edward Dering, bart. now of Surrenden, the prefent pofleffor of it. poirefTed of

it

in

CHARITIES. A PERSON UNKNOWN gave to this parlfli an annuity of 20s. paid out of lands in Romney Marfh, occupied by Mr. Stone, of

is yearly diftributed on New Year’s day to no parifh relief. receive the poor, who The poor conftantly relieved are about twenty, cafually forty.

Great Chart, which

This parish diction of Limne.

The

is

within the ecclesiastical juris-

the dioce/e of Canterbury, and

church, which

is

dedicated to St.

de^my of

Mary Mag-

a very fmall building, having at the well end a pointed tower, out of which rifes a fmall flender fpire. In the tower there are five bells. It has a middle ifle, dalen,

is

and two narrow ones coving to it on each fide. It has one chancel, and another building at the caft end of the fouth ifle, built of flint, with two handfome gothic windows on the fouth flde, and feems to have been a chantry or oratory.

It

is

now made

ufe of to lay the

materials in for the repairs of the church.

white Hone in the north

ifle,

There

is

a

having once had the figures

35§ of a

NEWCHURCH HUNDRED. man and woman in brafs. There

arc

no other

memorials or graveftones in the church. On the outfide of the fteeple, on the weft fide, there is a very antient Saxon arched door-way, with carved capitals and zig-zag ornaments round it, and fome fculpture under the arch. And there is fuch another fmaller one on the middle of the Touch fide of the Touch ifle. The church of RuckingTeems tohave beenefteemed part of the poflefllons of the Tee of Canterbury ever fince the reftoring of it to that church, by the means of archbifhop Lanfranc as above-mentioned, when, on the allotment of the manor to the priory and monks of Chrift-church, the archbifhop moft probably retained the advowTon of this church to himTelf. His grace the archbifhop is the prefent patron of it. valued in the king’s books at and the yearly tenths at il. 9s. 4d. In was valued hundred at one it pounds, 1588 communi-: cants one hundred. In 1640 it was valued at eightyfive pounds, communicants the Tame as before. There are about eighteen acres of glebe. In the petition of the clergy, beneficed in Romney Marfh, in 1635, for Tctting afide the cuftom of two^ pence an acre, in lieu of tithe-wool and pafturage, a full account of which has been given before, under Burmarfh, the reftor of Rucking was one of thoTe who met on this occafion ; when it was agreed on all Tides, that wool in the Marfh had never been known to have been pajd in Tpecie, the other tithes being paid or comIt is

a

rectory,

14I. 13s. 4d.

pounded for. There is a modus of one

per acre on all grafs within the Marfh, and by cuftom, all the upland pays four-pence per acre for pafturage, and one fiiilling per acre w’hen mowed, no hay having ever been taken in kind, the other tithes are either taken in kind, or compounded for. Formerly the woods of this parifii paid tithes, after the rate of lands in this

two

fiiilling

parifli

fiiillings in

the pound, according to the

money paid

,

RUCKING.

359

but in a fuit in tlie excheof them quer for tithe of wood, anno 1713, brought by Lodge, redtor, againft Sir Philip Boeder, it was decreed againft the redor, that this parifh was within the bounds of the Weald, and the woods in it confequently freed from tithes. Which decree has been acquiefeed in paid for the

fellcts

;

ever fince.

CHURCH OF RUCKING. PATRONS, Or The

RECTOR

by 'ukom /ire/ented.

Richard Matheive, A.

Archbijhoji,

,

M.

31,1 587, obt. 1608. yohn Fulnethbye, S.T. B.

Jan.

March

28, 1601, refigned 1608. Alexander RatvUns, A. M. Alajr 23, 1608, refigned 1610. Francis Foxton, S T. B. April 11, 1610, refigned 1613. William Majler^ S. 'T' . P. Feb.

1627.

12, 1613, refigned

M. Nov.

William Majier^ A. 17,

The Kin?,hac vire

The

Archbl/ho/t

1627/

John Lodge^ A. M. Nov. il, 1686. Thomas Brett, LL. D. deprived in 1716.’ Francis Muriell, A. M. July 1 8, I 716, obt, July 1750.*

Jude

Holdfivorth

M. Nov.

A.

27, 1750, obt. 1759.“

Thomas Wray, A.

M.

April

1760, refigned 1761.'* John Ben/on, A. M- Sept.

2

7,

1,

1761, refigned 1 764/ Bielby Porteus, A.M. March 19* 1764, refigned 1767.^

'

Son of the former. Rytp. Feed, vol. xviil. p. 1009 . He • Alfo reftor of Betftianger. *

w*s deprived t

for not taking the oaths.

L'kewife vicarof Di-tling.

He held ih s reftory w th the vicarage of Tong by d'fpenfation. w And reftor of Great Chart. X He held this reftory with that of Great Chart, bj difpenfation. See an

account of his numerous changes of preferment, vo!. vii. p. 5T4. y He was afterwards D. D. and in the reftory 1765 held by difp nfation of Hunton with this of Rucking. He was afterwards bilhop ofChefter, and thence tranflated to London, ofwhich

he

a 4

is

now

bilhop.

patrons,

newchurch HUNDRED.

j6o

PATROKS,

RECTORS.

Cifc,

^ohn Jenhnfon, A.

The Archbijho^

M.

1767, obt. I 780.* Hopkins FoXf S. T. B. 780, obt.

1

Fdward

I

Oct. so>

Nov»

g,

794.^

Taylor,

A. M.

I

794 »

obt. 1799.*’ ^

* And reflorof Gillingham by difpenfation. > And vicar of Linfled> by difpenfation In 1780.

b

And

vicar of Patrixbourn, cuna

Bridge.

THE HUNDRED OF HAM LIES

from that of Newchurch, being written in the furvey of Domefday, Hame. In the yth year of king Edward I. it belonged to the king and the archbifhop. IT CONTAINS WITHIN ITS BOUNDS PART OP THE the next north-weftward

PARISHES op

Orlestone,

I,

And

(!7w
the churches of thofe pariflies,

ri flies

of

Snave,

a.

Warehorne.

and likewife part of the pa-

Kennardington, Rucking, Shadoxhurst, and the churches of

which are in other hundreds.

Jlable has jurifdiftion over

One con-

it.

There

is a court leet held for this hundred, being one of the five, which are appendant to the manor of Aldington. It is held alternately at Warehorne and Hamftreet.

ORLESTONE, USUALLY

called Orljhnei

is the next parilh north- weft ward from. Rucking. It lies for the moft part on the upland clay-hill, where it is within the diftrid

©RLESTONE.

3^1

of the Weald, and within the jurifdiflion of the jiifliccs of the county ; but the fouthern part, below the foot of the hill, is within the level of Romney Marfli, and the liberty and jurifdidioa of the julUces

of it.

This parish

enveloped with woods, and is fituated in fo deep and miry a country, that it is only paflTable, and even then with difficulty in the dridl weather, of courfe it is little frequented, and but as little known. It lies on the clay-hills, which crofs the middle of it; the church, and clofe to it the court-lodge, Hand on them, but there is no village. The foil is a deep fliff clay. The greateft part of it Is woodland, cfpecially the north and weft parts, mod of which belong to Mr. Bouverie. The face of the country is mod

gloomy and

Is

fo

forlorn;

it lies

within the

Weald

as far as

Ham-flreet, in the fouth part of it, at the foot of the hill, about a mile below the church ; beyond v/hich it

Romney

The

road from Hythe through Bilfington to Warchorne, goes through this parifh a little above the foot of the hill, by Hamftreet, which is partly within the parifh ; and there is

is in

the level

of

Marffi.

another which comes out of the Marffi by Mammillgreen, which leads up to Ham-ftreet, whence eroding the other it goes through the centre of this parifh to Sugar-loaf and Bromley-green, and fo on to Kingfnoth and Afhford, but even this road is hardly paffable, except in the dried feafons.

The manors of Aldington and Bilsington claim over mod part of this parifli. The manor of Orlestone was, foon after the Norman conqueft, part of the poffeflions of Hugo dc Montfort, under the general title of whofe lands it is thus entered in the record of Domefday : In Name hundredy Willimn holds of Hugo three yoke and half a rood in Orlavejlone. Eleven Jochmen held this land.

now two

I he arable land

is

three canicaies.

carucates in demejne^

and

Inhere are

fifteen villeins^

with nine

HAM HUNDRED.

^62

borderers having three carucates and an half, are two chtircheSy and twenty acres of meadow. for the pannage offx hogs. jLine

Upon

the voluntary exile of

^here ood

W

Robert de Montfort,

grandfon of Hugo above-mentioned, in Henry I.’s reign, this manor, among the reft of his eftates, came into the king’s hands as an efeheat. After which it appears to have come into the pofteffion of a family who took their furname from it, and bore for their arms. Or, two chevronSy guleu on a canton of the fecondy a lion pafjanty argent ; which coat is faid to be an allufion to

William de Orlanftan, moft probably a defendant from that William who held this manor of Hugo de Montfort, as mentioned in the furvey of Domefday, is in the regifter of thofe Kentifh gentlemen who alTifted king Richard I. at the fiege of Aeon, in Paleftine. William de Orlanfton, his fon, held it in king Henry lll.’s reign, and obtained a charter of free -warren to it in the 51ft year of it, and as an additional franchife, a market weekly, and a fair yearly lor three ilays, on Holyroodday and two days afterwards. He died anno 12 king Edward I. holding it in capite by knight’s fervice, by making from thence fuit to the ward of Dover caftle, being part ot thofe knights fees which made up the barony there, called the Conftabularie.'* After which this manor, together with the advowfon of the church, continued in his defendants down to Sir Richard Orlefton, who died anno 7 Henry V. /. p. on which his two fifters and coheirs, Margaret, married to William arehorne, and Joane, to Sir William Scott, Parker,of of Scotts hall, entitled their refpe
who bore

it

withoiCt the canton.'"

W

'

^

See Camden’s Remains, p. 212, Book of Dover cafllc. Rot. Efch. ejus an.

N.

77.

Henry

ORLESTONE,

363

He

had no ifliie by her, buc by his fecond wife Ifabel, daughter of Vincent Herbert, alias Finch, afterwards remarried to Sir Gervas

Henry VI. anno 1433.

Clifton, he left feveral children, of

John

whom

Scott, of Scotts-hall, inherited this

the eldeft, Sir

manor, which

defcendcd down to Sir Thomas Scott, who died in the year 1594, and by will devifed a yearly rent charge of one hundred pounds out of this manor and thofe of Capel, Ham, and Brenfet,(nowufually called the Scottshall annuity) to his youngeft Ton Robert, afterwards of Merfliam, from one of whofe defeendants by a female heir, it is now become the property of David Papillon, efq. late of Acrife, but ihe fee of this manor, together with the advowfon, defeended at length down to Geo. Scott, efq. of Scotts-hall, who about the latter end of

king George

I.’s

reign,

pafled

it

away

to Sir

Philip

Boteler, bart. of Tefton, and his fon, of the fame name, died poffdfed of it in 1772, by virtue of whofe will,

and a partition of his eftates, this manor, with the advowfon of the church, came, with others, to William Bouverie, earl of Radnor, who at his death in 1776, devifed it, with the reft of Sir Philip Border’s eftates, which had come to him as above mentioned, to his eldeft fon by his fecond wife, the Hon. William-Henry Bouverie, the prefent pofleffor of it. There is not any court held for this manor.

CHARITIES.

There

are

to the ufe of the poor, but there is ilTuing out of land, called Church-field,

no donations

a yearly rent of 61. 10 s, HI tbis parifli, given by a perfon

unknown, towards

the repair

of the church.

The poor

conftantly relieved are about ten, cafually fifteen.

within the ecclesiastical jurisof the dioceje of Canterbury, and deanry of

Orlestone diction Limne.

is

dedicated to St. Mary, ftands on the upper fide of the hill, one field diftant from the road,

The

church, which

is

6

ham

364

may be

HUN-DRED.

be almoft dlfufed. The church-yard adjoins to the farm-yard and the courtlodge. It is a very fmall building, confiding of one ifle and one chancel, having a very low pointed ftceple of wood at the weft end, in which are three bells. It has but one graveftone in it, and that of no account. This church has always been accounted an appendage to the manor, and as fuch it is now of the patronage of the Hon. William-Henry Bouverie, lord of the manor of Orleftone. It is a redory, valued in the king’s books at 4I. 15s. gd. and is now a difeharged Jiving, of the clear yearly certified value of forty pounds. In 1588, as well as in 1640, it was valued at forty pounds, con^nunicants forty. road, which

faid to

CHURCH OF ORLESTONE. PATRONS, Or

hy

sectors.

whom p refented.

lards of the manor of Orlefone....

Edward

Pulejlon,

A. M. March

*597* obt. 1613.

Edward Han font A. M. May 26, 1613. Lancelot

Harrfon,A^lA, Alaya,

1626, obt. 1641.' John Lawryt A. M. July 24, 1641.

Mark

Sherman^ obt. 1665. Richards, Alarch 1666.

Robert

28,

William Stringer^ A. B. July 1 , l66g. Roger Powell, obt, January 24, 1685. ^ Jerman Dunn^ March 28, 1685, obt. 1686.®

Zaretan Crofton, A.

M. May

i

c, ^

1686.

Thomas Harpm- , reCgned 1710. A. B. Feb. 15,

Francis Peck,

J710, refigned 1715. «

And by

dlipenfatlon in *626, recRym. Feed. tol. zrUi.

tor of Bircholt.

p. 875,

^ Buried in VVarehorne church. i He was prtfenttd by the king.

PATRONS,



ORLESTONE. PATRONS,

^6^ RECTORS.



Zcr^s
\

A. B. Oft. 21, 1715, obt. 1721. John Hedges, A. B. June 9, 1721, refigned 1728. Theophilus Beck^

John Price, March 8, 1728,0b. 1751Blemel Pollard, Sept. 28, 1751, obt. J 764. IHilliam Polhill,

A.^,

Sept. 10,

1764, refigned 1779.'“ George Carter, A. M. Sept. 9, I 780, refigned 1781.® Willlam-Phillp Menzies, A. B. September, 1781, the prefent reft or.

He

been rcftnr of Bircholt, for the vicarage of Linton, as he did that on being prefented to Detling, and in 1782 was prefented to Albury, in Surry. •i

!iad

which he refigncd

!

Now

refkor of Hurft.

k Vicar of Frindlbury, a minor canon of Rochefter cathedral, and curate of Minder, in Sheppy.

WAREHORNE, LIES

the next parifli foiith-weflward.

So much of

which the church ftands, is within the eaftern divilion of the county, and lath of Shipway. So much as is in the borough of Great Kenardington, or Old Herlackenden, is in the hundred of Blackborne, weftern divifion of the county, and lath of Scray. That part which is in the hundred of Ham, below the foot of the clay-hill fouthward, is in the level of Romney Marlh, and in the liberty and jurifdiflion of the jufticcs of it. The reft of it is within the refpeflive jurifdidion of the juftices of the county, and within the diftridl of the Weald. This parish lies upon the clay-hills, near the weftern boundaries of them, an unhealthy, as well as unpleafant fitiuuion, partaking of the grofs atmofphere of the Marfh, and the foil of it in general a deep miry clay. The village is buiJt round a large green, called it

as

is

in the

hundred of Hana,

in

j

HAM HUNDRED,

366

more

the LecoU, or is

a handfome houfe, the

Hodges, who

lives in

Le 61:on, on which property of Mr. Thomas

properly, the

it, a?,

his anceftors

have for fome

generations part, bearing for their arms. Or, three ere centSyJable^ on a canton, argent, two bars zvavy, azure, •

over

all

an anchor in pale, [able.

At

a fmall diftance

Warehorne-green, and round it feveral houfes, one of which is the parfonage,and another Tinton houie, Mr. Howland’s, who lives in it. The church Hands on the edge of the hill, overlooking the Marfh, which is at the foot of it. About a mile northcaft from the church, over which the country is hill and dale, is the hamlet of Ham-ftreet, clofe at the edge of the Marfh ; part of which only is in this parifh, and about a mile further in the Marfh, another fmall hamlet, called Hammill-green, through which is the ufual high road, an execrable bad one, from this part of the Marfh to the upland country. This parifli extends northward by a narrow flip between Shadoxhurft and Orleftone, as far as Sugar-loaf and Bromley-green, which is partly in it, all which is for the greateft part covered with coppice wood ; and it extends again in like manner into the Marlh fouchward to Brookland, and joins Snave. All of it, above the Marfh, is within the Weald. There are two fairs, one kept on Ham-ftreet-green, on the 14th of May, for toys, and the other on the 2d and 3d ot October, on Warehorne-green, the profits of which belong to the earl of Thanet, being a very large one for cattle. The first mention made of Warehorne is in a charter of king Egbert, who with king Ethtlwulf his fon, in 820, gave to one Godwine, two plough-lands in a place called by the Englilh, IVerehornas, fituated among the marflics, and it was bought for one hundred

from the Lecon

is

money, and,

boundaries are exprefled extended on the eaft part fouthward over the river Limen, unto the South Saxon limits. In the year 1010, fliillings in

as the

archbifliop

I

WAREHORNE. Alphage was become pofTefled of this ma, nor, which he gave that year to Chrift^church, in Canarchbifliop

terbury, towards the cloathing of the monks there, and he endowed it with the fame liberties and privileges as

manor of Middleton was endowed w'ith. After which this manor continued with tHe religious till the time of taking the furvey of Domefday, in which record it is entered, under the general title of Terra Mo^ their

nachoritm Archiepi^

lands belonging to the of the archbifliop, as follows :

In

i.

e.

monks

Hame hundred

home.

the archbijhop himfelf holds Weretaxed at one fulins^. The arable land is ^

It

was

tivo carucates.

In demejne there is one cariicate^ and fix with three borderers having one carucate. There are twelve acres of meadoiv, and zvood for the pannage villeins,

In the time of king Edzvard the Confef'or,

of fix hogs.

and

afterzvardsj it

was worth

tzventy Jhillings,

and now

fixty fhiUings,

Not long

after which, the

monks appear

to liave

been manor, which was held of the archbifhop by knight’s fervice, by Ansfrid de Dene, in the reign of king John. But this name was extindl: here in the next reign of king Henry III. when Richard de Bedeford was become owner of it, and held it in like manner, and in the ^zd year of that reign obtained the grant of a market to be held at it w'eekly on aTuefday, and a fair for three days continuance at the feaft of St. Matthew, which was renewed and confirmed to him in the 8th year of king Edward I. at which time he had a grant ok free -zvarren within his demefne lands here. He died polTefTed of it in the 17th year of king Edward I. After which it did not continue long in this name, for in the next reign of king Edward If. Hugh de Windlefore, or Windfor, was become poffelfed of it, from which name it w'as alienated, in the beginning of king Edward lll.’s reign, to William de Moraunt, of Moraunt’s-court, in Chevening, who w'as IherifFin the 1 2th and 13 th years of that reign, to whom difpolTelTed of this

the

kam hundred.

^58

precept, that there fhould be the Tea coaft. one belf rung in any fteeple near only daughter and fon Sir Thomas Moraunt left an carried this eftate firft in marriage to

the kinfr KTued

h‘is

Lora, who

Thomas Cawne, of Ightham, and

fecondly to

but

His heir

Sir

James

Peckham, of Yaldham, in Wrotham,* in which name to Haut, whofe defcenit continued till it was alienated two dant Sir William Haut, of Bifboplborne, leaving daughters his coheirs, Jane, the youngcft, entitled her hufoand Sir Thomas Wyatt, of Allington, to it, as part of her inheritance, and he, in the 33d year of king Henry VIII. an a<5t having palled for thatpurpofe, exchanged It with the king for other premifes, and it remained in the crown till queen Elizabeth granted it to

from which name it palTcd by fale to Thomas Paget and Thomas Twifden, and they not long afterwards alienated It to Sir John Tufton, knight and baronet, whofe fon Nicholas was created Earl of Thanet, and in his delcendants, earls of Thanet, this manor has

Pdlis,

continued

down

to the right hon. Sackville, carl of

Thanet, the prefent pofleflbr of it. There is no houfe or court lodge on it. is a confiderablc Ti N TO N,"antiently called manor, in the fouthern part of this parilh, which, though the houfe of it is near the church, yet it lies for the moft part within the level of Romney Marlh. This manor, after the Norman conqueft, was given by the Conqueror to Hugo de Montfort. Accordingly it is thus entered in Domefday, under the general title of his lands, at which time it was reputed to lie in Blackborne hundred.

Hugo himjelf holds Tinlen*. tone. Ulnod held it of king Edward, and then it was taxed for one fuling, now for half, becauje it is without In Blache bnrne hundred^

the divifton.

The arable land

See more of the Morants, vol. and of the Peckhams, vol. v. p. 16. '

is

five car neat es.

iii.

In de-

of this biftory, p. 122,

ntefne

WAREHORNE.

369

twenty eight carucateSy and twenty-one zvith fix borderers having Jeven carucates^

viefne there are ’uilleinSy

Ihere

is

a churchy and nine fervantSy and three fifheries

offive JhillingSy and thirty-eight acres of meadow. M^ood for the pannage of forty hogs. In the time of king Ed-^ ward the Confefjor it was worth twelve poundsy and af~ ierzvards fix pounds, nozv [even pounds.

T'he

holds half a yoke, which five fochmen held

fame Hugo

and now

hold,

having one carucate there, with four borderers. It is and zvas worth alzvays five JhilUngs. And in another place, under the title of the bilhop

of Baieux’s

lands,

In Adilovtefbrige hundred, the fame Robert (de Ro~ menel) holds of the bijhop half a denne of the manor of Titentone, zvhich Hugo de Montfort holds, and there he has land to the quantity of half a carucate, and one villein,

with three borderers and half a carucate, and t ivo fifheries offive Jhillings. ^he whole of this is and zvas worth fifteen /hillings. I’his land is zvithout the divifion of Hugo, On the voluntary exile ot Robert de Montfort, grandfon of Hugh above-mentioned, in king Henry I. ’s reign, his polTefiions

came

into the king’s hands,

who

foon afterwards granted this manor of Tirendenne, for fo it was written, to Rob. de Ver,conftable ol England, and Adcliza his wife, daughter of Hugh de Montfort, and they jointly, in tlie early part of king Henry II.’s reign, having founded the priory of Horton, gave this manor to it." This gift was afterwards confirmed by Henry de Eflex, conflable of England, and by king Stephen and pope Lucius afterwards ; and in the 20th year of king Edward III. the prior of Horton appears to have held it of Dover caftle, that is, of the king in In which flare it capite, as of the Conftabularie there. continued till the diiTolution of it in confequence of the a 61 of the 27th of king Henry VIII. when it came, with the reft of the poflcftions of it, into the king’s “

Regift. Priorat, cart. 37.

VOL.

viir.

Dugd. Mon. B b

vol.i. p. 621.

hands.

^

HAM HUNDRED,

370

hands, whence they were together granted, two years afterwards, to archbifhop Cranmer, and they continued parcel of the Archbifhop’s poflelTions till the reign of queen Eilzabetli, when they were by a6t again vefted

crown, where this manor (laid only till the beginning of the next reign of king James I. when it was granted to Sir William Sidlcy, bart. of the Friars, in Aylesford,“in which name and family itcontim.»ed down to Sir Charles Sedley, bart. of Nuthall, in Nottinghamfhire, who fome years ago alienated this manor to Mr. Jeremiah Curteis and John Waterman, attornies-atJaw, of Rye, and they foon afterwards conveyed the manor itfelf, with the courts and all privileges and immunities belonging to them, to Sir Edward Dering, bart. whofe fon of the fame name is the prefent polfeflbr of it. in the

But

and demejne lands of this manor were alienated by them to Mr. John Howland, gent, of this parifh, who rebuilt the manfion of it, in which ihe court -lodge

he afterwards refided. He left three fons, Harman, Clarke, and William, and a daughter Anne, who mar-

Mr. Thomas Hodges, of Warehorne. On the divifion of his eftates after his death, Harman Howland, the eldeft, among other eftates, became poflelTed of ried

the manfion of Tinton, witli part of the

demefne lands, which he now poflefl'es, and refides at it and Clarke Howland, the fecond fon, became pofTefTed of the remainder of thofe lands, which ftill remain his property. The manors of Ham and Capel lie within this ;

parifh, the

latter

among

the

woods near

the northern

boundary of it, and the former, though now obfolete, and its fituation aimoft unknown, on the oppofite fide of the parifli, fomewhere near Ham-green, and was once of fuch note as to give name to the hundred itfelf. This manor was antiently part of the demefnes of the "

See SouthHeet, vol.

ford, vol. V. p.

428.

ii.

of

this hiftory, /

p. 430, and Aylesr /

family

WAREHORNE. one of whom, William de Oiian-

family of Orlanfton, fton, obtained a charter oi free-warren to his lands at Orlanfton, Werehorne, and other places, in the 51ft year of king Henry III. vvhofe defcendaiit Sir John Orlanfton, about the beginning of king Richard II. ’s reign, marrying the daughter of Sir

William atCapel, and heir to her brother Richard at Capel, who died Richard II. (whofe anceftor John de /. p. anno Capel, refided here at his manor of Capel, in king Henry II. ’s reign, and as appears by the leiger book of Boxley abbey, was a good benefi^dor to that houfc) became in her right entitled to the poflefTion of that manor, which had then been for many defcents in that family. He was fucceeded in the pofteffion of both manors by Richard Orlanfton, efq. who died f. p. anno 7 Henry V. and left his two fifters his coheirs, the cldeft of whom Joane, married to Sir William Scott, of Scotts-hall, entitled her hufband to the pofteftion of thefe manors, on the divifion of their inheritance between them ; fmce which they have continued in the like fuccefllon of ownerfliip as the manor of Orlanfton heretofore deferibed,

down

hon. WilliamHenry Bouverie, the prefent poftelfor of them. Parkers is another manor here, which antiently to

the

gave both furname and feat to a family of that name. Edward Parker held lands in this parifli, Wefterham, and other places, and bore for \m 2ivm%y Urgent, a chevron^ ermine y betzveen three majcles of the field.

After his death anno 9 Edward II. this manor continued in his defeendants until king Henry VIII. ’s reign, when it appears byfeveral court rolls that John Engham was

become

whofe family it remained till queen Elizabeth’s reign, when it was by fale conveyed to Taylor, who not long after alienated it to Collyns, and John Collyns, dq. mayor of Hythe, died pofieired of it in 1598, whofe ekieft fon Giles Collyns foon afterwards fold it to Squire, and he, at the latter end of king Charles IE’s reign, pafied it away to William Kingfley, D. D. of Ickham, and archdeacon of CanpofTcired of

it,

in

B b 2

terburV)

ham hundred.

2^2

>** which it died polTefied of it in i 647 delVended to his eklcft foh George Kingfley, of Chriftrechurch, in Canterbury, in whole dcfcendants it mained till it was at length, about the year 1726, alieparifh, nated to Mr. Thomas Hodges, gent, of this

who

tcrbury,

younger fon Jofcph, and his eldeft Mr. Thomas Hodges, gent, now of Ekham, is the

who foil

devifed

prcfent

it

owner

to his

of

it.

CHARITIES.

There unknown,

are three fields in this parifti, given by fome perfon the annual produce of which is 14I. 4s. now in the

occupation of Richard Howland and Saniuel Rutton. The rents* of it are difiributed yearly by the churchwardens, in whom the land is vefted, to fuch poor who receive no conftant alms, but are diftrelled by old age, ficknefs, or any other misfortune. The poor conftantly relieved are about thirty, cafually fifteen.

This parish is within the ecclesiastical jurisdiocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of diction oi Liinne.

The

church, which

is

Matthew, is of three ifles and

'dedicated to St.

handfome building, confifting a chancel, all which are ceiled, and handlbraely kept. a large

a fquare brick tower, built about twenty* fix years ago, in the room of the old one, which There are five bells in it. There are but fell down.

At

the well end

is

windows. Againft the wall of the chancel is a head carved in ftone, having a monks bonnet or cap on it j and at the fpring of the low'ermoll arch of the north ifle, is another fomewhat like it. Agalnfl the wall of the chancel is a monumcnt for John Coventry, reftor, obt. 1681, arms, fmall remains of painted glafs in the

A fejs^

ermine i between three ejcallops.

A

ftone, on.

which were the figures of a man and four children in brafs, moft of w hich are gone, excepting part of the man and in the middle ifle is a ftone, with an infcrip;

tion in brafs, for ’’

Thomas

Jekin, obt.

See more of the Kingflevs, vol,

vii.

of

1438.

In the

this hiftory, p.

552.

church-

WAREHORNE. '

373

church-yard are feveral tombs and memorials of the Hodges’s, the moft antient of which, legible, (for there arc feveral of them otherwifc) is for Thomas Hodges,

anno 1703.

The

the patronage of valued in the kina’s books at nine-

redtory of

the crown.

It is

Warehorne

is

in

teen pounds, and the yearly tenths at

il.

i8s.

There

are twenty acres of upland, and twenty acres of marfli

glebe land. In 1588 here were communicants one hundred and fixty, and it was valued at one hundred and twenty pounds. It is now^ valued at one hundred pounds. In the petition of the clergy, beneficed in Romney fetting afide the cuftom of zld. Marlh, in 1635, an acre in this parilh, and two pence in every other parilh throughout the Marlh, in lieu of tithe-wool and pahurage, a full account of which has been given before under Burmarlh, the rector of Warehorne was one who met on the occalion ; when it was agreetl on all fides, that wool in the Marlh had never been .known to have been paid in fpecie, though the other tithes were paid or compounded for, and in proof of this cuftom, an acquittance, given by the redor in 1564, was produced as a proof of it. There is a modus of one Ihilling per acre on all the marlh land in this pariOi.’ The woodland in it pays no tithe, as being in the Weald, as was determined in a fuit between the redor and Mr. Chute, of Betherfden, for the recovery of tithe for his woodland in this parilh. The PRIORY of Hoy ton was polTefted of a portion OF TITHES, arifing from their lands of Tinton, in this parilh, which on the fupprellion of the priory, Concerning this modus, fee the, cafe of Bate, reftor, v. Sedand others, in the Exchequer, anno 1726, by which the modus was eftablillied. Vezey’s Rep; rts, vol. ii. cafe 175. Concerning a modus for hay and fmall tithes, fee calc, Bate, rector, V. Hodges, in the Exchequer in 172a, in Bunbury’s Reports, ley

p. 196.

B b

3

came

y

'

2^4 came

ham hundred.

and was gmntcd, into the hands of the crown, the archbifhop, with the reft of the poffeffions of jt, to VIII. and though the kite of that

anno 20 Henry

the revenues ot it, priory, with the greateft part of Elizabeth^s was regranted to the crown in cjueen

portion of tithes feems to have conti“ nued’with the fee of Canterbury, and to have gained it ftill rethe name of the reSlory of IVarehorne his grace tains, and is now parcel of the poftcflions of Tei*^n, yet this

the archbifliop.

CHURCH OF H^HREHORNE. PATRONS, Or "Jhe

RECTORS.

hy "whom prefented.

King

Henry Curtije, April 6, 1626, lecond induiftioa Dec. 15, following.''

A. M. July 25,

John Jjherji, 1661.

M. June 11, March 3, 1680,'

John Coventry^ A. 167(5, obt.

James Perkins, A. M.

May

15,

1680. Thornton,

Stephen

January

13,

1680.

John Burletjon, A. M. Dec. 15, 1681, obt. 0 £l. I, 1719.' Richard Bate, A. M. Feb. 19, 1719, obt. March 4, 1736.“ John Bate, 1737,061. 1761.*' Sir JohnPerJhall, hart, Dec. 21, 1761, religned 1771.* John Fleming Stanly, A. M. Sept. 13, 1771, obt. 1783.

Donald Maclaine, Jan. 1784, obt.

I

796.

Charles ITillianis,

I

796, the pre-

fent rector.

»

Prefented 1)7 the king’s lat. pat. Foeod. vol. xviii. p. 648. Buried in the chancel of this

Bym. •

church. t Likewife reflor of Midley, and lies buried in VVatringbury church. “ Likewife vicar of Chilhain, and lies

w

Son of the forme;. religned this rcAory on being prefented to a benefice in Hertfoid*

He

fhire. y

He went

died at

to the Eaft Indies,

and

Madras,

buried in that church.

THE

375

C

)

*

THE HUNDRED OF ALOESBRIDGE LIES

Ham

the next fouthvvard from that of laflis written It in Domefday both Adilovtefhrige and Adelovejbrige, and in other antient records, Alolvejbrtdge. Somner thinks it probable that it took its name from fome great perfon, called Alolfe, a name frequent both in Domefday and other records, as the pofleflbr of eftates in this part of it at the time defcribed.

of the Saxons and afterwards. IT 1.

CONTAINS WITHIN Snargatb.

2.

Fairfield.

3.

Brookland.

And

ITS

BOUNDS THE PARISHES OF 4. Brenset; and 5. Snave /« pmt.

the churches of thofe parithes, and

parifiies

of

likewife

Ivechurch and Newchurch,

part of the the churches of

which it.

are in other hundreds. Ont conftabk has jurifdidion over 7'he whole of it lies within the levels of Romney and Wal-

land ilarthes.



«« ® ®

1

1® ® ®

SNARGA.TE LIES

the next parifh fouth-weftward from Warehome. Thefouthand eaft parts of it are within the level of Romney Marfli, and within the liberty and jurifdidlion of the juftices of it. Another, being the weftern part, which lies upon the Rhee wall, is within the liberty of the town and port of New Romney, and the divifion of the juftices of it ; and the refidue, be-

ing the northern part of juftices of the county.

The

parish of Snargat-e

the level of

Romney

fituaced, near the

in the jurildi(ftion of the

it, is

lies for

the moft part in

Marfli, in which the village

is

end of the Rhee wall, bevond which B b 4

it

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED.

376

extends into Walland Marfli, on the weftern fide of it. It is a very forlorn unhealthy place, partaking of the fame bad qualities of both air and water as the neighbouring parilhes in the Marlh, and if poflible to a greater degree, for the whole is an entire flat of marlhes, feveral of which are poor, and covered with rufhes and thirties, and others lie fo low as to become fwampy, and much covered with flags and other fuch weeds, which is greatly owing to the negledt of their being properly fewed. It has nothing further worthy

it

of notice

in

it.

The manor

of Aldington claims over

mort;

of this parilh, and the manors of Bilfington, Apledore, and Chartham, over other parts of it. part

Subordinate to that of Aldington was

The manor

of Snargate, which was antiently knight’s fervice, by a family of the name held of it by of Allard, one of whom was Gervas Allard, w'ho was admiral of the wertern feas in the 34th year of king Edward I. and hisgrandfon, of the fame name, died poflefled of it in king Edward lll.’s reign, leaving

the pofleflion of it to his widow Agnes, who held it at her death in the 4ad year of it. How long it continued in this name, I have not found, but in Edward I V.’s reign, it was come into the family of Fane, and John Fane, efq. of Tunbridge, died poflefled of it in the 13th year of king Henry VJl. anno 1488, and by will gave it to his fon Richard Fane, efq. afterwards of Tudeley,^ who alienated it to Wildgoofe, and he died poffefled of it in the 33d year of Henry VIII. and his defeendant Alexander Wiidgoofe conveyed it to William 1 hwayts, by fine anno 5 Elizabeth, onwhofe death it came to his daughter and heir Urfula. Her

away to Jackman, as he did again to Sir Edward Henden, one of the barons of the exchequer heirs parted

it

in the reign of king Charles *

See Collins’s Peer. vol.

iii.

I.

who dying

edit. iv. p.

174

/. p. in

et feq.

1662,

snargate.

377

1662, gave it by will to his nephew Sir John Henden, whole fon Edward Henden, efq. of Biddenden, became pofTefled of it on his death, but how it palled afterwards, or who is at this time pofleired of it, I have not been able, by all my enquiries, to gain any information of. There are no parochial charities. The poor conftantly maintained are about ten, cafually five. Snargate is within the ecclesf astical jurisdiction of the dioceje of Canterbury; and deanry of

Limne.

The

church, which is dedicated to St. Dunflan, is built of quarry-ftone. It is a large handfome building, confiding of three ides and two chancels, having a tower at the weft end, in which are three bells. The pillars between the ifles are beautifully flender and elegant. There is an old monument in the north wall of the middle chancel, the brafs of which is gone. There are no memorials in it. In theeaft window of the high chancel is a coat of arms, ^larterly^ firlt and fourth, oblit. fecond and third, chequy, or^ avd azure. The church is only pewed over half the length of the It is not ceiled in any part of it. ifies. The church was part of the antient pofteftions of the fee of Canterbury, and continues fo at this time, his grace the archbifliop being the prefent patron of It is a redtory, valued in the king’s books at it. In 171.6s. 8d. and the yearly tenths at il. 14s. 8d. 1588 it was valued at fixty pounds, communicants fixty. In 1 640 at feventy pounds per annum, communicants the fame. In the petition of the clergy, beneficed in Romney Marfh, in 1635, for fetting alide the cuftom of twopence an acre, in lieu of tithe wool and pafturage, a full account of which has been given before, under

Burmarfh, feveral acquittances were proved to have been given by the vicars of Snargate, mentioning their having received two-pence an acre in fatisfadtion of thofe



,

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED.

37 ^

according to the cuflom. There is a modus of one fliiJling per acre on all the grafs-lands in

thofe tithes, this parilh.

CHURCH OF SNARGJTE. PATRONS, Or Tic

RECTORS

hy 'idiom prefented.

Archhijhoji.

Nicholdu

obt

Gere,

June

T,

1587,

i6og.

Richard Clerke, S.T.P. July 6, 1611, 1609, Hatch, i6li. Samuel Birde,A. M. obt. r6z2. yames Bladeiuorth, A. M. 0 5t. 5, 1622, obt. 1624. JoJiah Coppin, A. M. Dec. 3,



<

1624, refigned 1630.

Ediuard

A. M. Nov.

Hichollsf

15, 1630.

ydin Wilmott, A. M.

Api'il

6,

1640. IVilliam Lauder

Thomas Snelling,

obt. 1667.

T. B. Jan. 16, 1667. Robert Richards, A. M. March 10, {668, obt. 1683. S.

Stephen Matchin,A,

M. 061

1683. Robert Skyring, A. 1708, obt. 1753.

M.

.

Jan.

23, i,

yeremiah Dunbar, 1 753, refig. 1756. Theophihs Delangle,A. M. April 3, 1756, obt. Junezg, 1763.“ yohn Bunce, indu£b. Dec. 1 763, refigned the fame year.^" yohn kFent'voorth, LL. B. 1763, obt. May 26, 1770.*= ffOlliam Wing Fowle, A . M. 1770, the prefent reftor.'* * In 1756, by difpenfation, vicar af Tenteriden. > Before reftor of Brenfet, andvlear of Newington near Hythe,and afrezwards reftor ofChmkford, inEflex. 1

*

And

fation,

reAor of Brenfet by difpen^ and lies buried in Brcnfet

church. <* In 1772, by difpcnfatftn, reflor of Bunnarlh.

FAIRFIELD

FAIRFIELD,

379

FAIRFIELD LIES

the next parllh weftward, in the level of Walland Nlarflij and in the jurildiclion of the jullices

of the county.

The

different from what its name forlorn and dreary place, and moft feems, to imply, is a It confifts is feemingly the fink of the v\hole Marlb. of an open level of marlh-land, unlheltered and without a hedge or tree throughout it. It lies very low, theeaftern part elpecially, which, for the fpace of feveral hundred acres, is overflowed in winter, and becomes one great flieet of water, and the reft of the year is a fwamp, covered with flags and ruflies, which is in great mealure owing to the mifmanagement of the fewers, and though the landholders have lately been put to a very confiderable expence, for the drainage of this level, they have not yet, nor in all likelihood ever will, reap any kind of advantage from it.

PARISH,

on a little rife in this part of it, furrounded by thofe fwamps, that for the

The church and

is

fo

far

ftands

greateft part of the year

on a through them up

a boat, or part, in

which

is

it is

horfe,

to be approached only in

pafTing with great danger

to the faddle girts.

the court-loclge,

lies

Idie weftern rather higher,

and the land is much more fertile and dry. William Sellyng, a man of great reputation for his wifdom and learntng, who was elefted prior of Chriftchurch anno 13 Edward IV. and died anno 10 king Henry VII. is laid by his wife management, though not without great expence, to have prevailed on all perfons, having lands at Apuldre and Fayrefeld, ^

danger of the fea, to contribute towards the maintaining of the banks and fences to keep on the it out, for before the burthen lay altogether church, and was become an intolerable expence to it.

within

the

The

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED. The manor of Fairfield, written

380

in anticnt

records Feyrsfelde^ was, together with the church, as early as

king Henry

lll.’s reign,

when

for

I

find

no

parti-

was given, part of the poffeflions of the priory of Chrift-church, in Canterbury, duringwhich time, in king Henry the Vllth.’s reign, prior Thomas Goldftone erefted a new courtJodge, being a convenient manfion, on it,' in which flateit continued till the dilTolution of the priory, in the 3ift year of king Henry VI H/ when it came into the king’s hands, where it did not remain long, for the king fettled it by his dotation charter, in his 33d year, on his nev/-eredled dean and chapter of Canterbury, part of whofe pofleffions it Hill remains. The demefne lands of this manor, being of the rack rent of about loool. per annum, have been from time to time demifed by the dean and chapter on leafes for three lives, the.right hon. Geo. AuguHus, earl of Guildford having the prefentintereft in theleafe vefted in him. A court baron is held yearly by the dean and chapter for this manor. There are noparochial chaiities. The poor conflantly maintained are about ten, cafually feven. This parish iswithin the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of cular mention of the time

it

Limne.

The

church, which is dedicated to St. Thomas, fBecket) the martyr, is very fmall, and built of brick. It confifts of one ifle and one chancel, having a low pointed wooden turret at the well end, in which hangs one bell. The church Teems to be but of very modern date. There is only one memorial in it, at the weft end of the ifle, for Mr. John Beale, of Fairfield, obt. *

Willis’s Mitred

^

There

Abbeys, vol. i. p 246. are feveral rentals of this manor

MSS. No. 1006 — 24

to 28.

demefne lands of

now

it is

among

the

Harldan

The

rack rent of the whole of the upwards of loool. per annum. *

775

-

FAIRFIELD.

381

1775. It appears by the feveral burials in it, mentioned in the wills in the Prerogative-office, Canterbury, to have been formerly much larger, and to have had a ring of bells in it. The church of Fairfield, which is exempt from the jurifdidtion of the archdeacon, has always been an appendage to the manor. It was appropriated by archbifhop Edmund, in the 23d year of Henry IIL anno, 1238, to the almonry of the priory of Chriftchurch, and on the diflblution of it was granted, with the manor, by king Henry VIII. to the dean and cliapter of Canterbury, who are the prefent poffieffors of the appropriation, -as well as the patronage of this church. The church is now efteemed as a perpetual curacy, and is of the yearly certified value of fifty pounds, which fum is, by covenant- in the leafe from the dean and chapter of the demefne lands of the manor, paid by the lefiee, who has likewife by it the nomination to the curacy. In 1588 here were thirty-eight communicants.

CHURCH OF FAIRFIELD. PATRONS, Or

hy

CU RATES.

whom lirefented.

The

lejfees of the demefne lands under the Dean and Chapter...

William Smith, A. 1710. Jojeph Wilcocks,

U

M. Nov.

Awgw^,

1713.®

illiam Stockivood, refigned.

John Arnald, A. B. June 1728, refigned 173+.''

Thomas Cobb, A. B. July obt. 1797.' Richard Kiljhe,

1

1

734,

797, the pre-

fent curate.

g Afterwards blfl op of Rochefier. b And vicar of WalderlLarc.

1

And

rcAor of Upper Hardies.

BROOKLAND,

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED.

O 82

BROOKLAND, SO

from the within the bounds of

brooks and waterings it, lies the next parifh fouth-. eafl-ward, moftly within the level of Walland Mar(h, and within the jurifdiftion ofthejufticesof the county; but there are fome lands, which are reputed to be within this parifh, containing altogether about 124 acres, which lie in detached pieces at fome diflance louth-eaflward from the reft of it, moftly near Ivychurch, fome other parilhes intervening, which lands arc within the level of Romney Marfli, and within the liberty and jurifdi(5tion of the juftices of it. The parish of Broohland lies on higher ground tlian either Snargate or Fairfield laft defcribed, and called

confequently

much

I'everal

drier.

It

is

more

fhcltered with

and inclofed with hedges, than any of the neighbouring pariflies. The village is neat and rather pleafant, confidering the fituation, and the houfes, as trees,

of a better fort than are iifually feen in the Marfh. The church (lands in the middle of it. The lands towards the fouth are by far the mofl fertile, for towards Snargate they are very poor and wet, and much covered with rufhes and thiflles. It confifls in general of marlh-land, there not being above thirty acres of land ploughed throughout the well as inhabitants,

pariflt,

which altogether contains about 1720 acres

of land.

A

held here yearly on the feafl of St. Peter ad Vincula, or Lammas-day, being Auguft i, for toys and pedlary. fair is

The manors

of Fairfield, Apledore, Bilfington,

and Court at Wick, extend over this parifh, Jubor^dinate to which is the manor of Brookland, which has long fince loft even the reputation of having been a manor. It was in early times the patrimony

BROOKLAND.

^8^

of the family of Paffele, or Palhley, as they were afterwards called whofe feat was at Evegate, in Smeeth,*'

whom Edward

de Palieley is the firft that is difcovered in public records to have been pofleffed of this iiRinor, and this appears by the inquifition taken after his death, anno 19 Edward 11. Soon after which it was alienated to Reginald de Cobham, a younger branch cf the Cobhams, of Cobham, whofe defcendants were feated at Sterborough cadie, in Surry, whence they were called Cobhams, of Sterborough^ and they had afterwards fummons toparliament among of

the barons of this realm. At length Sir Thomas Cobham died pofl'dTed of it in the nth year of king Edward IV. leaving an only daughter and foie heir, who carried it in marriage to Sir Edward Borough, of

Gainfborough, in Lincolnfliire, whofe fon and heir Thomas was fummoned to parliament as lord Burgh, or as it is ulually pronounced, Borough, anno 21 king Henry VIII. and left a fon and heir Thomas, lord Burgh, whole lands were difgavelled by the aft anno 31 Henry VTII. His fon William, lord Burgh, about the 12th year of queen Elizabeth’s reign, paffed it away to Evcfsfield, of SufTex, from whom it was alienated foon afterwards to Godfrey, of Lid, at which time thiseftate teems to have loft its name of havinobeen a manor. He, before the end of that reign, fold it to Wood, by whom it was again alienated in the beginning of king James I.’s reign to Mr. John Fagge, of Rye, whofe defendant John Fagge, etq. of Wifton, in Sutfex,was created a baronet in 1660. He had a numerous ifllie, of which only three fons and

two daughters

furvived.

Of the

former. Sir Robert, the eldett, was his fucceflbr in title Charles w'as an; ceftor ot the prefent baronet, the Rev. Sir John Fagge, ot

Chartham

;

and the third Ion

fucceeded by his father’s ‘

Thomas Fagge,

wjll to this eftate at

See foinefurtlier account of them umier

elq.

Hrook-

Sineefli.

land.

ALOESfiRlDGE HUl^DRED. ^§4 Imd. His Ton John Meres Fagge, efq. of Glyneiy^ daughter Elizabeth, who on his death in 1769, entitled her hulband Sir John Peachy, bart. of Weft Dean, in Sulfex, to the polfeffion of it. He died f. p. and (lie furviving him, in Suflex, left furviving an only

again became entitled to it in her this time the prefent owner of it.

There

are

own

right,

and

is

at

parochial charities.

Brookland

is^within the

risdiction of the of Limne.

diocefe

ecclesiastical juCanterbury, and deanry

The

church, which is dedicated to St. Auguftine, is a very large handfome building, confi fling of three The fteeple ftands on the illes and three chancels.

north

fide,

and

at

fome fmall dlftance from

it,

in

which are five bells. The church Is kept exceedingly neat and clean. It is cieled throughout, and handfomely pewed. In the high chancel fhere is a confeffionary, and a nich for holy water within the altar-rails. There are feveral memorials in it, but none of any account worth mentioning. At the weft end is a galcharge of the parilh. The font is very curious, made of caft lead, having on it two ranges of emblematical figures, twenty in each range. The fteeple is framed of remarkable large timber. It is built entirely of wood, of an odlagon form, perpendicular about five feet from the bottom, and from thence leflening to a Ipire at top, in which it has three different copartments or flories, the two uppermoft larger at the bottom, and projedting over thofe underneath them. Although there are but five bells in it, yet it has frames for feveral more. The whole is much out of the perpendicular leaning towards the church. In the church-yard are feveral tombs and graveitones for the Reads. The church of Brookland w’as part of the antient polfeffions of the monaftery of St. Auguftine, to which it was appropriated by pope Clement V. at the lery, lately eredted at the

requeft

BROOKLAND.

^85 king Ed-

of Ralph Bourne, the abbot of It, in ward II. ’s reign, but the abbot declined putting the bull for this purpofe in force, till a more favourable opportunity. At length John, abbot of St. AugulCletine, in I347» obtained another bull from pope ment VI. for the appropriation of it, and having three this years afterwards obtained the king s licence tor Iflip purpole,’ the fame was confirmed by archbilbop of this in 1359, who next year endowed the vicarage church by his decree, by which he afligned, with the requefl:

vicar, confent of the abbot and convent, and of the of the rents and profits of the church, to John de Hoghton, prieft, then admitted perpetual vicar to the

and canonically inllituted, and to his which in future in it, a fit portion from the underfitly maintained and iupport

vicarage of fuccefifors

it,

might be mentioned burthens. In the firll place he decreed the and ordained, that the religious Ihouid build on their own. of the endowment of the church, at with a iufcofts and expences, a competent manfion, and his luccelficient clofe and garden, for the vicar fervice, to be refors, free from all rent and fecular by the vicar paired and maintained from that time foil

the prcfentatiqn of the by him or his religious to be admitted and inftituted likewife have the fucceffors, into the vicarage, fiiould other fide or le great tithes of the lands lying on the Dover, viz. beyond the bridge called for the time being

;

who on

Re, towards churches of BrynBrynfete, and towards the parifii belonging to the chuich fete, Snaves, and Ivercherche, arifing from the of Brokelande, and likewife the tithes the foot, and Iheaves of gardens or orchards dug with parifo, and oblations made in the church or alfo all

pigs, geele, of hay, calves, chicken, lambs, honey, wax, (wans, hens, eggs, ducks, pidgeons, bees, gai den-herbs, wool, milkmeats, pafture, flax, hemp,

all tithes

*

See Dec. Script, col. 2085 et feq.

VOL. VIII.

C c

apples,

386.

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED.

apples, vetches, merchandizes, hillings, fowlings,

and

manner of fniall

tithes arifjiig from all things whathe taxed and eflimated the faid portion at the annual value of eight marcs fteiiing, at which fum he decreed the vicar ought to contribute in future, to the pajmient of the tenth and all other impoiitions happening, of what foe ver fort. Not intending that the vicar of this church Ihould be entitled to, or take of the iflbes and rents of it, any thing further than is expreffed before, but that he Ibould undergo the burthen of officiating in the fame, either by himfelf or fome other fit prieft, in divine offices, and in the finding of lights in the chancel, and of bread and wine for the celebration ofmalTes, the wafliing of veftments, and the reparation of the books of the church, and fhould neverthelefs pay the procuration due to the archbifhop, on his vifitation. But the reft of the burthens incumbent on the church, and no ways here expreffed, fhould belong to the abbot and convent, &c.® After this, the church and advowfon of the vicarage of Brookland remained part of the polfeffions of the above monaftery till the final diflblution of it, anno 30 Henry VIII. when it was, with all its revenues, furrendered into the king’s hands, where this redtory and advowfon ftaid but a fhort time, for the king, by his dotation charter, fettled them on his neweredled dean and chapter of Canterbury, part of whole polfeffions they continue at this time. On the abolition of deans and chapters, after the death of king Charles I. this parfonage was lurveyed in 1650, when it appeared that it confifted of a clofe of land of one acre, on which ftood the parfonage barne, and other outhoufes, with the tithe of corn and other profits belonging to it, eftimated mbs amis at all

foever.

And

2087. See likewife Regift.

j aud MSS. Lambeth and Cotton Fauftma, A. I, f. 232^

Iflip, f.

libraries, in the Britifli

162-2,

Mufeum,

twenty-

BROOKLANDt

387

twenty-four pounds, all which were by indenture, in 163.5, demifed for twenty-one years, at the yearly rent of eight pounds, but were worth, over and above the faid rent, fixteen fee

was to repair

pounds per annum, and that the lefthe premifes, and the chancel of the

parilh church.

In 1384 this church or redtory appropriate was valued at 13I. 6s. 8d. but anno 31 Henry VIII. it was demifed to ferme at only 81 3s. 4d. It is now demifed on a beneficial leafe by the dean and chapter, at the yearly rent of eight pounds to Mrs. Woodman, the prefent leflee of it. The vicarage of this church is valued in the king’s books at 17I. 12s. 8kl. and the In 1587 it was valued yearly tenths at il. 15s. 3kb .

at fixty pounds, communicantsone hundredand fixtyfix, and in 1640 the fame, and it is now of about the

fame value. There is a modus of one

fhilling per acre

grafs-lands in this parilh.

The

vicar

is

on

all

the

entitled to

all

throughout the parifli, and to the tithes of corn of thole lands, being one hundred and twenty-four acres, which lie in detached pieces beyond Brenfet bridge, in Romney Marlh, as mentioned before, in the endowment of

'^the fmall tithes,

fubjed to

this

this vicarage.

a fchool here, for teaching reading and writing, fupported by contribution, at which fifty children are ufually taught.

There

is

CHURCH OF BROOKLJND. PATRONS, Or

by

whom

RECTORS.

prefentedt

William, anno 29 Edward Bartholomew de Ferentino, 1

Dean and Chapter of

I."

ia

249.“

VICARS.

Canterbury,

Richard Birde, S. T. B. Dec.

27 ) » Prynne.

p.

^

597 >

o Dec. Script, col. 1896.

906.

c c a

PATRONS,

.

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED.

388

PATROffS, ^C.

Dean and

VICARS. Richard Martyn, A. M. July 87 1609. George Guilds A. M. March 20r 1660, obt, 1661 Thomas Rujfell^ A. M. Dec. 2,

Chajitor of Canterbury.

i66r.

Thomas John/on^ A.

M.

Dec.

ll,

1677, obt. Nov. 6, 1727.P fohn Le Hunt, A. M. Jan. 12, 1727, obt. April 1731. Simon Devereux, A. M. induced

Auguft 16, 6, i733.
173!, obt. July

Thomas Buttonjhata^ A.

I



3

>

1733. refigned

M. Dec, 1737.''

Robert Jenkins, A. M. April, 1737, refigned Jan. 1743.*

W illiam

Broderijt,

A. M. in.

duffed Od. 10, 1743, obt, April 1764. William Tafwell, A. B. Auguft 28, 1764, refig. Junei772.‘ Jq/hua Dix, A. M. induded

Auguft 21, 1772, refigned February 1788.“ Richard Sharpe^ i?88, the prcfent vicar. p And redtor of St. Margaret’s, In Canterbury. q He and his predeceflbr -were minor canons of the church of Canterbury, as were all his fucceflbrs in this

vicarage,

down

to the

t

Before vicar of St. Stephen’s, alias

Hackington. » He held this vicarage with the reftory of Wcllbere, by difpenfatlon. t He refigned this vicarag; for that of Rainham.

late vi-

car inclufire. He was alfo rcikor of St. Michael, Harbledown, by difpen-

ton.

fation.

rcAory of Old Romney.

B

R E

0

N

And perpetual curate of NackiogHe refigned this vicarage for the

S

E

T

LIES

the next parifli north-eaftward from Brookland, almoit all of it on the other or eaftern fide of the Rhee- wall, in the level of Romney Marfh fo j

much

therefore as

is

upon

that wall '

,

.

is

within the

li-

berty

BRENSET.

389

berty of the town and port of New Romney, and divifion of thejuftices of it, the liberty of which, and of the cinque ports, claim over it. The reft of it is in the hundred of Aloefbridge, over part of which, that Marlh, is, fo much as is within the level of Romney the liberty and jurifdidfion of that corporation claims j

and the remaining, being the north-weft part, in Walland Marlh, is within the jurifdi
of the county.

This parish

is

not fo

fertile as

the laft-defcribed

paridi of Brookland, nor fo well Iheltered with trees and hedges. Thegreateft part of it is open maillies,

not being more than fifty acres. There is no village, moft of the houfes in it ftanuing at ftraggling diftances on each fide of the road, leading from the church to Snave-green j in other relpecls parilhes adjoining to it is much the fame as the other the arable land in

it.

There

is

it

a fair on

Whit-Monday,

for toys

and

pedlary.

of Brenset, called likewife the manor of Newington Brenfet, from its having been Newington for lome time accounted alimb of that of

The manor

iuch near Hyth, had always the fame owners, and as become part of the in king Henry VIlI.’s reign it was Eflex, pofieflions of Thomas, lord Cromwell, earl of that reign, before whole attainder, in the 3id year of him into the kings hands, it came by purchafe from together with the manor of Newington above-menthe crown, in tioned. After which it continued in queen Mary, when like manner, till the firft year of Clinton and Saye, die granted it to Edward, lord whom it paffed, with the manor of Newington,

from fince been accounted to which this of Brenfet has ever ownerthip, down an appendage, in a like fucceffion of Beechborough,the to James Drake Brockman, efq. of held for this prefent owner of it. A court leet is manor. c

c 3

There

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED.

39®

There was

a manor of Brenfet, which moil probably related to this parilh, which was the property of the Scotts, of Scotts-hall, and afterwards of the Rote-

from whom it came by will to the family ofBouverie, and now belongs, with the manors ot Orleftonc and others, to the hon. VVilliam-Hcnry Bouveric, fome mention of which has been made before, but only the name of this manor remains, for there are no rents or profits received from it, nor is even the fitulers,

ation of

it

at prefent

Brenset-place

known.

an antient manfion in the fouthern part of this parifli, which was the refidencc for many years of the family of Edolph, before they removed to Hinxhill, and wrote their name in old deeds Edulf, in which manner it appears in a commif' fion dircd:ed to Stephen Edulf and others, colleffors for the cinque ports in the 6th year of Richard II. At length, Robert Edolph removing to Hinxhill in queen Elizabeth’s reign, this feat was afterwards alienated to Mr. John Fagge, gent, who refided herein the next reign of king James I. In whofe defendants it continued down to Sir Robert Fagge, bart. who dysng in 1740,/. p. his fiffers became his heirs, one of whom married Gawen Flarris Nafh, efq. of Petis

worth, and Elizabeth married Sir Charles Mathews Goring, bart. of that county, by whofe heirs, about the year 1777> feat, with the eftate belonging to

was

fold to

Mr. Henry Read,

of Brookland, who died pofl'efied of it about a year afterwards, upon which it came to his only daughter and heir Anne, the wife of Thomas Kempe, efq. of Barcombe in Sufit,

lex,

and

M.

P. for Lewes,

who

in her right

and is the prefent owner lion has been for many years made

titled to

it,

of

it.

iile

became enI'lic

man-

of only as a

farm-houfe.

Dean,

Dane-court, is an eftate in the weftern part of this parifh, which was once accounted a manor. It was antiently part of the pofleflions of a family. alias

BRENSET. who took theit name from

391 Ansfridus de

it. family, Dene appears, by a chartularie belonging to the priory

of ChrilV church, to have been owner of it in king Edward I.’s reign. How long it continued in his defcendants, I do not find, but it not long afterwards came into the potreflion of the family of Apledore,fo called from the ncighbouringtown of Apledore, whofe arms were, Or, a pile, gules, furmounted with a fefs ; but before the latter end of king Edward II I.’s reign, Thomas de Apledore dying f. p. Eimth, his only filler and heir, entitled her hufband Thomas Roper to this

manor, among the reft ot his eftates in thefe parts,^ which continued in the younger branch of his defcendants down to John Roper, elq. of Linfted lodge, afAt terwards knighted, and created lord leynham. length his delcendaiit Henry, lord Teynham, lucceeding to it, paired it away in 1705, to Sir Henry Furof Walderfhare, who died poflelfed of it His grandlon Sir Henry Furnefe, bart. dyin 1712. unmarried, this, on the ing in 1735, partition of his eftates among his three lifters and conefe, bart.

heirs,

was allotted, among

others,

to

Selina, the

married Edward Dering, efq. afterwards enSir Edward Dering, bart. who in her right became titled to it, and his fon of the fame name, now of Stirrenden, bart. is the prefent owner of it. There are no parochial charities. Tlie poor conftantly relieved are more than thirty, cafually not more

youngeft

;

flie

than two or three. Brenset is within

ecclesiastical ju-

the

RiEDiCTiO'S of the diocefe of Canterbury, and deanry of Limne. r u The church, which is dedicated to St. Eanuyith, a Ipire confifts of two ifles and two chancels, having three fteeple fhingled at the weft end, in which hang •

the lords See an account of the family of Roper, and of

Teynham,

vol. vi, p.

299.

C

c

bells.

4

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED. bells. In the north chancel is a monument, having the effigies of two men, lying at full length, for John

39^

Fagge, Ton of John Fagge, gent, of Rye, obt. 1639; and tor John Fagge, gent, of Rye, his fon, who married D-lizabeth, daughter of Bandard Flodfon, of

F

rant field,

1646. There are burials agges in the parifh regifier till very lately. In the north ifle, a memorial for the Rev. Mr. John

of the

in Sufl'ex, obt.

l

Wentworth,

reiftor

Brenlet, obt.

May

of Snargate

fix years,

and vicar of

26, 1770. The church of Brenfet antiently belonged to the abbey of Guyfnes, in Artois, in Flanders, to which it was appropriated before the 8th year of Richard II.*

and

remained fo

it

when

it

came

till

the reign of king

into the king’s hands

Henry V,

by efcheat, on the

death of Katherine, the late abbefs of it, and remained in the crown till king Henry VI. in his 17th year, granted it with the advowfonof the vicarage, to John Kempe, ai chbifhop of York, with licence to fettle the fame on his new founded college of Wye, to hold in free, pure and perpetual alms, in augmentation of the revenues of it, and to appropriate it to the members of

and their lucceflbrs for ever. In which fituation it remained till the fuppreffion of that college, anno 36 Flenry VIII. when it was furrendered, with all itspof-

it

who that year granted church, with the advowfonofthe vicarage, among other premifes, to Walter Bucler, efq. to hold in ca~ feffions, into the king’s

hands,

this

with certain proviloes for the maintenance of the curates and Ichoolmafter of Wye, as maybe further feen in the account before of the parlonage of New-

pite^

ington, contained in the fame grant,*^ with which *

Stev.

Propcjicto

Mon.

vol

i.

p. 41.

See

in

Harleian

ad firobandum diutluam

it

has

MSS. No. 52,27.

poffeffionem, (fc. in caufaventilata) tora?n Job. Archhep. Cant, occajione ecclrf. de Brenjite als Chal/ham. iTttCf aliasy conttaAhb* £5’ Conv, de Guijiies^ f.

I

See vol. vii.p. 358, 366, and before, p. ao8.’

continued

BRENSET.

393

continued down in like manner to James Drake "Brockman, efq. of Beechborough, the prefent owner of the parfonage and advowfon of the vicarage of this church. Befides the flipends paid to Wye college and curates, as may be feen before, there is a ftipend paid from it of ten guineas yearly to Chrift-church college, in Cambridge, which altogether is much more than the annual profit of this parfonage, which arifes from only about fifty acres of land ploughed, bringing in about twenty guineas per annum, and no more. The vicarage of Brenfet is valued in the king’s books at 7I. i8s. ii^d. and the yearly tenths at 15s- lo^d. In 16^0 it was valued at eighty pounds per annum. It is now of the yearly certified value of 71I. 6s. oM. There is a glebe of two acres of marfli land. In the petition of the clergy, beneficed in Romney Mar(h, in 1635, for letting afide the cuftom of twopence an acre, in lieu of tithe-wool and paflurage, a full account of which has been given before, under Burmarlh, the vicar of Brenfet was one of thofe who met on this occafion ; when it was agreed on all fides, that no wool in the Marfli had ever been known to have been paid in fpecie, other tithes being compounded for. But no evidence was produced on this head, in regard to the vicar of Brenfet. There is a modus of one Ibilling an acre on all grals lands in this

parifli.

CHURCH OF BRENSET. PATRONS, Or

RECTORS.

by •whom Itrefented.

Sir William Damjell,

The Queen.

Mattheio Borne, A.M. Nov, 11 1579, obt 1600. Matthew dngell, A. M.N0V.4, ‘

1600, obt. 1623. » See Newington before,

p.

208.

PATEeWB,

,

ALOESBRIDGE HUNDRED.

394

PATRONS,

KECTORS.

CSl’f.

Michael Stone, A. B. April 18, 1623, fecond induftioa Sept, * 23, 1629 Thomas Rujfell, obt. 1677.

The King

James Brockman,

A. M. OA.

George Gipps,

..

efq.

1677, obt.

2,

IKilliam Brockman, efq,

707. John Bunce, A. B. May26, 1707, refigned i 737.'’

James Brockman,

John

efq.

I

LL.

ff^entivorth,

B.

Feb.

738, obt. Maj’26 1770.' Richard Jones 1 770, obt, March

22,

I

1792. Anthony Hammond, June 1 792, refigned 1794. John IHood, April 1794, the prefent vicar.^ • **

* Prefented

by the

lord

keeper.

church, the former of which he refigned on being prrfented to this vicarage, as he did this for the ricaragc

Rym. I*

Feed. vol. xix. p. 145. See Snargaie before-

c Likewiferefforof Snargate. He lies buried in this church. d Before redor of Knolton and Ive-

N FRE(^IENTLY S

Snaves,

lies

of Liinne.

Alfo vicar of Herne,

«

A

V

written

E,

antient writings, the next parifh eaftward, in the level of in

Romney Marih, and

within the liberty and jurifdiction of the juftices of it. Part of it only is within the hundred of Aloefhridge, another part in the hundred

of Ham, and the remainder in the hundred of Newchurch. The manor of Ickham, near Canterbury, claims over a fmall part of this parifh. This parish is much the fame as Brcnfetlaft.de-

no village. The church ftands on the fouth fide of Snave green, or lees, along which there are feveral ftr^gling houfes. There is nothing further worth mention in it. The manor of Snave, alias Snaveleeze^ was held in early times by a family, which took its name from feribed.

There

is

'

SNAVE. from their poficffions here ; for I find, as high as kinoRichard I.’s reign, that John de Snave held land in Snave, by knight’s fervice, of the abbot of St. Augufline, bearing for his arms, as appears by his feal to a deed in the Surrenden library, ,S7 /lays offix points^ three^ two, and'one. But after this name was extindt, William de Sokenefle appears to have held it about the reign of king Edward 111 in like manner, of the abb